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How to audition at julliard

Juilliard Audition Dates for Fall 2021 Entry

Please see the appropriate section below for information on the audition dates available for your major. This information is provided for preliminary planning purposes and may change depending on the progress of the pandemic. Your actual audition date and time will be confirmed by the Office of Admissions.

Audition information will be updated on an ongoing basis. Please check back frequently for changes.

Dance

Dancers applying to enter the Bachelor of Fine Arts program in fall 2021 must submit a prescreening video. Dancers who receive favorable prescreening results will be invited to attend live callback auditions in February at Juilliard.

Audition City Audition Dates
New York February 25 – 28

Summer Dance Intensive

Applicants for the 2021 program will be required to submit a video audition; there will be no live auditions for the summer 2021 program.

Acting

All initial auditions for actors applying to enter the program in fall 2021 will take place remotely via Zoom. Approximately 50 individuals will be selected to come to New York in March for a live final callback round.

Audition City Audition Dates
Via Zoom December 4, 5, 6, 11, 12, 13, 18, 19, 20
Final Callback Weekend March 13 – 15

Music

The format of auditions for music applicants is being discussed. The goal of our auditions is to admit students who are prepared musically and technically , for studying at Juilliard. Our challenge is to find the best ways to achieve that goal in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

We will post audition information here as it becomes available. If you are in our admissions database as a prospect, or if you have already started an application for fall 2021, we will send you an email as well. To add yourself to our database, please fill out this form.

How to Audition at Julliard

Welcome to Juilliard

For over a century, students have enrolled in The Juilliard School and graduated to fulfill their dreams in the performing arts. Dancers, actors, playwrights, classical and jazz musicians—all have come here to hone their craft and deepen their artistry.

A career in the arts is challenging, but the only way to make it happen is to risk: To risk taking that audition, creating that work of art, exposing who you are.

We invite you to take the step of applying to Juilliard, and we look forward to supporting you on your artistic journey.

Kathleen Tesar
Associate Dean for Enrollment Management

Getting Started

Whether you are just starting your research into Juilliard or are in the middle of submitting your application, we look forward to connecting with you. We encourage you to reach out to us, ask us questions, attend our events, and talk with your counselors and teachers. Wherever you decide to start, we’ll be here for you along the way.

Application Deadlines

The applications for college-level degrees and programs at The Juilliard School and The Tianjin Juilliard School open on September 1! If you are applying as an undergraduate or graduate student, please note your application deadline:

The Juilliard School (New York, USA)

  • BFA or MFA in Acting—apply by November 1
  • AD in Opera Studies—apply by November 1
  • AD in Playwriting—apply by November 15
  • BFA in Dance—apply by December 1
  • All other Music degrees—apply by December 1

The Tianjin Juilliard School (Tianjin, China)

How to Audition at Julliard

March is audition month for dancers and musicians and callback month for actors, so the Journal has compiled some of the Admissions bloggers’ audition tips and cautionary tales.

How to Audition at Julliard

Know your material
Choose material that you gravitate toward and love— and know your text very well! Now’s a good time to make sure you’ve been preparing the correct works—you’re not going to want to realize that you’ve been playing the Bach E Major Sonata instead of the E-flat Major Sonata the day before (I may have learned this the hard way). The most essential aspect to auditioning is being so prepared that you could do the audition in your sleep. I try to spend weeks practicing my audition pieces over and over again until I know they are exactly where I want them, so even if something does go wrong, I will still have the ability and confidence to easily get back on course.

Get organized
Before you leave home or arrive at your audition, double- and triple-check that you have everything that you need with you, whether it’s music, rosin, pointe shoes, notes, snacks (very important), water, your phone charger, some form of identification (sometimes just a school ID won’t suffice, especially when flying), and a backup plan or two in case something goes wrong. And if you have to run to a CVS for ChapStick right before your audition, don’t sweat it!

How to Audition at Julliard

Don’t stress about your outfit, but…
As for your audition outfit, don’t stress too much about it—as if you don’t have enough to think about!—but choose something that looks professional, makes you feel confident, and will enable you to perform comfortably.

Arrive with time to spare
I once miscalculated the amount of time transportation would take for an audition. I arrived late and was overexcited and out of breath and all the chaos made my head fuzzy. And then at one point, the words completely slipped from my mind. Though I managed to fake it ’til I made it and was lucky enough to be accepted, I could have lost my chance completely. Moral of the story: always show up early.

How to Audition at Julliard

Be flexible
Make sure to allow yourself ample time to get there (early!), but don’t be surprised if auditions are running late. If you need to eat before performing, make sure you can do so as well. Treat this like any other performance—if you think it’s unwise to try something new, don’t.

How to Audition at Julliard

Do it for you
Audition for you, not your parents, your mentor, whoever—do it because you want it. Enjoy it! I learned more about acting during my three-day callback audition process than I did during my two years working as an actor before training at Juilliard.

How to Audition at Julliard

A word to the parents
Parents: we know this process is nerve-wracking for you too—go to Starbucks, go to the student cafeteria, ask questions of the current Juilliard students with nametags (they’re here to help)—and know that Juilliard has been running these auditions for many, many years and is still finding ways to make the audition process better every year. Be yourself In the interview, your best bet is to just be yourself. They don’t expect you to know everything; you are here to learn.

Be yourself
In the interview, your best bet is to just be yourself. They don’t expect you to know everything; you are here to learn. Be humble Accepting and recognizing that you still have a lot to learn shows a certain type of maturity that many people forget about: humility. Don’t be pretentious!

Enjoy the process
Once you’ve navigated the hurdles of wintertime travel, pre-audition hunger (or lack of appetite), and finding your way to the proper floor in the Juilliard building, everything will fall into place—you’re in your element. You know what you are doing. Your audition is meant to show your enthusiasm and dedication to your art—so even if everything doesn’t go perfectly, remember to enjoy the process!

Recalibrate
Think of the panel as an audience rather than as judges—I try to change my mindset from Will they like me? to I will offer whatever I can to touch their hearts and brighten their days.

How to Audition at Julliard

You’re supposed to be here
Early in my freshman year I told a faculty member that [non-Juilliard] people had said I was not supposed to be chosen for this school. The teacher responded, “You are supposed to be here. We don’t make mistakes.” Those words freed me to begin my true journey. Good luck! To all the auditioners out there, a very enthusiastic good luck! You’ll end up wherever you are meant to be, so above all, enjoy this exhilarating and memorable time.

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How old do you have to be to audition for the julliard school?

3 Answers

The earlist age for dance at Juilliard is 16. Very few get in at that age. I didn’t make it then, but I was excepted for fall ’09. I’m 18. Each year, they take only 12 girls and 12 boys out of all the thousands that audition or wish to audition. I also got into NYU Tisch for dance. I am leaning more towards Tisch because I believe the program is better.

How to Audition at Julliard

The Julliard School is actually a performing arts college, so technically to audition you would either have to be in your senior year of high school or beyond, although it is rumored that they take a few 16 year olds every year, but unless you’re amazing, I wouldn’t count on that. To audition for their summer program you must be between the ages of 15-17, but they’ve already stopped accepting applications. Their pre-college program doesn’t have a dance program within it–only music. If I were you, I would suggust looking elsewhere. Julliard may have the reputation, but that doesn’t mean that their program is as good as other colleges with dance majors, or that their school is right for all dancers that are amazing.

How to Audition at Julliard

julliard is like for music and you play an instrument but maybe they will accept you there if you dance good maybe you could be like maybe 16 or 18

Juilliard is every young actors wet dream. It is the Alpha and the Omega. It is a wasp among flies, a spark among mist, a god among men. Someone from Juilliard saying “yes” to you, is someone confirming your life: Yes, you are great. Yes, you are talented. Yes, I see you are gifted.

If you don’t get a callback at Juilliard does it mean the opposite? That you are not talented? Not gifted? Not great?

