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How to get stuff done a quick guide

How to get stuff done a quick guide

To-do lists can be your best friend or your worst enemy. You know, the pure satisfaction that comes from crossing through to-do’s, that feeling you get at the end of the day when you’ve checked everything off the list. That, plus your productivity skyrockets when you use them effectively. But a poorly managed and unrealistic task list, on the other hand, can leave you feeling overwhelmed and ready to give up.

We asked members of the Young Entrepreneur Council to share their best-kept secrets for managing to-do lists. Take these, add your own best practices and develop an efficient plan that works for you.

1. Find an accountability partner.

Sometimes an item on the to-do list might get pushed back because something more important came up. But too often we like to justify a moment of procrastination by calling it “prioritization.” There’s a big difference between those two terms. To stay on track, I suggest finding an accountability partner (or two) who can hold you to achieving the goals you set for yourself.

2. Identify three top priorities each day.

Once you write your long to-do list, highlight the three things you must accomplish in order to be productive and priority-focused that day. Don’t fall for the thrill of easy wins.

3. Estimate the time it takes to complete each task.

If you have downtime between meetings, for example, you can easily knock off a few items on your to-do list if you estimate they will each take a couple of minutes to complete. When you have longer available blocks of time, you can focus on heavier tasks that might take between 30 minutes and several hours to complete.

4. Create a “to-don’t” list.

The problem with to-do lists? Things just get in the way! Here’s the fix: Alongside your to-do list, create a “to-don’t” list. These are things you need to not do in order to accomplish your tasks for the day, such as “Don’t open email before 10 a.m.,” “Don’t eat a heavy lunch” and “Don’t answer phone calls while focusing.”

5. Schedule each action item on your calendar.

A to-do list is only as effective as the action you put behind it, and the best way to get things done is to schedule them on your calendar. When you know something needs to be done, set aside time to do it. If it’s something that can be done quickly, do it then. If it takes more time than you have right now, schedule it on your calendar when you do have time.

6. Make it digital.

In today’s digital age, you don’t have to limit your to-do list to pen and paper. Task management systems can allow you to create virtual to-do lists with deadlines, priorities, multiple tasks and much more. Most of these are simple, intuitive and don’t require a computer expert to set up. Don’t limit yourself to the Stone Age when it comes to something as important as your productivity.

7. Review your list at the start and end of the day.

Schedule time at the end of every day to evaluate your to-do list. What was accomplished? Cross it off. What’s still pending? What’s the priority? Cull, organize and prioritize the list. At the beginning of each day, review the task list that you left prepared and schedule out your day based on your to-do list and priorities.

8. Focus on one thing at a time.

Too often, we make a to-do list with every thought that comes into our minds, which leads to long and detailed lists that can be daunting. The key to an effective to-do list is to prioritize the list and then focus on a singular task at a time. Don’t overwhelm yourself by looking at the length of the list. Focus on the first task, then move down the list one step at a time.

9. Purge your list daily.

A to-do list is for short-term tasks: single action items you intend to complete within seven days. Items that don’t fit these criteria should be removed. If anything on your to-do list requires more than one action, it’s a project. Remove it from your list and use a project management tool. Once an item is on your list for seven days, do one of the “3 D’s”: drop it, delegate it or do it right now.

10. Use it for everything you do.

Use the same list for work and play. When you combine work and personal activities (and that includes leisure time), you create a habit of using the list. Whether you jot tasks down on paper or use any one of the online to-do-list apps, the more consistently you use a list, the more effective it becomes. Big presentation due? Grocery lists? Doctor appointment? Everything needs to get done, so put them all on the same list.

11. Be realistic.

The best thing to do is make the tasks on your to-do list realistic. As much as you would like to finish all of your current projects, most people overload the list and make it impossible to check each item off by the end of the day. Adjust your expectations so you can feel good about crossing off those to-do’s, making you feel more accomplished and refreshed.

How to get stuff done a quick guide

by Lana Gilbert

In this world of quick fixes and instant everything, is there a shortcut to getting things done?

For decades, I was a serial procrastinator. Fiddling pencils until lunchtime only to hurry up and make a presentation 15 minutes before a meeting gives me a real adrenaline rush. However, after some time, I realized that cramming just made me half mad and all stressed. Even worse–it put me on the brink of losing my job.

