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How to bargain the price down in bangkok

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

General haggling advice

As with anywhere in the world where haggling is a way of life, there are some general haggling tips to keep in mind in Thailand.

Have an approximate price in your mind

Have a rough idea of what you’re willing to pay for a product or service. It also helps to know the usual average prices to prevent overpaying or having unrealistic expectations. You can ask at your accommodation how much things like transportation, souvenirs, trips, massages, etc. generally cost if you have no idea yourself.

Shop around

Compare a few basic prices before handing over any cash to make sure you really have got the best deal. Negotiate with people who start with the lowest prices; you may not have much negotiating to do to reach a great price.

Don’t bargain for things you don’t want

While it’s okay to ask out of curiosity how much something costs and then move on, it’s really bad form to go through the motions of haggling if you really don’t intend sealing the deal at any price. Likewise, if the seller agrees to your price it’s really not cool to then say you don’t want the item or service. Remember, people are just trying to make a living. The time that they’ve spent with you is not only frustrating but could have caused them to lose a sale elsewhere. If you don’t reach an agreement that’s acceptable to both sides, however, it’s okay to walk away.

Maintain an air of disinterest

While you should definitely be interested in the item or service, don’t show the seller that you’re overly keen. If they think you’re too interested it will be difficult to get them to offer their lowest price.

Don’t suggest the first price

Whenever possible, let the seller open the negotiations with a price. It’s common to be asked what you will pay but try to stand firm and make the seller state the first amount. If you open too high, the vendor will accept with a gleeful smile, yet open too low and the seller may give you a look of disdain and not even bother entering into any discussion.

Start lower than you’re willing to pay

Part of the haggling dance involves both parties making offers and counter offers, eventually meeting (hopefully) somewhere in the middle with a price that everyone is happy with. Stating a price lower than you’re ultimately willing to pay lets you increase the amount incrementally until you reach an agreement.

Keep your cool

There’s little point in getting angry or frustrated while bargaining; either you find an agreeable price or you don’t. Losing your cool will only result in you looking ridiculous and the seller refusing to negotiate further. Keep things lighthearted and friendly. Remember, Thailand is known as the Land of Smiles!

So, with those general tips covered, here are some Thailand-related specifics.

Negotiating for accommodation in Thailand

If you’ve pre-booked your accommodation, there’s no room for negotiation unless you want to add extra nights. You can’t turn up and expect places to lower their rates that you’ve already agreed to! If you’re walking around and trying to find somewhere to stay, however, it’s okay to ask for discounts on walk-in room rates. Although many accommodations have a published price list, a lot of smaller guest houses and hotels might be willing to compromise on the price, especially during the low season or in the middle of the week. Discounts are also common if a person plans to stay for a longer period of time and pays upfront. Do keep in mind that accommodation managers are under no obligation to give you a reduced rate, but there’s certainly no harm in asking politely.

Bargaining for transport in Thailand

Trains and public buses have fixed prices for all; there’s no room to negotiate. Many private transport operators, whether its buses or boats may offer group-booking discounts. While this is by no means guaranteed, it’s worth asking when enquiring about prices if there will be a small group of people travelling together.

Taxis should always use the meter, again leaving no reason to bargain for the best price. If a driver refuses to use the meter simply find one that will; an agreed price for a taxi ride, even if it’s lower than originally stated, will almost always be higher than the metered fare. The exceptions are if you want to charter a taxi for the day or take a long inter-city journey. While many operators have fixed prices for long distance travel, or an hourly rate for touring, many will also knock a small amount off the price, especially if business is quiet. Obtain a quote and ask if they will do it for a lower amount. It can sometimes help to say that you want a moment to think and step away—if they are willing to offer a lower price they will often shout after you to agree. This is the same if you wish to charter a songtaew (converted pickup truck) or boat for a private journey.

Tuk tuks are the one form of transport in Thailand that often needs an element of bargaining to get the best price. With no meter, tuk tuk drivers often see tourists as fair game and try to charge the highest price that they can. It really does help to have an idea of how much the journey should cost to let you suggest a lower and more realistic price. If a tuk tuk driver refuses to lower the price, find another. (Unless, of course, you are happy with the price—you don’t need to haggle over everything all the time!)

If you’re renting a scooter for a week or longer, ask the owner if they can give you a better price than their daily rate. Some will give discounts for long-term rentals.

Last Updated: April 12, 2020 References

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Are you in Bangkok on business or pleasure and want to buy some cheap gifts for people? Bangkok — indeed, most of Asia — is a hub for bargaining. Instead of freezing the price of a good or service for all customers, the assumption is that customers who want a deal will have to haggle, or bargain.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

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I am going to travel to Bangkok next month (right in the Amazing Thailand Grand Sales 2016). Can anyone recommend some shopping centers that often offer great sales in the sales period in Bangkok 😀

Also, in shopping center like MBK, Siam, Terminal 21, do I need to bargain when buying anything and how to bargain and get a good price?

Thanks for your help.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

I bought some colourful sporty T shirts last year from an indoor stall upstairs at Sai Tai ( the southern bus station in Bangkok) and they were only 120 baht each. They were called GN Sport. At another stall there I bought a Tshirt with Thai writing on it. It says in Thai script “Rao koeu prachachon kong Phra Racha ” ( We are the people belonging to the King.) Or in more usual English ” We are the King’s People”

Lots of Thais gave me a thumbs up and said they liked it and they were surprised a

foreigner could read it. It cost 100 baht. There was no makers label just ” Made in Thailand” and XL , even though shirts I buy in UK are medium.

Always allow for two sizes bigger than you buy at home because Thai size M will be UK or US size XS or XXS.

If possible try things on or have a spare TShirt that fits you in your bag and measure the size against the one you want to buy.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Many tourists come to Bangkok, Thailand and, right before they go home realize they’ve bought so many things they’ll have to buy a new suitcase or a brand new set of luggage to carry it all home.

After all, Bangkok has many beautiful things at incredibly cheap prices. So, you buy them and then realize as you’re packing your suitcase, it’s never all going to fit. Luckily, you can buy a cheap suitcase in Bangkok, and there are many popular places to do that.

Mahboonkrong (MBK) Mall – The first place most people go to buy a new suitcase or luggage is Mahboonkrong shopping mall. Nicknamed MBK by anyone who is familiar with Bangkok, Mahboonkrong is an enormous mall located right next to National Stadium sky train station. On its seven floors, you’ll find many shops and market-style stalls selling suitcases and other pieces of luggage.

Start on the first floor at the market stalls in the middle and get a feel for the price. Then, check out the second, third and fourth floors as these have the most luggage stalls. If you find something you like, ask how much and then bargain. You should be able to knock at least 10-15% off the original price, maybe more.

Expect to pay anywhere from 700 -2,000 ($23-$66) baht for a well-made suitcase. Or, if you decide you want something lighter, the same shops and stalls selling suitcases have an enormous selection of carry-on bags, bags on wheels, backpacks etc, starting as low as 299 baht ($10). You’ll also find a variety of knock-off designer bags, which is up to you if you buy one.

Chatuchak Weekend Market – The next most popular place to buy a suitcase in Bangkok is Chatuchak Weekend Market. Only open on Friday evenings, all day Saturday and Sunday, it’s Asia’s largest outdoor market with more than 13,000 stalls. Here, you’ll find many stalls selling suitcases and luggage, as well as bags, backpacks, carry-on bags, etc. Prices again are cheap, and stall keepers will decrease their price by at least 10-20%.

Remember too, if you buy more than one, you have more bargaining power. Fake designer suitcases and bags are available here too. Chatuchak Weekend Market is located right next to Mo Chit sky train station and Chatuchak Park and Kamphaeng Phet underground train stations.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Chatuchak Mall – Chatuchak Mall is located directly behind Chatuchak Weekend Market and is open every day. Set up like the weekend market, with lots of market stalls, the only difference is it is indoors, air-conditioned, and the prices tend to be higher. Still cheap though, you’ll find at least 20 stalls here selling suitcases and luggage. Again, bargain and the price will come down.

Central Department Stores, Siam Paragon, Central World Plaza – Of course, if you want to splurge and buy a designer suitcase or bag, then one of the upscale shopping malls is the best place to go. Central Department Stores are all over Bangkok and often have sales on luggage, so you might find a top-quality suitcase for an inexpensive price.

There’s a Central Department Store near Mo Chit sky train station and another one at Chidlom sky train station. Siam Paragon is right next to Siam skytrain station and Central World Plaza just a short walk from either Chidlom or Siam sky train stations.

Both Siam Paragon and Central World Plaza are enormous, and have several other stores selling luggage.

If you want to buy a cheap suitcase in Bangkok, and don’t want to spend a lot of time looking for one, then one of these places should be perfect.

Of course, you could just not buy very much when you’re in Bangkok and so not need a new suitcase. Then again, what’s the fun in that.

This is a $300–listed–bike, but my budget is considerably lower than that, though I could probably go down to $250 or $275. Obviously, even lower would be great.

But I have had little experience actually haggling down the price and the times I have done so I get impatient with the process. I don’t want to be a jerk about it–I’m assuming the seller is just a regular Joe like me. Any tips, tricks, advice?

Did you already contact the seller and see the bike?

There are too many variables for anyone here to write up a foolproof game plan, but here are my general recommendations:

1. Be prepared to walk away and/or lose the bike to higher bid.

2. Be assertive and do not negotiate against yourself. Do not start with “How low can you go?” Start with “I will pay X for your bike.” If the seller says it’s too low, ask them to make a counteroffer.

