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Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

Starting with Windows 10’s Fall Creators Update, the Windows Subsystem for Linux now allows you to manually mount drives. It still automatically mounts all internal NTFS drives. However, you can now manually mount external drives and network folders using the Linux mount command.

How to Mount External Devices

The Windows Subsystem for Linux still automatically mounts fixed NTFS drives. So, if you have an internal C: drive and D: drive, you’ll see them at /mnt/c and /mnt/d in the Linux environment.

DrvFs now allows you to mount external drives like USB sticks, CDs, and DVDs. These devices must use a Windows file system like NTFS, ReFS, or FAT. You still can’t mount devices formatted with a Linux file system like ext3 or ext4.

Like with internal drives, these external drives will still remain accessible in Windows after you’ve mounted them in the Linux environment. Mounting them just also makes them accessible from the shell environment, too.

Let’s say you have an external drive G: that represents either a USB drive or an optical disc drive. To mount it, you’d run the following commands:

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

You don’t actually have to mount the drive at /mnt/g , of course. You can mount it wherever you want. Just replace both instances of /mnt/g in the commands with your desired path.

To unmount the drive later so you can safely remove it, run the standard umount command:

When working with an external device formatted with a FAT file system or any network file system, there are some limitations. The file system will not be case sensitive and you can’t create symbolic links or hard links on it.

How to Mount Network Locations

You can also mount network locations. Any network location you can reach from within Windows, you can mount from the Linux shell.

Network locations can be mounted in one of two ways. If you map a network drive to a drive letter, you can mount it using the same options as above. This would give you an opportunity to easily sign into the network share and enter your credentials in File Explorer. For example, if your mapped network drive is F:, you could run the following commands to mount it:

You can also specify a drive using its UNC (Universal Naming Convention) path. For example, if the path to the network share is \\server\folder , you’d run the following command. Again, use whatever mount point you like in place of /mnt/folder .

The Windows Subsystem for Linux environment does not provide any way to specify the credentials you want to use. You can specify the credentials by navigating to the folder in File Explorer in Windows, entering them via the Credential Manager, or by using the net use command.

You can run the net use command from within the Linux environment, as the Windows Subsystem for Linux allows you to launch Windows software from the Linux command line. Just run the command like so:

For example, the following command would connect to \\server\folder with the username Bob and the password LetMeIn and map it to your F: drive. Here’s the command you’d run:

After you connect once, Windows would remember this username and password and automatically use them, even when you use the mount command within the Linux environment.

To unmount a network location, you can use the standard umount command, once again:

DrvFs doesn’t set the Linux permissions accurately when you mount a network location. Instead, all files on the network file system appear to have the full access permission (0777) and you can only see if you have access to a file by trying to open it. The file system will also not be case sensitive and you can’t create symbolic links on them.

This article provides a workaround for the issue that mapped network drive may fail to reconnect in Windows 10, version 1809.

Applies to: В Windows 10, version 1809
Original KB number: В 4471218

Symptoms

You experience the following issues in Windows 10, version 1809:

  • In Windows Explorer, a red X appears on the mapped network drives.
  • Mapped network drives are displayed as Unavailable when you run the net use command at a command prompt.
  • In the notification area, a notification displays the following message:

Could not reconnect all network drives.

Workaround

Microsoft is working on a resolution and estimates a solution will be available by the end of November 2018. Monitor the mapped drive topic in the Windows 10 1809 Update History KB 4464619. Currently, you can work around this issue by running scripts to automatically reconnect mapped network drive when you log on the device. To do this, create two script files, and then use one of the workarounds, as appropriate.

Create a script file named MapDrives.cmd

The file should be run at a regular but not at an elevated command prompt because it should be run at the same privilege as Windows Explorer:

Create a script file named MapDrives.ps1

The file should be run at a regular but not at an elevated command prompt because it should be run at the same privilege as Windows Explorer:

Workarounds

All workarounds should be executed in standard user security context. Executing scripts in an elevated security context will prevent mapped drivers from being available in the standard user context.

