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How to celebrate fire prevention week

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NEWTON — Fire Prevention Week is approaching and from Oct. 7 to 13 the Newton Fire Department is joining forces with the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) to remind local residents to “Practice Your Escape Plan.”

NEWTON — Fire Prevention Week is approaching and from Oct. 7 to 13 the Newton Fire Department is joining forces with the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) to remind local residents to “Practice Your Escape Plan.”

During this year’s fire safety campaign, firefighters and safety advocates will be spreading the word about the dangers of home fires and teaching local residents how to plan and practice escape from a home in case a fire occurs.

The Newton Fire Department will host an open house from noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 29. Papa Gino’s of Plaistow will provide pizza. Tours of the station will be given and information will be available on practicing a fire escape plan.

According to the latest research, 3,030 people died in home fires in 2005, roughly eight every day. Being alerted to a fire and knowing what to do to escape is crucial, yet only 23 percent of households have planned and practiced a home fire escape plan.

“Many times when we speak to residents who have experienced a fire in their home, they recall becoming confused and disoriented by the conditions and severity of the situation — but they realized they needed to get out fast,” said Newton Fire Capt. Date Putnam. “Sometimes there are only seconds to escape, but there’s no question that having a plan in place that has been practiced saves precious time and makes survival more likely. We hope that Fire Prevention Week will prompt folks in our community to plan and practice their escape.”

Are you prepared for a fire? Although it’s difficult to prepare for the unexpected, reviewing the information below and taking action based on it to plan for a fire is strongly recommended. Don’t forget to practice your escape plan during Fire Prevention Week.

Install working smoke alarms on every level; and inside and outside of each sleeping area.

Develop a fire escape plan that identifies two ways out of each room and a family meeting place outside.

Make sure your plan allows for any specific needs in your household. If everyone knows what to do, everyone can get out quickly.

Practice using the plan at least twice a year.

Some studies have shown that some children and adults may not awaken to the sound of a smoke alarm; they may need help waking up.

If the smoke alarm sounds: Go to your closest exit, and if you run into smoke, turn and use another way out. If you must exit through smoke, get low and go under the smoke to your exit. Don’t take time to pick up belongings; just get out and help others get out. Move fast but stay calm.

Fire Prevention Week is actively supported by fire departments across the country. For 85 years, fire departments have observed Fire Prevention Week, making it the longest-running public health and safety observance on record.

Regina Fire & Protective Services will join fire services from across Canada to declare October 6-12 as Fire Prevention Week. As we mark the week, residents are encouraged to attend one of two open houses to meet their neighbourhood firefighters, learn how to escape from a fire, explore a fire truck and other fun activities.

  • Tuesday, October 8, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
    #3 Fire Station at 2640 31st Avenue
  • Thursday, October 10, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
    #6 Fire Station at 303 Rink Avenue

Donations for the foodbank will be accepted.

This year’s Fire Prevention Week theme, “Not Every Hero Wears a Cape. Plan and Practice Your Escape!” works to educate everyone about the small but important actions they can take to keep themselves and those around them safe.

It’s easy to take that first step – make your home escape plan!

1. Draw a floor plan or map of your house showing all windows and doors.
2. Mark two exits from each room.
3. Choose an outside meeting place.
4. Practice your plan two times per year.

Home escape planning and practice ensures that everyone knows what to do in a fire and is prepared to escape quickly and safely. Today’s homes burn faster than ever. You may have as little as two minutes to escape safely from the time the smoke alarm sounds. When the smoke alarm sounds in a real fire, it’s too late to start making a plan.

Find fire escape planning tools and safety tips at National Fire Protection Association.

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How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

Coos Bay Fire and Rescue.

Bethany Baker, The World

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COOS COUNTY — Fire departments around Coos County are joining forces with the National Fire Protection Association to celebrate its annual Fire Prevention Week and educate communities on the importance of fire safety.

This year’s campaign, “Not Every Hero Wears a Cape, Plan and Practice your Escape,” is focused on empowering individuals to create and practice an exit plan to safety escape a fire.

According to NFPA statistics, fire departments around the country responded to 357,000 home structure fires in 2017. The fires caused 2,630 fire deaths and 10,600 fire injuries throughout the U.S., said a press release by NFPA.

A number of fire departments will be hosting open houses throughout the county in honor of Fire Prevention Week, which is from Oct. 7 through Oct. 11, which will feature a number of activities, free refreshments and information about ongoing projects.

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

Fire Prevention Day is an annual observance commemorated on every October 9th. Fire accidents are the cause of several deaths. The day aims at promoting awareness on the ways to prevent fire disasters. The celebration of the Fire Prevention Day recognizes the work of the firefighters who relieve people during those emergency situations.

“It takes 20 seconds to check your smoke alarm, fire disrupts lives forever.” – Jack

History of Fire Prevention Day

The first Fire Prevention Day was celebrated in the year 1920. The observance of the day commemorates the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 in North America. According to legend, the cause of the fire was when Mrs O’Leary’s milch cow kicked over a lamp in her shed. The fire burned for over 27 hours from October 8 to early October 10, 1871. The fire had killing more than 300 people, destroying over 17,000 structures for about 3.3 square miles in Chicago, Illinois. More than 100,000 people were left homeless. Forty years later in 1911, the Fire Marshall’s Association of North America (FMANA) held the first Fire Prevention Day. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), the oldest membership section was the international sponsor. In 1920, President Woodrow Wilson had proclaimed Fire Prevention Week in which October 9 falls. The observance of the anniversary is a way to keep the public informed about the importance of fire prevention.

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The City of Victoria Fire and Library departments are celebrating Fire Prevention Week and Fire Safety Month in October by hosting events that involve trying on some fire gear, touring the fire safety house and participating in craft-making.

Fire Prevention Week takes place Oct. 6 -12. The Victoria Public Library and Victoria Fire Department will participate by hosting Fire Safety Day from 10-11:30 a.m. Thursday at the Victoria Public Library, 302 N. Main St. During the event, the library will host a children’s workshop involving arts and crafts, and a uniform try-on station. In the overflow parking lot at the library, visitors will be able to see fire trucks and ambulances, and even meet Sparky the Fire Dog. The event is free and open to the public.

Victoria Fire Marshal Tom Legler said children are the natural target for fire prevention education because they go home and tell their parents what they should be doing.

“We’ve heard some stories about children telling their parents to put out candles or to pull over to the right when they hear a siren,” he said.

A story now debunked but commonly referenced in fire prevention education is of Mrs. O’Leary’s cow, said to have kicked over a lamp in the owner’s barn, resulting the 1871 Great Chicago Fire, bringing more attention to fire safety and changing the way firefighters and public officials approached it. On the 40th anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire, the Fire Marshals Association of North America (known today as the International Fire Marshals Association) decided that the anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire should be observed to keep the public informed about the importance of fire prevention.

Last week, Oct. 1-3 Victoria firefighters staged their annual fire safety program for schoolchildren. Woody and the gang from “Toy Story” entertained and sent this year’s message of “Plan and Practice your Escape.” Along with the practice of testing the smoke alarms in your house, the National Fire Protection Association has plenty of tips to prevent fires.

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How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

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CASA GRANDE — Despite an overall decline in house fires in the United States over the past few decades, fires are getting deadlier and the Casa Grande Fire Department wants to educate students and parents alike on the dangers.

The main theme behind this year’s Fire Prevention Week is: Look. Listen. Learn.

The CGFD will kick off Fire Prevention Week between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Saturday at Walmart, when firefighters will be on hand to talk about fire safety and to interact with children.

“Our goal is to inform more people about the potentially life-saving difference that escape planning and practice can make and motivating them to action,” said Fire Marshal Barbara Rice.

This year’s campaign highlights three steps people can take to help quickly and safely escape a fire: Look for places fire could start; listen for the sound of the smoke alarm; and learn two ways out of every room.

CGFD Fire Prevention Officer Martha Bender also will take Fire Prevention Week on the road, visiting several Casa Grande schools and hosting a contest for second-graders at Cottonwood, Saguaro and Palo Verde elementary schools.

Other Fire Prevention Week activities that are open to the public include:

  • A visit to Dorothy Powell Senior Adult Center at 9 a.m. and again at 11:30 a.m. on Oct. 9
  • Visits with firefighters and games at Boston’s restaurant from 5 until 9 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 11
  • An open house at Fire Station 504, 1637 E. McCartney Road, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 13

For more information on Fire Prevention Week, call the Fire Department at 421-8777.

Celebrate Fire Prevention week Oct. 6-12!

Start off the week on Oct. 6 for an open house pancake feed at the Ralston Volunteer Fire Department station from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Proceeds from the open house directly support the volunteer fire department. The library is also celebrating this week by hosting some Ralston firefighters for a special storytime at the library on Oct. 10 at 10:30 a.m. Stop by for stories, songs, crafts and a picture with your local firefighters.

At noon on Oct. 10, our monthly Lunch & Learn program for adults will take place. Learn from Linda Dempsey, program specialist at CHI Health Henry Lynch Cancer Center, about increasing awareness and appreciation of the positives in your own life. Linda will help attendees expand on moments of gratitude and increase the time taken to express appreciation and return kindness. Life is busy for everyone, this is the perfect chance for us all to take a moment to slow down. The library will serve light refreshments, please join us.

Mark your calendars as the Library Foundation and Friends of the Library are sponsoring the 2019 used book sale in October. The sale will take place in the library meeting room on the following dates and times: Oct. 18, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Oct. 19, from 9 a.m. to p.m., and Oct. 20, from 1 to 4 p.m. The book sale includes books of every genre you can imagine, along with other materials, such as DVDs, CDs, puzzles and much more. We hope you stop by and support the Foundation by making a purchase.

The beginning of adulthood, first love and attending college are all common themes you’ll see in one of the newest coined genres: new adult fiction. New adult fiction includes protagonists who are of the age group 18 to 30 years old and going through the post-adolescent phase of life. Novels in this genre tend to be emotionally intense with a fast-paced story line. Interested in trying one of these exciting and fast-paced plots yourself? Hitting the new book shelves this fall, “Normal People” by Sally Rooney fits all of the new adult fiction categories. “Normal People” takes us through the early adult lives of two characters in Ireland, Connell and Marianne, as they navigate college, first love, secrets, and exploring the entanglements of family and friendship. Check out this polarizing, electric novel, along with other new adult fiction titles available on display in the library.

Thank you to everyone who participated in voting for the new library logo. Library staff worked hard to create the two designs that were up for vote in August. It was a close race, but with your input, a design was selected. Both designs had a leaf theme to reflect the natural tree interior design of the library as well as the fact that Ralston is a Tree City USA Community through the Arbor Day Foundation. Keep an eye out, as the new logo will begin making appearances around the library and on the website soon.

— Bailey Halbur is the director of the

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

By Tech. Sgt. Denise Johnson
380th Air Expeditionary Wing Public Affairs

SOUTHWEST ASIA — Ten deployed Airmen showed their support of Fire Prevention Week as they learned what it’s like to be a firefighter Oct. 8-9, 2008.