I never offer an explanation with my bids (“Geez, I’d like to pay $300, but my pet goat just ate my last paycheck so will you take $250?”). Maybe that works for some people, but not me. I do better with a very decisive and business-like approach.
posted by mullacc at 2:39 AM on September 11, 2009

I don’t agree with skipping “how low can you go?”. There is some academic research on this, done for lawyers seeking to mediate an outcome without litigation, that suggests strongly the earlier you can reach an agreement, the better outcome for both sides. It is described as ZOPA – Zone of Possible Agreement, should you wish to google and learn more than anyone could want. If the two sides have a zone they can agree in, the first to nominate a figure in that zone typically feel they have done well, and there is no barrier to a little further negotiation.
For example:
“What is the lowest price you can accept if I pay cash now?”
“$260”
“I was looking to pay around $200, but I can do $240 if you throw in a helmet and a lock”
“I really can’t take less than $250, but I will throw in a lock”
“Well how about $230 with no lock?”
etc.

The advantage of this kind of approach is to put a few elements in the deal which can be added and subtracted so both sides can feel they maximise their gain in the negotiation.
And it doesn’t feel confrontational, just about feeling your way to an agreement.
One other thing I came across when I last bought a car was intriguing.
The car was $15000, we settled on $13500, then the guy said “and I’ll give you an extra $100 off for any unexpected little issues.”
Yeah, it was $100 he could have kept, but if I discovered the tape deck chewed tapes or the spare was a flat I would just wear it. It bought him peace of mind that he wouldn’t get hassled after the deal was completed, and it bought him some karma.
I was happy to get it $100 cheaper, and thought him a good guy, the kind of guy I wouldn’t hassle if I discovered some unexpected minor issue. I think I will take this approach myself in future.
posted by bystander at 3:47 AM on September 11, 2009 [7 favorites]

I often search completed eBay auctions to get a sense of an item’s real market value. That way, you can make an offer that sounds something like, “I’m interested in your bike, but I think your price may be a little high. I know you were hoping to get $300 for it, but similar bikes are selling for $250 or so on eBay. Just last week one sold for $237, and it was in great condition. I like your bike, but money is tight so I can’t afford to overpay for it. Would you take $250?”

That way, you’ve conveyed appreciation of the item and empathy for the seller’s position, and you’ve based your lower offer on an objective, impersonal source (the eBay market). More often than not, this works for me. But, you do need to be prepared to walk if the deal isn’t good for you.
posted by jon1270 at 3:48 AM on September 11, 2009 [1 favorite]

Seconding the points about being assertive. It’s less about body language and tone of voice than it is about choice of words. Don’t use tentative language in your bid. In other words, don’t ask something like “I don’t suppose you’d be willing to take $250?”, or “Could you go a little lower than that?”, because a self-confident seller will see that as an admission that you’ll probably pay more if they say no.

It’s important that the seller believes that you’ve decided what you want to pay already. Something like “I’m willing to offer you X, because I think that’s a reasonable price based on other Y I have seen. ” will give the impression that you know the value of the item and have a maximum price in mind.

And never make a second offer if the response is ‘no’. Ask for a counter-offer. If the seller won’t budge, and if their price is too high, then wish them luck and tell them they can get back to you if they reconsider.
posted by le morte de bea arthur at 4:20 AM on September 11, 2009

Price negotiation for the last two cars I bought used from private sellers went like this:

Me: Would you take ($500 less than your asking price) for it?
Him: Yes.
Me: Thinking: I should have started lower.

Then the next one:

Me: How firm are you on your price?
Him: Well, I really couldn’t take less than ($300 dollars less than the price I was going to try to get).
Me: Done.

So at this point, I’m not gonna be the first one to throw out a number any more. I think that might be important. YMMV
posted by Shohn at 4:52 AM on September 11, 2009

You could try seeming pretty interested and then checking that it comes with whatever extras you were ‘expecting’.

eg. “Ok, so that comes with a helmet, bike lock, puncture kit, pump?” ect. And then say “Oh. ” when they say no. Make out like other people were including these things but appear torn over the fact that you’re still really kinda partial to their bike all the same.
posted by mu

har at 5:18 AM on September 11, 2009

I’ve bought and sold a lot of used cars. In the internet age, with craigslist, I’ve had awfully good luck sending email to buyers saying something like “Hey, I saw your car and it’s not quite what I’m looking for, but if you’ll accept $xxxx and it’s in the condition you describe, I’ll give you cash today.”

People really like cash today. A LOT. Haggling over email probably doesn’t get you the best price, because part of good bargaining is that tinge of discomfort, but it’s a good way of establishing a starting point for negotiating before you even show up.

It helps to be way less eager to buy than the seller is eager to sell, which is usually the case.
posted by paanta at 5:40 AM on September 11, 2009 [1 favorite]

In my experience, rule # 1 of negotiating is to be willing to walk away, and make sure the seller knows it.

Rule # 2 is to offer the lowest price that you feel can you can offer without being ridiculously unfair and insulting the seller. And don’t be afraid to come really close to insulting the seller with your offer. You just have to be able to say it with a straight face, and then go from there.

The lower you can go, the lower they’re likely to counter-offer in an attempt to compromise. Also, don’t accept the first counter-offer, even if they say it’s as low as they can go. Very few people really mean it when they say it’s as low as they’ll go, especially if you have cash on hand and are about to walk away. Many times just hesitating or saying you don’t think that’s quite low enough will be enough to get them to go down further.

Other things can come in handy, like noting problems with the item, etc., but these two things alone have worked wonders for me.
posted by greenmagnet at 8:23 AM on September 11, 2009

What are the best places in Bangkok/Pattaya to shop and bargain?

I have been to Pratunam, Chatuchak, MBK, Siam Paragon and Silom in Bangkok, and Walking Street and Mike Shopping Centre in Pattaya.

Please do a ranking based on the best place to the worst place. Do comment on your decision if you can. 🙂

7 Answers

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

If you want to buy anything in pattaya I would recommend the day market in pattaya tai (central pattaya) which is one block west of TK com shopping centre, it is only open tuesday thursday & saturday from memory but you can usually get good prices & you should not pay the asking price for merchandise. Always bargain. Start at about 1/3 of the asking price & work upwards (Slowly) until you reach a price that the stall holder will accept, particularly if you intend to buy more than 1 piece. There are also a number of local night markets woth looking at but they are not on every night. You should ask the locals to tell you what is on where as they will normally be very obliging.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

I have been to Chatuchak several times and each time it was so hot that was impossible to spend more than 4 hours there. Much prefer the shopping malls in MBK area, or Pratum. Across the street from Pratum is a hidden Gem in shopping, It is a warrens den of shops, mostly hidden from the typical traveler. Get off the beaten track, Enjoy the city, Go down the back alleys. I wore out a new pair of shoes in 4 weeks in BKK this past year, and intend to do the same again next year. If you get tired get a massage, and just tell them no extras when you first enter. be surprised how good a real massage will feel.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Without a doubt Chatuchak Market is the best place to shop.It is a must for shoppers.The whole experience of the place you will never forget.But remember it is only open Saturday & Sundays so do not miss out when you are in Bangkok.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

If you are looking for souvenirs, those touristic area you have been is indeed good choice. Best place may be Chatuchak ( and worst is of course Patpong night market/Silom). I usually buy cloth, food, or any daily needs at Tesco Lotus or Carrefour, and gifts at Emporium or Isetan. I don’t like to bargain with shop keepers and I am tired of it.

What are the best places in Bangkok/Pattaya to shop and bargain?

I have been to Pratunam, Chatuchak, MBK, Siam Paragon and Silom in Bangkok, and Walking Street and Mike Shopping Centre in Pattaya.

Please do a ranking based on the best place to the worst place. Do comment on your decision if you can. 🙂

7 Answers

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

If you want to buy anything in pattaya I would recommend the day market in pattaya tai (central pattaya) which is one block west of TK com shopping centre, it is only open tuesday thursday & saturday from memory but you can usually get good prices & you should not pay the asking price for merchandise. Always bargain. Start at about 1/3 of the asking price & work upwards (Slowly) until you reach a price that the stall holder will accept, particularly if you intend to buy more than 1 piece. There are also a number of local night markets woth looking at but they are not on every night. You should ask the locals to tell you what is on where as they will normally be very obliging.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

I have been to Chatuchak several times and each time it was so hot that was impossible to spend more than 4 hours there. Much prefer the shopping malls in MBK area, or Pratum. Across the street from Pratum is a hidden Gem in shopping, It is a warrens den of shops, mostly hidden from the typical traveler. Get off the beaten track, Enjoy the city, Go down the back alleys. I wore out a new pair of shoes in 4 weeks in BKK this past year, and intend to do the same again next year. If you get tired get a massage, and just tell them no extras when you first enter. be surprised how good a real massage will feel.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Without a doubt Chatuchak Market is the best place to shop.It is a must for shoppers.The whole experience of the place you will never forget.But remember it is only open Saturday & Sundays so do not miss out when you are in Bangkok.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

If you are looking for souvenirs, those touristic area you have been is indeed good choice. Best place may be Chatuchak ( and worst is of course Patpong night market/Silom). I usually buy cloth, food, or any daily needs at Tesco Lotus or Carrefour, and gifts at Emporium or Isetan. I don’t like to bargain with shop keepers and I am tired of it.

When I read Stick’s column from 14.07.2019, I had to grin to myself. It brought back memories from my last trip to Thailand in October and November, 2018. And I will share some of these memories with you. But I will have to make a big detour – mostly to meet Stick’s minimum of 800 words, partly because I’m enjoying to tell a story.

My first trip to Thailand was in 1995 with two friends, and I was turning 30 that year. I was neither shy nor a child of sadness. But I had absolutely no experience with P4P. Thailand took my virginity in this field without much effort…

My second visit to Thailand wasn’t until 2006. At the beginning I spent 2 nights in Bangkok on my way to Cambodia, and at the end of my journey there were some days on Koh Chang and 2 more nights in Bangkok. Since that time I come back to Thailand almost every year, mostly as a starting point to explore South-east Asia. But always spending some time in Thailand, from 5 days to three weeks.