Juilliard sees thousands of students, and like most of the best Theatre schools in the nation, they are looking for a certain type. They may not know what that type is, so don’t try to fit in, or be like him/her, or try to act like the person that moves you the most. Just be you. No one can be you, as well as you can. Not getting a callback means you’re normal and probably very talented. Honestly, having the courage to stand up and audition at Juilliard qualifies you as bold, and strident.

There are a number of articles in and around the web, on what it’s like to audition at Juilliard—I’ll let you in on what is like for me….

Very friendly. From the person at the door, the monitors in the hall, the woman who went around and let us know approximately what will be happening. Every one was sweet and friendly. Big smiles, big handshakes. Really nice people. Except this one kid. He was awkward. I think he was a fourth year student—it’s not easy to remember as I was pretty focused and didn’t talk to anyone, but he sat down in the holding area and chatted up some of the younger aspiring actresses and asked when they were going back home, and his energy was creepy, he seemed pompous, and arrogant. These women were like seventeen years old and he was asking what they were doing that night. And not in a way of being friendly. It was really slimy, and a little upsetting. I wanted to tap the kid on the shoulder and say you’re being inappropriate, but I figured it wasn’t my business, and anyway these girls have their parents waiting for them downstairs.

The holding room is horrible. It is Auschwitz, except everyone is nervous-chatty with the blah, blah, blah, about nothing. It made me ill. It made me hate actors. I kept going for walks and using different warm up rooms. They have them upstairs. I used them about three times. They say you can only use them once, but there were so many of us, the Juilliard students had no idea I continued to use the rooms. Also, and I don’t think I recommend doing this: I snuck into a room that was empty and just did some vocal warm ups and physical warm ups which was very helpful in giving me an idea of how my voice would sound in the room. The third time I used the room wasn’t for warm ups is was just to get out of Sobibor the holding pen. It really made me sick. So I sat in the warm up room and breathed. Just me and the grand piano.

I get called into ‘on deck,’ position. I’m waiting in the hall. I’m sitting down on a bench very focused. The person who is in the room comes out and the monitor says to him “give me a second.” The monitor enters the room, where the audition is taking place, comes back out a moment later and either says “they’d like to see you again,” or, “great, thanks so much.”

I felt very calm when I entered the room and saw three people sitting behind a desk. One of them was named Richard (I think), he was the one who spoke to the auditionees (in an assembly sort of way), when we first arrived. (An orientation, of sorts, prior to being led through a vocal group exercise. I thought the whole speech was a little unnecessary, but I appreciated it. I think it’s important to mention I’m thirty-five years old and no longer have that cultish devotion to people who speak in truths about art. I simply register it; it warms my insides, and I move on.) I remember feeling powerful. Not in a ‘fuck you’ get ready for me,’ but in a ‘you are all masters of your craft, and I take this craft very seriously.” I really wanted to share my monologues with these guys. I performed my Shakespeare and my contemporary (I had four more, and a song, in reserve). They said thank you. They called me back in the room. They asked why I chose my particular Shakespeare monologue. I told them. They said drop your character, just be you, and let me see the reason you chose this monologue. I did that, and felt very connected. I remember thinking, fuck, why didn’t my coach tell me that? They said thank you and I left the room. They called me back into the room and asked me to sit in the chair. I did. They asked me to perform my contemporary monologue, but sitting in the chair. They asked me who I was speaking to and I told them, and they told me to take myself out of the circumstances of that play and just simply sit in the chair, drop my character, my accent, my movements, and go for what I want. I did. I felt chills all around my neck and eyes as I performed the monologue with their adjustments (it’s important to note that during my rehearsing of these monologues, I had imagined what they would say to me after performing. I imagined what adjustments they would give me and how I would incorporate them. What I am saying is, I was surprised only by the feelings their adjustments elicited, not by the actual adjustments). They sent me out of the room. They called me back in the room and asked me to sing. But sing to myself, as if I was the only person in the room. I did. They said ‘thank you,’ and the moment they said it—I knew I was getting a call back.

Today was my NYC Juilliard audition! I’m sure that many of you who are auditioning to Juilliard in the upcoming weeks are interested in how the auditions are run, so I’ll recount my experience to you all. Note that if you’re not auditioning in NYC, the auditions will probably be a little different.

First, all the applicants were divided by last name (A-L and M-Z) into two holding rooms, where we waited until we were called into a large rehearsal room for the warm-up/orientation. While waiting in the holding room, several current Juilliard students with clipboards let auditioners know when their audition time was. I have no idea how the audition order was decided.

At around 9:00, all the auditioners from both holding rooms were led to the aforementioned warm-up, and it was then that I saw just how many prospective students there were. somewhere between 100 and 150.

Anyway, after a nice orientation speech from a couple of Juilliard’s teachers/directors and a quick mental/physical warm-up, we were led back to the holding-rooms. Then it was waiting time!!

It was around 9:45 and my audition was “in the 10:00 hour,” so I decided to go use one of the practice rooms. On the fourth floor of the Juilliard building, there are several small practice rooms that applicants can use for 15 minutes at a time. I don’t know if there are any practice rooms at other audition locations.

Because there were SO many auditioners, I didn’t end up auditioning until around 11:15-11:30ish. Instead of just having two or three auditors auditioning everybody, there were five panels of three faculty members each reviewing the applicants. The panel I auditioned for was comprised of a poetry teacher, an acting teacher, and an Alexander teacher. My audition was simply a little bit of talking followed by my monologues. Something to note about the monologue audition: there’s a tape line on the floor around 7ish feet from the auditors that you have to stand behind while acting. That was kind of annoying, but it makes sense.

My audition was over around 11:40, so I went out and got lunch before they posted the callback list at 2:00. Out of the 100+ auditioners, 16 were called back today. One Juilliard student I talked to said that today would probably have the most people called back out of all the audition days because it was the first day of auditions. Unfortunately, I wasn’t one of the 16 called back, but then again, I wasn’t really expecting it, and I don’t think anybody else applying straight out of high school should expect anything either. Most of the auditioners that I talked to were college graduates or college transfers. So, while it’s not impossible for a high school senior to get a callback, it’s not very likely.

And while I didn’t get a callback, I did get to see “next to normal,” so that was pretty cool.

If anybody has any questions or wants to talk about their own experience, please, go ahead!

Next up: Carnegie-Mellon in Pittsburgh, Sunday January 24th.

Michael Arden went to Juilliard.

Here’s my advice:

DON’T BE INTIMIDATED BY THESE PEOPLE WHO ARE PRETENDING THEY ARE IMPORTANT!

After all. don’t you think it’s a little suspicious that they only pick the “most talented” people to go to their school? See. perhaps they have very little faith in their actual ability to teach you anything at this school. so if they pick people who are ALREADY good. their school is going to look really good when those people go into the real world and become stars!

And in the end. THESE PEOPLE at the college auditions are NOT the people you need to connect with to have a successful career. You need to connect with AUDIENCES. and well, to do that. you have to connect with VARIOUS directors, all of whom have different opinions of what is good.

Now, I’m not saying that school can’t be a great experience. It can be a productive transition period from childhood to adulthood. And it can be a protective environment in which to work on your craft. So, by all means, work hard, prepare fully, and do your best.

Respect them like you would anyone else. but don’t give the people in the audition special power by thinking that they hold all the cards to your success in this business. They don’t.

And remember. what YOU are doing (baring your soul in front of strangers) is much easier than what THEY are doing (sitting at a table).

I went a couple years ago in Chicago. There were about 15 of us in the group for the time frame we signed up for. We were called into a conference room, had to pretend we were ANIMALS and crawl around the room as animals (yep). Then they called us in one by one. It was Michael Kahn, a woman voice teacher, and a male acting teacher. They all looked over 70 years old. Anyway, when you came in, they talked to you for like 2 min. Michael Kahn was totally rude. The other two were fine. Then you do your two monologues. They barely watch. No comments. Then they say thank you. They post call backs after your whole group goes. One boy got called back from our group. I remember he wrote one of his monologues he performed.