Fire and emergency services Airmen from the 380th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron provided life-like firefighting training to deployed personnel.

Non-firefighters donned firefighter apparel, received a procedural brief and entered a smoke-filled building in search of casualties. The volunteers were divided into teams. Each team included an active-duty firefighter to ensure the safety of everyone involved.

The “volunteer” firefighters learned how to communicate while maintaining situational awareness and recovering injured personnel.

“It’s a real challenge to try and find bodies, keep track of your team and where you are . when all the while you can’t see through the smoke and you’re wearing 45 pounds worth of gear,” said Col. Paul Murphy, 380th Air Expeditionary Wing vice commander. “We were lucky to have a couple of great teammates from the fire department to see us through; their expertise was invaluable.”

The 380th ECES hosted the event to build camaraderie between the deployed members while improving their own capabilities.

“One of the best ways to learn is to teach,” said Master Sgt. Sean Grady, 380th ECES assistant chief of fire prevention. “These events benefit everyone involved, it takes a bit of effort to coordinate them but I like to think they’re worth it.”

The Airmen and firefighters teamed up and searched for mannequins which were pre-positioned as victims in the smoke-filled, four-room building.

Overall the trainees seemed to enjoy the training while gaining a better understanding of the challenges firefighters face.

“I’ve always respected the work of our emergency-services personnel, both civilian and military, but this definitely gives you a new perspective,” Colonel Murphy said. “I really appreciate the fire department team for putting this event together.”

The 380th ECES Fire Chief, Senior Master Sgt. Joseph Walsh, said this was a great way to get the wing involved in fire-prevention activities.

“Fire Prevention Week is here and man what a great opportunity to have our fellow Airmen suit up, race in and experience darkness, heat and exhaustion without the fear of getting hurt . a luxury our firefighters don’t have in emergency operations,” Sergeant Walsh said. “Just like real-world responses, our trainees received a safety brief, were monitored by our designated safety officer and had an active-duty firefighter as a wingman during their search training.”

Firefighters, participants and even the mannequins came away from the smokehouse training no worse for the wear. The trainees however, have chalked up a new experience to add to their resume while gaining a new perspective from the other side of a firefighter’s mask.

October 5-11, 2014

GREENVILLE, SC – Working smoke alarms can make a life-saving difference in a fire. That’s the message behind this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives: Test Yours Every Month!” Along with firefighters and safety advocates nationwide, the Greenville City Fire Department is joining forces with the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) during Fire Prevention Week, October 5-11, to remind residents about the importance of having working smoke alarms in the home and testing them monthly. According to the latest NFPA research, almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms. Working smoke alarms cut the chance of dying in a fire in half, so this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign includes the following smoke alarm messages:

  • Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement
  • Interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home (this way, when one sounds, they all do)
  • Test alarms at least monthly by pushing the test button
  • Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old, or sooner if they don’t respond properly
  • Make sure everyone in the home knows the sound of the smoke alarm and understands what to do when they hear it

To celebrate Fire Prevention Week, the Greenville City Fire Department will premiere a new fire prevention video on Monday, October 6, and will participate in a national program sponsored by NFPA and Domino’s Pizza®. Customers who order a pizza from the Domino’s Pizza® at 435 Pleasantburg Drive on Monday, October 6 between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. will have the opportunity to have their pizza delivered by a Greenville City fire truck. When the pizza delivery arrives at the customer’s home, the firefighters will ask the customer if they can check the home for smoke alarms. If all smoke alarms work and are in the proper location, the customer will receive their order at no charge. If smoke alarms are needed, the firefighters will provide the customer with smoke alarms at no charge. The phone number for the participating Domino’s Pizza® location is 232-3640.

During Fire Prevention week, Greenville City Fire Department personnel will attend neighborhood association meetings, and on Saturday, October 11 , the Greenville City Fire Department will participate in a smoke alarm blitz on Greenville’s west side and in the Woodside community. The blitz will be held in conjunction with the Home Fire Preparedness Campaign, which is an initiative that The American Red Cross and its partners have launched that aims to reduce deaths and injuries caused by home fires by 25% in five years.

When was the last time you changed your smoke alarm?

This week marks the 89 th annual National Fire Prevention Week. Since it was established in 1920 by the NFPA, each year the Association chooses a different theme to alert the public of the danger of fire. But how did this program start and what is this year’s theme? Read on to find out.

The History of National Fire Prevention Week

National Fire Prevention Week was established in 1920 when President Woodrow Wilson issued the first proclamation. Since 1922, the week has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday in the period which October 9 th falls. This week was started to bring awareness to the fire safety and to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire, which raged through the city from October 8-10, 1871. This tragic conflagration killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 people homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures, and burned more than 2,000 acres of land. While it began on October 8 th , the fire did most of its damage on October 9, 1871. This week also commemorates the Peshtigo Fire, which is the most devastating forest fire in American history. This fire occurred on October 8, 1871, and roared through Northeastern Wisconsin. The Peshtigo fire burned 16 towns, killed 1,152 people, and scorched more than 1.2 million acres of forest before it burned out. Over the years, Americans have suffered many different fires, but these two fires remain the worst in history. But with the help of National Fire Prevention Week, the NFPA hopes to avoid tragedies like these in our future.

National Fire Prevention Week 2016: Don’t Wait – Check the Date!

This year’s slogan is “Don’t Wait – Check the Date! Replace Smoke Alarms Every 10 Years” in order to bring awareness to the public that they should replace their smoke alarms every decade. Since there are many different misconceptions about smoke alarms, NFPA has chosen to focus on this essential piece of fire protection equipment for the past three years. It is important for every household to have a smoke alarm that is properly working in order to avoid accidents. To find out how old your smoke alarm is, be sure to check the manufacturer’s date on the back of the alarm. If your smoke alarm is more than 10 years old, make sure to replace it with a newer version. Just like other electronics, smoke alarms have been updated since you have put up yours so upgrade and save a life!

Celebrate the 89 th Annual National Fire Prevention Week with Fireline

At Fireline, we offer an array of portable fire extinguishers, fire alarms, and sprinkler systems to keep commercial kitchens safe. Fireline offers the highest quality alarm systems to keep your business safe from fires and carbon monoxide poisoning. We also offer fire suppression systems as well to help keep commercial fires controlled should they break out. Our trained technicians will work with you to determine which air sampling smoke detection system is best for your business. We will also help install and maintain the system for your commercial building.

To get started with Fireline today, or for more information on sprinkler systems call us at 1-800-553-3405, or visit our contact page.

Be sure to “Like” and “Follow” the official Fireline page today on Google+, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Celebrate Fire Prevention week Oct. 6-12!

Start off the week on Oct. 6 for an open house pancake feed at the Ralston Volunteer Fire Department station from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Proceeds from the open house directly support the volunteer fire department. The library is also celebrating this week by hosting some Ralston firefighters for a special storytime at the library on Oct. 10 at 10:30 a.m. Stop by for stories, songs, crafts and a picture with your local firefighters.

At noon on Oct. 10, our monthly Lunch & Learn program for adults will take place. Learn from Linda Dempsey, program specialist at CHI Health Henry Lynch Cancer Center, about increasing awareness and appreciation of the positives in your own life. Linda will help attendees expand on moments of gratitude and increase the time taken to express appreciation and return kindness. Life is busy for everyone, this is the perfect chance for us all to take a moment to slow down. The library will serve light refreshments, please join us.

Mark your calendars as the Library Foundation and Friends of the Library are sponsoring the 2019 used book sale in October. The sale will take place in the library meeting room on the following dates and times: Oct. 18, from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Oct. 19, from 9 a.m. to p.m., and Oct. 20, from 1 to 4 p.m. The book sale includes books of every genre you can imagine, along with other materials, such as DVDs, CDs, puzzles and much more. We hope you stop by and support the Foundation by making a purchase.

The beginning of adulthood, first love and attending college are all common themes you’ll see in one of the newest coined genres: new adult fiction. New adult fiction includes protagonists who are of the age group 18 to 30 years old and going through the post-adolescent phase of life. Novels in this genre tend to be emotionally intense with a fast-paced story line. Interested in trying one of these exciting and fast-paced plots yourself? Hitting the new book shelves this fall, “Normal People” by Sally Rooney fits all of the new adult fiction categories. “Normal People” takes us through the early adult lives of two characters in Ireland, Connell and Marianne, as they navigate college, first love, secrets, and exploring the entanglements of family and friendship. Check out this polarizing, electric novel, along with other new adult fiction titles available on display in the library.

Thank you to everyone who participated in voting for the new library logo. Library staff worked hard to create the two designs that were up for vote in August. It was a close race, but with your input, a design was selected. Both designs had a leaf theme to reflect the natural tree interior design of the library as well as the fact that Ralston is a Tree City USA Community through the Arbor Day Foundation. Keep an eye out, as the new logo will begin making appearances around the library and on the website soon.

— Bailey Halbur is the director of the

In America, we’ve been recognizing Fire Prevention Week for over 100 years. A house fire isn’t something any of us want to dwell on but this week is a good reminder to STOP, DROP – and think about a few very important things you can do to save yourself and your family, like changing batteries in smoke detectors and installing carbon monoxide/explosive gas detectors.

Over the years, our country has certainly had some unique fire prevention themes:

  • 1936 – Stop it
  • 1942 – Today Every Fire Helps Hitler
  • 1945 – We Burned the Enemy – Now Save Yourself From Fire
  • 1946 – Fire is the Silent Partner of Inflation
  • 1950 – Don’t Let Fire Lick You

While these titles may leave us scratching our heads in amusement, they certainly get our attention.

Smoke Detectors Save Lives!

This week, give fire safety your attention. Test all the smoke detectors in your home and replace all batteries with a fresh batch. The National Fire Protection Association recommends having a smoke detector in each bedroom, outside each sleeping area and on every level of your home.

Who Should Have a Carbon Monoxide Detector?

Anyone who has at least one fuel-burning device in their home. Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the leading causes of accidental poisoning because it is tasteless and odorless. Caused by the incomplete burning of various fuels, Carbon monoxide can go undetected for long periods of time with dire consequences. Experts recommend having a CO detector (alarm) on every level of the home. The alarm should be tested once a month and wiped clean of dust and debris.

What is a Gas Explosion Alarm?

Propane and natural gas are highly flammable. Propane tanks are inherently safe when used and installed correctly, but a gas leak can cause an explosion resulting in loss of property and life. A gas detector or gas explosion alarm is a small unit, usually with a digital display, that sounds when it detects the presence of gas. Many companies now sell all-in-one units that work for both gas and carbon monoxide. A relatively cheap investment for your safety and peace of mind.

Finally, make sure your family has an escape route in case the unthinkable happens. Make sure kids know how to get out of the house in case of a fire and plan a designated meeting spot. Remember, “get out and stay out.”