Workaround 1: Create a startup item

This workaround works only for the device that has network access at logon. If the device has not established a network connection by the time of logon, the startup script won’t automatically reconnect network drives.

I’ve searched the community and cannot find the exact issue I’m having. I’ve had two networked drives with multiple shares in each for years. I never had trouble in Windows 7 having the mapped shares available. I’ve always mapped with the \\drive name\share method. The drives are connected via Ethernet through a switch to my router. The PC is connected directly to the router. Now the problem. Immediately after upgrading, I lost the ability to access one of the boxes using the \\drive name\share method, however, if I remapped the share using \\IP address\share, everything worked fine. The other box, containing more shares continued to be accessible through \\drive name\share until today, when I lost the ability to access the shares. I have not remapped using \\IP address\share yet because I’m hoping there is another solution to go back to \\drive name\share. Anybody had a similar experience and is there a solution?

Edit: Problem as stated above is on a desktop. I also have a laptop upgraded to windows 10 from 8.1. The network drive mapping does not occur on the laptop. The laptop only connects wirelessly to the network, directly to my router. I’ve had two routers since upgrade, a Cisco E3000 and now a Linksys EA6900. I believe I can rule out router problems. Since wireless connection works, I’m working on the assumption that the Ethernet connection might be the issue. According to Windows 10 the driver is up to date.

Dec 19, 2019
Comment

The Command Prompt is one of two stock terminal apps you’ll find on Windows 10. The other is PowerShell and there are quite a few differences between the two. Command Prompt has been around much longer than PowerShell and it stands to reason that more people use it. With Command Prompt, you can move to any directory on your system, and run commands in it. You might run into a slight problem if you’re trying to move to a folder with a space in the name but there’s a simple trick to it.

If you’re trying to access a network location in Command Prompt, the cd command won’t do the job. In fact, the error message that you get might lead you to believe you cannot access a network location in Command Prompt and run commands in it. That isn’t true. You just need to use a different command for the job.

Network location in Command Prompt

When you use the cd command and follow it up with a network location, Command Prompt tells you that ‘CMD does not support UNC paths as current directories’. A quick search will tell you that a UNC path is a path with double slashes or backslashes which is what a network path has.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

To move Command Prompt into a network directory, you need to use the pushd command. First, get the complete path to the network location you’d like to access. In the screenshot below, the complete path to the folder that’s open in File Explorer is;

The path is not simply Z:\ which is what you get if you try and copy it from the location bar.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

Once you have the path, run the following command. Enclose the path in double-quotes if there is a space in the path.

Syntax

Example

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

You will notice that Command Prompt allocates a different drive letter to the network location than the one you see in File Explorer. This isn’t anything to worry about.

If you’re wondering how this works in PowerShell, you don’t need to. PowerShell will let you switch to a network location with the cd command.

Syntax

Example

Unlike Command Prompt, PowerShell does not have trouble with UNC paths. If you like, you can just use PowerShell instead of Command Prompt. It is different from Command Prompt but it isn’t less powerful. In fact, you’ll find that in many cases, the above case being a good example, PowerShell is easier to work with.

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How can I solve this problem after updating to windows 10 v2004 from v1909, i cannot map network drives/shares anymore, everything was working fine before the update, the shares are located in a windows server v1809.

When i try to connect the shares on map a network drive either using \\server_name\share_name or \\IP_of_the_Server\share_name using the correct domain\username and password i get a error code 0x80070043, the windows server is a domain controller and the windows 10 is a laptop that is not joined in the domain.