Anyway, it was a pretty degrading experience. I am still convinced that Michael Kahn is the anti-Christ. He had an air of real nastiness.

don’t bother. Julliard auditions are horrible and the people who administer them are evil. It’s a horrible process to go through.

My favorite Revenge story is this. I was watching Sex and The City . does anyone remember the episode where the sandwhich( a guy dressed as a huge sandwhich to promote some deli) was saying “eat me” to miranda? Well watch it with the commentary. The guys is like “this was his first job out of Julliard.” I like to think in my mind that julliard kids end up playing sandwhiches. Everytime I walk by Julliard I proclaim “eat me”

Juilliard is a great school and I have a couple of friends there who love it. There are crazy audition stories from every college program. I have my own at Tisch. Cranky auditors should never stop you from auditioning at a school where you think you might be happy and where you’ll get excellent training. And if you think that all Juilliard kids are playing sandwiches, have a look at this.

Their techniques can work for people in many fields, too.

How to Audition at Julliard

By Daniel McGinn

How to Audition at Julliard

Few professional experiences are as stressful as auditioning for a seat in a professional orchestra. A big-city symphony may offer tryouts to 200 musicians for a single opening — and unlike in a Ted Talk or a boardroom presentation, when a musician is playing a classical piece, the judges know exactly what they’re supposed to hear. “With public speaking, there’s a lot of wiggle room,” says Noa Kageyama, a Juilliard-trained violinist who’s now a professor there. “But in music, everybody knows what note is supposed to come next, and how it’s supposed to sound.”

Kageyama understands this pressure firsthand. He learned to play violin at age two, eventually earning admission to Juilliard himself. Although he never had a full-blown panic attack while playing, Kageyama often experienced subtle signs of anxiety. Sometimes his hands would sweat excessively. Sometimes his mind would wander during auditions. “There was this frustration over why I couldn’t consistently play the way I was capable of playing, even if I was prepared,” he says.

In 1999, as a graduate student at Juilliard, Kageyama signed up for an elective class called “Performance Enhancement for Musicians,” taught by a sports psychologist who’d previously worked with Olympic athletes. The course taught him that backstage jitters are an unavoidable part of a musician’s life, and that even if you can’t entirely eliminate them, you can systematically develop skills to perform well despite them.

“It was such an eye-opener,” Kageyama says. “It’s not a crapshoot out there. There are things I could do to get better at this.” Kageyama was so taken with the course that he put aside his violin, entered a PhD program in psychology, and eventually returned to Juilliard, where he now teaches the performance psychology course himself.

At 11 A.M. one morning, Kageyama, who is thin and soft spoken, with close-trimmed black hair, stands in Room 102 at Juilliard. Around him in a circle of chairs are twenty grad students, instrument cases — violas, cellos, flutes, bassoons — at their feet.

In one class, he asks each student to play for one minute while being video-recorded. (He doesn’t actually turn the camera on — it’s there simply to increase their stress level — and instead has them play 90 seconds, to discombobulate them.) In another class, he makes them do burpees until they’re sweaty and breathing hard — then asks them to play for the group. “It’s distracting when your heart is pounding,” he says, but if you practice playing while feeling that sensation, it can become a little less unnerving. “It’s the same thing you need in an audition — to see past what your body is saying, and to focus on the task at hand.”

How to Audition at Julliard

Much of the course focuses on teaching the students to practice “centering,” a technique popularized by the performance psychologist Don Greene, who was Kageyama’s instructor at Juilliard back in the 1990s. Centering consists of a quick series of breathing and mental exercises designed to reduce anxiety before performing; you can learn more about it in a series of YouTube videos, or in Don Greene’s book on the practice. Kageyama aims to get his students to learn to center themselves in less than 10 seconds.

The culmination of this course takes place during the class’s final exam, in which students perform a mock audition in front of judges from the New York Philharmonic and other professional organizations. The week before the exam, Kageyama shows them the quiet rehearsal space where they can prepare, and the room where they will play, outfitted with a screen that prevents the judges from seeing the musician. (Screened auditions are the norm in many music auditions; they limit the potential for bias due to gender, ethnicity, or other visible attributes.)

One week later, when the students show up for the mock audition, everything he’s told them turns out to be a lie. The musicians are called up to audition in random order, with no warning. The supposedly quiet rehearsal space is filled with weird noises. (Kageyama has hidden a badly-tuned AM radio playing loudly.) When the students enter the audition room, there is no screen; the judges are in plain sight. One of the judges appears drunk.

This “adversity audition” is the traditional culmination of the Juilliard course. It tests whether the techniques the students have learned help them cope not only in a traditional audition, but even in a worst-case scenario. The piano contains ping pong balls to disrupt the playing; sometimes an oscillating fan is set up to blow around the sheet music. “The judges are instructed to be disrespectful, ornery, rude, and difficult,” Kageyama says. By most accounts, they play this role very well.

While the judges do assess the musicians’ playing, they’re also paying close attention to how well the students cope with the circumstances. Do they let the judges’ behavior interfere with their routine before they begin? Do they appear frazzled, distracted, frustrated, or angry? When Caeli Smith, a viola player, entered the room, the various disruptions (especially the noisy rehearsal space) had taken a toll. “I was feeling very clammy, not warmed up, and very nervous,” she recalls.

But Smith closed her eyes, focused on her breathing, and did the centering exercise her professor taught her. “Once you get good at it, you can do it in about ten seconds,” she says. She repeats some simple affirmations, ones that focus not on success, but on doing her best. (An example: “I’m going to feel free to explore all the possibilities of what this music might hold.”)

It was challenging to do this in the audition room. “The judges kept saying, ‘Whenever you’re ready, whenever you’re ready,’” she recalls, and it was clear they were trying to disrupt her. But she still took a few seconds to herself, and she didn’t put her bow to her strings until she was ready. Afterward, she was pleased with her performance. “I did get really nervous… but I was able to deliver what I wanted despite so many distractions,” she says “I had my routine, and I prepared myself before playing,” she says. It’s the kind of coolheaded performance to which we all should aspire.

Daniel McGinn is a senior editor at Harvard Business Review and the author of Psyched Up: How the Science of Mental Preparation Can Help You Succeed (Portfolio, 2017), from which this article is adapted.

Hello!! I am only in the 8th grade this year. but since i was in gr.3 Julliard has been my DREAM school! I do research on it, so I know what it is all about. But I NEED to know what is expected. I know I am only in the 8th grade, but I am looking aat myfuture. I am going to a high school that greatly supports acting and preforming. It has an excellent Drama program. Also, I am an Actress myself, also a model though. But I’m assuming if I get jobs in acting It will greaten my chances lon getting in. Please maybe list the link on such, preparing, maybe some audition videos? Also a list on what will be expected and what I nwill need to know. And only 8% of people get in:'(

3 Answers

How to Audition at Julliard

The first thing you need to learn is how Juilliard is spelled. (YA spell check is wrong.)

They only take 18 or less freshman into this school for a Drama major. That means many talented people don’t make the cut. If you have already worked professionally it certainly helps. This is what you need for your pre-screening video in order to get an audition in person: (all taken right from their site)

“One contemporary monologue, no more than two minutes in length. Contemporary monologues may be taken from works spanning the time of Anton Chekhov to present day.

One classical monologue in verse or blank verse (NOT prose), no more than two minutes in length. Possible classical selections include: Greek plays in verse translation, Lope de Vega, William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, John Webster, John Ford, Racine in verse translation, William Congreve, and Richard Brinsley Sheridan.”

Audition Materials for live call back if you get one: (taken from the Juilliard site)

“Four memorized monologues (two classical and two contemporary), each approximately two minutes in length. One of the classical selections must be from a play by Shakespeare. In the initial audition, we will ask each auditioner to present two monologues – one classical and one contemporary – of contrasting natures. The remaining two monologues are in reserve, in the event we need to see additional material. Please note: Do not select monologues from monologue books and please be prepared to answer questions about the entire play from which your selection is chosen.

