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How to become an automobile journalist

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  2. Automotive Journalist Jobs
  3. How to Become an Automotive Journalist

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Anyone who has read a car review in “Car and Driver” or “Automobile” magazine has seen the work of automobile journalists. They research automobiles by interviewing manufacturers and automobile experts and write about the latest new cars. They also may take photographs. They publish articles as freelancers or employees of automobile publications. People who want to become automotive journalists must have a love for automobiles and some technical knowledge of car engines, style features and rating variables. Salaries tend to be average, compared to other careers but can increase significantly for automotive journalists who rise to the top of the field and who are dedicated to perfecting their craft.

Salary and Qualifications

The average annual salary for an automotive journalist was $34,000 as of 2013, according to the job site Simply Hired. As with most journalism jobs, these writers usually have bachelor’s degrees in journalism, English or communications. But these professionals must also be creative and persistent in providing readers with stories that are entertaining or that provide car shoppers with information they need to make the right purchase.

Salary by State or Region

Automotive journalists’ salary can vary considerably by state or district. They earned some of the highest salaries, $53,000, in the District of Columbia, according to Simply Hired. They also earned relatively higher than average salaries in Massachusetts and New York — $41,000 and $40,000 per year, respectively. Automotive journalists in Ohio earned $32,000 annually, while those in Oklahoma and Florida made $31,000 and $28,000 per year, respectively.

Contributing Factors

Several key factors can affect automobile journalists’ salaries. Most notably, these professionals earn more with experience. They can get merit increases working for car magazine publishers, which can increase their salaries by thousands of dollars annually. Some might move to larger publications for more money, as larger publishers have bigger budgets to pay more. Freelancers can increase their incomes by finding certain niches, such as sports cars or Cadillacs, and gaining technical expertise in their specialties. Automobile journalists also tend to earn more in states with larger metropolitan areas, as living costs are higher in these markets.

We answer all the most commonly asked questions regarding our brilliant world of automotive journalism

All that glitters isn’t gold. Automotive journalism as a career choice does seem glamorous as one gets to test incredible cars, powerful bikes, travel to exotic locations on the company’s money, and the end result is usually a 600-700 word text review and a 5-minute video. And at the end of the month, somebody is paying you to do all this. Correct?

Yes, but only after you have put in over 10-12 hard years of sitting at the news desk, researching the shit out of the internet to get the latest news, filing in numerous news stories on a daily basis, posting them on your website, social media-ing it, doing follow-up stories and a ton of coordination with various members of your team, which takes up the better part of the day. Even if you are on shoots, you have to make sure the car/bike/scooter is clean, you will have to do further cleaning at the shoot location, plus follow the photo/video crew’s direction to make sure the vehicle is beautifully portrayed in images and videos. All of this, plus the pay isn’t handsome, the working hours are erratic, and you end up missing out on most social events. Then why do it?

Because every day that I get up and sit at the news desk, filing my share of stories, I know that I love my job. I love automobiles. My passion for automobiles is just as high as it was when my father first gave me a toy car. I know this passion will not wean for the next 20 years. And that’s the same for nearly all members of team ZigWheels, BikeDekho, CarDekho or PowerDrift. We are all nutters. So if you seriously want to be part of this nutty field, here’s what you need to know:

What Degree Do I Need?

Usually, any degree will do. You could have studied to be an engineer, lawyer, doctor, banker or whatever, it doesn’t matter. You just need a degree, at least that’s what the basic prerequisite for entering this field is. The stamp is all that employees need to hire you.

What Knowledge Do I Need?

Some knowledge would be a good start. If you want to be writing about automobiles, you should know the basics. If you want to shoot, you need to know the basics of photography or videography. If you want to edit videos, you at least need to know the basics of Adobe Premiere Pro or Apple Final Cut Pro. Some knowledge is essential, most of the others, you learn along the way.

What Skills Do I Need?

For a writer, language skills are important, not so much for a photo/video crew member. You are an enthusiast first, a writer second and a tester last. So, without the ability to convey your thoughts through to the audience, you will fail at the task at hand. If your consumer, that is the reader or viewer, doesn’t get the picture you are trying to paint, you haven’t done your job well. It is important that you know how to articulate in the medium.

Same goes for a photographer or a videographer. If you aren’t able to capture the beauty of the automobile, its intricate details and stuff, then your audience will be left disheartened. Skills are honed over time but the foundation and the will to learn must be there.

How Do I Convince My Parents?

Having grown up in a house that is literally surrounded by cars, bikes and books, I would not know a lot about this question. My parents did not force me into it but somewhere knew that my dad’s passion for automobiles would rub off on me. So, I have a lot to thank him for that. As for the problem at hand, yes, Indian parents would find it absurd that their ward wants to join a field where there is so much hardship and without equivalent pay to your peers who are growing up to be doctors, engineers and trained professionals. As long as YOU have made up your mind that YOU are going to be happy doing the job for the rest of your life, it shouldn’t be a problem for most parents. After all, parents just want to see you prosper and be happy.

When Do I Get To Test A Ferrari Or A Ducati?

Maybe never. Yes, entering this job means that you might never even get to experience the stuff that you dreamed of or adorned your bedroom walls with. You will have to accept this harsh reality and carry on. An Audi/BMW/Ferrari needs to be paid as much respect and taken as much care of as you would a Honda City/Maruti S-Presso/Tata Nano. Same goes for motorcycles. The trust factor between the editor, your seniors, and you needs to be there so that they can entrust you with the testing process. When they see that you can take up the responsibility of evaluating a vehicle without harming yourself (very important), your team members on the shoot and then the vehicle, is when you start to grow in this field. There is a hierarchy that you will need to understand as your senior has been roughing it up for years before you even entered the field.

What Does The Job Of An Auto Journo Entail?

I will break this into four sub-categories:

Writer: Write stories. File them for a website/magazine/newspaper. Make sure that it has been copy checked, laid out, formatted properly. Social media is key as that’s what draws traffic to your story.

Video presenter: Plan a script. Make sure you visualise what kind of shots you will need for the things you say/intend to say. Execute the shoot and help out with the coordination for the final video.

Photographer: Shoot the entire vehicle, covering all angles. No details to be missed here. Ask the writer/presenter what is to be highlighted about the particular vehicle. In case you miss out on taking a shot of the front disc for the front disc variant of the Hero Glamour, that will be a big miss. Edit photos and provide the best of the bunch to be used for various purposes. Same goes for a videographer, without the last bit of skill needed of course (but could be a value add).

Video editor: Check what the video intends to show. Line up the shots accordingly. Choose the shots pertaining to what is being told on screen. Choose the right music/background score for the sequence.

What Do I Need To Know About Shoots?

A shoot is the most brilliant as well as the most taxing part of the job. Irrespective of the vehicle at hand, this is usually the most fun part as you go to great locations, drive on fantastic roads, and enjoy the automobile in due course. It might be right outside your office or abroad, every shoot is fun. But to get to experience them, you need to await your turn and repay your faith in your seniors by doing a good job. Only then will more vehicles come your way and you will grow in this field.

What Is Expected Of Me Post Testing The Car/Bike?

Write about it. Duh! Riding a bike is the easy part. Communicating the same emotions you felt while riding, that’s where you prove your worth!

Read about how to become a journalist. Learn about job duties, education requirements, job outlook, and salary to find out if this is the career for you.

What Is a Journalist?

A journalist is a writer who investigates current events, issues and trends, then generates a story surrounding uncovered facts and disseminates it to the public via print, broadcast, or online media. In generating a story, journalists attend live functions and conduct research, review their notes for relevant details, write story copy and correct grammatical, punctuation, spelling and content errors. They often work a particular area or ‘beat,’ such as politics, entertainment, business or sports.

What Does a Journalist Do?

Journalists provide the public with accurate and unbiased information on current events through the mediums of print, television, radio and online media. Their job is to thoroughly research newsworthy stories and to present them in a clear and coherent manner. As well as having excellent verbal and written communication abilities, journalists need strong interpersonal and investigative skills in order to make contacts within the industry and carry out interviews. While some journalists may work for just one institution, most journalists work freelance positions that allow them to contribute stories to many different publications or broadcasters at once.