[Moderator Edit: Answers marked in this post reflect work arounds to this problem]

Update (2/9/2021): Last year when I posted this problem the solution that i used was to rollback to v1909, so if you’re having the same problem this is still the best solution, because it was working fine until today, when on my laptop appears a message box to update windows to a newer version and since i was on my way out and was going to live the laptop on, (i keep come back to read the post but never decided to update and since there was solutions each i now know are not related to my problem), i just click update my BAD, because instead of updating me to v20H2, it updated me to v20H1 and since I was on a roll, I decided to update to v20H2 to see if this was already fixed and no the problem still exist and now I’m stuck with windows v20H2 or v20H1, the windows server is still v1809 with all updates, it’s using SMBv3, since Encrypted data is on (i also tried it with Encrypted data off/SMBv2v3 and with SMBv1 ON in both client and server and i get the same network name not found error), and the client is windows 10 v20H2 and it have no mapped network drives and i just can’t map any network drive i always get the same error code 0x80070043, i can use RDP, i can access my personal website, i can use FTP each is the workaround that I’m using at the moment, but i just can’t map the drives i think that the problem in my case is related to some kind of authentication or secure protocol communication error used in SMB., but keep in mind that when i was using v1909 or previous versions, i had no problem with mapped drives or accessing the server with net use and there are no modifications on the server or network side, the only change is updating the client (my laptop) to a newer windows version after v1909.

So if someone has a solution or some ways of troubleshooting this please share them with me.

Update (2/9/2021): Finally got a solution after having 3 windows installations on the same day, that makes everyone happy, reinstall windows but keep apps and files, voila everything is like it was before and working fine again. 🙂

My shared drives were inaccessible after updating my windows 10 to the latest “Windows 10 Fall Creators Update”.

Within the latest “Windows 10 Fall Creators Update” the Guest access in SMB2 is disabled by default.

You can change this setting within your group policy settings.

Right click the Windows Icon at the bottom left of the task bar, or select the windows key + r

Within the run box, type “gpedit.msc”

Within the local Group Policy Editor, select “Administrative Templates”

Select ”Lanman Workstation”

Double click “Enable Insecure guest logons” option

Tick the “Enable” option

If this did not work consider checking this registry key too:

It should be set to 1 for your case.

3 Answers 3

Within the latest “Windows 10 Fall Creators Update” the Guest access in SMB2 is disabled by default.

You can change this setting within your group policy settings.

Right click the Windows Icon at the bottom left of the task bar, or select the windows key + r

Within the run box, type “gpedit.msc”

Within the local Group Policy Editor, select “Administrative Templates”

Select ”Lanman Workstation”

Double click “Enable Insecure guest logons” option

Tick the “Enable” option

If this did not work consider checking this registry key too:

It should be set to 1 for your case. (Credits: zhqiat)

One additional thing to look into.

If you apply the gpedit.msc solution as qore5 has mentioned and it still does not work, you may need to edit a separate registry key.

and change AllowInsecureGuestAuth to 1.

This has happened after several Windows 10 updates.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

The accepted answer works by lowering the security on the client side. It is not enforcing the restriction in Windows 10 / Windows Server which was added for security purposes. It requires adjusting each of your clients.

On the other hand, the real answer is to raise the security on the server side and remove any mapping to guest accounts

ADD THESE LINES [global] client min protocol = SMB3 client max protocol = SMB3 restrict anonymous = 2 encrypt passwords = true REMOVE

  • the map to guest option (which I had as bad user)
  • any ‘guest ok’ line in your smbd.conf

restart samba and you’ll be prompted for a username/password instead.

As a last resort, resetting network settings may get you back online

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

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What to Know

  • To reset network settings, go to Start menu >Settings >Network and Internet >Status >Network Reset.
  • If you have a VPN or a proxy server, it may need to be reconfigured following the reset.
  • Resetting network settings removes and reinstalls every network adapter installed on your system.

This article explains how to reset your network settings on Windows 10.

How to Reset Network Settings in Windows 10

Using the network reset utility in Windows 10 is fairly simple.