Classical material must be in verse or blank verse — NOT PROSE. Possible classical selections include: Greek plays in verse translation, Lope de Vega, William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, John Webster, John Ford, Racine in verse translation, William Congreve, and Richard Brinsley Sheridan.

Contemporary selections may be from Anton Chekhov to present day.

Applicants should prepare 16 bars of any song (to be sung a cappella). If an applicant is asked to sing, it is an opportunity for our faculty to find out information about an applicant’s vocal range and instrument. Please note: Not all applicants will be asked to sing during the audition process and a trained singing voice is not required for admission.

Applicants are required to bring one copy of their resume to the audition. Applicants are also welcome to bring one photograph or headshot to the audition. Photographs are optional.”

* You only need a “C” average for high school so grades don’t count much. It is 100% about your audition. No SAT or ACT scores are required.

EDIT: Keep in mind there are other great acting schools and Juilliard is not right for everyone. Some are even considered better training. Juilliard is just the one best known most by the average person.

8 Answers

How to Audition at Julliard

. All applicants should refer to the General Applications Procedures.

2. Undergraduate applicants are eligible for either the Bachelor of Music degree or the Diploma, which requires at least three years.

3. Undergraduate applicants may also pursue studies in the cross-registration (B-C-J exchange) program.

4. Transfer status is available only to those accepted into undergraduate programs. Advanced standing for music students is based entirely on faculty evaluations of the student’s capabilities and by the placement exams which are administered after acceptance.

5. Graduate applicants are eligible for the following programs: Master of Music, Graduate Diploma, Doctor of Musical Arts, or the Artist Diploma.

6. Those interested in the Artist Diploma should refer to the Artist Diploma section in General Applications Procedures.

7. International Students: Please refer to International Students section.

8. TOEFL and essay rating will be required for students for whom English is not the native language. Please refer to International Students section for details.

Music Entrance Auditions

Repertoire: All applicants must prepare the complete repertoire required for their instrument and follow all instructions indicated. Many departments require a recording of the required repertoire for pre-screening purposes. Please refer to the Application Checklist for a list of materials that must accompany the application.

Audition Dates: Invitations to the live auditions at The Juilliard School will be sent out approximately one month prior to the scheduled audition date.

Accompanists: We encourage you to use a Juilliard accompanist for your audition. A list of accompanists will be provided with your schedule letter. You must contact an accompanist from the list two weeks prior to your audition and provide her or him with a piano score of the repertoire for the audition. Students who wish to bring their own accompanist may do so. A rhythm section will be provided for jazz auditions. Collaborative Piano applicants please refer to the Collaborative Piano audition requirements below regarding the audition partner guidelines.

Practice rooms during auditions: Students scheduled to audition may use The Juilliard School practice rooms any time during audition week

(March 3-10, 2006). Practice rooms are not available to applicants before or after audition week. Out of consideration for fellow applicants, please use practice rooms in the evenings only on days other than your scheduled audition date.

Callbacks: All musicians will play for the faculty once. Only voice, piano, and flute have callbacks. Callbacks will take place on the same day as the applicant’s scheduled audition. Applicants must be available until 10pm for callbacks. Flute students will be asked to play a second time. Piano students will be asked to play a second time and undergraduate students are asked to take tests of basic musicianship. Voice students do not have a singing callback. The callback consists of a short written test, a muscial skills interview, and a brief diction evaluation. If an applicant is not called back, she or he may reasonably conclude that she/he is no longer under serious consideration for admission.

Other: J.OC., Orchestral Conducting, and D.M.A. applicants have specific audition procedures. Please refer to “Audition Requirements” section for a description of the audition process.

Admissions notification: All applicants are notified of their acceptance status by mail. Letters will be sent by the Office of Admissions by April 1, 2006.

Criteria for Acceptance

A serious commitment to music training and a career in music performance.

Exceptional talent and potential as a performer.

Broad and thoughtful interest in the world of music, including its historical traditions and contemporary trends.

A clear dedication to artistic excellence and a desire to exercise artistic leadership.

A high level and quality of previous training and musicianship.

Ability to sightread music.

Personal maturity and a generosity of spirit essential to ensemble work.

How old do you have to be to audition for the julliard school?

3 Answers

The earlist age for dance at Juilliard is 16. Very few get in at that age. I didn’t make it then, but I was excepted for fall ’09. I’m 18. Each year, they take only 12 girls and 12 boys out of all the thousands that audition or wish to audition. I also got into NYU Tisch for dance. I am leaning more towards Tisch because I believe the program is better.

How to Audition at Julliard

The Julliard School is actually a performing arts college, so technically to audition you would either have to be in your senior year of high school or beyond, although it is rumored that they take a few 16 year olds every year, but unless you’re amazing, I wouldn’t count on that. To audition for their summer program you must be between the ages of 15-17, but they’ve already stopped accepting applications. Their pre-college program doesn’t have a dance program within it–only music. If I were you, I would suggust looking elsewhere. Julliard may have the reputation, but that doesn’t mean that their program is as good as other colleges with dance majors, or that their school is right for all dancers that are amazing.

How to Audition at Julliard

julliard is like for music and you play an instrument but maybe they will accept you there if you dance good maybe you could be like maybe 16 or 18

Hello, I am a High School Senior and I am getting ready for my February drama audition with Julliard.

I have had theatre training outside of high school at Goodman Theatre and I have participated in vocal training with an apprenticeship of Gallery 37 (opera theatrics, dance, theatre arts, etc.) BUT, I have not been in a single play (I have only had performances with the After School Matters chorus company) My resume is heavy with training and extremely low with actual experience. I have asked my theatre instructor to help me with preparing for the audition currently (so I have no worries about the monologues and how to present myself)

My biggest issue is that I know that Julliard highly accepts transfers and not high school seniors. AM I READY?

4 Answers

First of all, @mintchips49: Who told you “accepts” is spelled “excepts”? Why are you, as an adult, being so rude to a high school senior who is asking a legitimate, intelligent question? The college search can be confusing and intimidating for high school students, and it doesn’t help to put your personal bias into your answer. Juilliard has an excellent acting program. So does NYU Tisch at the graduate level. Neither program is right for every single actor. Young actors should be searching for the right program at the right school for their personal talents and interests.

Now, on to Brandon’s question.

It is true that experience can be helpful in the audition process, but it is by no means required. The Juilliard Actor Training Program Web site even states, “We have found that what makes a young artist ready for training—talent, dedication, generosity, curiosity, and the willingness and ability to grow—cannot be predicted by age or experience.” (http://www.juilliard.edu/degrees-programs/drama/ac.

If you are interested in the program, go for it. You have just as much of a chance as anyone else!

How to Audition at Julliard

Who told you Juilliard (that is they way it is spelled. YA spell check is wrong) excepts transfers over high school seniors? The fact that Juilliard only excepts 18 freshman into Drama should be your biggest worry. Many talented students are passed over due to so few spots. Many of the students have already worked professionally. Having no experience ever performing in a play will work against you in any drama audition for a BFA in Drama, let alone Juilliard. If I were you, I would try to get into some productions ASAP. Have you never auditioned for anything? Often a cold readying is part of an audition. Do I think you are ready with zero stage experience. the answer is no. I also think that you should look at other school programs. Juilliard is not the only, or even the best training for actors. Schools like NYU Tisch have a higher hire rate than Juilliard.

Who pronounced you Juilliard (this is they way this is spelled. YA spell verify is defective) excepts transfers over severe college seniors? the fact that Juilliard ultimate excepts 18 freshman into Drama will might desire to be your excellent difficulty. Many proficient pupils are skipped over as a consequence of so few spots. most of the scholars have already worked professionally. Having no understanding ever appearing in a play will artwork in opposition to you in any drama audition for a BFA in Drama, enable by using myself Juilliard. If I have been you, i might attempt to get into some productions ASAP. have you ever under no circumstances auditioned for something? often a chilly readying is a factor of an audition. Do i think you are able to desire to be able with 0 degree adventure. the respond isn’t any. I even have self belief which you may desire to seem at different training classes. Juilliard isn’t the only, or perhaps the ultimate education for actors. colleges like NYU Tisch have a miles better lease fee than Juilliard.