Journalist Requirements and Career Facts

Education Required Bachelor’s degree
Education Field of Study Journalism, communications, English, or a related field
Projected Job Outlook (2018-2028) -10%* (for all reporters, correspondents, and broadcast news analysts)
Median Salary (May 2018) $41,260* (for all reporters and correspondents)

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Five Steps to Become a Journalist

Step 1: Prepare in High School

Whatever medium you choose to work in, you will need a strong background in writing. Courses in English, language arts, humanities and social studies will push you to develop your skills in this area. Writing for the school newspaper, yearbook or literary magazine is helpful as well. Volunteering to work for your school’s TV or radio station, if it has either or both, could help you prepare for a place in broadcast journalism.

Step 2: Earn a Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism

A bachelor’s degree is the typical education requirement for journalism positions, and many prospective journalists choose to pursue a degree in journalism. A bachelor’s in journalism teaches you how to write for different distribution media. It also provides you with an understanding of journalistic ethics and fundamental methods of investigation – how to cultivate sources, conduct personal interviews and search news databases. Some programs are divided into broadcast, print, photojournalism, and public relations specializations. Because many journalists are freelancers, you may want to consider courses in marketing and business administration as well.

Step 3: Pursue an Internship

Many journalism programs include an internship course through which you can gain experience in a professional newsroom. Schools that offer journalism bachelor’s degrees often maintain relationships with local media outlets to facilitate your access to them. In addition to experience, you can build a portfolio and make contacts that may help you obtain a job after you graduate.

Step 4: Find Employment

You can find work for newspapers, magazines, TV stations, radio stations, colleges and universities, as well as a wide assortment of Internet portals. Data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) show that as of 2018 the majority of journalists worked for newspapers and magazines. A smaller but significant share worked for TV and radio stations. The job outlook for journalists isn’t promising. Employment is expected to decline ten percent from 2018-2028, partially due to losses in advertising revenue. Opportunities will be strongest at online magazines and newspapers. The median salary of journalists as of May 2018 was $41,260.

Step 5: Advance Your Career

You will likely have to start out in a small market at a small station or newspaper. Entry-level tasks include writing obituaries or covering civic meetings or court cases. After you’ve accumulated more experience, advancement usually entails changing jobs to positions at larger publications or broadcasters in a larger market, covering a specific field or covering more difficult or dangerous stories. With sufficient experience you could become a columnist or editor if you work at a newspaper. You could advance to the position of correspondent, announcer or program manager if you work for a broadcaster.

What Are Some Related Alternative Careers?

There are a number of other positions within the field of media that require applicants to hold a bachelor’s degree in journalism, communications, or a related field. Students may also want to consider becoming editors, whose responsibilities primarily include revising and preparing content for publication. Those who are more interested in the technical aspect of news reporting should look into becoming film or video editors, whose job duties consist of managing, producing and editing videos for telecommunication purposes. Another writing-related career that requires similar skills to journalism is becoming an author and writing creative fiction or nonfiction for books, magazines, or other publications.

An exciting and fast-paced career, journalism is a great fit for recent grads who are interested in current events and passionate about storytelling. If you’re considering a career as a journalist, then you’re probably wondering how to get started. For example, is there anything you can do to hone your writing skills and get employers to notice you? Absolutely!

Here are the steps to take if you want to become a journalist.

Earn your bachelor’s degree

One of the keys to starting a career in journalism is earning your bachelor’s degree. Depending on the type of journalism you want to pursue (for example, investigative journalism or broadcast journalism), you should pick a major that will help you learn about that specific type of journalism while also giving you a sense of the broader journalistic landscape. Majors to consider include journalism, communications and English.

Pro Tip: If you’re interested in reporting on a particular subject, such as politics or technology, consider taking on a double major or a minor. This will help you develop specialist knowledge of your subject while also giving your the reporting skills you need to succeed in the field.

Develop your writing skills

In addition to getting your bachelor’s degree, it’s important to hone your writing skills by writing extensively across a broad range of subjects. There are two great ways to do this: 1) By starting a blog where you can develop your voice as a writer and 2) By pitching and writing articles on a freelance basis. This will help you build up your portfolio while also helping you grow your professional network.

Pro Tip: Creating a personal website is another good way to showcase your work and establish an online presence. This is quick and easy to set up with templates like those found in WordPress and Squarespace and will make you stand out from the crowd when it’s time to find a job.

Establish connections with reporters and editors

Networking is important in any field and it’s especially important in communications-focused fields like journalism that rely on strong professional networks. The best way to approach networking is by reaching out to reporters and editors you admire and asking them to set up a time to chat (either on the phone or in person). Once you connect with them, tell them a bit about your experience and professional goals and ask them for any advice that can help you get started.

Pro Tip: Always follow up after a meeting or phone call to let the person know that you appreciate their time and that you found value in the meeting. This is a great way to keep the relationship going and to develop a long-term connection.

Intern with a newspaper, magazine or media company

An important step in any journalism career, an internship will help you gain exposure to the field while also giving you a feel for what a the day-to-day life of a journalist looks like. As an intern, you’ll be fact-checking stories, collaborating on story ideas and and maybe even helping with the final editing before the piece gets published.

With new publications continuing to pop up on an almost daily basis, the field of journalism has many opportunities for recent grads. By following these steps, you’ll be sure to set yourself up for success as you begin your career as a journalist.

Next, get more career tips for internships and entry-level jobs such as How to Use Social Media to Network Online and find answers to common interview questions such as Where Do You See Yourself in 5 Years?

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So my name is Dylan. I’m nineteen and I spent a year in junior college where I majored in. um. I forgot. LOL It had something to do with writing (I think) but I spent most of the time sexting my girlfriend in class so I don’t really remember anything. Whatever. Seriously, who needs education when there’s Google and Wikipedia?

So I quit school and decided to be an Internet journalist. Seemed pretty cool and I could do it at home on my laptop. My Dad asked me if I knew anything about journalism. He’s old so he thinks people still have to know stuff. LOL. “No,” I said, “but so what? I stream reality shows.”

So it’s really easy becoming an Internet journalist. Anybody can do it. You just start a website, give it a really impressive title like mine, “NationalNewsSpectrum.com,” stick on a few Google-image photos of presidential candidates or some Middle Eastern shit or crashing planes and stuff so it looks real. Then you write some stories. You just make shit up. It’s that easy.

So my first story, “Hillary Clinton Admits She Doesn’t Know What a Taco Is,” was totally bogus. I just made up an “Unnamed Source” and “quoted” him saying how he overheard Hillary ask one of her aides what a taco is right before she went into a Mexican restaurant in Arizona to shake hands. After that, I made up a few Hispanic leaders and “quoted” them saying they were outraged blah blah blah and BOOM!

So after I wrote the story, I posted it on Facebook and hoped I’d get a lot of shares, maybe even go viral. It did. You’d be amazed how many people on Facebook believe everything they read if it looks like it came from an Internet source. Thousands!! People who are gullible—like, say, everybody—will start thinking it’s true.

So pretty soon, my taco story was all over the Internet. Other amateur journalists with websites like mine picked it up and ran it like it was actual news. LOL. Some “reporters” tweaked stuff so eventually the story morphed into, “Hillary Says She Hates Mexican Food,” and then “Hillary Secretly Dislikes Mexicans.”

Pretty cool, huh?

So there used to be this thing I once heard about called “fact-checking,” but nobody does that anymore. What a hassle. Besides, who cares about facts anyhow? My Dad once told me Fox News doesn’t care about facts and they’re supposed to be a legitimate TV news operation with real reporters who studied journalism (waste of time.)

So once my taco expose got picked up, I Googled “hillary taco.” and guess what? It was on Google like, maybe fifty times. Now everybody thinks it’s true and it gets all over Facebook again and people start tweeting about it. SNL even did a skit about it.