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How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

There is a severe shortage of volunteer firefighters in Chester County.

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National Fire Prevention Week is Oct. 6-12, 2019 and now is the perfect time to sign up to become a volunteer firefighter. The Chester County Fire Chiefs Association encourages community members ready to volunteer at their local station to visit HelpFightFire.com.

This year’s Fire Prevention Week theme is “Not Every Hero Wears a Cape. Plan and Practice Your Escape!” It emphasizes the need to have an escape plan in place in the event of a house fire and practicing it to make sure everyone has enough time to get out, according to the National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA).

A home escape plan includes working smoke alarms on every level of the home, in every bedroom, and near all sleeping areas. It also includes two ways out of every room, usually a door and a window, with a clear path to an outside meeting place (like a tree, light pole or mailbox) that’s a safe distance from the home. Home escape plans should be practiced twice a year by all members of the household, according to the NFPA.

Celebrate Fire Prevention Week by Visiting Your Local Fire Station

Across Chester County, fire stations will celebrate National Fire Prevention Week in their own way. Many will host open houses, where visitors can meet with volunteers, participate in fire prevention activities and learn how they can get involved. Contact your local fire station to find out what it has planned. Updates will also be posted on https://www.facebook.com/helpfightfire/.

“Meet the brave men and women who help keep you and your family safe every day,” said Neil Vaughn, head of the Chester County Fire Chiefs Association recruitment committee. “We need more volunteers like you and Fire Prevention Week is the perfect time for you to learn more. Find out what your fire station has planned and stop by.”

Help Make a Difference in Your Community

The need for volunteer firefighters in Chester County has never been greater and there are a plenty of ways to serve. From firefighters, junior firefighters and EMTs, to fire police and administrative volunteers, everyone can help. Hear from a few of our volunteers about why they continue to serve:

“It’s a great way to give back,” said Alert Fire Company No. 1 volunteer firefighter Karl Stevens, “while also spending time with family and friends. Being part of a volunteer fire company is a great way to meet new people from all different backgrounds.”

“As a first responder you have to remember that the people we are helping and caring for are in a vulnerable moment in their lives, whether they are experiencing an emergency, a motor vehicle accident or a fire,” said West Grove Fire Company volunteer EMT Chrissy Miller. “The other firefighters and EMTs that I ride with do just that; they care.”

“The younger guys join because of the sirens,” said Thorndale Fire Company volunteer fire police officer Ron Miller. “But I do it because of the satisfaction I get from giving back to the community. We’re helping someone in times of desperation and making life easier for them.”

“Ask any firefighter and they’ll each tell you, it’s an adrenaline rush to respond to an emergency call,” said Mike King, vice president of the Chester County Fire Chiefs Association. “You’ll love being part of a team that helps save lives. And if going into a burning building isn’t your thing, there are other ways to help too. There’s a volunteer role for you.”

To learn more about how to become a volunteer firefighter in Chester County, go to HelpFightFire.com. Volunteer today. Chester County lives depend on it.

About The Chester County Fire Chiefs Association

This week October 4-10th is Fire Prevention Week. Fire prevention and fire safety is something that every family should talk about on a regular basis.

The dynamic “Lion King” duo, Timon and Pumbaa, are back and are excited to help your family to stay fire smart with laughter, music, and a lot of great safety lessons. “Disney’s Wild About Safety with Timon and Pumbaa: Safety Smart About Fire” is a great way to introduce or remind your family what to do in a fire emergency.

During the twelve minute video, “The Lion King’s” Timon and Pumbaa help parents and children understand what to do in a fire emergency. From smoke alarms, fire escape plans and preventative measures such as not playing with matches, Timon and Pumbaa review their Safety Smart® Checklist full of valuable and life-saving fire safety information. You can even view the video at www.safetysmartdvd.com during the month of October.

The video was wonderful. From the moment that it came on, the kids were silent and watched these beloved characters. They were even singing the song at the end.

This year’s Fire Prevention Week is centered around the theme of Burn Prevention Awareness and Underwriters Laboratories (UL) is helping families identify those scary burn “hot spots” in their homes. With two small girls running around my house, burn “hot spots” are something that always have me worrying.

Burn prevention tips from UL:

* Create a kid-free zone in the kitchen. Keep kids about three feet away from the stove — if possible — while adults are cooking. Place a kitchen rug to identify the kid-free zone.
* Keep the pots in back. Cook on the back burners. Never leave a pot on the stove within reach of a child as children have a tendency to reach up and grab anything in their line of sight.
* Test the bath water first — if the water is too hot for you, it’s too hot for your child. Before bath time, make sure your child’s bath water isn’t too hot. An adult should be able to place his or her arm in the water for 30 seconds without discomfort. To cool the bath water down, run some cold water before your child gets in.

Take some time this week to talk to your children about fire prevention and fire safety. Make certain that they know what to do and that you have a family plan.

Regina Fire & Protective Services will join fire services from across Canada to declare October 6-12 as Fire Prevention Week. As we mark the week, residents are encouraged to attend one of two open houses to meet their neighbourhood firefighters, learn how to escape from a fire, explore a fire truck and other fun activities.

  • Tuesday, October 8, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
    #3 Fire Station at 2640 31st Avenue
  • Thursday, October 10, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
    #6 Fire Station at 303 Rink Avenue

Donations for the foodbank will be accepted.

This year’s Fire Prevention Week theme, “Not Every Hero Wears a Cape. Plan and Practice Your Escape!” works to educate everyone about the small but important actions they can take to keep themselves and those around them safe.

It’s easy to take that first step – make your home escape plan!

1. Draw a floor plan or map of your house showing all windows and doors.
2. Mark two exits from each room.
3. Choose an outside meeting place.
4. Practice your plan two times per year.

Home escape planning and practice ensures that everyone knows what to do in a fire and is prepared to escape quickly and safely. Today’s homes burn faster than ever. You may have as little as two minutes to escape safely from the time the smoke alarm sounds. When the smoke alarm sounds in a real fire, it’s too late to start making a plan.

Find fire escape planning tools and safety tips at National Fire Protection Association.

Working smoke alarms can make a life-saving difference in a fire. That’s the message behind this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives: Test Yours Every Month!”

Along with firefighters and safety advocates nationwide, the Greenville City Fire Department is joining forces with the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) during Fire Prevention Week, October 5-11, to remind residents about the importance of having working smoke alarms in the home and testing them monthly. According to the latest NFPA research, almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms. Working smoke alarms cut the chance of dying in a fire in half, so this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign includes the following smoke alarm messages:

• Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement
• Interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home (this way, when one sounds, they all do)
• Test alarms at least monthly by pushing the test button
• Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old, or sooner if they don’t respond properly
• Make sure everyone in the home knows the sound of the smoke alarm and understands what to do when they hear it

To celebrate Fire Prevention Week, the Greenville City Fire Department will premiere a new fire prevention video on Monday, October 6, and will participate in a national program sponsored by NFPA and Domino’s Pizza®. Customers who order a pizza from the Domino’s Pizza® at 435 Pleasantburg Drive on Monday, October 6 between 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. will have the opportunity to have their pizza delivered by a Greenville City fire truck. When the pizza delivery arrives at the customer’s home, the firefighters will ask the customer if they can check the home for smoke alarms. If all smoke alarms work and are in the proper location, the customer will receive their order at no charge. If smoke alarms are needed, the firefighters will provide the customer with smoke alarms at no charge. The phone number for the participating Domino’s Pizza® location is 232-3640.

During Fire Prevention week, Greenville City Fire Department personnel will attend neighborhood association meetings, and on Saturday, October 11, the Greenville City Fire Department will participate in a smoke alarm blitz on Greenville’s west side and in the Woodside community. The blitz will be held in conjunction with the Home Fire Preparedness Campaign, which is an initiative that The American Red Cross and its partners have launched that aims to reduce deaths and injuries caused by home fires by 25% in five years.

National Fire Prevention Week 2018 is October 7-13. Each October, the week that includes October 9 becomes a focal point for fire safety and prevention practices at the workplace, in the home, and around our communities.

If you haven’t included National Fire Safety Prevention Week on your EHS department’s agenda, there’s still time—and plenty of reason—to emphasize it in the workplace.

This Year’s Theme: Look, Listen, Learn, Be Aware—Fire Can Happen Anywhere

The National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) chooses a new theme each year to help employees and citizens connect fire safety and prevention with their everyday lives. This year’s theme, Look Listen, Learn, Be Aware—Fire Can Happen Anywhere, is an excellent reminder that no one is immune from the dangers of fire.

It also identifies three easy calls to action that everyone can put into practice:

  • Look – Be observant. Look for areas or hazards that could cause fires.
  • Listen – Smoke alarms and fire truck alarms should not be ignored.
  • Learn – Pay attention to safety exits and routes to get there. Everyone should know at least two ways out of a building.

While the NFPA is largely focused on home fire safety, their valuable information and annual themes can easily be adapted for the workplace. EHS leaders are no strangers to fire safety, and it’s important you share this knowledge with all employees.

You Can’t Rely on Just Technology

The NFPA cited that the home fire death rate in 2016 was 10% higher than that in 1980. If that sounds surprising to you, it should. There have been significant advancements in fire safety and prevention , including an increased use in smoke alarms and sprinkler systems.

However, this increase in fire-related home deaths sounds a dire warning: technology alone isn’t enough to prevent fire safety issues.

This is a major talking point for companies, especially those that have sophisticated fire safety equipment and procedures in place. Technology should never be a replacement for sound judgment and evacuation, and it’s important to remind workers where their priorities should lie.

Focus on Prevention and What to Do in the Event of a Fire

When you’re integrating National Fire Prevention Week into your training and EHS-related activities, two of the things you can focus on is how to prevent fires and what to do when prevention fails.

Start by identifying potential fire hazards in your organization. Do things like sawdust or chemicals in the workplace pose a threat? Do you have known electrical issues? Are flammable materials properly stored at all times?

It’s important to expose any potential fire-related factors so that employees understand why you’ve established certain procedures. Once they realize the risk of not following protocol, such as not properly storing items or not maintaining a clean workspace, they are better able to make good choices at work.

But even the best preventative efforts can still fail, and employees need to be prepared to handle the consequences. Holding fire drills, talking about escape routes, explaining how to communicate during the fire, and knowing where designated meeting spots are can all be life-saving.

Go through the various steps of fire response as a team. Look for flaws during the process to identify training opportunities. Find ways to improve evacuation so that everyone has the best chance of avoiding the threats caused by fire. You might even call in your local fire department for hands-on demonstrations or professional talks.

Fire Safety Can Be Applied Anywhere

Teaching fire safety in the workplace can also bring it top of mind when employees are off the clock. Four out of five fires in the U.S. occur in the home.

Your employees are your most valuable asset, and keeping them safe at all times should be a top priority. What they learn at work doesn’t disappear when they leave for the day. In case they do become involved in a fire, at home or otherwise, they can put what they learn at work into action.