But in all that time I never developed a real liking for the gogo scene. On my first visit my friends took me to Patpong. The shows were unbelievable, and it was really fun. I will spare you the details except one: One of the dancers probably saw the expression on my face. And when she did the banana show, she aimed at me. And she aimed well! The banana shot past my right ear at a distance of maybe 5 centimeters. I will never forget it and you can’t imagine how much fun my friends had.

Whenever I visited a gogo later it was boring compared to that first experience. I had seen all a man has to see, and so I stopped visiting gogo bars completely. By the way, I think I hold a world record. I spent 2 x 3 nights in Pattaya, and I never had anything to do with a bargirl / beer bar girl / massage girl. On the other side I was never shy to take a freelancer to my hotel – if she was friendly, pleased my eye and asked for an acceptable price. So I was always looking for the bargain bonk.

At the end of 2010 there was a big change in my life. I felt in love with a German girl and – lucky me – she fell in love with me. The relationship is strong to this day. But that brought some change in my yearly routine. She had no objections to my travelling to South-east Asia and the journeys continued. I told her honestly about the former years (it was the only meaningful thing – she is neither prude nor stupid). But I told her too that- due to her, I had developed in to a most honourable man. And that was true, because I lost a big part of my interest in freelancers.

O.k., maybe it was 90% true. What do you do if you are sitting in the now torn-down Walkabout in Phnom Penh and an old acquaintance approaches you and tells you that you are still very handsome and she has no money and the old buffalo is sick? I think most of you know the situation and know the solution too… But nevertheless there were years I had no encounters at all (it’s not so difficult if you are travelling in rural parts of Laos or Cambodia).

But fast forward to the asking prices of 2018. I arrived in Bangkok afternoon of 19.10.2018, staying in the Dynasty Inn in Sukhumvit soi 4 as I always do. I just love the people watching (even if the Golden Bar has gone) and the craziness on the street and watching the girls at 2:00 AM as they leave Nana Plaza and so on. It was still low season, and I believe that the prices were due to the fact that the girls had real trouble to make ends meet.

In the evening I intended to stroll down soi 4 in the direction of the Tobacco Monopoly and have a look at how things had changed. I didn’t get very far. In a corner near Nana Disco or whatever it is called today stood a good-looking girl. It is difficult to rate a girl because everybody has a certain style they like. But to give you an impression, I would rate her as 7+. She was a little bit shy, but her smile was relentless. I chatted with her and eventually asked for the price. She said 1,000 baht, and I was a little bit shocked. The last time I had heard this number was some years earlier. She was more than friendly, and let’s call it a short time GFE.

The next evening I intended to walk to Sukhumvit and have dinner. I met a ladyboy with enormous cleavage. I’m not really in to ladyboys, but I’m in to breasts and couldn’t keep my eyes off them… He asked for 2,000 baht. I said I´ll have dinner now. He / she lowered the price to 1,000 baht and I thought why not? Was not so pleasant as the evening before but still o.k… The next day I took a flight to Phnom Penh to spend 3 days and meet my best friend on the last day.

The first day I walked really hard, took some drinks at the riverside, and at 10:00 PM I was tired and a little bit boozed but still not ready to go to bed. So I sat down in a bar in Rue Pasteur (or Street 51) for a last beer. Ordered and then had a look at the people who sat in the bar. And there she was, ticking all they boxes. Imagine a maybe 30-year-old girl with long brown hair, a beautiful face, slender, but the right things in the right places, and best of all, she had the broad lips and the broad smile Julia Roberts is famous for. Have you ever thought about having a 30-year-old Asian Julia-Roberts-lookalike in your hotel room? I certainly hadn’t, but the feeling of tiredness and booze disappeared at once. She, professional as she was, saw my look at once, and some minutes later she was drinking on my bill. The asking price was 30 US$, and I thought that was very cheap for the experience.

Then I was travelling to Sukhothai, to Surat Thani, to Krabi and back to Bangkok. There I had another 1,000 baht ST-GFE. So, the bargain bonk still exists. And in my opinion the GFE still exists, too. I have to admit: My really best GFE was 1995. But my second and third best GFE were in 2018. Hey guys, that was a wonderful journey! And it was not only because of the girls.

Wish you all the best!

The author of this article cannot be contacted.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

When she was 17 years old, Noon Rakchanok took the Skytrain to the Siam district in the commercial heart of Bangkok. She wandered along the busy skywalk, past streams of people laden with shopping bags, growing increasingly nervous. She tuned out the grunt of the traffic from the congested road below and prepared to do something she had never done before: ask the gods for a favour.

‘Praying gives me confidence’

“I didn’t know whether it would work or not, but I begged for the gods to help me get into Thammasat University,” says Rakchanok.

She bought some incense sticks and candles from a little stall at the shrine’s entrance, as well as a garland of marigolds to drape at the feet of the golden, four-faced Brahma statue. That day – as it always is – Erawan was surrounded by crowds of faithful worshippers and desperate agnostics, all praying for something just outside of their control.

Rakchanok was asking for something substantial – potentially life-changing – and she knew that those offerings alone wouldn’t cut it. “I said to the god that if it would come true, then I would pay him back by buying a Thai dance,” she says.

Paying for these traditional dances to honour the gods is considered a fair trade and not a bribe. And like all good quid pro quo agreements, the terms must be mentally agreed upon in advance, right down to the specifics, like how many dancers are to be paid for.

If the prayers are answered, then it’s necessary to head back to the shrine to give thanks – and to pay the gods in song and dance. Never short of business, the gods usually enjoy a full timetable of performances.

‘I always pray for what I can get, not more than I expect’

Flecks of grey have started to salt their way into Bubpa Surin’s hair, which she has pulled back tightly into a ponytail. Facing the Erawan Shrine, she kneels on a mat to pray while eight dancers begin to sway behind her. They’re wearing colourful dresses of green and yellow, or red and blue, bedecked with patterns of white sequins. Each of their gold hats, shaped like stupas, is adorned with a single red rose.

The dancers move gently in time with the rhythm of the plinky-plonky live music. The sound melds with the traffic, the churn of trains and the footfalls of thousands of shoppers. It’s hardly a tranquil environment. However, Bubpa Surin’s face is a portrait of serenity.

Tomorrow, Surin will head to the port, where she will board a cruise ship that will be both her home and place of work for the next three months. “I just want to return safely,” Surin says. Cruise ship work is too lucrative to pass up. But a life at sea is a risk, and she is not taking any chances. “I pray both before and after I go – it’s just the way it works for me.”

Within minutes, it is over. Surin gets up, and somebody else takes her place, to pay off their spiritual debt. A price chart on the wall nearby lists the costs for however many dancers one wishes to pay for. Surin – like many others – has paid for the full complement of eight dancers.

‘I have been praying that [my partner] and I will be OK’

“At Erawan, I always promise to pay for the maximum,” says Kan Sangtong. “What have I got to lose? If my request comes true, then it’s worth it because I’ve already gained something, and if it doesn’t, then I don’t have to pay for the dancers.”

Sangtong is 32 and tall, with a good head of wavy black hair, which he’s sad about having to cut in a few weeks for his graduation ceremony, having just completed a master’s degree in political science. A hairstyle with a short back and sides for men at these events is still mandatory in Thailand.

Unlike Surin and Rakchanok, Sangtong’s wish is not quite so clear cut; there’s nothing like an acceptance letter or safe passage to serve as a litmus test. Nevertheless, he purchases the usual accoutrements, holding the incense up to his forehead in supplication before lighting it and placing it among the others.

Sangtong is from a rural area to the north of Bangkok, but the city is now his home. The problem is, his partner wishes to stay in their hometown. “Lately I have been praying that she and I will be OK and find a solution,” he says.

When he’s finished, he admits doubt. “I haven’t always had success. I didn’t get what I wanted in the past because I didn’t have enough merit,” he explains. But he’s also noticeably calmer and more philosophical about his situation.

“In Thai Buddhist belief, there are ways to increase your merit,” Sangtong explains. “Meditation and donations of food, money, knowledge or forgiveness all count.” But there is one much greater way for men in Thailand to gain merit – a way that is usually reserved for the most sacred of trades.

‘I asked them to spare my father’s life’

Samphawo Bhikkhu has just entered his eighth year as a monk. “My first intention was to become a monk for just 15 days,” he says, rearranging his bright orange robes around his shoulders as he reminisces.

A decade ago, he prayed that his father’s life would be spared for a few more years after he was diagnosed with cancer. When this blessing came to pass, Bhikkhu upheld his end of the bargain and ordained himself at a local temple.

“After 15 days as a monk, I wanted to know more about what the Buddha taught. About enlightenment.” While it is not uncommon for monks to take the cloth in this way, this type of trade is far less frequent than paying for dancers.

“When I graduate my ninth year of studying, I’m thinking to go out into the forest and make my quest for enlightenment real,” says Bhikkhu.

Bhikku’s life was radically altered after fulfilling his pact. Yet the gods have been a boon to countless other lives in subtler, less tangible ways – by inspiring confidence, helping people navigate periods of uncertainty or simply by being allies in a struggle that may otherwise feel lonely.

There are always factors that are out of people’s reach. And for many, that’s ultimately when it’s time to enlist a god’s help, to assist with the uncontrollable elements and as a way to navigate a complex world. “After my successful first experience, I continued to believe in the gods,” says Rakchanok, who graduated from her first-choice college, Thammasat University, a few years ago.

“You can’t just wish it, of course. Your actions must support your wish,” Rakchanok says. “When I applied for university, I needed the grades. But most of the [selection process] is something that I cannot see or control.”