Go to Start menu > Settings, then select Network and Internet.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

In the left navigation pane, select Status to make sure you’re viewing the network status window. Then scroll down until you see the Network Reset link.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

Click the Network Reset link and review the Network Reset information message. When you’re prepared to network your reset settings, select Reset now.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

Select Yes in the network reset confirmation window. This will initiate the reset process and restart your computer.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

You will get a warning when the computer’s about to reboot. You should have plenty of time to save your work and close out all applications.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

When the computer restarts, you’ll notice that your network connection isn’t active. This is because your network card reset and released its previous connection. Just select the network icon, pick the network you want to reconnect to, and choose Connect.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

If your TCP/IP settings are set to automatically detect, your network connection should detect the appropriate network settings and connect to the internet without any problems.

Fixing Any Remaining Settings

If you configured a VPN client or other network software before the network reset, you may need to reconfigure them to get them working again.

Fixing this software is as simple as opening the VPN software and entering your IP and other settings like you did when you originally installed the software.

If you were connecting to a corporate network using a proxy server, you may need to reconfigure your proxy server settings.

Select the Start menu and type Internet Options. Select Internet Options.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

In the Internet Options window, select the Connections tab.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

Select the LAN settings button, and in the LAN Settings window, select Use a proxy server for your LAN. In the Address field, type the address for your corporate LAN proxy server. Select OK on both windows to accept the changes.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

If you don’t know the correct proxy server settings, contact your IT help desk to ask for the correct network address and port of your proxy server.

You may need to restart your computer for the changes to take effect, and your network card to reconnect to your corporate network.

What Does a Windows 10 Network Reset Do?

Resetting network settings in Windows 10 should be a last resort. When you initiate a network reset, it removes and reinstalls every network adapter currently installed on your system.

The Network Reset Utility was originally introduced by Microsoft after the Windows 10 Anniversary Update build (version 1607) so people could quickly resolve network problems caused by the update. The utility still remains to help people fix network connection issues.

The network reset utility also sets every networking component on your system back to the original factory settings. The components that get reset are as follows:

  • Winsock: This is an interface for applications that handles input and output requests to the internet.
  • TCP/IP: This stands for Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol, and allows all network devices on your computer to communicate over the internet.

If you’ve customized any of these settings from their defaults, you’ll need to note those settings because performing a network reset will remove any custom settings.

However, most people have all of these components set to automatically detect, so in most cases you won’t see any issues after a network reset.

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When you map a drive, you’re basically creating a shortcut for that drive on another computer or in another location. In other words, mapping allows you to create a new drive letter for a folder, giving you access to it just like other computer drives. Many people map their folders when they want permanent access to a folder on another computer, network, or server. Unfortunately, mapped drives don’t always work the way we want them to and some people may run into the issue of a mapped network drive that is not showing. When the drive isn’t showing, you obviously can’t open and work on it. The good news? There are a few different ways to resolve this issue. Today we’ll help teach you how to fix mapped network drive not showing in Windows 10/8/7.

Solution 1: Fix Mapped Network Drive Not Showing in File Explorer in Windows 10/8/7

If your application is running with admin rights, you may not be able to see it on your mapped drives. Here’s how to get around this:

Step 1. Click on “Start” and in the program box type in “regedit”. Click Enter.

Step 2. Find this sub-key : “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System” and right click it.

Step 3. Select “new” and click “DWORD value”.

Step 4. Type in “EnableLinkedConnections”. Press Enter.

Step 5. Select “EnableLinkedConnections” and right click. Choose “modify”.

Step 6. Type “1” into the value box. Click OK.

Step 7. Exit and restart your computer.

Solution 2: Fix Mapped Network Drive Not Showing All Files/Folders in Windows 10/8/7

Sometimes files, folders, and subfolders in Windows can be hidden. When this happens, users cannot see them at all, even when they go to select the appropriate drive letter. This is what happens when files or folders are hidden on the NAS drives, and it can easily happen to mapped network drives. Here’s how to unhide your mapped network drives:

Step 1. Open File Explorer.

Step 2. Click on the “view” tab.

Step 3. Click on the box next to “Hidden items”.

Step 1. Open File Explorer.

Step 2. Select the “Organize” tab.

Step 3. Select “Folder and search options”.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

Step 4. Click on “view” tab.