It’s Not Too Late to Celebrate National Fire Prevention Week

National Fire Prevention Week 2018 is here, but it’s not too late to include it on your events calendar. Whether it’s talking about it during safety meetings or planning a full-scale week of activities, fire safety and prevention is too important to skip.

For more insights on improving your EHS department, explore our blog .

October is Fire Prevention Month! The goal of Fire Prevention Month (and week October 6 th – 12 th ) is to raise awareness about fire safety and help ensure your home and family is prepared in the event of an emergency.

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

In 1922, the National Fire Protection Association named the second week of October Fire Prevention Week in commemoration of the Great Chicago Fire in 1871. Today, we celebrate Fire Prevention Week and Month by raising fire safety awareness and educating families, students and communities across the United States. During this month, fire departments educate their communities, and encourage parents and loved ones to practice fire safety and whole home safety. The National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) 2019 campaign for Fire Safety Month is “Not Every Hero Wears A Cape. Plan and Practice Your Escape.” At First Alert, we are proud to support their mission and this year’s theme that firefighters are heroes too.

For Fire Safety Month this year, First Alert is urging families to improve their home’s safety by checking their alarms, testing the alarms regularly and adding reliable protection when replacing expired alarms. We are dedicated to helping protect what matters most because a home emergency can happen at any time and we want you to be prepared.

Fire Prevention week is the perfect time talk with your whole family about fire safety – include testing alarms, changing the batteries or upgrading to 10-year sealed battery alarm for hassle-free protection, and escape planning.

  • 3 of every 5 home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no working smoke alarms
  • Less than 50% of homeowners have an escape plan
  • Carbon monoxide (CO) is the #1 cause of accidental death
  • 60% of consumers do not test their smoke and CO alarms monthly*
  • Only 47% of people report having CO alarms in their home
  • Just 43% of homeowners have an escape plan*

Are You Fully Protected?

Having functioning alarms installed throughout your home is the first line of defense for fire prevention. They work around the clock to give your family an early alert in the event of an emergency, providing you time to safely escape. Smoke and CO alarms should be placed on every level of the home, including the basement, as well as inside and outside each bedroom. Fire alarms should also be placed on every level of the home, especially in the kitchen and garage.

  • How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

Celebrate National Fire Safety Week

This year’s National Fire Prevention Week theme is “Hear the Beep Where You Sleep.” Take this week to educate yourself and your family on how to fireproof your home, while minimizing the odds of injury or death should a fire occur.

Avoid Becoming a Fire Statistic

In 2013, U.S. fire departments responded to nearly 370,000 home fires. These fires caused $7B in damages, killed 2,755 people and injured 12,200 more. That amounts to an average of 41 people killed or injured per day. Here are more eye-opening statistics:

  • Half of fire deaths occur when families sleep, but just 20 percent of fires occur during the night
  • A quarter of fire deaths are from bedroom fires, while another 25 percent of killer fires start in living rooms or dens
  • The majority of fires start in kitchens due to cooking activities, but most fire deaths are from fires ignited by cigarettes or other tobacco products.

Check and Upgrade Smoke Alarms

Sixty percent of deadly home fires occur in homes lacking a working smoke alarm. When alarms are installed and working, fire deaths are halved. Make sure your alarm batteries are fresh. Use combo alarms with ionization and photoelectric sensors that detect both flaming and smoldering fires.

Be Extra Vigilant When Cooking

Forty percent of fires starting in the kitchen are the result of unattended cooking or excessive heat applied to flammable ingredients. Other causes are failing to clean grease and the ignition of loose, flammable clothing.

Boost Safety with a Security or Home Automation System

Strongly consider installing a home automation system or home security system with 24/7 monitoring of CO/smoke alarms plus emergency sensors for detecting gas leaks, water leaks or unusually high temperatures. Such systems notify emergency responders automatically. Built-in presets let you unlock doors and turn on all interior and exterior lights at the push of a button so that everyone can get out quickly and safely.

Install Fire Extinguishers in Central Locations

Keep a small UL-rated A/B/C fire extinguisher in the kitchen and a larger one in a central hallway at a minimum. Be sure everyone in the house knows where they are and how to use them.

Use Supplemental Heating Wisely

Half of home heating fires occur during the winter months. A third of these are caused by improper use of space heaters and another 28 percent from improperly maintained wood stoves or fireplaces. When fighting winter’s chill, be especially careful to avoid locating space heaters close to flammable materials such as upholstery, clothing or bedding. Keep your wood stove flue or fireplace chimney free of creosote.

Five Quick Tips to Avoid Electrical Fires

25,000 home electrical fires kill more than 1,300 people each year in the U.S. Here are ways to avoid those:

  • Hire a licensed electrician to inspect your home’s electrical system
  • Repair problems causing flickering lights, sparking outlets or buzzing breakers
  • Only use power strips with thermal-overload protection
  • Replace worn appliance, lighting and extension cords
  • Keep furniture, curtains and clothing away from outlets

Plan Your Escape

NFPA’s escape planning grid is an easy way to create an escape route map for all floors of your home. Mark two exits from each room including windows and doors. Teach everyone how to check exit doors for heat and how to crawl on the floor to avoid smoke inhalation. Agree on a single meeting place outside.

National Fire Prevention Week or any week of the year is an ideal time for proactive fire prevention planning. The steps outlined above will substantially decrease the odds of a home disaster, avoid injuries and preserve lives.

Contributing Author: Beth Kelly is a freelance blogger and researcher. In her free time, she likes fixing old cameras and learning to speak new languages. She was born and raised in Michigan but now resides in Chicago, IL. Find her on Twitter.

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

Firefighter Jeremy O’Neil talks about not being scared of fire fighters in full turnout gear & SCBA while FFs Longley & Bachelder demo their structural gear.

PHILLIPS – Wednesday Oct. 9, the Phillips Fire Department presented a “Learn Not to Burn” Fire Safety & Prevention program at the Phillips Elementary School. This annual event occurs during fire safety week, the second week of October. Topics include the importance of working smoke alarms, having fire escape drills in the home, stop, drop & roll, and determining an outside meeting place in case of a fire. General information was presented to the children for what to do in an emergency, the most common types of fire in the home, and what to expect from the fire department, including how fire fighters look and sound in full turnout gear and air packs.

The students were shown firefighting equipment and they asked questions about firefighting. They were also provided promotional material to take home and discuss fire safety with their family. At lunchtime recess, the children were also given the opportunity to tour the Phillips Fire Department apparatus; a 1989 custom EONE Pumper truck (formerly from Topsham), ENGINE 2. A 1999 International medium duty rescue truck, RESCUE 3. A 2000 Ford 550 brush truck, FORESTRY 1, were present for the show and tell.

The Phillips Fire Department would like to thank the teachers, aides and administration for the opportunity to share the message of fire safety with their classes. Also instrumental in organizing this event was the school nurse, Debbie Russel, whose coordination efforts were essential to make this happen.

For more information about this presentation, the Phillips Fire Department, or to join call Chief Jim Gould 639-3473 or stop by the park street station on Tuesday nights. The chief would like to remind citizens, neighbors and friends to properly maintain all chimneys, flues, or vent pipes prior to the heating season to prevent a possible chimney fire over the winter.

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

FF Rick Skinner shows students the Jaws of Life rescue tools.

Date When Celebrated : Always on October 9 th. Fire prevention week is during the week in which October 9th falls.

According to legend, on October 8, 1871, Mrs. O’Leary was in her barn, milking her cow. The cow kicked over a lamp, which started the Great Chicago Fire of 1871. The fire burned for over 27 hours. When it was over, more than 300 people were killed, 100,000 people were left homeless, and over 17,000 structures were destroyed.

The Great Chicago fire sparked major efforts in fire prevention. Forty years later, the Fire Marshall’s Association of North America(FMANA) held the first Fire Prevention Day. In 1920 , President Woodrow Wilson proclaimed Fire Prevention Week.

The Saturday during Fire Prevention Week is Fire Service Recognition Day.

Did You Know? Dalmatians became fire dogs because they were often kept around the horses at fire houses to guard them.

Remember “EDITH”, which stand for “Exit Drills In The Home”. Today is a good day to have a practice drill.

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Did You Know? There are literally thousands of daily holidays, special events and observances, more than one for every day of the year. Many new holidays are being created on a regular basis. At Holiday Insights, we strive to thoroughly research and report details of each one as completely and accurately as possible.

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This week October 4-10th is Fire Prevention Week. Fire prevention and fire safety is something that every family should talk about on a regular basis.

The dynamic “Lion King” duo, Timon and Pumbaa, are back and are excited to help your family to stay fire smart with laughter, music, and a lot of great safety lessons. “Disney’s Wild About Safety with Timon and Pumbaa: Safety Smart About Fire” is a great way to introduce or remind your family what to do in a fire emergency.

During the twelve minute video, “The Lion King’s” Timon and Pumbaa help parents and children understand what to do in a fire emergency. From smoke alarms, fire escape plans and preventative measures such as not playing with matches, Timon and Pumbaa review their Safety Smart® Checklist full of valuable and life-saving fire safety information. You can even view the video at www.safetysmartdvd.com during the month of October.

The video was wonderful. From the moment that it came on, the kids were silent and watched these beloved characters. They were even singing the song at the end.

This year’s Fire Prevention Week is centered around the theme of Burn Prevention Awareness and Underwriters Laboratories (UL) is helping families identify those scary burn “hot spots” in their homes. With two small girls running around my house, burn “hot spots” are something that always have me worrying.

Burn prevention tips from UL:

* Create a kid-free zone in the kitchen. Keep kids about three feet away from the stove — if possible — while adults are cooking. Place a kitchen rug to identify the kid-free zone.
* Keep the pots in back. Cook on the back burners. Never leave a pot on the stove within reach of a child as children have a tendency to reach up and grab anything in their line of sight.
* Test the bath water first — if the water is too hot for you, it’s too hot for your child. Before bath time, make sure your child’s bath water isn’t too hot. An adult should be able to place his or her arm in the water for 30 seconds without discomfort. To cool the bath water down, run some cold water before your child gets in.

Take some time this week to talk to your children about fire prevention and fire safety. Make certain that they know what to do and that you have a family plan.

Fire Prevention Week: Free Classroom Resources!

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

For young and old alike, Fire Prevention Week is a great reminder of the importance of fire safety! Best practices should be taught early and often to ensure young children are avoiding potentially hazardous situations and prepared to react in case of emergency—both at school and at home. During October 9-15 of this year, we encourage you to dedicate some time to brushing up on safety practices with your students as part of the official Fire Prevention Week.