So next, I decided to do a health-type piece. People love that shit. I called it, “British Scientists Discover Cancer Cure in Enzyme-Rich Dog Urine.” I made up this UK college called Winterfell University, invented a few scientists (Dr. Stannis Baratheon, PhD) and “reported” that the tests had gone on for 20 years and involved 10,000 people. And so on. That one was picked up too. But this time I really lucked out—some NBC News science reporter talked about it.

So, what’s the point of all this journalism, you ask? Money. Duh. Once you get a million hits, you attract advertisers and that’s when the bucks start pouring in. I made $60,000 last year. No shit.

So now I’m doing so well at this, I had to hire my sister (she’s 15) to come up with some ideas too. Here are a few stories we’re working on right now:

“Bernie Says He Hates Maple Syrup: Vermont Voters Outraged!”

“Exclusive: Donald Trump Once Punched a Kitten.”

“Doc Says an Overdose of Brita Water Killed Prince.”

“Clinton Maid Reports That Bill and Hill Sleep on Bunk Bed. Who’s On Top?”

“Dinosaur Bones Found With Human Skeleton Nearby.”

“Palin’s Mom Says She Dropped Sarah on Her Head 30 Times When She Was a Baby But Not on Purpose.”

“Newly Found Documents Suggest That Queen Victoria Might Have Been a Man.”

“500,000 Bernie Supporters Say They Will Vote for Grover Cleveland in 2020.”

‘How do I become a BBC journalist?’ is a question every BBC journalist is asked. Jonathan Baker, former head of the BBC Academy’s College of Journalism, provides some answers.

How to Become an Automobile Journalist

We each give different replies to the question of how to become a BBC journalist based on our own experiences, and of course there is no definitive answer. But as an organisation the BBC can offer some basic guidance and advice.

The good news is that opportunities arise regularly because the BBC employs several thousand journalists and people are always arriving, changing jobs or leaving.

You can enter the organisation at every level: from work experience to full-time jobs on high-profile network news programmes. A good place to start when you’re preparing for any approach or interview is on the BBC Academy website. This is a training area for BBC journalists that is freely available to all in the UK. It covers a wide range of editorial subjects and issues, and multimedia craft skills. You might also find the production section of the website helpful.

However you seek to join the BBC, you’ll find that competition is fierce. There are always far more applicants than posts. You need talent of course but you also need tenacity and an ability to distinguish yourself from other candidates.

A university degree is not required. Many of the BBC’s top journalists did not have a university education. You might have other experience or qualifications which are regarded as just as useful or important.

The BBC is interested in personal qualities as well as educational achievements. It puts a high value on a proven commitment to a career in journalism and on qualities such as energy, enthusiasm, flair, imagination, passion, analytical skills, intellectual curiosity and a reluctance to accept things at face value. You certainly need to be literate and numerate, to be able to swiftly read into and absorb issues and arguments.

Having said that most BBC journalists are graduates, which suggests a degree gives you a definite advantage. And of course a degree is concrete evidence of intellectual discipline.

Many people considering journalism as a career wonder whether they should choose a degree in media studies, journalism or English rather than other subjects. It is fair to say that many senior journalists are suspicious of media studies courses and doubt their relevance and value to a career in news. They look much more favourably on journalism courses which are more news focused.

But your degree need not have any obvious connections to a career in journalism. It is better to study a subject you like and feel passionate about.

If you might want to specialise in a particular area of journalism – such as science, economics, law or politics – then a relevant degree is obviously a great starting point. A second language is also an asset. Many BBC journalists have arts degrees and the BBC is always interested in widening the knowledge base of its workforce.

As for post-graduate qualifications, they are certainly good to have, but again not essential: you might have other experience or qualifications which would be regarded as just as relevant and valuable. If you secure a job in BBC journalism, you can expect to receive training inside the organisation.

Finally, if you are thinking about studying for a journalism qualification, what should you aim for? It is not up to the BBC to recommend one course or college over another. Ask around and do some research about reputation and course content. You might find these two organisations helpful: the Broadcast Journalism Training Council (BJTC) and the National Council for the Training of Journalists (NCTJ).

Many jobs in BBC journalism are not advertised externally. There could be a number of reasons for this – expense, for example, or a recruitment freeze which means vacant posts are offered in the first instance to existing staff.

You can keep up to date with everything that is available by visiting the BBC Careers website. Be aware that many jobs are not permanent vacancies but short-term contracts – covering maternity leave, for example.

How to Become an Automobile Journalist

0 How to Become an Automobile Journalist

Journalism is appealing to almost anyone who enjoys creative writing and educating others about current events. If this sounds like you, you should learn how to become a journalist. Being able to combine two passions for a paying job is one of the best decisions you can make.

What Is a Journalist?

Journalists are everywhere; at newspapers and magazines, on the radio, on TV, and all over the Internet. They write articles to report on anything they think the public needs to know more about. This ranges from political issues to crimes happening in a city or state.

Take this quiz to skip straight to final interviews with Remote Friendly Tech Companies!

How to Become an Automobile Journalist

Many journalists are also photographers, making them photojournalists. They are the same as journalists, except they take photos and use them to tell their stories.

What Does a Journalist Do?

Conducts Interviews

Perhaps the most important part of journalism is conducting interviews. Without interviews, there would be no stories. Journalists find sources closest to the stories they intend to write and conduct interviews either in person or over the phone to get information and quotes.

Writes and Edits Stories

Of course, it wouldn’t be journalism without writing. After collecting all of the information they want to publish, journalists write their stories in the manner that they feel will be received best by the public. They also edit their work prior to turning it in, ensuring it is the best possible draft it can be.

Photography

Not all journalists do photography, but for photojournalists, it is a huge part of their job. Many journalists feel that their message translates easier to the public if they are able to accentuate it with photographs. This can often mean crime scene photos or photos of protests in a city.

Essential Journalist Skills

Persistent and Driven

Especially when trying to find people to interview, journalism can be frustrating. As a journalist, you need to be persistent and have the drive to accomplish your goals because you are more than likely to have doors slammed in your face over and over again before making something work.

Creative

Creativity plays a huge role in writing stories. Even though journalists report on real-life events, being able to write creatively and keep an audience entertained is key to having your voice heard as a journalist. For photojournalists, being creative is important to capture the right shots for the story you are trying to tell.

Critical Thinker

Critical thinking can be important when journalists are trying to piece together bits of a story. Oftentimes, journalism is similar to detective work as journalists try to uncover secrets to write a good story. Critical thinking is vital to this aspect of the job.

Journalist Salaries and Job Outlook

Journalists are often paid by the hour, with pay ranging from $10 an hour all the way to $32 an hour. The national average is right around $17 an hour, and working full-time, this adds up to an annual salary of $41,620. However, if you are able to score a job with a higher hourly pay, your salary could look more like $65,000 per year.

In the age of modern technology, newspapers, radio shows, and televised news channels are quickly becoming a thing of the past. Many of the big news companies such as The New York Times and CNN have started making their articles mobile-friendly, but the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics has still predicted journalism employment to decline 10 percent by 2028. This doesn’t mean there will be no jobs, but it will become more difficult to be hired.

How Long Does it Take to Become a Journalist?

Most journalism jobs only require you to have earned a bachelor’s degree, so it typically takes around four years to begin work as a journalist. Some journalists choose to earn a graduate degree, which adds a few extra years to the time it takes to become one, but that is not necessary.

How to Become a Journalist: A Step by Step Guide

Step 1: Earn a Bachelor’s Degree

The first and most important step to becoming a journalist is to earn a bachelor’s degree. Earning a Bachelor’s Degree in Journalism generally takes around four years total, can be done online, and allows students to pick an area of concentration so that their degree is best suited for their career goals.

Step 2: Earn a Master’s Degree (optional)

While earning a master’s degree is optional, it can seriously help you find a job as a journalist. Especially today, with journalism job opportunities declining, having a higher degree will give you an advantage over other applicants. This normally takes one to two additional years of schooling.