How to Audition at Julliard

If you don’t make it at least you tried! I see no harm is trying!

Hello, I am currently a Junior in Highschool, and decided that I would like to apply to Juliard. I figured that I have a year to prepare, and that should be plenty of time considering most of m free time is dedicated to practise. Though I have a few questions.

I play Violincello, and will be auditioning with said instrument. These are the requirements for the audition.

1. Major and minor scales and arpeggios in four octaves.

2. An étude on the level of Duport études, Piatti, or Popper High School of Cello Playing.

3. Two contrasting movements, including a prelude, from an unaccompanied cello suite by Bach.

4. A first or last movement of a concerto by Lalo or Dvorak, or the Haydn D Major, or comparable.

5. A work by a contemporary composer.

Naturally, I would like some recommendations. Pieces that are both emotional, and add a lot of room for interpretation, while still being difficult and requiring the use of many different skills.

Also, i heard something about a CD. I could not find any information about this on the website, and any info on that would be appreciated, and recommendations for the CD would be welcome as well if anyone knows the requirement for it.

If you need any more info, please let me know!

6 Answers

How to Audition at Julliard

“I figured that I have a year to prepare . . .”

No – you NEED a good ten years of more to prepare. As the other expert posters have told you, this is not like deciding to apply to another college. Unless you have failed to tell us of a lifetime full of serious study with top/international artists, a long list of major music awards and competitions won (not All-County Orchestra – REAL competitions) then you are in over your head. NOBODY who is truly qualified to apply to Juilliard would be asking here – this life-altering educational path would have been laid out before them a long time ago – and not knowing how to spell the name of the school, or being able to comprehend the application directions is a huge red flag. *IF* you have a really fine private teacher, discuss this with them. You school guidance counselor will have no clue. Good luck with college applications – but this is almost 100 percent NOT the place for you.

How to Audition at Julliard

Please discuss this with your current school guidance counselor, as well as your music teachers. You don’t get an audition without passing the prescreening first.

You cannot just mail them a CD of your playing either.

Basic application and audition information IS on the website, and you need to read over the rules very carefully. This is one of the most of the competitive music schools in the world. Their acceptance rate is very low. That means that even IF you were the ONLY cello student applying that year, if you don’t play to a certain standard, not only would you not get IN, you wouldn’t get to audition. They just would have NO cello students entering that year. THAT’S the way it works.

Read the FAQ page. It also have contact information so that you may call or write to the school for answers to specific questions you have. That is better than coming here and having some 12 year old tell you to “follow your dreams”. It will actually save you both some time and heartache.

Here are some details on audition/application requirements for music students

Again, discuss your plans with your current guidance counselor and your cello instructor. You may not be ready for Juilliard or Curtis or other conservatories like those, but perhaps you might be able to get into a music program at your local university. Some of these programs aren’t necessarily a breeze to get into either. It depends on where you go and how well you play.

For example, have you won any major music competitions for your age group, or have you performed with any well-known junior orchestras (or adult orchestras for that matter). Be aware of your competition.

How to Audition at Julliard

Are you a college graduate actor looking to continue your studies and perfect your craft with graduate school and an M.F.A in acting? You’ve come to the right place! The application process and audition process for any M.F.A. program is pretty arduous, but it is as sure-fire a bet as any to set you on the path to success in the field. Below, Backstage has rounded up how to apply and audition for four of the nation’s top M.F.A programs for actors, including the Yale School of Drama, DePaul University, UC San Diego, and The Juilliard School. Deadlines for initial applications for the incoming graduate class of 2017 are coming up this fall and winter—so get ready, and good luck!

DePaul University
The main draw of DePaul? Well, besides being a lauded M.F.A. program in the bustling, theater-thriving city of Chicago, the university’s graduate classes are small, intimate, and hands-on. Not only that, but students are even taught by guest lecturers like David Mamet and John Malkovich! Online applications for 2017’s incoming pool of graduates will be available Oct. 1, 2016, and they are due either two weeks before a student’s in-person audition or Jan. 15, whichever comes first. Said applications involve submitting a headshot and résumé, three letters of recommendation, and official transcripts. Auditions are then scheduled for either on campus or regionally in Los Angeles, New York City, Atlanta, Houston, and San Francisco. The audition asks for one classical and one contemporary monologue. Prospective students are then divided up into small groups with a school faculty member to run through brief group improvisation, movement, vocal expression, and scene partner work. Comfortable clothing is encouraged!

The Juilliard School
Only two groups of eight to 10 students within Juilliard’s Actor Training Program are chosen each year for the school’s lauded four-year B.F.A. and M.F.A. programs. Requirements to apply for either degree are the same—other than, of course, a Bachelor’s degree is needed to pursue the Master’s. This year’s prerequisite online application, which includes a supplementary essay portion, is due no later than Dec. 1. Essays should detail your personal artistic goals and how you see your craft interplaying with the greater world; they should be no more than two pages, double-spaced, and written in a 12-point font. From there, U.S. applicants are invited to self-schedule their audition online. Auditions call for four monologues of “contrasting nature”—two classical (one Shakespeare) and two contemporary running no more than two minutes each. Those auditioning should also prepare 16 bars of any song to be sung a cappella, only by request. A letter of recommendation from an acting teacher, director, or coach is due two week’s before that in-person audition. Auditions will be held this year in New York City, Chicago, and San Francisco, January through February 2017; final callbacks in NYC are currently scheduled for March 10–12.

UC San Diego
UC San Diego is often cited as the premiere MFA acting program on the West Coast—just ask Tony favorite Danny Burstein! Priding itself on nurturing the “innate talent” of its students and the “strengthening and tuning of that instrument,” the program’s partnership with Tony-winning regional theater La Jolla Playhouse even promises an enticing post-grad professional residency. Deadline for applicants’ initial online application is coming up Dec. 7; required materials include academic transcripts from all post-secondary institutions, a statement of purpose not unlike that required of Juilliard, Yale, and others, a professional headshot with a résumé printed on the other side, and at least three letters of recommendation. An additional hard copy of one’s headshot and résumé must be mailed to school by Dec. 7. Auditions are then held January and February in San Francisco, Chicago, and NYC, where prospective parties have seven minutes to present two monologues, again no longer than two minutes, one classical and one contemporary with contrasting themes, to show range. One monologue should also be age specific and appropriate. Callbacks are held later that day, where a third monologue may be requested.

Yale School of Drama
To join the ranks of Meryl Streep, Paul Giamatti, and Lupita Nyong’o as a graduate of the Yale School of Drama’s acting program, prospective talent are up against 1,000 of their acting peers for the coveted 15–17 spots. The stakes are high: Yale’s widely regarded as an education unparalleled and unlike any other. The first step toward acceptance into the school begins with an online application—the 2017 deadline for which is coming up Jan. 3. The application calls for an up-to-date résumé and headshot along with an academic transcript for those pursuing an M.F.A., a statement of purpose running no more than three pages in length, and three letters of recommendation; one must be from a former director. That’s followed by a mandatory in-person audition, where the applicant will have five minutes to present one Shakespearean monologue in verse and another contemporary monologue. A third should also be ready in the actor’s arsenal in case it is requested of him. From there, callbacks take place over two days with a select 30 performers; decisions will be made this year after the final callbacks Feb. 17–19, 2017. Check out drama.yale.edu for further deadlines and audition dates in New Haven, Chicago, and San Francisco.

For more acting advice, visit Backstage’s YouTube channel!

RACHEL KOLAR

CLASS

How to Audition at Julliard

With its acceptance rate of only 7.6 percent in the 2010 – 2011 school year, the Juilliard School is a highly competitive environment for aspiring performers and playwrights. Students must not only complete an application and submit letters of recommendation, but also must attend an audition or submit a sample play. Because Juilliard is internationally renowned for its music and drama programs, prospective students must be prepared to compete against some of the finest young actors, playwrights, dancers and musicians in the world.