Learn why we celebrate each year and how you can help educate students on fire safety by downloading our free Fire Prevention Week Toolkit from EducationCity. This month’s resources includes Fact Sheets, Activities, and critical thinking questions known as ThinkIts to help review fire safety with your students. In addition, as you plan an upcoming lesson, don’t forget to highlight these five best practices for avoiding and responding to a fire:

1. Routinely test smoke alarms

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has officially sponsored Fire Prevention Week since its inception in 1922, and each year selects an annual theme. This year, NFPA continues its three-year effort to educate the public on essential smoke alarm safety. As part of these best practices, it’s important to remember that smoke alarms should be checked regularly, and batteries changed once a month. Every 10 years, your smoke alarms should also be replaced. Share this friendly “Don’t wait—check the date!” infographic from NFPA with your students for quick tips on replacing a smoke alarm.

2. Develop and practice fire evacuation plans

While fire drills sometimes feel like yet another disruption in your day, they are a necessary routine to prepare young children for fire emergencies. In anticipation of upcoming fire drills at your school, ensure you and your students have rehearsed lining up and exiting quickly. For older learners, this may feel like old hat, but in a new classroom, the exit strategy may be different and it’s important they are current on the procedure.

3. Create emergency communication plans

In addition to knowing where students should go in case of fire, being able to communicate who is safe and who still needs help is just as important. We suggest using a simple “student whereabouts” board to get an at-a-glance view of who’s in your room that day as well as posting an evacuation class list that you can grab and take with you to easily check that all your students are accounted for once outside. Enforce the importance of using these systems to seek permission before exiting the classroom.

Don’t forget to connect all fire safety education back to home! Encourage your learners to think about the best exit strategy when they are at home and what they should do if smoke or a fire is present. Encourage students to share what they’ve learned with parents and siblings, discuss the plans they developed, and practice fire safety regularly.

4. Focus on prevention

This particular tip has applications that spread far and wide—both at home and while at school. Focus on prevention by helping students identify hazardous situations that they should avoid or seek an adults help with. This includes staying away from a hot stove, not using an oven or microwave without adult supervision, and identifying flammable objects that should stay away from heat sources. Additional tips and lessons can be found at NFPA’s Sparky School House site.

5. Report a fire immediately

While we certainly hope that an emergency doesn’t happen, it’s important to know what to do in case one does! Your students should know how to use a phone to immediately call authorities. 9-1-1 is probably the first number any child learns, but practicing recalling this number certainly won’t hurt. Remind students that firefighters have special training, protection, and equipment that allow them to safely handle a fire. Check out these great classroom reads for more information firefighters and how they protect our communities.

Interested in exploring more content to celebrate important events and holidays throughout the year? Check back each month for more free topical resources from our pre-K through 6th grade digital program, EducationCity.

  • How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

National Fire Prevention Week

The destruction fires cause can be devastating to cities, businesses, and families. In 1871 The Great Chicago Fire took place on October 8th-9th; killing 250 people, destroying more than 17,400 structures, leaving 100,000 people homeless, and burning more than 2,000 acres. The impact of the fire was so widespread amongst the population that it brought fire safety to the forefront of the public mind. Afterward, community initiatives started making fire safety a topic of concern to avoid reliving a horrific history.

On the 40th Anniversary of the great fire, the International Fire Marshals Association decided to spread the importance of fire prevention across the whole country. As the popularity of this yearly public service announcement grew, President Woodrow Wilson issued the first National Fire Prevention Day proclamation in 1920. Every president since 1925 has since then signed a proclamation continuing this important safety day.

Today we celebrate fire safety all week long, with National Fire Prevention Week from Sunday through Saturday during the week October 9th falls. This week-long event is the longest running public health and safety event on record.

In the 1800s, fires could easily demolish a whole city. Today, we educate the public on fire safety and have changed our building materials to limit the spread of fires. To keep your community and school children excited about learning about fire prevention and how to stay safe, follow our fire safety activity hot list.

Fire Department Open House

Fire Prevention Week is an ideal time for fire departments to open their doors to the public. They can invite schools and families in for a tour of the firehouse and their trucks. During this time, they can teach the public

  • To change your fire detector every 10 years
  • To replace their fire detector batteries every 6 months
  • It’s best to have a fire and smoke detector combo
  • What to expect if they are being saved from a second floor or higher
  • Why it’s important not to use fire hydrants for summer, water recreation
  • To never return to a burning building, for any reason
  • That a fire extinguisher should easily be accessible where they will be needed
  • That the fire department can recharge their fire extinguishers

Fire Safety Practice for Kids

It’s important to reiterate to kids each year what they need to do in an emergency. National Fire Prevention Week is a perfect time to do just that. Fire departments, schools, libraries and post offices can host activities for kids to practice fire safety.

Crawl Under Smoke Safely

Heat rises and that is no different in a fire. The heat of a fire at floor level can be 100 degrees and the air at eye level can easily reach 600 degrees and burn your lungs. That is why it’s important to learn to crawl as low to the floor as you can.

To make practicing this crawling technique fun for kids, bring out a large rectangular blanket or sheet. Have the children grab onto the sides of the fabric and rapidly move it up and down, while another child practices a low crawl underneath it. The blanket will simulate the hot air and smoke above them that they should avoid being near while they practice the low crawl.

Stop, Drop & Roll

It’s also important to teach kids not to panic in an emergency situation and to be able to think. If their clothes happen to catch fire they need to know how to smother it. Have the children practice stop, drop, and roll. Also, bring out a blanket for this exercise. Wrapping a blanket around a child who is “on fire” while they stop, drop, and roll will smother the fire more quickly.

To continue fire prevention learning at home, give out learning devices such as fire prevention coloring books. Also, hand out prizes to children once they practice the fire safety exercises correctly. Here is a list of our favorite learning tools and prizes during National Fire Prevention Week.

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week
How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

Top Promotional Children’s Gifts During National Fire Prevention Week

  • Fireman Custom Rubber Duck
  • Coloring Book – Flash Teaches Fire Safety
  • Firefighter Badge Sticker
  • Fireman Drawstring Bag
  • Foam Walking Pet Dalmatian

At Home Fire Drill

While you have the attention of children and their parents, remind them to practice their own fire drills at home. Be sure that children know two ways to get out of every room. Set a designated meeting spot far away from the house.

Once all the routes are known and the meeting location is established, it’s time to practice an in-home fire drill. Set off a fire alarm and have the kids escape the house. Since smoke can darken a house, to take it one step further, you can practice with blindfolds and feel your way through the rooms and out to safety. Fires can happen anywhere, so remind your kids to determine the fire route out of their friends’ houses, too.

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

Top National Fire Prevention Week Gifts for Adults

  • Jar opener in the shape of a fire helmet
  • Fireman hand sanitizer
  • Fire hydrant stress balls
  • Fireman emoticon face pens
  • Promotional pot holders.

Don’t ignore fire safety, start spreading the word today with these products! The next time you want to promote National Fire Prevention Week, just stop, drop, and roll right into ePromos!

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The St. Helena Fire Department will celebrate Fire Prevention Week by hosting an open house from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 13.

The 19th annual event will include rides on antique fire trucks, activities for kids, Smokey Bear, Sparky and his fire engine, fire and rescue demonstrations, jump houses and food in Lyman Park, adjacent to the Fire Department.

Fire Prevention Week, sponsored by the local Fire Department and the nonprofit National Fire Protection Association, is from Oct. 6-12. The theme of the week is “Preventing Kitchen Fires.”

During this year’s fire safety campaign, fire departments will be spreading the word about the dangers of kitchen fires — most of which result from unattended cooking — and teaching local residents how to prevent kitchen fires from starting in the first place.

According to the latest National Fire Protection Association research, cooking is the leading cause of home fires. Two of every five home fires begin in the kitchen — more than any other place in the home. Cooking fires are also the leading cause of home fire-related injuries.

“Often when we’re called to a fire that started in the kitchen, the residents tell us that they only left the kitchen for a few minutes,” said St. Helena Fire Chief John Sorensen. “Sadly, that’s all it takes for a dangerous fire to start. We hope that Fire Prevention Week will help us reach folks in the community before they’ve suffered a damaging lesson.”

A blog by Lynette M. Fraga, Ph.D., executive director of Child Care Aware® of America

Child Health Day is October 30, and while we care about child health, nutrition, and obesity prevention every day of the year, we’d like to take this opportunity to highlight the specific issues of lead poisoning and fire safety.

National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week is October 25-31! To celebrate, let’s learn how to keep the children in our care safe from lead exposure in toys, homes, and child care.

According to the CDC, children under the age of six are most at risk for lead poisoning. If your house or apartment was painted before 1978, your home or child care space should be tested for lead in both the paint and dust to be sure toxic levels are not present. Your health department can test it for you to be sure it’s lead-free and safe for the children in your care.

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention WeekOctober 4-10 was Fire Prevention Week, and the National Fire Protection Association has a great checklist that children can help with as they go through their house to make sure they’re prepared in the event of a fire. Their campaign “Hear the Beep While You Sleep” reminds everyone in the family where smoke alarms should be placed around the house, and to test them every month. They even have printables, music videos, and a monthly calendar to help get children involved in fire prevention at home!

Additional resources:

Use these resources to keep your kids and family safe and healthy!

By on March 3, 2016 No Comment

The annual apparatus display starts Orion Township’s celebration of Fire Prevention Week 2003. It takes place Oct. 5, noon-4 p.m. behind the township hall at Greenshield/Joslyn Roads.
Fire trucks from Orion and several surrounding departments will be on display. Other displays include the Oakland County Sheriff’s Department and the North Oakland County Hazardous Materials Response Team.
Survival flight is scheduled to arrive for display at 3 p.m.
Home Depot will also conduct a Children’s Safety Workshop. Representatives from Sam’s Club will be on hand with the “Vial-Of-Life” program.
Kids will receive balloons, safety brochures, hats and other gifts. Refreshments will be served by the Ladies Auxiliary of the Firefighters Association.
Firefighters will be showing off their local fire stations during an open house on Oct. 12, 1-4 p.m.
Visitors at Station #1, #2 and #3 will see working fire and rescue apparatus displays. Kids will receive free refreshments and gifts.
Also available will be movies, brochures and activity books on fire safety and fire prevention.
Station #1 is located at 93 South Anderson (next to Children’s Park); Station #2 is at 200 East Silverbell (east of M-24); Station #3 is located at 3365 Gregory (west of Baldwin).

Celebrate Fire Prevention Week 2003 added by on March 3, 2016
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Four people were killed last year in Minnesota homes without smoke alarms or with inoperable smoke alarms.

Working smoke alarms can make a life-saving difference in a fire and all it takes is a few minutes to make sure yours are working. That’s the message behind this year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign, “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives: Test Yours Every Month!”

Fire Prevention Week is Oct. 5-11. The Minnesota Department of Public Safety State Fire Marshal Division and firefighters statewide remind residents to have working smoke alarms in the home and test them monthly.

“In a fire, seconds count. Smoke alarms can alert people to a fire before it spreads, giving everyone enough time to get out,” State Fire Marshal Bruce West said. “Smoke alarms can prevent tragedies.”

According to the latest National Fire Protection Association research, working smoke alarms cut the chance of dying in a fire in half.