Step 3: Choose a Specialization

Again, choosing a specialization is not mandatory, but it helps impress employers. Some areas you can choose to specialize in include broadcast journalism, environmental journalism, news reporting, photojournalism, or sports reporting. It is possible to specialize in multiple areas, but be sure the areas you choose will benefit your career.

Step 4: Complete an Internship and Build a Portfolio

Completing an internship provides you with work experience, which you can then use to build a portfolio. Both the experience and portfolio can be submitted with your resume when applying for jobs, and they will help convince employers to hire you over other candidates.

Should You Become a Journalist?

While journalism may be on the decline, if this is a career you are truly passionate about, you should become a journalist. The career will not be eliminated completely, and if you have a backup plan, you should be good to go.

Journalist FAQ

What makes a good journalist?

Being a good writer, ethical, and creative help make you a good journalist.

Do journalists travel a lot?

Some journalists travel frequently while others rarely do. It depends on the position you are hired for.

Why do journalists get paid so little?

Journalism is a job in low-demand and it is on the decline, so journalists simply are not paid as much.

Year after year, the esports industry gets bigger and better in every way, and with so much action and expansion going on, new companies emerge, old ones increase in size, and more people are required to help satisfy the content demand of esports fans across the globe.

Where to start

1. You need to be an esports enthusiast

Before you get involved in esports as a content creator (either as an esports writer, esports journalist or something else), make sure you know what you’re talking about. Become deeply familiar with the esports titles you want to write about, their professional scenes and their communities. Writing about League of Legends or Dota 2 without actually having played these games extensively AND watched a number of important tournaments is akin to writing poetry in Russian without really understanding the Russian language. To people who are just as clueless as you are you might sound like Alexander Pushkin, but to esports natives you’ll sound like a complete tourist.

How to Become an Automobile Journalist

Each electronic sport is a Universe of its own, with many notions and mechanics that need to be understood before you can write about it competently. And the deeper you want to go in your analysis, the more knowledge you need about the game. Writing a simple news article may not require you to know all that much about the game itself, but writing a guide, a match analysis or any type of content that involves these elements does.

2. Volunteer for an esports job

Just like with many other types of jobs, whenever someone wants to hire an esports writer or esports journalist, they generally ask for samples of your work. What else have you done so far in this industry?
And to be able to answer that question in a way that’s advantageous for you, you need to have a portfolio.

The best way to build such a portfolio is to volunteer for jobs at various companies that provide esports content. You won’t be paid for your articles, but at least you’ll get some good writing experience and also have a chance to expose your work to an audience. Anywhere between 3 and 12 months of writing as a volunteer will prepare you for your next step.

How to Become an Automobile Journalist

The good news is that if you really do have a good understanding of at least one esports title and can competently write about it, there will be a next step. The bad news is, you’ll have to actively search for it. The likelihood of someone contacting you for a job at this point (because they saw your work and liked it) is pretty slim, but the portfolio you’ll have built will be a nice asset whenever applying for one.

The only requirement you should have when agreeing to work as a volunteer is this: your articles must be published under your own name. This aspect becomes less important as time goes on, and you may actually reach a point where, except for your best work (such as opinion pieces and guides), you won’t have a problem working as a ghost writer. In fact, if you’re really successful, you may reach a point where you’ll insist to work as a ghost writer and where this will be one of your most important conditions for accepting a job.

Skills to develop

Besides learning all you can about the esports titles you want to cover and their professional scenes, there are a number of skills that you can’t do without when trying to become an esports writer or esports journalist.

  • Become highly proficient in English

Most jobs in esports that involve content creation will require excellent writing skills in English. If you don’t satisfy this condition, people will generally not want to work with you unless you’re incredibly good at what you do!

How to Become an Automobile Journalist

If you happen to be the exception to the rule, they may ask an editor to take care of your messy content, but you really shouldn’t rely on this.

  • Become a better communicator

If you want to write, then learn about communication skills and thinking processes (because that’s where your communication comes from). There are many aspects to this, but it’s enough to learn a little bit about each to get a better idea of how you could improve as a writer. Learn about argumentation, critical thinking/rationality, teaching, storytelling, copywriting and humor.

Where to look for jobs

Apart from the obvious places (esports news online magazines, legal & renowned esports betting sites, tournament organizer portals, esports team sites and so on), there are several websites where you can actively apply for a job if you want to become an esports writer or an esports journalist. These are ReKTJobs, gamejournalismjobs.com, The Esports Observer, UpWork and obviously Indeed.

Want to write for us? Get in touch through our Contact Form here.

How to Become an Automobile Journalist

You’ll find plenty of opportunities to work in the esports industry. Just make sure you know your stuff before applying!

I’m sure you’ve heard this advice a 100 times before, but I’ll say it anyway because it’s true: love what you do and success will eventually come. Get busy learning as much as you can about esports and writing, and you’ll surely be able to work as an esports journalist one day.

Success usually comes to those who are too busy to be looking for it.” – Henry David Thoreau

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How to Become an Automobile Journalist

How to Become a Journalist?

Journalism is a prestigious profession. It is full of glamour, excitement, and money. In addition to this, a journalist is such a person who can make a significant change in society. He/she is a person who has an approach to politicians, bureaucrats, and criminals to get their view for publication. Therefore, the profession requires the best analytical skills along with widespread knowledge. Learn how to become a journalist step by step.

Eligibility of a Journalist

  • Aspiring candidates should have passed Senior Secondary Examination (10+2) or equivalent in any stream.
  • Candidates with graduation in any stream are more preferred and suitable for it.

Required Skills of a Journalist

  • Candidates should possess an enquiring mind, excellent written skills, and a concise writing style.
  • They should be familiar with the current affairs of almost every field.
  • Applicants should have a high standard of accuracy, the ability to work under pressure, and a thick-skinned person to handle rejection.
  • They should have enough stamina and quick understanding.

Journalist Becoming Process

Step One
Candidates need either Diploma, Degree or Postgraduation course after completing 10+2. Besides this, the admission in the course is given based on the marks obtained in the qualifying exams or by clearing the entrance tests.

Step Two
During the courses, candidates read first-hand knowledge of news, features, reviews, etc. Furthermore, the general knowledge is also imparted on paragraphing, writing an introduction for a lead story, script-writing for radio or television.

Step Three

After passing the course, candidates undergo an internship with a newspaper or television house for candid knowledge of real reporting scenes. This is basically a practical training.

Journalist Possible Career Options

The candidates can join the following areas after the course.

  • Central Indian Government Information Services
  • News Agency
  • Newspaper House
  • State Government Information Services

Career/Job Types

  • Chief Reporter
  • Correspondent
  • Journalist
  • Principal Reporter
  • Senior Reporter
  • Special Representative
  • Staff Reporter
  • Trainee

Salary of a Journalist

The monthly salary, on average, varies from place to place and from time to time. Thus, the average monthly salary is Rs.20000 to Rs.25000. But with the advancement in career, they can get more monthly salary. Furthermore, candidates can earn more with reputed news channels. As a result, this will sharp competitive skills. To summarize, journalist career is one of the hard-working paths. However, hard-working nature is the main tool for success.

Should I Become an Online Journalist?

Journalists, also known as correspondents or reporters, typically cover a specific area or topic, such as sports or entertainment. As technology grows more advanced, print publications and other media sources are making the necessary move to digital formats to keep up with the trends. As a result, the increasing number of electronic news media outlets has created a greater demand for online journalists. Professionals in this field often work freelance or are self-employed and the quest for assignments or publication may be very competitive.

Career Requirements

Degree Level Bachelor’s degree preferred
Degree Fields Journalism, communications or related field
Experience Experience from internships or entry-level positions is beneficial
Key Skills Communication skills, objectivity, interviewing skills, persistence, familiarity with Web design, editing, analytical, spreadsheet and other industry software, experience with video cameras, mobile phones and microphones
Salary (2015) $38,453 per year (Average wage for journalists)

Sources: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS); O*Net Online, www.payscale.com.