Explore this article

  • Take private lessons for your art form
  • Check the audition requirements for your department of choice
  • Rehearse an audition piece
  • Practice your audition piece in front of an audience
  • Maintain good grades in your academic courses
  • Write an application essay
  • Ask your parents and teachers
  • Sleep well before your audition

1 Take private lessons for your art form

Take private lessons for your art form if you have not already begun to do so. Because the Juilliard School is so competitive, students without advanced training are unlikely to be accepted. Let your teacher know you intend to attend Juilliard so he knows how much to challenge you and can advise you on the areas you most need to improve.

2 Check the audition requirements for your department of choice

Check the audition requirements for your department of choice so you know what to practice. For instance, if you wish to audition for the dance school, you will have to prove your mastery of both modern dance and ballet even if you are only interested in one of those disciplines. If you are interested in certain music programs, you will have to submit an audio recording of yourself for pre-screening before you can audition.

3 Rehearse an audition piece

Rehearse an audition piece that highlights your strengths as a performer, beginning at least six months in advance so you have time to master it. Your teacher should be able to help you choose an appropriate piece. However, if you are auditioning for a program that requires multiple audition pieces, make sure your pieces are not too similar so the admissions staff will not think you lack range. If you are primarily a comedic actor, for instance, prepare at least one dramatic monologue to demonstrate your breadth as an actor. If you are applying for the playwriting program, write a play showcasing your strengths as a writer and ask your English teacher and any creative writing tutors to help you polish it.

4 Practice your audition piece in front of an audience

Practice your audition piece in front of an audience to help you overcome nervousness. Ask the people watching you for advice. It can be useful to get a perspective other than that of your teacher.

5 Maintain good grades in your academic courses

Maintain good grades in your academic courses, particularly English. Although Juilliard does not have a minimum GPA or class rank for acceptance, they do require your transcripts to make sure you are capable of handling college-level work. Furthermore, Juilliard strongly encourages that one of your letters of recommendation come from an English teacher and ask that the letter emphasizes your speaking, reading and writing skills.

6 Write an application essay

Write an application essay emphasizing the importance of the arts in your life, even if you choose an essay topic that does not explicitly address the arts. Because Juilliard does not use Common Application questions, they expect you to write essays just for them rather than recycling your other essays. Use specific examples. Rather than saying, for instance, “My mother taught me that music was important,” describe the way she took off work early to drive you to orchestra rehearsals and bent over backwards to arrange your schedule so you had two hours to practice every day.

7 Ask your parents and teachers

Ask your parents and teachers to read your admissions essays for you and make suggestions.

8 Sleep well before your audition

Sleep well the night before your audition. Eat a balanced breakfast. Double-check the time and location of the audition and show up at least 20 minutes early. Although it may be impossible not to feel nervous, do your best to appear self-confident.

I was wondering if anyone could give me an insider’s view on a drama audition at Juilliard?

5 Answers

How to Audition at Julliard

“All applicants for admission to The Juilliard School must perform in person for members of the faculty according to the requirements in their respective departments. Students may be scheduled for a personal interview by members of the faculty and/or administrative staff during the audition period. International students, please visit the section on International Students regarding pre-screening by tape and English proficiency.”

I have a friend who auditioned for Julliard about 4 years ago. He didn’t make it, which shocked me because he’s a very good actor. But what they’re looking for is a range of emotion, contrasting genres (i.e. classical vs contemporary), and your use of space around you (i.e. does your body language match the core message and emotion of the monologue or is it distracting and useless?). These are just a few examples. Also, it is essential you stick to the time limits they set for your audition. Do NOT go over time. But don’t make it so short that they don’t get a good idea of what you can do.

See course training objectives below. (Link 2 below)

And you can see what exactly is required and what is expected in an audition for Julliard at the PDF file link below (3).

Replies to: What to wear at the piano audition?

-offered auditions: piano BM (Bachelors in Music as I’m assuming that your son is a prospective college freshman if its for Pre-college sorry I don’t know mich about it but some of this stuff is/ will be relevent soon or for. The future) is a pre-screened, meaning due to some circumstance (ex. Large amount of applicants, not enough time for auditions etc.) applicants must first sent a video of them playing, kind of like a preliminary round, usually a small portion of the required audition repertoire. They send this in and this determined whether you will be invited to a live audition. And this audition is the final “round”. So as for offering, anyone can audition regardless of anything (even age), however in pre screen case anyone can do it but only a few will be invited to NYC audition, Leading to the next question

-how many- it all depends on the faculty’s preference, their studio space (how many students they can teach), and talent (if youre good they’ll squeeze you in no matter what.) sometimes many will audition but none will get in, they didnt find what they were looking for. But they’re always no chance if you never audition. Sometimes knowing a faculty member helps cause they know your style, so try to get a lesson with the teacher your son wants to study from before the audition.

-audition day- most likely you’ll get a time and location and you wait till its your turn to present to the panel, you usually can get warm up time befoe the audition for like 15-20min. Be early and stay near the location as the audition can be early or later than the time given due to late applicants and such. There may theory , ear/aural, history placement exams at some time but check with the website or email admissions about it. That’s about it.

-attire: try to go for porformance/concert attire, which is formal but works what you’re doing (etc. doesn’t hinder hands or body when playing).nothing too fancy or crazy but what you would wear to someone’s graduation or formal event. Try a white dress shirt a tie and black pants + dress shoes, can’t go wrong with that. Groom nicely and don’t wear too much fragrances. A tux is not necessary IMO. But you can keep a suit jacket or something with you but take it off during the audition cause it can be hot or feel hot. As long as you look clean and sharp, to show that you’re take this seriously.

Remember, every audition is a source for opportunity but also a learning opportunity for improvement in many aspects in and outside of music.

Best of luck to your son on his audition! Look forward to hearing about it on the forum some day haha.

I’m a singer, and want to go to Julliard so badly. I need advice on how to prepare for auditions and get the judges to really LOVE me. And how do I not get nervous and freak out? Thanks everyone.

4 Answers

How to Audition at Julliard

I was in the opera program at Juilliard (just to let you know, the only voice program at Juilliard is opera). The only criteria of getting into Juilliard is your audition, that’s it! In the training of a singer, it is more about the process over the long term, so getting nervous and over-practicing will not do you any good. The most important thing is to get a good private voice teacher (keep on trying teachers until you get the perfect fit). Extra things that you might want to try to get is to learn Italian (or at least know basic diction), piano, music theory, ear training, dance, and acting. These things are not needed for the audition, but will give you a jump start if you end up studying at Juilliard.

First you send in a tape/CD, and those they like will be invited to NY for a live audition. At the audition you sing 2 pieces. In selecting pieces, rather than singing “showy” or “difficult” pieces,” you should sing pieces that represent your voice at its best and that you sing perfectly. It is better, for this audition, to pick easier pieces than hard pieces (art songs are better than arias). For example, your Italian piece should be one from the “24 Arias and Songs” book. The people who are selected for the callback are required to take a written theory test of basic roman numerals analysis, a test on how well you are in a coaching situation (where you have a 15 minute diction coaching with one of the Juilliard coaches), and then an ear training test where they ask you intervals and then ask you musical questions about the pieces you sang in your audition.

Being nervous is a good thing, but to get rid of the bad kind of nervousness you should prepare well. Nothing can go wrong if you know your stuff . Remember, when you audition the judges want you to succeed because they are looking for talented students for their school. Juilliard is looking for good overall performers: good diction, musicality, and don’t forget to act!

Hope this helps!!

You should have some degree of classical training, as well as offer some experience with contemporary forms of dance as well (i.e. cultural dances such as latin american varieties, hip hop, etc.) Essentially, you are attempting to demonstrate your unique qualities as a dancer which separate you from the general crowd. In order to reduce your stress prior to an audition, try to focus on how this audition will bring you the possibility of performing for national and international audiences in the near future. Stay focused and believe that your outer confidence will trump any inner insecurities that you may be feeling in that moment. good luck!