For Thais like Rakchanok, life’s victories aren’t solely attributed to blessings from the gods. But irrespective of how much sway the supernatural has over life’s circumstances, these trades are a way of showing gratitude to the gods for the good things that happen. And what better way to do it than with musicians, dancers and fellow devotees?

Thailand is world-famous for its beautiful rattan furniture. Made from various types of palms, rattan is used for tables, chairs, sofas, cupboards, wardrobes, minibars and much more. Bangkok is one of the best places to buy rattan in Thailand, as there are so many rattan stores and dealers. If you’re going to be rattan shopping in Bangkok, check out these best shopping areas. You won’t be disappointed.

Chatuchak Weekend Market – One of the first places everyone in Bangkok goes to shop for furniture is Chatuchak Weekend Market and rattan furniture is no exception. Chatuchak has a large furniture area, with many rattan products. You’ll find modern style rattan desks, chairs, tables, sofas etc., as well as various styles of traditional Thai rattan. Browse several furniture shops and get quotes from each. Don’t forget too, you’re expected to bargain so should be able to get the price to come down by several thousand baht.

Get to Chatuchak Weekend Market by taking the sky train to Mo Chit station or the underground to Khampaeng Phet station.

Sukhumvit Road (Sois 27-63) – Thai friends always shop for rattan on Sukhumvit Road in downtown Bangkok. With literally hundreds of furniture and design shops, there are a number of excellent rattan shops up these small sois that sell a selection of traditional and modern styles.

On a cooler morning, start at Sukhumvit Soi 27, just a few blocks down from Asok sky train station and walk down Sukhumvit Road, cutting down the sois on the left hand side of the street as you go. It’s a long way down to soi 63, so you can always cover it in a couple of days – but it’s a wonderful area of Bangkok with thousands of furniture, design and home accessory shops and with various furniture stores selling rattan.

Hawaii Thai – One of Bangkok’s largest rattan companies, Hawaii Thai has been around for more than half a century. They specialize in both natural rattan and synthetic rattan, which is particularly popular for furniture that will be outside most of the year, as it’s more durable than the natural product.

At Hawaii Thai, you’ll find lounge chairs, dining chairs, tables, mini bars, bedroom sets, pool chaise lounge, bar stools and chairs and a whole slew of rattan accessories, in both traditional Thai style and thoroughly modern. Hawaii Thai’s large showroom is at 2991/59-60 Ladprao Rd., Bangkapi in Bangkok .

Impact Arena – The largest convention center in Thailand and the second largest in Asia, Impact Arena often has furniture shows and sales, interior design and home decorative shows, and OTOP (One Tambon, One Product) shows. At just about any Impact Arena furniture show, you’ll find the best deals on rattan furniture in Bangkok.

Most of the shows usually have wholesale days where only dealers and store owners can buy. But the last day or two of the show is always open to the general public and the prices are incredibly cheap.

Check Impact Arena’s yearly calendar for dates of furniture, home decorative, interior design or OTOP shows – there’s always at least one a month and they are massive.

Impact Arena is in northern Bangkok in the Muang Thong Thani area. Easiest way to get there is either drive or take a taxi, as it’s around 30 minutes outside the city center.

Photo – Some of Hawaii Thai’s incredibly beautiful rattan furniture

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Haggling, bartering, bargaining call it whatever you want but it is a way of life in Thailand, the first rule of bartering is: never accept the first price you are offered, unless you are shopping in a shopping centre or store with clearly marked fixed prices. The same rules for bartering in Thailand will also work for barting in Bali as the market scene is very similar., keep these tips for haggling in mind and you will do fine!

Now days we often get emails from fans and friends and family asking a lot of how to questions such as:
How to barter in Thailand?
How to haggle in Thailand?
How to bargain in Thailand?
How we do we get the best Phuket Tailor prices?
How do we get the best price at the markets compared to the fixed priced shops?
How do we know if we are getting taken for a ride with prices?

(Barter, Haggle and Bargain are all the same thing!)

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I wish we had known this on our first shopping trip in Phuket, we went out shopping for the day and thought the prices they were throwing at us seemed fairly reasonable and even got sucked into a tailor store (which we had sort of planned for and got a good bargain compared to suits in Australia.. anyway I digress).

When we got back to the hotel we looked on Tripadvisor and googled how much we should be paying for things at the Phuket markets and I was shocked at how much we had been over charged! We quickly learnt how to barter.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Firstly, think about what you want to purchase and do a bit of research online, Cathy and Gary’s page are fantastic for prices in Bangkok and prices in Phuket. This will give you an idea of what you would expect to pay. Keep in mind this a guide and prices can fluctuate during high and low tourist seasons.

The words “how much” are like magic words to a vendor’s ears. A calculator will get thrust at you with numbers on it (this will of course be the cost of the item in Thai Baht), our general rule is to offer a significantly lower price such as 75% of the original price by typing the number in the calculator, the vendor will “look hurt” and say “no no no” and provide you with a new number, this will go back and forth.

When shown the new figure, look a little surprised and umm and ahhh, then make another offer, go up in small increments and you might end up at maybe 50% of the original price, if you can get 25-50% off of the original price you are doing well.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Our top 10 Hot tips

1. Be flexible and also remember that sometimes you are bartering over mere cents. Keep in mind how much the item you are purchasing would cost at home.

2. Be prepared to walk away, if you feel like you are being reasonable and the vendor is asking far too much, politely say thank you and proceed to walk out of the store, chances are if your offer is reasonable, the vendor will chase you and agree to your price.

3. Always smile, be happy, joke and laugh with the vendor, don’t ever get aggressive or angry as this is not the Thai way, you will loose face and embarrass yourself. Remember this is a fun activity; there is no need to be aggressive.

4. Feel free to provide a small tip if someone has done a good job to help you or accommodate your sale; this is earn you a BIG smile and make that vendors day! (while this isn’t required it would certainly go a long way for some vendors, if you have a bit of change).

5. Don’t be shy, bartering is a part of the fun at market stalls, it’s the best way to get the best price when shopping and a part of the culture.

6. Look around at different vendors before making your purchase or enquiring about price. People often make a purchase at the first place they see and then miss out on a bargain or getting something in the colour they wanted or for a better price.

7. If a vendor is really pushy (and yes sadly, there are a few vendors like this), just say thank you and walk away, chances are they are not going to give you a good deal and will try to guilt you or push you into the sale.

8. The more items you buy, the better deal you will get, make sure to look around and pick out a few items and ask the vendor for the best deal!

9. Have the money you want to spend in one pocket, if you pull out a 1000 baht note after haggling down to 200 baht, the vendor may be offended. Instead provide 2 x 100 baht notes and explain this is all you have and don’t keep bargaining once the deal is agreed upon, it’s rude.

10. Use lines like: “I’ve seen this cheaper somewhere else.” And “I’m not really sure…” or look at your friend/partner and say “I don’t know, what do you think”, the vendor will see you are not sure and try to give you a “discount”

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

I recommend to most of my American friends not to buy a camera in Bangkok, Thailand unless absolutely necessary. Unlike the UK and Europe, where cameras are often quite expensive, cameras in America are cheaper than in Thailand so it’s not usually cost-effective to buy one.

Of course, we can all have accidents when we’re on vacation with cameras getting dropped, lost or even stolen and that’s when you may need to buy a camera in Thailand.

If this happens to you while you’re still in Bangkok and you don’t want to spend the rest of your vacation unable to take pictures, then buying a new camera in Bangkok may be your only option.

For the best places to buy cameras in Bangkok, check out these excellent shops and malls. You’ll get the best camera deals here.

Pantip Plaza
– I list this shopping mall as the first place to buy a camera simply because it’s the most popular electronics mall in Bangkok. However, many Thais will tell you to avoid Pantip Plaza and go elsewhere instead. Pantip can have good deals and is in an easy location to get to but, with overly aggressive sales people, shops that are crowded and scams that seem quite prevalent, I tend to avoid Pantip and so do most of my Thai friends.

If, however, you want somewhere quick, then Pantip Plaza is your place. Located as it is on New Phetchaburi Road, a ten minute walk from Ratchathewi sky train station.

Just make sure you bargain well if you do, and check the paperwork to make sure the camera you’re buying is genuine and not fake.

Fortune Town Mall – My favorite place to buy any electronics, including cameras, is Fortune Town Mall. Much less busy than Pantip Plaza and with a mostly Thai clientele, you’re guaranteed to get much better prices and far better service.

Sales staff aren’t aggressive, there are well over 50 shops selling cameras and camera accessories and, with bargaining to be expected, you’ll get the price down a little bit. Nikon, Canon, Sony, Casio, Brica, Ricoh – everything is available at Fortune Town Mall.

When you buy a camera in Thailand also make sure, if you don’t live here, that the warranty you get is an international warranty. Most of them will be but you don’t want to be saddled with a Thailand-only warranty, so spend that extra minute to check.

You will also find many stores selling mobile phones, computers, laptops and tablets here as well, along with other electronics at low prices.

Fortune Town Mall is one of the easiest camera place to get to as it’s right next to the Rama 9 Subway Station. The mall has some excellent restaurants and cafes for lunch or a coffee too.

Mahboonkrong (MBK) Mall – Mahboonkrong Mall (known as MBK) is one of the best malls in Bangkok for cameras and cell phones. Located right next to National Stadium sky train station, there are several excellent camera shops here. Surprisingly, during the King of Thailand’s 60th anniversary celebrations in 2006, I even saw the UK’s Prince Andrew shopping for cameras here. No joke!

The most popular store is Foto File on the first floor, although I’ve found the smaller stores on the 4th floor to have better prices.

With more than 100 small stalls selling cameras on the 4th floor, you have a good choice too. Just make sure you buy an original camera and not a fake, as these are around here.