Step 5. Choose “hidden files and folders” > “Show hidden files, folders, and drives” and click OK.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

Once you have finished this process, all hidden drives, folders, and files should appear in their original location.

Solution 3: Recover Hidden Files when Mapped Network Drive Not Showing

If you have tried to learn how to fix mapped network drive not showing in Windows 10/8/7, but have not had any success with the methods listed above, there is a third solution that is more likely to work. It’s called AnyRecover.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

Features of iMyFone AnyRecover: В В В В

Recover your data from a variety of different places including hard-drives, computers, USB and external sources, email accounts, and mapped network drives.

Search down deep into the soul of your sources to recover data, files, and folders that you may have thought were deleted forever.

Provide you with easy, simple to follow instructions that can help you recover your files, folders, and data in minutes.

Provide you with the assurance that all of your data and information is kept 100% safe and secure.

Recover data from over 1000 different source types including pictures, videos, emails, documents, and archives (to name a few).

Here’s how to use it to restore your files when network drive not showing up in Windows:

Step 1. Download and run AnyRecover software and select the network drive that you would like to restore files from.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

Step 2. After selecting the location you want to recover lost data, hit “Start” button. The program will start to scan for your deleted, missing, or hidden files.

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

Step 3. Once finished scanning you will see a list of all your recovered files, folders, and documents. If you wish, you can preview them within the program. Select the files that you would like to restore and then click “recover” and save them to a different hard disk (aside from the original location).

Windows networking how to work with network drives & network locations

And it’s that simple! In 3 easy steps you can use AnyRecover to recover your missing, hidden, or deleted files from your mapped drives.

Conclusion

If you are having a problem finding your mapped network drives, you may need to learn how to fix mapped network drive not showing in Windows 10/8/7. The first step is to try one of the first two methods listed above. If these do not work, or if you are not comfortable with following the steps, you can also try the third option – AnyRecover. AnyRecover has an extremely high success rate when it comes to recovering data, even after it has been “permanently” deleted.

This article provides methods to solve the issue that mapped drives are unavailable in an elevated command prompt.

Applies to: В Windows 7 Service Pack 1, Windows Server 2012 R2
Original KB number: В 3035277

Symptoms

This issue occurs when the following conditions are true:

  • You use Group Policy Preference (GPP) or logon scripts to map network drives during logon.
  • User Account Control (UAC) is enabled.
  • The following UAC Group Policy setting is configured to Prompt for credentials:
    User Account Control: Behavior of the elevation prompt for administrators in Admin Approval Mode
  • The EnableLinkedConnections registry entry is configured. See the detail to configure the EnableLinkedConnections registry entry.

Under these conditions, you experience the following situation:

  • When you sign in to the client, mapped drives are available as expected.
  • When you run an elevated command prompt as administrator, the mapped drives are unavailable in the elevated command prompt.

This issue also affects other applications that run in an elevated context (run as administrator) and use drive letters to access mapped drives.

Cause

When UAC is enabled, the system creates two logon sessions at user logon. Both logon sessions are linked to one another. One session represents the user during an elevated session, and the other session where you run under least user rights.

When drive mappings are created, the system creates symbolic link objects (DosDevices) that associate the drive letters to the UNC paths. These objects are specific for a logon session and are not shared between logon sessions.

The EnableLinkedConnections registry entry forces the symbolic links to be written to both linked logon sessions that are created, when UAC is enabled.

When the UAC policy is configured to Prompt for credentials, a new logon session is created in addition to the existing two linked logon sessions. Previously created symbolic links that represent the drive mappings will be unavailable in the new logon session.

Workaround – Method 1

  1. In Local Group Policy Editor, locate the following Group Policy path:
    Local Computer Policy\Windows Settings\Security Settings\Local Policies\Security Options
  2. Configure the following policy to Prompt for consent: User Account Control: Behavior of the elevation prompt for administrators in Admin Approval Mode

Workaround – Method 2

Map the required drives again in the elevated session, for example, by using a .bat script file.