Step 1: Earn a College Degree

According to the BLS, a majority of employers prefer candidates with a bachelor’s degree in journalism, communications or a related subject. Bachelor’s degree programs in this field teach students about reporting, research, writing, editing, journalism ethics and laws regulating mass communications.

Some of these programs may also offer classes that teach students about digital media, changing technologies and how they impact the media industry. Students learn how to use video recording and editing, develop interactive story graphics and design websites. They also become familiar with computer software that combines text, audio, image and video elements commonly used on news outlet websites.

Success Tip:

  • Gain extracurricular experience. Acquiring hands-on experience during undergraduate studies can provide journalism students with a competitive edge over their peers. Internships, part-time jobs and volunteer experience working for school or community newspapers, magazines or television stations all provide students with the opportunity to gain practical experience. During an internship, students can expect to research, write and edit stories, take photos and design websites.

Step 2: Build an Online Portfolio

Having a portfolio can help an online journalist highlight his or her best work. Traditionally, journalist portfolios consist of a compilation of published clips in hard copy form. Online journalists should create website portfolios that display their reporting, writing and editing skills, as well as their expertise with digital media. When creating the online portfolio, aspiring journalists should ensure that no grammatical or spelling errors or inaccuracies are present. All links should be checked to guarantee they are live and lead to the correct pages. Overall, the website should be organized and easy to navigate.

Success Tip:

  • Join a professional organization. Organizations like the Online News Association can provide journalists with a variety of resources. Organization members typically have access to industry conferences and networking opportunities.

Step 3: Prepare for the Job Interview

The BLS reported that competition for journalism jobs is intense, especially in large metropolitan areas with major media outlets. Candidates new to the field can prepare for interviews by researching the company and preparing a list of questions to ask the interviewer. Asking questions not only shows interest, but also illustrates journalistic aptitude. Demonstration of good communications skills and knowledge of current events are also key skills a journalist should exhibit during an interview.

The advent of social media and the internet has changed how the world does business. Brands and businesses have quickly understood the increasing importance of having a strong presence online. One of the most effective ways to reach out to new and existing clients is through social media platforms. For automobile manufacturers, car influencers like Sergio Mariscal have become an essential ingredient in the marketing mix.

It’s safe to say that Sergio has a natural passion for all things related to automobiles. As an in-demand and successful automotive journalist, the 35-year-old is living his dream, traveling the world, and road-testing cars of all shapes and sizes. He also hosts a popular TV show focusing on, you guessed it, everything related to four wheels.

When Sergio talks cars, millions clamor for his opinion and advice. His influence is evident, helping consumers choose cars complementing their lifestyle. He’s just one of a new breed of car influencers who are proving indispensable in the automotive industry.

The U.S. automotive industry spends over $14 billion a year on digital advertising, and the influence of car experts on consumers, when it comes to what make and model they purchase, is skyrocketing, especially amongst the millennial generation, who in the majority of cases turn to video and online for research before buying.

Chevrolet, Ford, Mustang, and Porsche are just a handful of the more well-established brands that have sought to break into the lucrative millennial market by using car influencers to head their campaigns.

Social media and automotive marketing are made for one another. An influencer who has personality, character, knowledge, and a cult following can do wonders for the sales of a car by simply endorsing it.

Sergio, aka Cheko Mariscal, is a well-known car influencer whose genuine enthusiasm for all things with an engine and four wheels has earned him a reputation as something of a trendsetter. But getting to this point has been a long and winding road full of unexpected twists and turns.

Born in his beloved Mexico City in 1984, Sergio says that the only thing he loves more than cars are family, friends, and the country which he lives in and which lives in his heart—Mexico.

At the age of 14, Sergio left his country of birth to move with his family to Miami, Florida. Although he left Mexico, Mexico never left him. “I had a great time in Miami, especially studying Business Administration for three years at Barry University,” he says. “Miami is an amazing city and gave me so much for the six years that I lived there, but eventually, the call of my native country was too much to resist, and so in 2004, I packed my bags and headed home.”

Upon his return, Sergio resumed studies at the Universidad Iberoamericana. After graduation, he decided to do something different with his life, instinctively gravitating towards the thing he felt he was born to be – an entrepreneur.

Sergio created a popular magazine and eventually sold it to an investment group, but not before realizing that he had a natural knack and flair for making things work in the media world. Combining his three passions of entrepreneurship, media, and above all, cars, Sergio created CarGlobe.mx in 2013, and a legend was born.

As the face of CarGlobe.mx, Sergio is probably best known by the name that car enthusiasts across the globe call him – Cheko Mariscal. Over the years, CarGlobe made Cheko Mariscal a household name in the automotive industry, and he has lived in the fast lane ever since, hosting his car-related TV show and guesting on many others.

Known for possessing an insatiable and incredible drive for success, Mariscal appears to show no signs of slowing down. Yet, he is the first to admit that without his wife of six years, Estefania Gomez, and his two boys, Cheko and Sebastian, he would probably be on the road to nowhere.

“My family and my country are what inspire me to do something great with my life,” he says. “They are what fuels me to keep my foot to the pedal in search of the bigger and better horizons that I know are always just around the next corner.”

And this passion is what top auto brands are leveraging to reach and influence car buyers.

How to become a Journalist? Which college to choose, what programme to do, are some of the questions that come to the minds of young aspirants who wish to pursue a career in this field. Before looking at the means to become a journalist, one must look at what the profession entails the reason for its popularity, the specialisations offered and the courses in demand. With the advent of popularity in this field, Journalism has come to the fore as a good career choice. In recent times, Journalism has emerged as a dynamic and diverse degree option among the students. Journalism involves gathering, interpretation, and presentation of news and other information of current interest. It includes various core subjects and specialised fields of study like print, radio, television or even web. With a rampant rise in institutes and universities offering Bachelor’s degree in journalism across the country, its popularity is now an established fact.

How to Become an Automobile Journalist

“I think in today’s competitive world of journalism where skills are important and so is niche reporting with a focus on content, a journalism course is more than relevant and significantly useful if you wish to join the field,” said Anubha Yadav, Assistant Professor in Journalism Department, Delhi University. With such challenges, diverse career sectors, research options, students today are inclined towards Journalism Studies. Careers360 demystifies the question – How to become a Journalist by listing all facets to enable aspirants to make a good choice.

Who is a Journalist and what do they do?

A Journalist is also called as a Reporter or a Correspondent. A writer who investigates current events, issues, and trends, and then generates a story uncovering the facts, and disseminating it to the masses through mediums like print, broadcast or online can be broadly termed as a journalist. While generating a story, a journalist has to attend press meets, conferences, and conduct research before drafting a story line. Once all this is done, a journalist reviews the notes for relevant details, writes the story copy, corrects grammar as well as structure content, and finally files the copy. Journalists often work in particular areas, like entertainment, politics, business or sports etc. While some journalists work in a media industry or a news agency, many journalists work freelance that allow them to contribute stories to many different publications or broadcasters at once.

How to become a Journalist?

While some might believe that the power of the pen is something inherent that cannot be taught but has to be developed with practice, but journalism courses promise to teach the “craft of journalism” through learning. Journalism as a field has seen huge changes in every aspect in recent times. Therefore it has become the norm to learn about it before stepping forth to make it a career. The first step towards becoming a Journalist is to apply for a Bachelor’s or a Master’s programme in a media institute or university. A degree in Media and Journalism is important for aspirants of this field. The degree prepares the aspirants and hones their knowledge base while helping them gain practical skills. Prof. B. K. Kuthiala, Vice Chancellor, Makhanlal Chaturvedi University of Journalism and Communication (MCNUJC) Bhopal said, “Today, it is all about journalism and communication. Major job opportunities are in the area of content production, both text and visual. Like any other education system, a media institute requires a variety of courses and students require a full-time degree to learn the practical aspects of the field.”