You’ll be able to tell it’s real if the camera they sell you is sealed in a box and has an original international warranty card. There’s also a Canon shop at MBK and, Sunny Camera that specializes in Nikon cameras.

In fact, Mahboonkrong is such a great place to buy a camera in Bangkok, I even saw the United Kingdom’s Prince Andrew shopping there. (And no, I’m not joking. He had bodyguards and Thai police accompanying him).

Camera and Lens – Finally, I’ve had several Thai friends recommend a small camera shop called Camera and Lens. Located in the Central Rama 3 Mall, Camera and Lens has a decent selection of cameras, as well as new and even second hand camera lens.

The big plus to this shop when I was there was how knowledgeable the staff is and that they do speak enough English to help you with what you need. Prices are usually slightly higher than MBK or Fortune Mall, but the pleasant service makes up for it.

Take a taxi to Central Rama 3 Mall, only about 15 minutes from the center of Bangkok as long as you don’t go during rush hour.

Overall, Bangkok, Thailand is one of the best places in south east Asia to buy cameras, although it may not always be the cheapest. Prices on cameras in Bangkok, however, don’t fluctuate too much from shop to shop like they do in Hong Kong, so you’re pretty much guaranteed you’re not getting scammed.

With thousands of camera shops to choose from too, you should be able to find the camera you want here.

Should I bargain for everything I want to buy in Thailand?

No. If an item has a price tag then you’re not expected to bargain. You are not expected to bargain in a restaurant either.

While bargaining is a central part of the Thai shopping experience, you should approach it with a healthy attitude. The point of bargaining isn’t to see the vendor lose money, but rather to get a price that you are both happy with. There can be a lot of tooing and froing on price, but it’s best done with a smile and a laugh rather than a scoul and finger pointing.

Remember once you start bargaining, if the vendor accepts a price you offer, then you should buy the good. It is considered very bad form to decline a purchase after having a price accepted.

There is no hard and fast rule on how much you should try to get knocked off the price. Obviously in tourist areas, for example Bangkok’s Sukhumvit Road, the markup can be extraordinary and you could work towards a discount of perhaps 60-70% off the opening price. In other places though a 10% discount may be more reasonable.

A good way to get some benchmarks is to peruse similar goods in the big shopping centres (where the prices are marked) this should give you an idea of a base price to work around.

Lastly, many stallholders believe that selling to the first customer of the day brings them good fortune for the day. This gives you a bit of an advantage to wear the price down a little more. You’ll know you were the first if, after the sale, the vendor gets your money and touches all their products with it.

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How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Doing a similar job to the taxi is Thailand’s ubiquitous tuk-tuk ตุ๊กๆ). So named because of the sound of their engine, these are motorized rickshaws and are popular amongst tourists for their novelty value. They are occasionally faster than taxis in heavy traffic as weaving in and out is easier, but generally about the same or slower. Without any luggage, 3 people can fit into one fairly comfortably – it’s possible to fit more in but it gets a bit cramped. Fares always have to be bargained for, and it is sometimes possible to bargain tuk-tuk drivers down to less than the taxi flagfall of 35B when they make good value. Most times, they offer no savings over a taxi, except perhaps if you’re good at bargaining and can speak good Thai. The initial price they quote is likely to be well over the going rate, but it’s easy to bargain it down to a more reasonable one if you know roughly the equivalent taxi fare.

It’s essential to bargain the price with tuk-tuks before getting in. If you only ask after the ride, it’s likely to end in a request for an ridiculous fare which can obviously lead to an unpleasant situation.

Just like taxi drivers, the tuk-tuk drivers mostly come from the rural northeast of Thailand and don’t have to undergo any training (some will not even have passed a driving test), so don’t be surprised if they sometimes have no idea where your destination is. A subtle point to remember when in one is not to rest your feet on the rail near the drivers head, as doing so is extremely disrespectful towards the driver.

As tuk-tuks are open-ended, they expose passengers to the high pollution levels in the middle of Bangkok’s roads and offer almost no protection in case of an accident. There is theoretically a ban on new tuk-tuks as they are so noisy and polluting, but it doesn’t really seem to be being enforced at present. Nevertheless, many of the local residents are not too enamoured with tuk-tuks nowadays and, were it not for their popularity with tourists, the days of the tuk-tuk on the streets of Bangkok would surely be numbered.

What’s wrong with tuk-tuks?

Though they are initially popular with tourists, most people seem to stop using tuk-tuks fairly quickly. They have something of a reputation for taking passengers to an entirely different destination than the one they requested, and it’s not undeserved either. This alternative destination is invariably a a type of shop, usually a tailors. They get paid a commission from the shop just for bringing you there (though whether they admit this to you is another matter), and this often takes the form of cash and/or a free petrol fill-up in a nearby station. If you find yourself in this situation, there’s not much you can about it, except take a brief look in the shop, come out and wait to be taken to your proper destination. It’s not a good idea to buy anything in the shop, the prices are marked up significantly (30% +) to give extra commission for the driver and profit for the shop, so they’ll be cheaper elsewhere.

Remember too that tuk-tuks are no cheaper than taxis, and if you’re offered any trip for what seems suspiciously cheap (e.g. 10B, 20B or even free), they have to make money somehow. You can be 100% sure this fare will be subsidised by either visiting a few clothes shops or as part of the infamous gem scam. The plus side of this is that you can often get to your destination quite cheaply, providing you’re prepared to put up with a little sales pitch on the way. Some people even recommend telling the driver you know what he’s up to before you get in, and you don’t mind going to a couple of shops for him to pick up commission in exchange for a free ride ! Given that most tuk-tuk drivers English is extremely limited though (not extending much beyond ‘Hey you ! Where you go ? You want tuk-tuk ?’), how well this plan will work if you can’t speak Thai is debatable. On the other hand, it’s not unusual for the driver simply to drive off after receiving his petrol voucher and leave you in the middle of nowhere – not a nice situation if you are a new arrival.

In general, the same rules apply to tuk-tuks as to taxis if you don’t want any problems. Don’t take ones that spend all the time parked in tourist areas, don’t act like you’ve just arrived and problems are be unlikely. In addition, avoid offers from tuk-tuks for ‘shopping trips’ or ‘sightseeing tour’ for 20B/hour or similar, as it ends up wasting a lot of time. In the evening, when the shops are closed, is the best time to take a tuk-tuk if you want the experience.

November 28, 2012 // by Roy Cavanagh

Bangkok taxis operate on a meter system with fares set by the Department of Land Transport. Although Bangkok taxi fares are regulated, there are some important things that visitors to the Thai capital need to take into consideration when hiring a cab.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Not switching on the meter

Some tourists complain that drivers refuse to switch on the meter or the driver says that the meter is ‘broken’. These are invariably the taxis parked up outside tourist attractions and hotels. The driver will usually try to negotiate a fixed fare rather than use the meter. If you don’t want to do that, the answer is simple; flag down a moving cab. If a cab is parked up outside a tourist attraction or hotel and the driver asks you where you want to go, you are almost certainly going to pay over the odds for that journey. It might not be a lot more and you may decide that the convenience factor makes it worthwhile so it’s your judgement call. However, if you want to ensure you get a taxi that charges the meter price you will need to flag down a moving cab.

How to hail a cab in Bangkok

Cabs that are available for hire will have a red sign illuminated in their front window. The polite way for asking a taxi to stop is to stretch out your arm with your palm facing downwards and move your arm slowly up and down. If for any reason the driver doesn’t want to use the meter, get out and wave down another taxi; there are thousands in Bangkok so it isn’t difficult to find one. Depending on where you are going from and to, there are times when the driver may know that he will be stuck in traffic if he accepts your fare so he may decline to pick you up. This can happen during rush hour or heavy rain, but just try another cab until you find one willing to pick you up.

Fare rate table

I took the photo on the right during my time in Bangkok last month. The taxi had the rate card prominently displayed in the cab. Click on the photo for a larger image. How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Example fares

These fares are estimates; the exact fare will depend on traffic and any other surcharges noted below.

  • A journey of 5km = 55 Baht
  • A journey of 10km = 80 Baht
  • From Terminal 21 shopping mall (Asoke Skytrain station) to Grand Palace = 90 Baht
  • From Bangkok Suvarnabhumi airport to MBK shopping centre (National Stadium Skytrain station) = 260 Baht meter fare + 70 Baht express-way tolls + 50 Baht airport pick-up surcharge.

Do drivers speak English?

Most Bangkok taxi drivers don’t speak too much English beyond a few basic words and stock phrases so if you wave down a taxi in the street and start showing him your Lonely Planet map with street names in English, it isn’t going to be much use. If you know where you want to go, ask staff at your hotel or guest-house if they can write down the name in Thai and just show that to the taxi driver when you get in. If you are catching a taxi from Bangkok airport there are dispatchers who can speak English so there should be no problems.

Extra charges

In addition to the meter fare there are some extra charges that come into play, so don’t automatically assume the driver is trying to rip you off. The flag fare or starting fare is 35 Baht, but there are other charges that sometimes apply on top of the meter fare especially if you catch a taxi at Bangkok airport. However, there is no additional surcharge for night-time or ‘out of hours’ pick-ups.

Airport surcharge

If you take a taxi from the official ranks at Bangkok Suvarnabhumi or Don Muang airports, there is a surcharge of 50 Baht on top of the 35 Baht flag-fare. This won’t show up on the meter and should be paid in addition to whatever the final meter reading is when you reach your destination.

Toll-way/Express-way charges

If you are travelling across Bangkok you may be asked if you want to take the express-way to avoid traffic. As they say in Thailand, ‘up to you’, but it’s usually the best option and will save time. Express-way charges vary from around 25 to 45 Baht. For example, travelling from Bangkok Suvarnabhumi airport into the Sukhumvit area of the city would incur two express-way charges; 45 Baht and 25 Baht. You are responsible for this fee. The driver will usually hand you the toll-way receipt.