  • Install smoke alarms in every bedroom, outside each separate sleeping area and on every level of the home, including the basement.
  • Interconnect all smoke alarms throughout the home. This way, when one sounds, they all sound.
  • Test alarms at least monthly by pushing the test button.
  • Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old or sooner if they don’t respond properly.
  • Make sure everyone in the home knows the sound of the smoke alarm and understands what to do when they hear it.

Fire departments statewide will be hosting educational and family oriented activities during Fire Prevention Week to help residents learn the importance of working smoke alarms and testing them monthly.

To find out more about Fire Prevention Week programs and activities in your town, contact your local fire department. More about smoke alarms and Fire Prevention Week is available on NFPA’s website atfirepreventionweek.org.

Open house

This week, local fire departments are celebrating Fire Prevention Week and seeking to raise awareness among residents of how to prevent fires.

The Stillwater Fire Department will host an open house 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 11. Other departments hosted events earlier this week.

The Stillwater event is open to all area residents. It will include firefighting demonstrations, station tours, free fire education/prevention materials, blood pressure checks, face painting, child fingerprinting and child safety seat information. There will also be visits by the Stillwater Police Department, Lakeview Hospital EMS and Freckles the Fire Dog.

Visitors will have an opportunity to practice using a fire extinguisher on live training props, use a fire hose, learn CPR, register for door prizes and enjoy free refreshments.

If you go

What: Stillwater Fire Department open house

When: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday October 11, 2014

Where: Stillwater Fire Station, 216 N. Fourth St.

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A fire safety plan can include mapping your house, installing more fire alarms and designating a safe spot

The provincial government is reminding Manitobans to create a fire safety plan and escape route for this year’s fire prevention week, which begins Sunday.

“It’s important that every family has a fire safety plan and that they practice the plan so they know what to do in an emergency,” said Growth, Enterprise and Trade Minister Blaine Pedersen, in a media release.

“It doesn’t take long to prepare and can be a good family project. Practicing the escape plan could make the difference between getting out unharmed and being trapped inside if a fire breaks out,” he said.

Fire Prevention Week runs from Oct. 6-12 and this year’s theme is ‘Not Every Hero Wears a Cape, Plan and Practice Your Escape.’

That could include drawing a map of the home and marking two exits from each room, practicing a fire drill and teaching children how to call 911.

Fire experts says people may have less than two minutes to escape a burning home once a smoke alarm goes off.

“Fire safety is such an important topic,” said Brad Yochim, president, Manitoba Association of Fire Chiefs. “It only takes a few minutes to make a map of your home with two exits out of every room, test your smoke alarm and choose an outside meeting place.”

This year’s campaign includes the following safety tips:

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of the home and in every bedroom for maximum protection.
  • Remove smoke alarms from the wall or ceiling, check for the manufacture date and replace any that are 10 years old or older.
  • Connect hard-wired smoke alarms throughout the home so when one sounds, they all do.
  • Test alarms monthly.
  • Ensure everyone in the home knows the sound of the smoke alarm and understands they should go outside immediately if they hear it.
  • Agree on a family meeting place.
  • Stay outside and call the fire department.

The Casa Grande Fire Department is pleased to work in coordination with the National Fire Protections Association (NFPA) to celebrate Fire Prevention Week from October 8-14, 2017. This year’s theme, “Every Second Counts: Plan 2 Ways Out!” works to better educate the public about the critical importance of developing a home escape plan and practicing it.

“In a typical home fire, you may have as little as one to two minutes to escape safely from the time your smoke alarm sounds,” said Fire Prevention Officer, Martha Bender. “That’s why home escape planning is so important in a fire situation. It ensures that everyone in the household knows how to use that small window of time wisely.”

In support of Fire Prevention Week, the Casa Grande Fire Department will host a variety of outreach events to share these life saving messages with residents. The schedule of events for the week is as follows:

In addition to the scheduled events, the Casa Grande Fire Department encourages all Casa Grande households to develop a plan together and practice it. The NFPA and Casa Grande Fire Department offer these additional tips and recommendations for developing and practicing a home escape plan:

  • Draw a map of your home with all members of your household, marking two exits from each room and a path to the outside from each exit.
  • Practice your home fire drill twice a year. Conduct one at night and one during the day with everyone in your home, and practice using different ways out.
  • Teach children how to escape on their own in case you can’t help them.
  • Make sure the number of your home is clearly marked and easy for the fire department to find.
  • Close doors behind you as you leave – this may slow the spread of smoke, heat, and fire.
  • Once you get outside, stay outside. Never go back inside a burning building.

For more information on Fire Prevention Week, please click here or contact Fire Prevention Officer, Martha Bender at (520) 421-8777, ext. 5980.

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Area fire companies are participating in the National Fire Protection Association’s yearly Fire Prevention Week Campaign, Oct. 5 to 11.

Kutztown and Fleetwood fire companies are among the local participants, offering tips to help prevent fires.

“The purpose of fire prevention is to educate the community in eliminating fire hazards or elements which cause fire to occur or conditions which will contribute to the spread of fire,” said David J. Reimer Sr. of Kutztown Fire Company. “The firefighter’s utmost concern is the prevention of destructive fires. Prevention saves the effort and expense of extinguishing them.”

While Kutztown’s department has a number of goals, they feel it is most important to improve its ability to inform and educate the public about safety.

Last year, they responded to 465 calls. So far, they responded to 307, mostly automobile accidents, automatic fire alarms, medical assists and brush fires.

Fleetwood fire department’s goals are to ensure the public is aware of fire prevention week and resources where they can find fire prevention tips.

“We have a special focus on children to educate them on dangers of fire and proper steps in case of fire (Call 9-1-1, stop-drop-roll, etc). Fleetwood visits all the schools in the borough for a personal presentation to all pre-school and elementary students, with hand outs to take home to discuss with their parents,” said Chris Young of Fleetwood Fire Company.

Last year, Fleetwood responded to 360 fire and rescue calls. So far this year, they have responded to 250 calls.

Young said some of the most common causes of fire that the company responds to, according to recent records, were related to electrical appliances and / or extension cords.

He offered a few tips to help prevent fires.

A) Make sure you have at least one WORKING smoke detector in the home for early warning.

B) Make sure matches, lighters, etc. are kept out of reach of children

C) Have a home evacuation plan and practice fire drills.

D) Ensure all heating equipment (fireplaces, central furnace, portable space heaters) are properly maintained and inspected.

E) Ensure electrical outlets are not overloaded, and extension cords are inspected.

How is it important for people to be proactive in preventing fires?

Young quotes NFPA, “With home fires still accounting for 2,865 fire deaths or 84 percent of all civilian deaths, fire-safety initiatives targeted at the home remain the key to any reductions in the overall fire death toll.”

Reimer also offered tips.

“With the holiday season quickly approaching, it is important to be very careful in the use of electrical cords and candles,” said Reimer. “Overloaded receptacles and or extension cords can cause a fire and unattended candles are another cause for concern.”

Another concern is carbon monoxide. Although the popularity of carbon monoxide (CO) alarms has been growing in recent years, Remier said not to assume that everyone is familiar with the hazards of carbon monoxide poisoning in the home.

Often called the silent killer, carbon monoxide is an invisible, odorless, colorless gas created when fuels – such as gasoline, wood, coal, natural gas, propane, oil, and methane – burn incompletely. In the home, heating and cooking equipment that burn fuel are potential sources of carbon monoxide. Vehicles or generators running in an attached garage can also produce dangerous levels of carbon monoxide.

“Being proactive in the prevention of home fires can save your life,” said Reimer. “Have an escape plan, talk to firefighters and visit fire prevention websites. Don’t hesitate to call the fire department. Minutes do matter when it comes down to saving lives and property.”

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And our Last Word in business is a bear.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

A bear with his own ZIP Code – bear who talks but only says one thing.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

SAM ELLIOTT: (As Smokey Bear) Only you can prevent wildfires.

INSKEEP: Smokey Bear turns 70-years-old tomorrow. He’s the star of the longest-running public service announcement campaign in American history.

ELLIOTT: (As Smokey Bear) Let a little fire get started, catch on, destroy and your forest is nothing. Remember, only you can prevent forest fires.

ELLIOTT: He’s a guy on a mission to protect the forests and protect the wild lands.

INSKEEP: That last voice there is actor Sam Elliott. When he’s not playing a cowboy in movies like “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” or “the Big Lebowski,” he is the voice of Smokey Bear. He’s done that since 2008.

GREENE: And there’s something special about having Sam Elliott in this role.

ELLIOTT: I realized that we had the same birthday, August 9th, 1944. That was the same date, the same year they started this campaign.

GREENE: So on that date, Sam Elliott was born in Sacramento and a bear was chosen as the symbol of fire prevention.

INSKEEP: Wow, he’s a World War II baby. Now, at that time, an average of 22 million acres of forest were destroyed by fires each year. Humans caused 90 percent of those fires, so the government commissioned an artist to create Smokey.

GREENE: Elliott remembers seeing signs featuring Smokey when he was a kid.

ELLIOTT: Everywhere you went in those days, at the trailhead, there was this iconic vision. You know, it was either a statue or some bear carved into a board.

GREENE: The campaign caught fire as it – soon attracted commercial interests.

INSKEEP: So in 1952, Congress passed the Smokey Bear Act to protect the bear’s image. According to the United States Forest Service, Smokey must always.

GREENE: Appear dignified and friendly.

INSKEEP: Avoid clowning and horse play.

GREENE: And never walked rapidly toward small children.

INSKEEP: So happy birthday to Smokey Bear and also Sam Elliott. Also, be careful lighting the candles. That’s the Business News on MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

As an advanced air ambulance provider, some of the most heartbreaking cases we see involve burn victims. A few months ago, we told you the story of transporting a young burn victim from Ukraine to Boston so that he could get treatment for the severe injuries he’d sustained in a house fire – a fire that also claimed the lives of the rest of his family, including his parents, grandparents, and siblings.

That tragic story was in my mind recently when I realized that October 7-13 is National Fire Prevention Week. Held every year at the beginning of October, Fire Prevention Week reminds all of us of the importance of taking some basic steps to prevent fires, and the damage and injuries they can cause.

Here are some facts about fire to keep in mind, from the National Fire Protection Association:

  • In 2010, there were more than 350,000 home fires in the U.S.
  • Those fires caused more than 13,000 injuries and 2,640 deaths.
  • Cooking, heating equipment (such as fireplaces and space heaters) and smoking are among the leading causes of home fires.
  • Roughly two-thirds of fire deaths happen in homes without working smoke detectors.

How can you protect yourself and avoid becoming a statistic? Consider these steps:

  • Make sure you have a working smoke detector(s) in your home. Check the batteries at least once a year.
  • Have an escape route from your home, and practice it with your family.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher in an easily accessible place in your home.
  • Be cautious when using candles, which can easily start a fire.
  • If you smoke, take precautions to avoid an accidental fire, such as not smoking in bed.
  • Consider installing automatic sprinklers in your home, since these reduce the risk of fire deaths by more than 80%.