Steps to become a Journalist

How to Become an Automobile Journalist J ournalism is an exciting career, especially for those who have a passion for storytelling and reporting. Also, it is one of those careers that give much room for growth and advancement. If you are interested in becoming an independent journalist or pursuing journalism as a life-long career, it’s good you know what it takes to achieve it. This includes getting to know what the society expects from you, the training you will need to undergo as well as the skills needed, which include learning how to write an Australian essay.

If you are interested in becoming an independent journalist or pursuing journalism as a life-long career, it’s good you know what it takes to achieve it.

Journalism is not like most careers with clear and precise steps to follow for you to achieve success. At some point, you might get confused how to acquire the right skills and how to get employers to notice you or bid for high paying jobs. These issues require careful thought, so you don’t make mistakes. If you are wondering what is independent journalism or what it takes to become a successful journalist, this article will address these challenges and the best way to overcome them. Here are the steps you need to take.

Education

As a journalist, most of your daily tasks will revolve around writing. So you can’t decide to become an independent journalist and hate your pen. To write effectively, you will need a Bachelor’s degree. This is the key to kick-starting a successful career in journalism. Many employers in Australia prefer candidates with degree journalism, English, and communications. And those that grasp the concept of essay writing Australia.

Develop your writing skills

You can do this after leaving school, but it is advised to start it during your Bachelor’s program because it’s not easy to become a great writer. You need to put in some effort, make a lot of mistakes, and finally begin to write creative content. All these will take time. The best way to start is to begin writing on a broad range of topics, especially on events in Australia and other countries of the world. You could start a blog and become known as an online writer for a specific niche. Or you may decide to pitch and write articles for websites and blogs on popular writing platforms.

As you seek for more expansion and growth in your career, you won’t encounter problems with your work or find it challenging to get someone to write my essay for a fee before showing a prospective client your portfolio.

Training

As an aspiring journalist, you should seek to gain more experience through on-the-job training. As you work with professionals in the field of journalism, you will gain more ideas and knowledge, which will give you insight into the world of journalism. Most students can attest to the fact that training helped them to gain insight and understand the concept behind the independent journalism definition.

How to Become an Automobile JournalistWork experience

If you work as an intern in Australia, you should familiarize yourself with writing skills. Especially those related to essay writing and reporting. Websites such as Edubirdie can help you, so you can be proud to say, “Edubirdie writes essays for me.” Journalism is one of those professions where experience matters a lot. Even if you can’t work for big brands upon leaving school or find anyone online, you can choose to work for small firms and know how to write creatively. Apply for an internship with popular organizations and write for them to get you going in your career pursuits.

When it comes to experience, most employers would prefer applicants with a minimum of one year experience, especially if you can draft an essay or create an intriguing story.

Licenses, registrations and certifications

Licenses and certificates go a long way to show your prospective employers that you are worth your “onions.” It also shows the level of your competency and professionalism. In some states or countries, you may be required to register with the authorities as a writer or an author. If this is mandatory in your locality, ensure you obey them.

Important qualities of an independent journalist

Writing skills

This is a must-have for anyone who wants to excel in journalism. You must know how to convey feeling and emotion through writing to enable you to connect with the audience.

Adaptability

Journalists should be able to adapt easily to newer programs and software such as WordPress.

Creativity

Aside from storytelling, you should be able to relate an event in writing and express yourself creatively. This includes the ability to develop interesting plots, write about different characters, and fuse life into a boring piece of writing.

Persuasion

Depending on your area of focus in journalism, you will need to hold persuasion skills dearly. If you work in an advertising agency, you may be asked to come up with a creative sales copy for an ad. This means you have to ensure the content is highly persuasive to motivate people to buy the good or service.

Public speaking

You might be asked to give a speech or talk to an audience about your brand. This is where public speaking skills are highly needed. Such skills will help you to stay focus and maintain eye contact without distorting the quality of information disseminated.

Journalism is an exciting career, especially in Australia. This guide addresses the challenges facing anyone that wants to embrace the profession and possible solutions to them.

Journalism is a very exciting but tasking profession. You may end up practicing for quite a long time without making any meaningful impact in the field. Yours is just to get paid at the end of the month. But there comes a time when your contributions will determine whether you will remain on the job or get laid off by your employer. Of course, freelancing is one of the most difficult aspects of the job because your creativity, doggedness and reporting skills matter a lot. So from the outset your aim should be how to acquire and improve on your skills so as to become a successful journalist. This is a very useful piece. It doesn’t just tell you how you can become a successful journalist but also provides a guide on how you can be a journalist in the first place. You have to become a journalist first before striving for success in the field. So how can you be a journalist? Just go through it.

How to Become an Automobile Journalist

How To Be A Journalist

Journalism is a competitive, yet highly rewarding field. It’s the backbone of the media industry and is critical to a high functioning democracy. To be successful as a journalist, you must have a passion for truth, honesty and integrity, and the guts to go out and get the story. Read on for important steps on how to become a journalist.

Build upon your natural writing talent. To become a journalist, some intrinsic skills are necessary to achieve success. First off, you’ve got to have an inquiring mind. You must be passionate about knowledge and learning, and willing to do what it takes to get at the truth behind a story.

You must have high ethical standards. You must be able to write well. If you want people to talk and open up to you, it’s imperative to have great communication skills, both written and verbal. An unbiased attitude and the ability to be objective is key.

Get a formal education. A solid education is an investment in your future. Look over course curriculum carefully. You’ll want to make sure that the communications and journalism courses offered meet your personal interests. Journalist requirements vary, but a solid education is recommended in virtually all lines of work within the field. It’s not uncommon to hear how famous journalists received no formal education in journalism, but the competition for jobs is becoming increasingly fierce. Obtaining a degree in journalism or a related field will just increase your chances for employment. Research and choose the right journalism school. Begin by requesting information from journalism schools . You’ll have the opportunity to speak with a representative from the school to make sure that the programs offered meet your needs. Find more information about selecting a journalism school.

Choose your niche. Attend the basic courses in journalism, but make sure that you get classes in your chosen specialty. If you’re interested in fashion reporting, for example, you may not have the same courses as someone who is studying investigative journalism. Become an expert in your chosen field. Read books, subscribe to magazines, attend events—anything to keep you current. Get involved. You must have passion for your subject. Indifference and apathy are the enemies of good journalism.

Secure an internship (or two or three).
Many schools have newspapers, yearbooks, newsletters, or radio stations that accept interns. The experience gained is essential when it comes time to apply for a job.

Write, write, write.
Then, write some more. Build a portfolio of your work that you can present to future employers, and make sure it’s quality work. You cannot rely on word processing systems to catch your spelling and grammatical errors, and these common mistakes will almost guarantee that you struggle in your quest for employment. Often in journalism, what you write goes live without anyone in the middle to make sure you’ve spelled everything right and used proper grammar. Also, read everything you can get your hands on. Read newspapers, subscribe to magazines, explore books. It is very important to stay up to date on current events.

Be willing to start small. Think community publications, local newsletters, or small area newspapers. Anything to get your work published. If you have a hobby, look for opportunities to write a piece for a newsletter. Sometimes for free, but again—anything to get your work published. Create an online presence for yourself by starting your own blog or website. Network. Join clubs or associations. Make good connections during your internships. And above all, never, ever burn bridges.

Hone your technical skills. Photoshop, HTML, CSS, and web publishing programs are all very important in today’s media. Maintain a presence on Facebook, Twitter, Linked-In, and anything else that will get your name out there, help you make connections, and continue to write. It could also be beneficial to learn a foreign language to enable you to work within different ethnic groups and cultures.

A degree alone is not going to get you a job. You must know what you want, be passionate about it, and then pursue it relentlessly. Don’t accept no for an answer. Be persistent. You’ll need talent, of course, but you’ll also need a good education and persistence. You must be able to set yourself apart from the competition. Start by learning more about available programs and request information from a variety of journalism schools and degree programs.

Last updated : 28 September 2015

How to become a Journalist. Read our free guide about becoming a Journalist in the UK.