Hiring through the radio service

If you, or somebody on your behalf, orders a taxi via the radio communication service there is a 20 Baht surcharge. For tourists this usually means your hotel or guest-house will call the cab for you. They may give you the option of an agreed set fare or you can opt for the meter fare plus surcharges. The latter should be cheaper. A cab called for you via the radio should be with you within 20 minutes.

Traffic jams

Bangkok traffic is notorious and there may be times when you are stuck in a traffic jam (‘rot tit’) and this will be reflected in the fare. If the taxi is stationary or moving less than 6km/hour then the meter charge is 1.5 Baht per minute.

Why are Bangkok taxis different colours?

Bangkok taxis come in a variety of bright colours including orange, pink, blue, green and yellow. The colours represent different cab companies and you are free to flag down any one of these provided they have their red for hire light illuminated in the front window.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Seat belts

Under Thai law, seat belts are compulsory for drivers and front-seat passengers. This law is frequently overlooked by drivers and passengers outside of Bangkok, nevertheless it is a legal requirement and police do carry out random spot-checks.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Bangkok’s most popular mall is Mahboonkrong (MBK) mall, located right in the city center next to National Stadium sky train station. MBK is a discount mall, with seven floors stuffed with shops and market stalls selling some of the cheapest items in Bangkok.

For first-time visitors to MBK though, there are five things that are must buys if you want to get the best deals in town.

Cell Phones – Mahboonkrong (MBK) is the most popular place in Thailand if you are looking for a cell phone. With more than 200 stalls and small shops selling mobile phones, both new and used, and just about every brand of phone available, you can’t go wrong here.

New phones are cheaper than anywhere else in Bangkok, just make sure when you buy it it’s in a sealed box with all the manuals – that way you’re sure it’s new.

Used phones are an excellent deal at MBK too, as Thais trade in their phones for the newest model often, so it’s easy to buy a barely-used phone for a cheap price.

Look for Nokia, Samsung, Sony, Apple iPhones, LG, Huawei, Motorola, and just about every other cell phone brand. Remember too, the cell phone area is technically one large market, so you can bargain if you feel the price is too high.

Shoes – Mahboonkrong is one of the top places in Bangkok for shoes. If you want to buy shoes for work or for casual wear, everything is available here from cheap fashion sandals starting at 199 baht ($6.60) to handmade leather shoes from 1,000 baht ($32) on up.

You’ll also find a superb selection of running shoes, hiking boots, flip flops, work shoes, Crocs and more. Prices for shoes at MBK are 30-60% cheaper than many other places in Bangkok, and quality is generally good.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Bags, Purses and Wallets – Around 90% of the bags I own, and I own a lot, I’ve bought at MBK. In fact, they are about the best thing you can buy at MBK as there’s such an enormous selection.

Some of the best MBK bag shops to start off at are the ones selling inexpensive fashion bags, canvas bags, shopping bags, evening bags – you name it they sell it, and many go for the same price – 199 baht ($6.60). They’re wonderful for gifts to take back home too.

If you’re looking for higher-end items, look in the more than 20 leather luggage and bag shops, as here the quality is gorgeous, the leather soft, and the price a fraction of a leather store outside MBK. You’ll find everything from conservative purses, designer wallets and leather briefcases, to bright orange, yellow or purple modern leather shoulder bags all hand-tooled and designed.

Expect to pay between 1,500-3,100 baht ($48-$100) for most leather bags, but the quality you’ll get would be more than $300 in most western countries.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Luggage and Backpacks – For most people who visit Bangkok on vacation, they end up buying too many things as the cost of living is so cheap. That also means, before they return home, they have to buy another piece of luggage to fit all their new stuff in. That’s where shopping at MBK is the best choice.

MBK has more than 50 stores and market stalls selling all types of luggage from hard-case suitcases like Samsonite and Swiss Army to large soft canvas bags on wheels. You’ll also find an enormous selection of backpacks at MBK, and with prices beginning at 199 baht ($6.60), there’s really no need to buy one anywhere else.

T Shirts and Shorts – Every family member and friend I’ve had visit me in Bangkok has spent much of their vacation at MBK stocking up on t shirts, as MBK is the best place to shop for them in the city.

At MBK, you’ll find more than 200 stalls and shops selling t shirts and shorts – designer-style t shirts (many are bootleg designer shirts, so it’s up to you if you buy them), football shirts, hockey shirts, BAPE shirts, Disney shirts, army fatigues, country and western shirts, shirts featuring music bands and famous singers, men’s, women’s and children’s shirts – you name it, MBK has it.

Most t shirts range between 99-199 baht ($3.20-$6.60) and the quality is superb.

Not only does Mahboonkrong (MBK) sell just about anything you’re looking for, it’s cheap, there are more than 200 restaurants, cafes and food stalls to eat at when you need a break from shopping and, the best part, it’s just like a Thai market but it is indoors so it’s air conditioned – no need to contend with the stifling hot Bangkok heat.

Now watch the video below, and you’ll get a superb idea of just how many shops there are in MBK and what you should look for when you go.

Verb 1. bargain down – persuade the seller to accept a lower price; “She beat the merchant down $100”

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Get the sales price you want for your boat.

The final sales price of a boat can vary greatly depending on how the negotiation is handled by both buyer and seller. This is one of the final steps to a deal. This part is like a game of ping pong where the ball is the dollar value of your boat.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

How firm you are on the selling price of your boat will be affected by a number of factors, including the market and its condition.

Very much like negotiating the purchase of a car or home, you as a seller, may have a stronger position to negotiate if:

  • The boating market is strong and boats are selling quickly.
  • You are not in a rush to sell.
  • Similar boats are listed slightly above your asking price.
  • You are contemplating multiple offers at the same time.

Negotiation Process

Your Asking Price

Initial Offer

Counter Offer

Other Factors

Multiple Offers

If you have multiple buyers interested but one seems particularly “hot,” negotiate with that buyer first. And if you choose to negotiate with several buyers at the same time, make sure each one knows up front that there are other offers pending.

Some negotiations go on for weeks with multiple offers and counter offers; most are over after two or three “rounds.” If you are both realistic about the boat’s value, it shouldn’t be too hard to agree on a final price and move on to that deal-sealing handshake.

Editor’s Note: This article was originally published May 2015 and was updated in October 2017 and April 2020.

Do you want to pay less for products that you really want?

There are a series of price negotiating tactics that you can use to get a better price for nearly any product.

If you are in sales you can also use these to negotiate the price of the products you are buying or selling.

These techniques also work in long-term business arrangements, where you will be working with the same party again, year after year.

These are 5 negotiation skills that you should be prepared to use in any selling situation.

1) How to Negotiate Price Using “The Flinch”

No matter what price the other person offers, flinch as if you just heard something very disappointing. Put a sad look on your face. Roll your eyes upward and back as though you were experiencing great pain.

Say something like, “Wow! That’s an awful lot of money!”

Surprisingly, sometimes just flinching will cause the other person to drop or increase the price immediately. And if the first flinch gets you a lower price when you are buying, or a higher offer if you are selling, be prepared to use the flinch again and again throughout the negotiation.

2) Asking Questions as a Negotiation Skill

Ask, “Is that the best you can do? Can’t you do any better than that?”

When you ask the price and the person tells you the price, you pause, look surprised, or even shocked, and say, “Is that the best you can do?”

And then remain perfectly silent. If there is any flexibility in the price, very often, the other person will drop the price immediately, or raise their offer immediately.

If they lower their price in response to, “Is that the best you can do,” you then say, “Is that the very best you can do?”

Ask, “Couldn’t you do any better than that?”

You can also ask, “What is the best you can do if I make a decision today?”

This adds an element of urgency and triggers the fear of losing the sale in the mind of the vendor.

3) How to Negotiate Price Using Assertion

Whatever price they give you for a particular item, you immediately reply, “I can get this cheaper somewhere else.”

Whenever you tell a person that you can get that item cheaper somewhere else, from one of their competitors, they immediately soften and begin to back pedal on the price. When you use this negotiation tactic to tell people you can get it cheaper somewhere else, they lose their confidence and become much more open to negotiating with you on a better price, rather than lose the sale altogether.

The assertion, “I can get this cheaper elsewhere,” often demolishes price resistance because they think that you will go somewhere else.

Remember to make it easy for a person to give you concessions. Don’t be adversarial or confrontational. Be a nice person. When you ask in a pleasant way, it’s much easier for the person to concede to you than if you are serious or aggressive.

4) Lowballing in Negotiations

When they ask you for $100, you lowball your answer and say, “I’ll give you $50 cash right now.”

Whenever you offer cash immediately, the price resistance of the other party diminishes dramatically. There are reasons why offering an all-cash deal causes people to be more open to doing business with you. The three most obvious ones are reduced inventory costs, no credit card merchant fees, and the feeling of “instant gratification.”

Sometimes, you will offer them $50 for a $100 item, and they will come back with an offer of $60. Very often you will find that even if you lowball at a price that seems ridiculous, they will sell it to you for far less than you ever thought you were ever going to have to pay.

5) Using “The Nibble” Negotiation Tactic

A nibble is an add-on.

You say something like, “Okay, I’ll agree to this price if you will throw in free delivery.”

If they hesitate about adding something else into the deal.

You can say in a pleasant way, “If you won’t include free delivery, then I don’t want the deal at all.”

Make it clear that you are willing to walk away if they are not willing to add something complementary to the deal.

Here is the key to how to negotiate the nibble. Agree on the purchase of the main item. Agree on the price and terms. Make it appear as if it is a done deal. The other person thinks they have sold the item, even a house, a car, or a boat, at a price that they are happy to receive. Then you add on additional requests.