I have found that a big edge is gained by working with the teacher(s) in another environment such as summer music programs. Tanglewood, Aspen, where ever the person you want to study with teaches. Then they know how you work and whether or not they want you as a student. Other than that, don’t listen to anyone warming up! It always sounds better through the door.

Hello, I am a High School Senior and I am getting ready for my February drama audition with Julliard.

I have had theatre training outside of high school at Goodman Theatre and I have participated in vocal training with an apprenticeship of Gallery 37 (opera theatrics, dance, theatre arts, etc.) BUT, I have not been in a single play (I have only had performances with the After School Matters chorus company) My resume is heavy with training and extremely low with actual experience. I have asked my theatre instructor to help me with preparing for the audition currently (so I have no worries about the monologues and how to present myself)

My biggest issue is that I know that Julliard highly accepts transfers and not high school seniors. AM I READY?

4 คำตอบ

First of all, @mintchips49: Who told you “accepts” is spelled “excepts”? Why are you, as an adult, being so rude to a high school senior who is asking a legitimate, intelligent question? The college search can be confusing and intimidating for high school students, and it doesn’t help to put your personal bias into your answer. Juilliard has an excellent acting program. So does NYU Tisch at the graduate level. Neither program is right for every single actor. Young actors should be searching for the right program at the right school for their personal talents and interests.

Now, on to Brandon’s question.

It is true that experience can be helpful in the audition process, but it is by no means required. The Juilliard Actor Training Program Web site even states, “We have found that what makes a young artist ready for training—talent, dedication, generosity, curiosity, and the willingness and ability to grow—cannot be predicted by age or experience.” (http://www.juilliard.edu/degrees-programs/drama/ac.

If you are interested in the program, go for it. You have just as much of a chance as anyone else!

How to Audition at Julliard

Who told you Juilliard (that is they way it is spelled. YA spell check is wrong) excepts transfers over high school seniors? The fact that Juilliard only excepts 18 freshman into Drama should be your biggest worry. Many talented students are passed over due to so few spots. Many of the students have already worked professionally. Having no experience ever performing in a play will work against you in any drama audition for a BFA in Drama, let alone Juilliard. If I were you, I would try to get into some productions ASAP. Have you never auditioned for anything? Often a cold readying is part of an audition. Do I think you are ready with zero stage experience. the answer is no. I also think that you should look at other school programs. Juilliard is not the only, or even the best training for actors. Schools like NYU Tisch have a higher hire rate than Juilliard.

Who pronounced you Juilliard (this is they way this is spelled. YA spell verify is defective) excepts transfers over severe college seniors? the fact that Juilliard ultimate excepts 18 freshman into Drama will might desire to be your excellent difficulty. Many proficient pupils are skipped over as a consequence of so few spots. most of the scholars have already worked professionally. Having no understanding ever appearing in a play will artwork in opposition to you in any drama audition for a BFA in Drama, enable by using myself Juilliard. If I have been you, i might attempt to get into some productions ASAP. have you ever under no circumstances auditioned for something? often a chilly readying is a factor of an audition. Do i think you are able to desire to be able with 0 degree adventure. the respond isn’t any. I even have self belief which you may desire to seem at different training classes. Juilliard isn’t the only, or perhaps the ultimate education for actors. colleges like NYU Tisch have a miles better lease fee than Juilliard.

How to Audition at Julliard

If you don’t make it at least you tried! I see no harm is trying!

I have dreams of going to julliard and being an actress when I am older. I take drama class in school and do some shows on the side but I have no proper coaching. Will I need to be experienced if I want to go to julliard? What’s the audition like? Please help me

3 Answers

How to Audition at Julliard

Cogito is wrong in that you need to know how to dance and sing for Juilliard (that is the correct spelling) if you are going for a Drama major.

It is also still possible to get in if you have tons of natural talent with less training. This is the one major that intense training is not a requirement to audition. However they have less than a 5% acceptance rate. There are people applying for this school who have already worked as professional actors already and they only take 18 out of all who apply into the freshman drama major. Many famous actors have auditioned for this school (before they became famous of course) and not gotten in or were asked to leave for not being talented enough. So, it isn’t a lock for anyone even if they are very talented. They “cast” the students by type too so if there are more people who look like you, you have less of a chance to get in. That is because they want diversity in their casting for their productions throughout the year.

You can look at the website requirements for audition information.

*(While a song may be required in some auditions for a Drama major, you will be judged on how you handle it more than your vocal talent. Juilliard does not have or do musical theater. Their vocal training is part of the music not drama major and is opera based)

How to Audition at Julliard

They teach at degree level – so they would expect you to have already studied acting at a real acting school for several years, be quite good at singing and dancing, and have had lots of stage experience, taking mostly leading roles.

And no high school stuff, classes or plays/shows, are of much interest.

Only a few of the very best will ever get a place there – to stand a chance, you’d need to get into a good acting school (a class – not one-to-one) and start working really hard.

And also, join a really good youth theatre.

How to Audition at Julliard

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by following the program, I have noticed major differences in my singing ability, and I have learned how to hit notes I never would have previously imagined. I’ve always been part of my church choir, and every else also notices the improvements. I found that with this, as anything else, consistency and perserverence are key. Practice makes perfect. But having some great professional help along the way certainly doesn’t hurt! Anyhoo, take care!

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Juilliard audition piece needed!

First off, I’m a 17 year old tenor.

Hopefully, I’ll be going to audition at Juilliard next year and one of my pieces needs to be in English. I was hoping that one could be more modern but I really don’t listen to much modern music and so I am really at a loss for ideas.

  • It doesn’t need to be from an opera.
  • The tessitura cannot go beyond an Ab4
  • Not too long–not too short

Any other suggestions or ideas you have would be greatly appreciated too.

By the way, I’m sorry if I posted this in the wrong place. Please move it if it needs to be!

Thank you!

Not an unbelievable performance, but you get the idea. I think the Juilliard would LOVE this. If you think you’re up to the task.

Um, that looked a little bit strange for me and frankly, I’m not sure my voice teacher would be into that. I do like the sound though and if the matter weren’t so. vulgar(?) I’d definitely be into it.

Any other suggestions? Perhaps I should look for more music by Birtwistle?

Thank you so much for your reply.

Also, I might add that I have tremendous weight to my voice, for a young singer. Something that works with that and maybe even shows off that maturity would be great.

Last edited by BenjaminBritten; May-31-2009 at 13:52 .

You have no idea how much they would love the Birtwistle, if you could sing it with flair.. the weightier the better!

You could try something from Curlew River by Britten? The Ferryman has some nice parts (I refrain from ‘aria’)

What about some Ives? I think that would impress someone.

The interpretation is mature.

How about The Vagabond by Ralph Vaughan Williams?

Seconded on the Vagabond. And the piano part is not ridiculously hard either, so you don’t need to worry much about possible accompanists.

And IchGrolleNicht: I love your username!

Thanks! Schumann is my favorite!

check out some Ned Rorem, Vaughan Williams, Samuel Barber (sure on this shining night is a great one), John Jacob Niles. those all should give you a good start.

most important thing is this: let your teacher pick one that they think is going to best fit your voice. also, dont pick something that is out of your skill set/level. The judges want to hear a good, solid performance. something that they can work with and mold; not a professional voice that wont get any better. also, there is a certain “cannon” that most teachers recognize as good beginner music — they would rather hear you sing something from those selections and sing it well than take a risk and sing something obscure. it’s harder for them to judge your voice if they are not familiar with the piece.

Check out some Samuel Barber. “Sure On This Shining Night” is a good one–lyric and beautiful. Also “The Daisies” and if you’re wanting something really dramatic: “Bessie Bobtail.” He writes beautifully for the voice–IMO he’s one of the best of the American writers of art songs.