Job Description of a Journalist

Journalists are persons who are responsible for creating pieces of text or stories for newspapers or news reports programmes. The hours vary depending on the type of writing you are required to produce and the amount of research required. It is a varied and fun job that will allow you to learn many things and educate and inform the public. Being a Journalist is a good job for many people, but the key traits to have are a great eye for detail, strong Writing ability, and ability to work alone, a good sense of humour, stylish, able to communicate well and able to work to a brief.

How to Become an Automobile Journalist

Entry Requirements for a Journalist

To become a Journalist you may wish to enrol on an English language, English Literature, Creative Writing or journalism course at your local college or university. It is a good idea to create a portfolio of your work to showcase your work to potential employers. The ability to create a good range of different styles of writing, such as factual reports, historical write ups and educational pieces will give you great potential for employment. An unbiased viewpoint is essential and you must be able to write formally for educational and factual pieces.

Responsibilities and duties of a Journalist

Standard duties of being a Journalist are usually to listen to the brief issued from your employer to ascertain what they are looking for from a piece of writing. You will then have to research the subject or content matter to ensure everything is factually correct. You will then have to create the piece you have been asked to create, keeping in close contact with your employer to ensure that the piece is fitting requirements. You may be responsible for investigating a piece over a period of time and taking many accounts and statements from people in order to ensure the piece is correct. You might be responsible for finding an image to illustrate the piece. You then must hand the work to your editor for proof reading, and make any amendments as requested.

Working Hours

These may vary depending on the duties and job you are doing. Journalists are generally expected to work a variety of hours as they can often be asked to do last minute pieces or cover social events. So weekends and evenings are likely to be busy times for a Journalist. News can happen at any time and it is very important that it is reported quickly.

Skills and Training Development

Many Journalists progress their career with time served and honing skills and techniques to become better Journalists. You can enhance your career prospects by learning how to do other things such as activism, blogging, and holding writing workshops. You can also offer your services as a proof-reader or editor of others work in order to gain a promotion or extra employment.

Average Salary of a Journalist

The average salary for a Trainee Journalist is £15,000 PA.
The average salary for a qualified Journalist is £25,000 PA.
The average salary for an Editor is £30,000 PA.

The world is full of news. There are big meeting between presidents, prime ministers and other envoys, and there are debates about moral issues, acts by citizens, decisions by governments, news about the latest movie and admissions and results.

Every event in our day to day life is being recorded and produced to us. These are a league of humans who have taken it upon themselves to bring news together, and by doing so inform, educate and influence the society.

How to Become an Automobile Journalist

These are journalists, who take very day of their life to reach out to the truth and put in front of the eyes of the general public.

Types of Journalism

  • Journalism has taken up many forms, as the number of mediums increased. It started out as pamphlets and newspapers, which helped a lot many revolutions around the world.
  • Following which radio and television and off late the Internet age birth a totally new set of journalists, where even the citizens can use the power.

But to be a journalist in the real sense, you will have to follow few steps, and decide on a few things that will help you understand if the path is best for you.

Who Should Become a Journalist?

  • If you have a burning passion to speak the truth put and go after stories, you might have a good future in the field.
  • What journalism requires the most is to use your talents and skills to provide the masses different perspectives about one specific topic.
  • By doing so, they have to let the public decide on the issue. Moreover, journalists will be exposed situations which might play with their emotions.Many believe that one needs this basic instinct for emotions while many disagree.
  • What one must keep in their mind is that their voice will be what thousands will be listening to, so whatever decision they take, they need to do the right thing.
  • A journalist will be facing riots, battles, wars and many uncomfortable situations. If one has it all to face such situations then they should move ahead with their decision.

Steps to Become a journalist?

The first step will be to sharpen up your writing and speaking skills. You will need them a lot through out your journey.

You also need to focus on your current affair knowledge as you will be presenting opinions and providing specifics of many events. If you plane to move ahead in such a career, you better start early.

Academics

You can take up Journalism, irrespective of the stream you choose for your class 12 board examinations, though many students go for Arts, as subjects like Literature, Political Science, and economics, help in developing skills that will be of later use.

You can opt for a Bachelors or Undergraduate course in Journalism and Mass Communication to study about various theories of communication, understand the need and use of various media, and various techniques of reporting and editing.

If your interest in journalism remains then you can definitely go for a Masters course, where you will gain more knowledge and will get to know about various other areas that are related to Journalism like Advertising, Broadcasting, Public Relations, Media Studies etc.

Profession

You will only learn the practicalities of Journalism once you are on the field and covering news. You will have to start as a trainee and do the basic work. You will move forwar to become a Staff Reporter, A Principle Reporter, then a Senior Reporter, a Correspondent, a Chief reporter and a Special Representative.

As time goes you will find your self climbing the ladder up to become a senior journalist. This will require a lot of experience and the work you have done in your past will also count.

Career Opportunities as a Journalist

The most sought after careers are being a reporter and finally an editor and being a news anchor. But along with them you can also take up the job of a cameraman, photo journalist, foreign correspondent, social media journalist and broadcast journalism. You can also take up the career of designer, as layout designers for newspapers and graphic designers, for electronic media are always needed.

How much will you be earning as a Journalist?

The average salary that is offered to a journalist is Rs. 2,39,907 per year. This will move with the number of years one spends as a journalist and as the experience of a person increases, their pay scale will increase as well.

Individuals who are looking for information about how to become a journalist can greatly benefit from assessing the requirements and everyday job requirements of this one-of-a-kind profession.

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The Importance of a Journalist

A journalist’s role in society is often misunderstood or undervalued. Any country that claims to run a free society offers its citizens the right to free press. Journalists define this free role in their daily careers. The role of journalism allows professionals to give the citizens of a country accuracy when it comes to transmitting the latest news. A journalist has the responsibility of presenting the news without inputting their own views, beliefs or opinions. The responsibility of a journalist is great because of the fact that this profession allows the general public to quench their thirst for knowledge and genuine unbiased news. A true journalist has the capability of maintaining the greatest amount of transparency while reporting on the latest news in a particular area. To some individuals, the field of journalism may seem like a very glamorous career. Journalists are often portrayed as news reporters that enjoy a celebrity status in their community. Even though this is not completely true, a journalist can definitely become a hero of free press regardless of whether they conduct their jobs behind the scenes or in front of the camera lens.

How To Become A Journalist

Students that choose to be a part of the world of journalism need to have a passion for this particular field. The best journalists are often individuals that have a love for writing and a thirst for obtaining knowledge. Journalists are best described as competitive individuals as well as individuals that enjoying hard-nosed reporting. Journalism is a field which requires true dedication in order to obtain the ultimate satisfaction. A student who is truly committed to learning how to become a journalist should enroll in a reputable college which offers a Bachelor’s degree specializing in the field of journalism. In addition, recent years have shown an influx in students who receive their degree in communication or English literature.

Journalism students may also opt for a degree in journalism from a reputable journalism school. Enrolling in an accredited journalism school gives students the opportunity to obtain the knowledge and credibility in the field of journalism. In addition, a student also has the opportunity to practice journalism and their journalistic skills while enrolled in a journalism school.

An excellent list of accredited online schools that offer bachelor’s degrees in all areas of communications, including excellent degrees for anyone looking for how to become a journalist, can be found here: Top 10 Online Bachelor’s in Communication Degree Programs

In addition to getting a degree, students that wish to secure a job in the field of journalism are highly recommended to seek internships that are directly correlated to this particular field. By obtaining an internship in journalism, a student has the opportunity to gain experience in this specific field. In addition to obtaining internships, a student can also choose to volunteer in an environment which utilizes the field of journalism on a daily basis.

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With determination, perseverance, and dedication to serious study, a hardworking student can be well on their way to learning how to become a journalist.