Use these negotiation techniques to secure the best prices for yourself in business sales and in life. Never be afraid to ask for a better price, remember that prices are an arbitrary number for the most a salesperson thinks you’re willing to pay. You can almost always get a better price.

About Brian Tracy — Brian is recognized as the top sales training and personal success authority in the world today. He has authored more than 60 books and has produced more than 500 audio and video learning programs on sales, management, business success and personal development, including worldwide bestseller The Psychology of Achievement. Brian’s goal is to help you achieve your personal and business goals faster and easier than you ever imagined. You can follow him on Google+, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Linkedin and Youtube.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Some buyers are conditioned to try certain tactics to lower your price. Maybe they’ve read about negotiation in books or were trained to use pressuring strategies.

When buyers take this kind of positional and win-lose approach, their goal is generally to gain the most for themselves at the expense of the seller. For example, savvy buyers know that many sellers will be especially vulnerable to manipulation just when a contract is about to be signed. It’s tempting at this point for the seller to give the buyer what they want and lower the price instead of digging deeper to uncover if their concerns are valid, or a bluff.

Here are six common tactics buyers might use to gain a positional advantage, and ideas for how to respond:

Anchoring

Buyer says: “We’re looking to spend no more than $500,000 for this.”

With this tactic, the buyer shares a target price, such as a budget cap, to anchor the bargaining range.

How to respond: Ideally, you should be the first to suggest a price. Don’t wait for the buyer to do so. If that doesn’t work out, don’t accept their number at face value. Ask how they came up with their number, and how it fits with their budget. The goal is to uncover whether it’s a real number or a ploy.

Whack Back

Buyer says: “Your price is too high,” no matter what it is when you tell them for the first time.

This is one of the most common buyer tactics—to ALWAYS push back on the first price offered.

How to respond: Ask why. Listen fully as the buyer explains their objection, and ask permission to completely understand the issue. What they say will dictate your response. For example, if they say, “Well, I’ve bought it before for X!” You can say, “I think the reason I’m here is that you’ve had a lot of problems in the past. We’re different than X.” And so on.

Sticker Shock

Buyer says: “It costs how much?!”

The buyer appears to be shocked or stumped by the price you’ve offered. It could be an orchestrated reaction, rather than genuine surprise.

How to respond: Ignore their flinch and wait for any theatrics to die down. Ask why it seems high to them. Often their reasoning is faulty, and you can open up a conversation based on what you find out.

Cherry Picking

Buyer says: “I know I told you our initial order would be 5,000 units with 5 components, but we’ll just need 500 units and 2 components at first. I did the division so the price should be. “

In this scenario, the buyer has tried to unbundle a solution to gain concessions, and assumed the unit price will stay the same.

How to respond: Address the issue head on with a statement such as “I’ll need to review the pricing based on the new scope and terms.” They may make it seem as though these new terms came out of nowhere and nothing can be done, but remember—you don’t have to accept changed terms just because the buyer changed them. Engage in a discussion to work out appropriate pricing.

Pencil Sharpening

Buyer says: “You’re going to have to do better than this. We need to get it for less.”

This is a common pushback tactic to “get you ready” to drop your price because it’s “expected.”

How to respond: Don’t ask “Well, where do we need to be?” This is a trap. Focus instead on asking questions such as, “Why?” and “What are you comparing us to?” Hold your ground on differentiating the value you offer. If you probe to create solutions, the buyer will often back down.

Going, Going, Gone

Buyer says: “I will give it to a competitor by noon if you don’t make this concession.”

This tactic uses time pressure to get the seller to lower their price.

How to respond: Don’t panic or reflexively drop the price. Stall for time to think. Ask for a few minutes to disengage, saying something like, “I’m in the middle of something else right now. I can take a look soon and call you back.” Alternatively, you can ask, “So we’ll know one way or another after your meeting?” If the buyer says no, then it could be a bluff. If it’s a yes, take time to think and call back with a bargain you want. But be aware that this can be a power play on their part. If you cave, they’ll expect it in the future.

Now that you can identify these buyer strategies, prepare for your next negotiation by giving some thought to how you will respond if any arise. It’s your job to dig deeper into the real issues, separating the buyer’s valid concerns from their bluffs and manipulations.

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I am counting the minutes until I fly on the 18th.

Just curious as to what’s been everyones best Bargain in bangkok, specifically the MBK centre!

Bags, clothes, watches, dvd’s . let’s hear it!

I think men clothes are the Best bargain that I found in the MBK malls , usually at a half price to the US. depatments store and that all I need to buy

in Bangkok. I am counting everyday until I head to

LAX for Bangkok fly , a nice pleasant long haul in

At MBK the best bargain is probably the copy polo’s @ 150B – but don’t take their “example” shirts for definites on sizing, take the one your going to buy out of its packaging before purchase.

If your not fussy on bags then wait til the markets or Phuket (if your going). If you like good quality bags then try the bag store on Ground Floor right up the end closest to the hotel (Pathumwan Princess). She’s definitely expensive, but i didn’t find hardly any of her bags anywhere else that i went in Thailand including Koh Samui and Phuket. Generally you can find the same bags everywhere and shop around to get the best price which i did for the more popular styles.

Make sure you go to Suan Lum Night Bazaar – great atmosphere and market. Great copy Tiffany jewelery.

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what express boat pier I should take off to go to the Royal barge museum and about how far is the museum from that pier by walking or taxi. How much about for taxi. thks in advance for any information.

If I will hire a long tail boat, where is the closest pier I can do so and how much will it be about? Is the price fix or do we have to bart with the boat man

what express boat pier I should get off to go to the Royal barge museum and about how far is the museum from that pier by walking or taxi. How much about for taxi. thks in advance for any information.

If I will hire a long tail boat, where is the closest pier I can do so and how much will it be about? Is the price fix or do we have to bart with the boat man

I went by taxi one time and it involved walking down small alley ways for a while thinking I was completely lost. Long tail boat is a good way, you can hire a boat for a few hours, do a tour around the canals and then the boat can moor right outside the museum and wait for you. You have to bargain with the boat driver.

Get the Express Boat to Phra Pinklao pier, (any of orange, green, yellow or no flag boats), and from there take a motorsai, (motor bike taxi to the Barges). There are always some motorsai men by the exit from the pier, and they can be recognised by their orange vests. You can also walk to the barges from Phra Pinklao pier by walking down Thanon Somdejphrapinklao Soi 1:

I believe that boats are not allowed to moor outside the museum.

“I went by taxi one time and it involved walking down small alley ways for a while thinking I was completely lost”

For me, that walk was more interesting than the museum itself!

Bangkok’s No.1 nightlife tour – Don’t miss it!

How to get trashed for less…

Love a bargain? Our quick guide to some of the cheapest places to drink in Bangkok’s nightlife areas.

Soi Cowboy

Top of the list of cheap drink venues has to be the Shark Bar on Soi Cowboy with a very tempting 70 THB till 8 pm covering all standard drinks and local beers but not, as the sign points out, Corona and Lady drinks. The Shark has the added advantage of a handy ‘Ya Dong’ stall outside the bar which serves local moonshine at just 20 THB a shot! Shots are FREE on the Hangover Tour

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Staying on Soi Cowboy in the middle of the soi is the new Lighthouse (formerly Sheba’s) which goes one better holding the same 70 THB happy on till 9pm!

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

The Lighthouse – making sure you get dashed on the rocks – this bar has the added advantage of looking out over the legendary Cowboy 2 bar which, as you can see below, has more than a few thirsty single mums on standby…

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Sukhumvit soi 11

A couple of hundred yards down soi 11 (Sukhumvit) on the left hand side is a small soi where you will find the legendary Cheap Charlies. The bar has been around since the early 1980’s and has grown over the years as has its popularity. Its now (thanks to the Herald Tribune) right on the tourist map, along with the Sky bar at the Lebua State Tower. Do the locals still go to CC’s? Probably some pre clubbers, its always crowded these days and still has some quirky rules which include no working girls and no kissing at the bar? Mon dieu! At 80 THB a drink it is certainly not the cheapest place to drink anymore.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Cheap Charlies is more popular than ever but not as cheap as it used to be. Check out the impromptu Break Dancing which takes place most nights outside the bar for the pleasure (and tips!) of the crowd.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Soi Nana

The beer bars opposite the Nana hotel have long been a favorite cheap place to drink but prices have been creeping up recently with the 60 THB happy hour beer now giving way to a more substantial 80 and 90 THB. Stumble Inn does still have a 3 litre tower of local beer for just 500 THB which does work out cheap if you have a big group or are on a suicidal bender.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Patpong

The best deal on Patpong is Electric Blue, which still has a draft beer at just 45 THB! Can that be right? yes because its Chang draft and its a glass (smallish) but amazingly the price is good all night, so this does make electric blue certainly the cheapest go go bar to get a drink at in Bangkok.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Will going cheap help you to bag a hottie? Probably not but stayed tuned for our next post on where are the hottest girls in Bangkok.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok
Many times in life, the difference between success and failure is just a few details. This is especially the case when it comes to negotiating with people in the wilderness of Craigslist. Whether you are negotiating as a buyer or seller, the following 11 tips will help you get the price you want.

Negotiating tips when buying items on Craigslist

1. Be kind. When you are communicating with the seller of an item, treat them like a person. Be kind and courteous. Say hi at the beginning of the email, it’s like smiling. Thank the person for their time at the end of the email, because you took up a small portion of the person’s life, and gratitude is appropriate. People are much more likely to be flexible on the price if you treat them like they are more valuable (which they are) than the item you are interested in.

2. Ask questions. Ask if there are any issues with the item. I purposely ask this vague question as it’s kind of all encompassing. If you ask specific questions, you will get specific answers. Asking if there are any scratches will get a yes or no, but they might not mention a dent. When you ask if there are any issues, it brings to mind every little flaw or defect in the item, and with these flaws in mind, a person is often more likely to bring down the price.