Many home fires can be avoided through some commonsense precautions, while the risk of injury and death can be reduced by having smoke alarms and an escape plan. Both adults and children should be well versed in fire safety practices, since accidents can happen at any time, and fires can quickly spread out of control.

At MedFlight911 air ambulance, we encourage everyone to practice fire safety, both during Fire Prevention Week and throughout the rest of the year! To find out more about MedFlight911’s advanced air ambulance services give us a call at 888-359-1911 or get a no-obligation medflight air ambulance quote here.

Subscribe to this page using the link at the bottom for updates about our next Fire Prevention Week.

Fire Prevention Week: Not Every Hero Wears a Cape. Plan and Practice Your Escape!

In partnerships with the National Fire Protection Association® (NFPA®)—the official sponsor of Fire Prevention Week for more than 90 years—the Brantford Fire Department is promoting Fire Prevention Week, Not Every Hero Wears a Cape. Plan and Practice Your Escape! to educate the public about the small, but important actions they can take to keep themselves and those around them safe.

Join the Brantford Fire Department as they host a series of events in support of Fire Prevention Week, including a number of displays with educational information and a chance to see a fire truck on the following dates:

Beckett Building, 219 Colborne St, Brantford

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Fresh Co., 50 Market St S, Brantford

Wednesday, October 9, 2019

12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Wayne Gretzky Sports Centre, 254 North Park Street, Brantford

Wednesday, October 9, 2019

5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Elements Casino Brantford, 40 Icomm Dr, Brantford

Thursday, October 10, 2019

4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Lowes – First Alert & OAFC Event, 215 Henry St, Brantford

Friday, October 11, 2019

10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

To celebrate the end of Fire Prevention Week, an Open House will be taking place at Fire Station #4, 400 Colborne Street West, on Saturday, October 12,2019 from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. Everyone is welcome!

Follow Brantford Fire on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter for up to date information on Fire Prevention Week programs and activities in Brantford or visit www.fpw.org to start planning your home escape.

Fire Prevention Week’s history

The history of Fire Prevention Week has its roots in the Great Chicago Fire, which occurred on October 9, 1871, and killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures and burned more than 2,000 acres in 27 hours.

While the origin of the fire has never been determined, there has been much speculation over how it began. One popular legend, which was recently refuted by a Chicago historian, is that Mrs. Catherine O’Leary was milking her cow when the animal kicked over a lamp, setting the O’Leary barn on fire and starting the spectacular blaze.

On the Great Chicago Fire’s 40th anniversary, the Fire Marshals Association of North America (FMANA) sponsored the first National Fire Prevention Day, advocating an annual observation as a way to keep the public informed about the importance of fire prevention.

The National Fire Protection Association has designated Oct. 5-11 as National Fire Prevention Week. National Fire Prevention Week was established to commemorate the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 that killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless while destroying more than 17,400 structures and burning more than 2,000 acres. The fire began on Oct. 8 with most of the damage occurring on Oct. 9, 1871.

The fire allegedly started when a woman known as Mrs. O’Leary was in her barn with her five cows. One of her cows became agitated and reportedly kicked a lantern over, igniting the two-day fire. Mrs. O’Leary claims to have been in bed for the evening when the fire broke out. Others have speculated that some boys who were smoking cigarettes near the barn started the fire. Some have said a fiery meteorite may have fallen from the sky that day igniting fires in Michigan, Wisconsin and Chicago, Ill.

President Woodrow Wilson issued the first National Fire Prevention Day proclamation in 1920. Since 1922, National Fire Prevention Week has been observed on the Sunday through Saturday period in which Oct. 9 falls.

Locally, the Williams Volunteer Fire Department commemorates National Fire Prevention Week annually. Members of the WVFD hosted an open house at Fire Station One Oct. 7. Throughout the week, they will visit schools and the Williams Senior Center providing demonstrations on how to use a fire extinguisher, how to obtain and maintain smoke and carbon monoxide detectors and how to stay safe if a fire should occur.

Join the firefighters today from 3-7 p.m. at the Williams Aquatic Center for a free swim. Enjoy free refreshments and pizza from 5-7 p.m. courtesy of the WVFD.

The WVFD stresses the importance of fire prevention and safety throughout the year. If you have smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in your home, but are not sure if they are working, contact the WVFD at 635-4451. WVFD members will come to your home to test your safety equipment free of charge.

We are lucky to have the WVFD. Up until 1912, Williams had no organized fire department, no formal plan in the event of fire and few pieces of equipment to fight fires. Their only tools consisted of buckets and a water wagon.

On July 12, 1884, four businesses were leveled by fire. On July 8, 1885, seven more businesses were burned to the ground. In July of 1895, two blocks of what was then known as Front Street burned. July of 1896 saw the destruction of most of the sawmill property — a major business in Williams.

On July 2, 1901, a fire ignited, consuming 36 businesses, two hotels and 10 residences. The damage was estimated at $300,000. In February of 1903, six saloons, one restaurant and two houses burned. On Oct. 3, 1908, another fire destroyed an important business block.

Finally in 1912, Williams’ first fire department was formed. The present WVFD was organized in 1921. There were 12 members on the department at that time.

Today’s WVFD firefighters are better equipped than firefighters of 82 years ago. The volunteers wear pagers and have radios that alert them when there is a fire. These volunteers leave their places of employment or the safety of their homes to protect our property from fire. The time they donate to the community is invaluable. We applaud their commitment to maintaining safety from fire in our community.

Blenheim, Chews Landing, Erial and Glendora fire companies need volunteer firefighters.

By Nicole, Community Contributor
Sep 19, 2019 9:17 am ET

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

Gloucester Township . Becoming a hero to the community is just a few clicks away. Help kick off Fire Prevention Week the right way by signing up online to become a volunteer firefighter in Gloucester Township today.

The Blenheim, Chews Landing, Erial and Glendora fire companies need volunteer firefighters and there’s no better time than during Fire Prevention Week to learn how you can get involved. Community members who are ready to help can go to FirefightersofGloucesterTwp.org to sign up.

Fire Prevention Week is Oct. 6-12 and the theme this year is “Not Every Hero Wears a Cape. Plan and Practice Your Escape!” It’s important to have a plan in place to get your family out of the house in the event of a fire.

According to the National Fire Prevention Association, a home escape plan includes drawing a map of each level of the home and showing all doors and windows, and also having working smoke alarms on every level of the home, in every bedroom, and near all sleeping areas. Additionally, make sure to have two ways out of every room, like a door and a window, and a clear path to a meeting point outside that’s a safe distance away from the house like a tree, light pole or mailbox. Lastly, teach young children how to escape on their own if you can’t help them. Visit www.firepreventionweek.org for more safety escape planning and practice tips.

Meet the Heroes in Your Backyard

The Firefighters of Gloucester Township invite members of the community to celebrate Fire Prevention Week 2019 with them during three open house events.

  • Thursday, Oct. 3: Erial Fire Company will host its annual Fire Prevention Week kickoff event from 7-9 p.m. in the parking lot of the Gloucester Township Lowe’s, 485 Cross Keys Road, Sicklerville. The event will feature food, several fire trucks, display tables and a fire safety trailer for participants to walk through.
  • Monday, Oct. 7: Chews Landing Fire Company will hold an open house from 7-9 p.m. at its station, 43 Somerdale Rd, Blackwood. Participants can meet volunteers, see the trucks on display and learn more about becoming a volunteer.
  • Tuesday, Oct. 8: Glendora Fire Company will hold its open house from 7-9 p.m. at the station, 22 8th Ave., Glendora. The event will feature inflatables, several emergency trucks and giveaways. It will be a night of fun for the whole family.

It’s a Rewarding Feeling

Volunteering as a Gloucester Township firefighter is an excellent way to give back to the community.

“Becoming a volunteer firefighter is a rewarding feeling,” said Glendora Chief Mike Riccardelli. “It makes you feel good to help others. People rely on us to help during one of the worst days of their lives and we are ready to be there for them.”

“Volunteering has made me a more rounded person with a better understanding of others,” said Erial firefighter Christopher Brown.

“I take pride in belonging to a group of people that care,” said Chews Landing firefighter Fred Koehler.

There are several ways community members can volunteer at their fire station including: firefighters, junior firefighters for teens between 16 and 18 years old, volunteer associate members and ladies auxiliary members. “Even if you don’t want to run into a burning building, there is a way you can still help us,” said Chews Landing Fire Chief Michael Millisky.

“And Fire Prevention Week is the perfect time to sign up,” said Blenheim Fire Chief Jonathan Smith. “You’ll have a chance to meet some of the other volunteers in the township and see if becoming a volunteer is right for you.”

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How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

There is a severe shortage of volunteer firefighters in Chester County.

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National Fire Prevention Week is Oct. 6-12, 2019 and now is the perfect time to sign up to become a volunteer firefighter. The Chester County Fire Chiefs Association encourages community members ready to volunteer at their local station to visit HelpFightFire.com.

This year’s Fire Prevention Week theme is “Not Every Hero Wears a Cape. Plan and Practice Your Escape!” It emphasizes the need to have an escape plan in place in the event of a house fire and practicing it to make sure everyone has enough time to get out, according to the National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA).

A home escape plan includes working smoke alarms on every level of the home, in every bedroom, and near all sleeping areas. It also includes two ways out of every room, usually a door and a window, with a clear path to an outside meeting place (like a tree, light pole or mailbox) that’s a safe distance from the home. Home escape plans should be practiced twice a year by all members of the household, according to the NFPA.

Celebrate Fire Prevention Week by Visiting Your Local Fire Station

Across Chester County, fire stations will celebrate National Fire Prevention Week in their own way. Many will host open houses, where visitors can meet with volunteers, participate in fire prevention activities and learn how they can get involved. Contact your local fire station to find out what it has planned. Updates will also be posted on https://www.facebook.com/helpfightfire/.

“Meet the brave men and women who help keep you and your family safe every day,” said Neil Vaughn, head of the Chester County Fire Chiefs Association recruitment committee. “We need more volunteers like you and Fire Prevention Week is the perfect time for you to learn more. Find out what your fire station has planned and stop by.”

Help Make a Difference in Your Community

The need for volunteer firefighters in Chester County has never been greater and there are a plenty of ways to serve. From firefighters, junior firefighters and EMTs, to fire police and administrative volunteers, everyone can help. Hear from a few of our volunteers about why they continue to serve:

“It’s a great way to give back,” said Alert Fire Company No. 1 volunteer firefighter Karl Stevens, “while also spending time with family and friends. Being part of a volunteer fire company is a great way to meet new people from all different backgrounds.”

“As a first responder you have to remember that the people we are helping and caring for are in a vulnerable moment in their lives, whether they are experiencing an emergency, a motor vehicle accident or a fire,” said West Grove Fire Company volunteer EMT Chrissy Miller. “The other firefighters and EMTs that I ride with do just that; they care.”