Filed under: how to become a journalist, journalism degree

Developments in tech and media mean that there are a wide variety of roles which people specialise in within a journalism career. As a reporter you’ll often be given leads to follow, and expected to submit a story on the subject given to you by your editor. As a correspondent, you’ll normally have a field or country of specialism. As an editor, you’ll be in charge of…well…editing other people’s stories and compiling them into a coherent form for publication. Then you have feature-writers and columnists: journalists who write longer, more opinionated pieces on less immediate topics.

All journalists will spend most of their time writing, but there are also lots of opportunities for travel and meeting new people through interviews whilst following a story. No day is the same as a journalist, and its reactive nature can make it a very exciting environment to work in; however strict publication deadlines can often lead to stress and working long and antisocial hours.

This shouldn’t put you off though. If you thrive in a constantly changing work environment with strict deadlines, then journalism is perfect for you. Besides, journalism is still evolving to fit into the digital age, and with the ‘fake news’ phenomenon still running rife, broadcasters need fresh perspectives and creativity from people with all sorts of background to steer the profession into the 22 nd Century without losing its integrity.

How to Become an Automobile Journalist

What subjects do you need?

Journalists must be good researchers and good writers. Because of this, both science and arts subjects can be very useful in preparing for a career in journalism. History and Geography are particularly strong as they involve the evaluation of data and sources followed by discussion in an essay. English Language can also be helpful to make sure you have a good understanding of grammar and writing techniques and how you can use them to engage your audience.

Ultimately, your choice of subjects at school will not limit you in a career as a journalist. It’s good to have at least one essay subject beyond GCSE, but it’s not required. If you’re hoping to become a specialist in a particular area, for example a Political Correspondent, or a Science Correspondent, then you’ll need a good background in your chosen subject area.

How do I get there?

As a school leaver, it can often be hard to know how to break into journalism. Should you take a degree in journalism or media studies? Should you go for a degree in English? Or should you jump straight in and work your way up from a local level? Ultimately, all three of these options are perfectly valid paths towards a journalism career, and the path you choose should be the one that fits best with your personal circumstances.

Studying a journalism degree can seem the most direct path to a career in journalism, and if you get into one of the top journalism schools then an undergraduate degree in journalism and media studies can give you good foundation skills from which to launch your journalism career.

However, much like becoming a lawyer, prospective employers in journalism often value people with interests and experience in areas outside journalism. Consequently, many people working in newsrooms have bachelor’s degrees outside journalism, in anything from atmospheric physics to classical music.

If you have a bachelor’s degree in another subject then it can be beneficial to study for a postgraduate degree in journalism to develop the specific skills (e.g. shorthand) that are vital to this career. Many of the top universities for journalism specialise in MA courses rather than undergraduate courses which implies that a bachelors outside of journalism followed by a journalism masters is an increasingly popular route into journalism.

No matter what academic path you take when studying for journalism, work experience is crucial. Journalism is a career based on deliverables, so no matter what academic experience you have, a journalist looking to employ you will want to see evidence that you can produce articles in the high-pressure envir onment of a journalist’s office. The only way you’ll be able to get this experience is through work experience.

Susannah Butler, one of the youngest feature writers at London’s Evening Standard, says that the best sort of work experience is found in local media. Local newspapers with small teams of staff are much more likely to give you more to do than big national companies with teams of hundreds of staff. Definitely give her article here a read to hear how she got to where she is now so quickly.

The best way to get work experience is to be bold and get in touch with people. Look people up on Google and see if you can find a phone number or email address. Contact them and ask if you might be able to come in and shadow them for a week, or if not whether they know anyone else who might be able to help you. If you’ve got an idea for a piece then ask if they might be willing to look through it for you. That way you can show your ability without seeming overly pushy. Don’t expect much recompense or even acknowledgement for your first few pieces, but gradually this sort of exposure will help build a profile you can show to a prospective employer.

Work and life experience are so crucial in getting a job as a journalist that you can be very successful without a degree. If you start at your local paper as an assistant from school and work your way up, perhaps travelling a bit on the income from your salary, then you can move upwards to bigger things very easily. Some of the top journalists at the biggest institutions do not have a degree!

Developments in tech and media mean that there are a wide variety of roles which people specialise in within a journalism career. As a reporter you’ll often be given leads to follow, and expected to submit a story on the subject given to you by your editor. As a correspondent, you’ll normally have a field or country of specialism. As an editor, you’ll be in charge of…well…editing other people’s stories and compiling them into a coherent form for publication. Then you have feature-writers and columnists: journalists who write longer, more opinionated pieces on less immediate topics.

All journalists will spend most of their time writing, but there are also lots of opportunities for travel and meeting new people through interviews whilst following a story. No day is the same as a journalist, and its reactive nature can make it a very exciting environment to work in; however strict publication deadlines can often lead to stress and working long and antisocial hours.

This shouldn’t put you off though. If you thrive in a constantly changing work environment with strict deadlines, then journalism is perfect for you. Besides, journalism is still evolving to fit into the digital age, and with the ‘fake news’ phenomenon still running rife, broadcasters need fresh perspectives and creativity from people with all sorts of background to steer the profession into the 22 nd Century without losing its integrity.

How to Become an Automobile Journalist

What subjects do you need?

Journalists must be good researchers and good writers. Because of this, both science and arts subjects can be very useful in preparing for a career in journalism. History and Geography are particularly strong as they involve the evaluation of data and sources followed by discussion in an essay. English Language can also be helpful to make sure you have a good understanding of grammar and writing techniques and how you can use them to engage your audience.

Ultimately, your choice of subjects at school will not limit you in a career as a journalist. It’s good to have at least one essay subject beyond GCSE, but it’s not required. If you’re hoping to become a specialist in a particular area, for example a Political Correspondent, or a Science Correspondent, then you’ll need a good background in your chosen subject area.

How do I get there?

As a school leaver, it can often be hard to know how to break into journalism. Should you take a degree in journalism or media studies? Should you go for a degree in English? Or should you jump straight in and work your way up from a local level? Ultimately, all three of these options are perfectly valid paths towards a journalism career, and the path you choose should be the one that fits best with your personal circumstances.

Studying a journalism degree can seem the most direct path to a career in journalism, and if you get into one of the top journalism schools then an undergraduate degree in journalism and media studies can give you good foundation skills from which to launch your journalism career.

However, much like becoming a lawyer, prospective employers in journalism often value people with interests and experience in areas outside journalism. Consequently, many people working in newsrooms have bachelor’s degrees outside journalism, in anything from atmospheric physics to classical music.

If you have a bachelor’s degree in another subject then it can be beneficial to study for a postgraduate degree in journalism to develop the specific skills (e.g. shorthand) that are vital to this career. Many of the top universities for journalism specialise in MA courses rather than undergraduate courses which implies that a bachelors outside of journalism followed by a journalism masters is an increasingly popular route into journalism.

No matter what academic path you take when studying for journalism, work experience is crucial. Journalism is a career based on deliverables, so no matter what academic experience you have, a journalist looking to employ you will want to see evidence that you can produce articles in the high-pressure envir onment of a journalist’s office. The only way you’ll be able to get this experience is through work experience.

Susannah Butler, one of the youngest feature writers at London’s Evening Standard, says that the best sort of work experience is found in local media. Local newspapers with small teams of staff are much more likely to give you more to do than big national companies with teams of hundreds of staff. Definitely give her article here a read to hear how she got to where she is now so quickly.

The best way to get work experience is to be bold and get in touch with people. Look people up on Google and see if you can find a phone number or email address. Contact them and ask if you might be able to come in and shadow them for a week, or if not whether they know anyone else who might be able to help you. If you’ve got an idea for a piece then ask if they might be willing to look through it for you. That way you can show your ability without seeming overly pushy. Don’t expect much recompense or even acknowledgement for your first few pieces, but gradually this sort of exposure will help build a profile you can show to a prospective employer.

Work and life experience are so crucial in getting a job as a journalist that you can be very successful without a degree. If you start at your local paper as an assistant from school and work your way up, perhaps travelling a bit on the income from your salary, then you can move upwards to bigger things very easily. Some of the top journalists at the biggest institutions do not have a degree!