If you are in person, let them talk for a bit after you ask. Let there be a little silence so they have time to volunteer a good bit of information about the items.

3. Avoid Confrontation. I’ve greatly reduced the number of sellers I call on the phone. My reason for this is that many people get offended at lower offers and tend to overreact. Once an offense has been taken, they dig their heels in and won’t budge. This same person, given a few minutes to think about an offer, will often calmly make a rational decision and accept a lower offer. I think it’s easier to avoid confrontation and communicate kindness via an email. Plus, for a person that really needs to the higher price, you are giving them an easier way to stick to their price without any high pressure. Our goal should be two happy parties, not always just an extra nickel of profit. I’ve been learning this more and more over time.

4. Communicate that you are not desperate. It is often said the one that needs the other the least in a relationship holds the power. This is very true when it comes to buying and selling. I will often end an email by saying no worries either way. I’m trying to honestly communicate that it’s fine if they accept my offer and it’s going to be fine if they don’t. Realizing that the sun will come up tomorrow even if you don’t get the item is very important, and will be communicated to sellers in your tone of voice and your words. Don’t be desperate.

5. Tell the seller why it’s worth selling to you at a lower price. What are some of the benefits of selling to you at this lower price? Ask how soon you could pick it up. This shows the seller that you are serious and would be willing to come right over and pick an item up. A quick sale is valuable to many sellers and this adds motivation for them to lower the price. Tell them you are flexible and are willing to work around their schedule. Tell them you have cash and the means to safely remove the item yourself. I’ve waited a week or two before picking up some appliances as they wanted to use them up until they moved.

How to Bargain the Price Down in BangkokNegotiating tips when selling on Craigslist

1. Realize your strengths and weaknesses. Some people would rather perish than endure high pressure, awkward confrontations. If this is you then avoid negotiating over the phone or in person. Leave your phone number out of the ad and have people email you. It’s easier to be courageous when facing a computer screen than an old grizzled Craigslist shark. If you want to include your phone number, tell people you are firm on the price. When they ask for a lower price, refer them to the ad and tell them you are firm.

2. Give your item a chance to sell at your desired price. When someone calls or emails a lower price, don’t send back a knee jerk rant about how much your great aunt originally paid for the bird bath. Politely tell them that you might consider their offer if it hasn’t sold by the end of the week, or whatever other time frame you set up. If people are calling about the item, you probably have it priced correctly and eventually someone will pay full price.

3. Don’t be desperate to sell. I will often see ads where a seller will say things like their enormous freezer is sitting in the living room and making life unbearable. Even if that’s the truth, you don’t need to volunteer the information. If you need to move the item to a place that isn’t going to drive you insane until it sells, then do so. Otherwise you are going to get worked over by a discerning buyer that will see your desperation.

4. Don’t drop the price once a person has shown up. Once a person has invested a bunch of time and gas to come to your place to inquire about an item, they are serious about buying. If they act like they aren’t going to pay full price, call their bluff and don’t drop the price. 95% of the time they will end up buying the item. If the rare event takes place and they end up leaving without buying, that’s ok.

5. Have someone else with you. We often give in to pressure because of fear. Having another person with you has a tendency to give a boost of courage you need to stand your ground. This is especially helpful when someone is coming to look at a car or another high priced item. Have them keep you accountable or even make it a joint decision that must go through you both.

6. Be kind. Many times I’ve had someone tell me that they were going to offer less but that I seemed like a good guy. Being kind and courteous to people will often earn you favor in their eyes. Treat each person with a clean slate. It’s easy to get hard and calloused after a rough transaction, but you need to forget about those and assume the best of each person.

Have any questions? What negotiating tactics have worked well for you? I’m sure many of you have interesting negotiation stories, so feel free to share them in the comments.

The pictures above are from our trip this past weekend to the Oregon Coast. It was incredibly beautiful out there.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Interested in visiting one of Bangkok’s infamous train markets? We’ve got the details.

Fun, colourful, sometimes crazy, often crowded, and full to bursting with fantastic sights, smells and sounds, Thai street markets are famous all over the world — and they’re a great place to pick up a bargain.

Some of the most unique and unmissable markets in Thailand are Bangkok’s train markets.

Read on for the ultimate guide to the biggest and best train markets in Bangkok…

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

Rod Fai Night Market Ratchada

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

By aotaro (CC BY 2.0 licence)

Rows of rainbow coloured tents cover stalls selling vintage items and clothing, up to date fashions, handicrafts and jewellery, shoes and bags, antiques, and much more await you at this large market buzzing with a vibrant, arty energy.

Trendy Thais come here to shop, to see and be seen, and to enjoy the evening in true Thai style.

Being so popular with the locals means that the prices here are lower than many other Bangkok markets, and on top of that there’s still room for haggling to get the perfect deal.

One side of the market boasts a sizeable food section, with food trucks serving up a plethora of dishes ranging from Thai specialties and street food, to international foods like pizza, pasta, and Japanese cuisine.

Take a pew at one of the market’s many lively bars, down a few Thai beers or cocktails, listen to the music, and soak up the ambiance — it’s the perfect way to spend an evening.

Conveniently situated on Ratchadaphisek Road just behind the Thailand Cultural Center MRT, Rod Fai Night Market Ratchada is easy to get to.

It’s open from Thursday to Sunday in the evenings from 5pm to midnight.

Rod Fai Market Srinakarin

A post shared by THAILAND🇹🇭 (@thailand) on Aug 18, 2018 at 11:01am PDT

This massive open air night market in east Bangkok just behind Seacon Square Shopping Mall is the bigger brother of the above train market at Ratchada.

Truly unique and with an unbeatable festive atmosphere, Rod Fai Market Srinakarin has a youthful, fun vibe and is jam-packed with stunning displays of weird and wonderful vintage and antique items — from kitsch furniture and stylish retro fashions to classic motorbikes.

Another zone of the market has over 2000 vendors selling all kinds of modern products such as electrical goods, clothes, toys, homewares, jewellery, handicrafts, and more.

The locals love it here and come here in droves at weekends to hang out and have fun, but it’s not just the shopping that attracts the crowds, it’s also the chilled out atmosphere and the numerous places to eat and drink on offer.

The choice here is excellent, with restaurants, and food stalls serving up super tasty dishes of steaming noodles, grilled seafood, coconut ice cream, crispy pancakes, Thai curry, sizzling stir fries, papaya salad, and tons of other delicious foods at a bargain price.

The cafes and cool bars dot the market’s perimeter, enticing customers with live music and potent cocktails – they are the perfect place to sit and chill and enjoy the ambiance.

There’s so much to do and see at Rod Fai Market Srinakarin that you can easily keep yourself amused all evening and well into the night.

Open from 5pm to midnight from Thursday through to Sunday, the market is a little out of the way.

The best bet is to catch the BTS down to On Nut Station from where you can get a cab or motorbike taxi to take you the rest of the way to Srinakarin Soi 51.

How to Bargain the Price Down in Bangkok

A home is the biggest purchase most Americans will make in their lifetime, so getting a good deal matters.

Continue Reading Below

While playing hardball to get what you want at the price you want, you risk over negotiating and being left empty handed. Here are five tips to secure the home of your dreams without breaking the bank.

Keep Emotion Out. Experts advise treating a home purchase as a business transaction, and avoid getting emotionally attached to a home which eliminates any leverage during negotiations.

“You have to treat the transaction as a business decision,” says Michael Corbett, Trulia’s real estate expert and author. “The minute you get too emotionally attached to this house, you are dead in the water.”

Be Realistic. Yes it’s a buyer’s market, but sellers are still looking for reasonable offers.

According to Brendon DeSimone, a Zillow blog contributor, the final sale price of a home always boils down to the motivation of the buyer and the seller. “If the seller really needs to sell the home, they’ll be more likely to negotiate on price. Likewise, if the buyer absolutely loves the home, they’ll be willing to make an offer close to, or at list price,” says DeSimone.

Making an unrealistic offer could result in a seller refusing to deal with a buyer.

Know the Market. Understanding the current state of the real estate market in the desired area will aid a buyer’s negotiations.

DeSimone recommends buyers know how long the house has been on the market, how much the price has dropped and how many times, how many deals have fallen apart and how many similar homes are for sale in the vicinity.

Corbett says the agreed to selling price doesn’t matter if the comparables in the area are lower. For instance, the final price may be $400,000, but if comparable houses in the neighborhood are going for $380,000, there’s little chance the buyer will get a mortgage for $400,000.

“Often times one of the big issues even if the price is negotiated is they can’t get the bank to agree,” he says.

Find the Seller’s Motivations. Corbett says knowing the seller is just as important as knowing the market and the house when trying to lower a home’s asking price.

To glean a seller’s motivation, Corbett suggests checking out the home’s selling history.

For instance, if there have been previous offers in escrow that have fallen through, a seller might be more willing to accept a lower price than someone who put their house up for sale last week.

Offer Non-Price Perks. To make a lower price more attractive, buyers can offer other perks like a quick inspection process, or paying in cash. Cash offers mean the seller doesn’t have to wait for a mortgage to get approved. A quick inspection/due diligence period is also an enhanced negotiating tool.

“Instead of the usual two weeks, try to get [the inspection] done in one week,” says DeSimone. “If you have a contingency to get a loan, have your loan broker fully document your file and send a letter along with your offer stating so. Having your file fully documented up front saves time during escrow.” Even offering a quick close may be enough to get the seller to accept your offer.

On the flip side, buyers willing to meet the asking price but are low on cash, can ask the seller to pay the closing costs or throw in all the appliances. Last-minute perks could mean the difference between a deal closing and falling apart.

bargain price

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