“The younger guys join because of the sirens,” said Thorndale Fire Company volunteer fire police officer Ron Miller. “But I do it because of the satisfaction I get from giving back to the community. We’re helping someone in times of desperation and making life easier for them.”

“Ask any firefighter and they’ll each tell you, it’s an adrenaline rush to respond to an emergency call,” said Mike King, vice president of the Chester County Fire Chiefs Association. “You’ll love being part of a team that helps save lives. And if going into a burning building isn’t your thing, there are other ways to help too. There’s a volunteer role for you.”

To learn more about how to become a volunteer firefighter in Chester County, go to HelpFightFire.com. Volunteer today. Chester County lives depend on it.

About The Chester County Fire Chiefs Association

Residents asked to learn smoke alarms save lives, make sure they work

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

Fires are real, not just events in the news or movies.

Fire is fast, extremely hot and spreads rapidly. It creates thick black toxic smoke that is even more deadly than flames!

When fire strikes, seconds are important! There is no time to stop and think. Everyone needs to know what to do!

Smoke alarms provide the early warning of the problem and a home fire escape plan will provide time to escape safely.

Although we hope you never have to use it, planning and practising your home escape plan may one day save your life and the lives of your loved ones.

The 2014 Fire Prevention Week campaign is “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives: Test Yours Every Month! ”

This year’s theme focuses on providing families and communities with the knowledge necessary to test their smoke alarms, identify potential fire and burn risks in and around the home, and be prepared if a fire or other emergency should they occur.

The Lone Butte Fire Department has again partnered with Horse Lake Elementary School to teach children and their families the importance of developing and practising a home fire drill.

Children will learn these skills by completing an interactive fire safety worksheet – “Fire Safety Starts with You.” The children who successfully complete the activity booklet and the entry form and return the entry form are eligible to enter to win an iPad.

Remember, fire safety starts with you!

Jon Grieve is the fire chief for the Lone Butte Fire Department.

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How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

Captain Jonathan Degen helps riders off the back of the Montague Fire District Authority’s fire truck on Wednesday, Oct. 11.

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

A man holds a child while watching a fire truck returning from a ride at the Dalton Twp. Fire Department open house Wednesday, Oct. 11.

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

Muskegon Co. Deputy Jamie Ottinger shows his K-9 dog, Rex.

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

A child blasts water from the fire hose during the Montague open house.

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

Children play on a Fire Safety Bounce House at Dalton Fire Department.

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

Lt. Mike Holman of the White Lake Fire Authority waves as he gets ready to give a ride on the department’s restored 1950 Ford pumper.

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

A firefighter assists a child out of the smoke house at the Montague Fire District Authority’s open house.

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Several area fire departments celebrated National Fire Prrevention Week, Oct. 8-14, with open houses and visits to the fire station by school classes. The White Lake Beacon captured images from open houses held by the White Lake Fire Authority, Montague Fire District Authority and Dalton Township Fire Department.

It is never too early or too late to learn about fire safety.

On Saturday, October 5, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m., the fire stations of South Dundas opened their doors to the public, showing visitors what fire fighters do, how they are equipped and the vehicles they use to stop fires and rescue fire victims. The stations in both Morrisburg and Iroquois welcomed a steady stream of children, parents, grandparents and friends throughout the event.

The South Dundas open houses mark the start of 2013’s Fire Prevention Week, which runs from October 6-12.

Fire Prevention Week is designed to increase public awareness about the dangers of fire and to teach ways to protect families, homes and property from fire. The special theme of this year’s activities is focussed on preventing kitchen fires.

Accidents in the kitchen are among the most common causes of residential fires.

Deputy chief Marc St. Pierre, of the South Dundas Fire and Emergency Services, introduced visitors to the Morrisburg Fire Hall to the hazards of stoves and other fast heating objects common in most homes. “It’s not a bad thing to get kids used to stoves,” he said, “but adults must be there to supervise and teach at all times.”

Children in particular enjoyed games of “hot” and “cold” with local firefighters. They were invited to put objects like play toasters, play irons or ice cube trays on to red or blue mats indicating whether these objects could hurt, or start fires.

It may have been a game, but the objectives were serious: teaching little ones to stay away from appliances which can harm them.

There were free hand outs, colouring books and fire helmets for the young crowd.

Children visiting South Dundas fire halls also gathered around fire fighters like Morrisburg’s Chris Sachs or Iroquois’ Todd Tysick, to watch them put on all their distinctive protective gear, including tanks and masks.

“Many kids are really afraid in a fire,” Sachs explained. “The problem is that if they see a fire fighter in full gear come out of the smoke, they could be just as frightened of us: sometimes they will actually hide from us. That’s just what we don’t want them to do. We want them to recognize that we are friends and always come to us.”

“Part of our purpose today is to help educate the public,” said Iroquois fire fighter Justin Vanhecke.

Visitors could check out, and climb into, rescue equipment, pumper trucks and vans, including the pumper rescue vehicle recently added to the South Dundas fleet. Sounding sirens and testing smoke detectors were very popular with young visitors. Free barbecues at both local stations were served up by the volunteers.

Despite the cold winds and intermittent rain showers, hundreds visited the Sykesville-Freedom District fire company’s open house Sunday Oct. 18 as it hosted all sorts of public safety and health organizations as part of Fire Prevention Month.

October is Fire Prevention Month for fire departments all over the country. The main focus is on Fire Prevention Week, which is always the week including Oct. 9, the anniversary of the Great Chicago Fire in 1871.

Carroll County fire departments hold events throughout the month to spread the word about fire safety. At the Sykesville open house, the electric line safety demonstration by BGE workers drew a large crowd to the company’s special trailer that was rigged with its own electric transmission line.

“We had great participation — a lot of organizations came out and we go out a lot of information,” said. Lt. Chris Flanagan, the fire prevention officer at the Sykesville-Freedom District fire company.

“This week, we’re going to all four elementary schools [Carrolltowne, Eldersburg, Freedom and Piney Ridge] to bring the Carroll County Safety Trailer,” Flanagan said. “The second-grade students at each school get trained on how to find hazards and how to escape a fire — get low, get to a meeting place and call 911.”

Inside the fire department’s Jubilee Hall, kids could have some fun along with the serious lessons. Just inside the door was Libby Luebberman, of Sykesville, a department volunteer, with her two Dalmatian dogs.

“They’re my pets, but they’re part of the fire department tradition, so I bring them up here every year,” she said.

Children got to meet Sparky, the department’s costumed Dalmation mascot, as well. The kids were also fascinated by the tiny fire truck being driven by another Sparky — actually a remote-controlled truck with a stuffed version of the mascot in the driver’s seat.

The fire department served up hot dogs, chips and punch, providing lunch to the attendees, many of whom returned the favor by putting some money into the donation boots in the hall. The fire department volunteers are still working to pay for the rebuilding of the fire hall burned in February 2010. Volunteers handed out balloons and plastic fire hats to the kids and emergency medical technicians did blood pressure checks.

Members of the department’s junior firefighters showed kids how to crawl under smoke to get away from a fire and demonstrated how to put on fire gear.

“I can get my gear on in 46 seconds,” said Abby Burrows, 14, of Sykesville, one of the junior firefighters.

New Slate of Foundation Officers and Board Members
Foundation Helps Spread Safety Message

Foundation Supports Fire Prevention Week

How to Celebrate Fire Prevention Week

Foundation Supports FDNY Fire Prevention Week

A sea of red junior firefighter and EMT helmets took over the Plaza at Rockefeller Center on Tues., Oct. 7 as hundreds of New York City school children celebrated National Fire Prevention Week 2014.

The special event brought the children together with the New York City Fire Department and Tishman Speyer and served as a reminder to everyone in attendance to be vigilant about fire safety.

“We know teaching children to be fire safe will not only empower them, it can also save their lives,” said Fire Commissioner Daniel A. Nigro. “Our free fire safety education program, which is funded by the FDNY Foundation, is critical to reducing fire deaths; especially among children.”

Commissioner Nigro administered the Junior Firefighter and EMTs Pledge – an oath designed to remind children to practice fire safety – swearing-in the Junior Firefighters and EMTs.

The students traveled to Rockefeller Center from schools across the five boroughs and had the opportunity to interact with firefighters and fire equipment.

Nicole Willheimer brought her students from PS 375, Mosaic Preparatory Academy in Manhattan.

“It’s important they learn how to protect themselves in case of a fire. And I hope they go home and encourage their parents to get the proper tools they need, like smoke detectors,” she said. “I was absolutely floored at the opportunity to participate. I’m so thankful to give the children the opportunity to learn how to protect themselves directly from the FDNY.”

The students moved through demonstrations presented by the Fire Safety Education Unit, including a hands-on look at how to operate legal window gates, how cooking fires can begin and what smoke looks like inside an apartment or house.

“We have stations for them and the children go home and bring the information to their parents,” said Lieutenant Anthony Mancuso, Director of Fire Safety Education. “Without the Foundation, we couldn’t do this event, we couldn’t do the work we do every single day of the year. We want to reach the very young, they’re so vulnerable and the Foundation helps us get this crucial message out.”

“The Foundation is proud to fund the fire safety education program,” said FDNY Foundation Chairman Stephen Ruzow. “Our greatest privilege is to support the work of the FDNY by helping to prevent deaths through education.”

At the event, each child also received the newly-released FDNY Fire Safety Activity Coloring Book. The coloring book was funded through a generous donation to the FDNY Foundation from Toys”R”Us. The book is distributed at schools and events throughout the year and helps to spread important fire safety lessons to youth across the city.

“It is our pleasure to sponsor the fire safety activity coloring book, which serves as an impactful way to support our community as thousands of kids learn about fire safety year-round in a fun and engaging way,” said Toys”R”Us Corporate Philanthropy Manager Rachel Willard.

“We are so grateful to have partners like Tishman Speyer and Toys”R”Us,” said FDNY Foundation Executive Director Jean O’Shea. “This donation allowed us to redesign our activity book to continue to make fire safety lessons fun and interactive for children throughout the city.”

The students and Fire Commissioner Nigro were joined by FDNY Chief of Department Edward S. Kilduff, members of the Department’s Fire Safety Education Unit, FDNY Foundation representatives and Fire and Life Safety officials from Tishman Speyer.

“This is a great day at Rockefeller Center. We are proud of all of the students who were sworn in as Junior Firefighters to celebrate Fire Prevention Week,” said Frank Bavaro, Director of Fire and Life Safety, Tishman Speyer. “I want to give a special thanks to Commissioner Nigro and the great Firefighters who were here today to teach everyone about preventing fires in our city, communities and homes.”

“Education material, great events like this and consistent community outreach are how the FDNY is reducing the number of people lost to fire year after year,” said Commissioner Nigro. “For the FDNY, talking about fire safety is a full time job because we know by preventing fires and educating the public, we can reduce the number of fatal fires.”

For more information about the FDNY Foundation’s public outreach programs, including the Fire Safety Education Unit, CLICK HERE.