Take a look at the Copland “Old American Songs”, also. “All the Little Horses”, “Zion’s Walls” and “At the River” are very good audition pieces and work very well for a ‘younger’ voice.

And look at the Vaughn Williams “Songs of Travel”–a wonderful collection, and beautifully laid out for the voice–especially a younger voice. I’d recommend “Bright Is The Ring Of Words.” Very expressive and quite dramatic.

And if you’re depending on a Julliard accompanist, all of the above should be standard accompanying literature for them.

Hope this helps. Good luck!

Wow, guys! I had actually forgotten all about this thread. Thanks for all your help.

I decided to go with “Orpheus with his lute” (Vaughan-Williams), “But thou didst not leave His soul in Hell” from Messiah, and “Amarilli, mia bella.”

Anyway, I had my Juilliard audition last month and. are you ready for it. I got in!

Thanks again for all your help!

First off, I’m a 17 year old tenor.

Hopefully, I’ll be going to audition at Juilliard next year and one of my pieces needs to be in English. I was hoping that one could be more modern but I really don’t listen to much modern music and so I am really at a loss for ideas.

  • It doesn’t need to be from an opera.
  • The tessitura cannot go beyond an Ab4
  • Not too long–not too short

Any other suggestions or ideas you have would be greatly appreciated too.

By the way, I’m sorry if I posted this in the wrong place. Please move it if it needs to be!

Thank you!

Benjamin, I know someone who attended Julliard and not to scare you but Julliard has extremely high expectations for their students auditioning. It is best if you can sing a show stopping Aria in a foreign language as for the English composition, more than likely it should be an art song or contemporary classical song in the classical style but not modern. Any of the Aria’s for male roles from an opera will do, hint make sure you can traverse a lengthy Aria if need be because Julliard may require that you do so. Good luck to you on your Julliard audition

  • How to Audition at Julliard

Senior Matilda Mackey explains the audition process for the Julliard School of Dance. She auditioned in Chicago for a spot at the internationally known college conservatory program.

How to Audition at Julliard

UPDATE: On Monday, March 21st, Matilda Mackey received a phone call announcing her acceptance into the Juilliard School.

With an acceptance rate of 6.7 percent, some may be frightened to audition, but Matilda Mackey ’16 is not one of those people. The Juilliard School located in the Lincoln Center in New York City is home to A-list celebrities, boasting successful names such as Emmy-award winner Viola Davis, cello legend Yo-Yo Ma and two-time Oscar nominee Jessica Chastain. For Mackey, this audition is everything she’s been waiting on for six years as she auditioned for the dance school.

“The audition began at one o’clock on a Friday afternoon. We got our numbers and were placed in numerical order across the bar and we began our ballet class,” Mackey said. “After the ballet barre and ballet center, we went outside to wait for the results. They cut about 30-32 people which was a large percentage of people to start with. We began with 50.”

The second round, after ballet, was a modern class.

“It was shorter, but we did a mixture of combinations, moving across the floor, playing with musicality and tempo, arching your back and curves and getting grounded and more loose.”

Juilliard is internationally recognized as one of the best performing arts schools in the world, but that didn’t mean Mackey would be auditioning against strangers.

“There was a girl from my studio, Nolte [Academy of Dance in Iowa City], that was there. Two of my friends that I met at the Juilliard Summer Intensive in 2014 were there. What was really hard for was that only one of my friends and I made it through. The other two people I knew got cut after the first round,” said Mackey.

Aside from group auditions, the process entailed a solo round. Mackey performed a routine she had choreographed herself.

“I was nervous for this because solos are just so intimate and vulnerable, especially if it’s your own choreography,” she said.

After surviving the round of cuts from the solo, she was taught an entirely new combination to be performed in pairs.

“We learned a really fast paced modern choreography… My partner was actually cut after this round which was sad.”

Then, after four rounds of dancing and cuts, came the interview.

“It was unique to each person even though they ask everyone similar questions… They asked about two pages of questions. They asked how we work in groups, what we know about Juilliard, what book we read recently, what we enjoy academically and a time we had to overcome an obstacle. The questions were trying to pick up who we are as people instead outside of dancing.”

To prepare for the audition, Mackey says that she treated every class like an audition.

I also kept telling myself to breathe and I told myself that I am a human before I am a dancer.”

— Matilda Mackey ’16

“Specifically at the start of this year, I treated every ballet and modern class as if someone was watching me at the whole time. I also did extra modern privates to up my intake of that specific style. They really enabled my muscle memory to pick up on things in a quicker manner. I also kept telling myself to breathe and I told myself that I am a human before I am a dancer .”

It’s easy to imagine that an audition for such a competitive school would be mean-spirited and lacking in kindness, but Mackey disagrees.

“At the end, there were five girls and five guys and we were all sitting around sharing food, talking about where we’re from. It was a really friendly environment. I could picture that becoming the actual class at Juilliard if we were to all get in.”

If you’re considering auditioning for Juilliard or any dance school, Mackey has a few things she wants you to know.

You have the ability to make everything work for yourself. If you persevere and keep your passion and dedication strong, you can achieve anything.”

— Matilda Mackey ’16

“I want every young dancer to remember not to take everything too seriously. You have one life to live and there’s no reason why you shouldn’t be the person who makes it through all the cuts or hires for that job you really desire. You have the ability to make everything work for yourself . If you persevere and keep your passion and dedication strong, you can achieve anything.”

Correction: An earlier version of the article said Mackey auditioned in New York City at the school. Mackey auditioned in Chicago.

How hard is it to get into Julliard for music? I really want to go to Julliard and I practice each and every day. I’m not really old enough yet because I’m only 16 but I heard they have a pre-college program from 11+. What songs do you think would be good to play for a Julliard Audition?

There asking for 1 Sonata ( I might do Moonlight Sonata)

1 by Bach- all inventions

A Romantic work ( I might do Chopin’s Nocturne in C# minor)

and a 20th or 21st century piece( either A Comme Amour or the River Flows in you)

Also does anyone know a good technique for commiting music to memory? Help Please.

3 Answers

How to Audition at Julliard

It sounds like you’ve already looked at their web site, but if you haven’t here is the admissions page for the precollege program, and the entrance audition page:

It is a myth that you have to be in the top 1%, 2% etc. nationally to get into Juilliard, although it is competitive. The fact is that after a certain point, it’s virtually impossible to distinguish yourself musically, just because there are so many excellent musicians out there. Your best bet for getting into Juilliard is to try to cultivate a network: Does your teacher know anyone who went there or works there? Can you take an introductory lesson with someone who teaches there (many of their instructors also have private studios)? Get creative – you never know who may know someone, so get the word out that you’re looking to connect with people at Juilliard. Although conservatories try not to let personal connections bias the admissions process, the fact is that when choosing between two equally promising candidates, virtually anyone will choose the one they already have a (positive) relationship or connection with.

What I always tell my students is that, for an audition, they should perform the most challenging piece that they can perform well, every time. Remember, you will not be judged on what you *don’t* play, as long as you play what you *do* play well. You won’t impress them by playing a more challenging piece sloppily, so you’re better off playing a simple piece excellently.

For committing music to memory, I recommend focusing on one measure or phrase at a time. Memorizing can be challenging for people with good reading skills, so try to practice the piece enough that you can focus on the music itself and not on reading. Analyze the piece without playing, so you can remember what’s happening musically. This is the equivalent of memorizing the outline of a speech, and is really important because it can help you get back on track if you make a mistake.

One last thing: Juilliard has an excellent piano program, but so do a lot of other schools. Lots of young people dream of going to Juilliard because of the prestige of the name, and don’t really think about what the program will actually offer them. I’d recommend looking into other programs as well, not because you’re not good enough for Juilliard, but because (1) you don’t want to put all your eggs in one basket and (2) another program might actually fit your needs better. At each school, find out who the teachers are and what their students have accomplished. Remember, the people who are teaching the private piano lessons are 85% of the reason to go to any school. If those people aren’t what you’re looking for, it doesn’t matter how prestigious the program is.