Changing habits isn’t for the weak, but it’s the inevitable path you’ll have to take if you want to get things done. Now, these are not quick fixes, but these habits will slowly but surely help you to get things done, day in and day out.

1. Work like you are on a half day

If you are like most folks, you spend your mornings sipping coffee, checking out the latest updates from your social media newsfeeds and replying back and forth to emails. Before you know it, it’s lunchtime. Half the day is now gone. The best way to work is to tackle your most difficult tasks in the morning. Work like you are about to leave the office by lunch. Attack your tasks like you don’t have much time left. Resist the temptation to check your emails first thing in the morning. Likewise, don’t open your chat messages. If there’s something urgent that must be done, surely the sender would be calling you to follow up by now. Everything else that is in your inbox can wait up until midday. Reply to your emails once you are done with your biggest task for the day.

2. Cut your to-do list in half

Limit your to-do list for the day to one small post-it note. Portion your lengthy tasks into segments that can be done in an hour or two. Having a long to-do list puts you in fight and flight mode. Being swamped with work and feeling not in control will make you work slower. Empower yourself by picking out only the top three tasks for the morning and do the same for the afternoon. Do these important tasks before you move on to other time-consuming activities.

3. Cut your tasks into small 45-minute chunks

Put yourself in a working frenzy for no more than 45 minutes at a time. Try to do one of your most important tasks in the morning, and do it before you make your morning coffee. Reward yourself for a small job done fast by sipping that first cup. Throughout your day, portion your tasks into 45 minutes sprints. After the 45 minutes timer hits zero, reward yourself once again by drinking a large glass of water. Your focus won’t dwindle if you cut your tasks in 45-minute chunks. These mini-breaks keep you productive throughout the day.

4. Develop smart morning and night habits

Resist the temptation to put off work until you feel ready. Don’t give yourself an option to catch up on your most important tasks after dinner time. This practice is like giving yourself an excuse to put off work until late in the day. Even if you say that you are not a morning person, do your best work in the morning, not at night. If you want to be better than the rest, forgo gratification and comfort at night. Cut off your cable connection. That large TV might look enticing, but it will surely rob you of your precious me-time. Reserve your nights to learning something new about your job or business.

Work smart, not hard. Looking harried and tired is counterproductive to your work image. Breezy and easy is the new cool. There is a way to do things right and fast without looking stressed and worn out. It’s all up to you. Just make the shift right now.

Productivity coach, speaker, blogger and author of Chaos to Control, a Practical Guide to Getting Things Done Read full profile

How to get stuff done a quick guide

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It has to be one of mankind’s greatest challenges; staying focused in the fast paced, technology driven world we are living in. Information overload, a common phenomenon, work overload another. But staying focused is perhaps the best way for us to get things done and move forward with our lives and our jobs. So how do we keep our eye on the ball when it’s accustomed to bouncing around from court to court?

Focus on one thing

“He who chases two rabbits catches none” – Confucius

Wise words from a wise man, but most of us will relate to chasing maybe a dozen rabbits at the same time and a couple of elephants. But if we are to follow the wise words of Confucius we will get more done and achieve our goals quickly. Working on more than one thing at a time will waste valuable time. When we switch from one task to another, it takes our brain time to readjust and concentrate on the second task and precious time is lost in the changeover. The reality being that multitasking is a productivity nightmare.

Eliminate known distractions

Last week I suggested an information detox to help us recognize the amount of information that we consume is unnecessary. A detox also helps us to unwind and relax, an essential part of focus and concentration. If you need to get work done, disconnect from technology. Turn off all notifications and reminders of emails and tweets etc. Take control of all communication and social media and only go to them when you are ready to spend time there. It’s not good to get notifications – human beings are not strong enough to ignore these teasers.

Calm the mind

One of our biggest distractions is not as you may have thought – Facebook – it is our own thoughts racing through our minds when we are trying to get something done. These cheeky thoughts often tempt us away from the job that needs doing, or they annoyingly and repeatedly inform while we are working on task A that task B, C and D remain unfinished. Don’t listen, take control of your thoughts and redirect them to the job at hand. A great way to still the mind is meditation. It can help to silence the constant chat we all experience from time to time. It can be a great assistance to focus.

De-clutter

De-cluttering is another way to eliminate distractions, if your desk, office and head are clear, you are minimising the possibilities for distractions. I always start my week by cleaning my office, anything that was left lying around from the past week needs to be dealt with, you need to know that there is nothing you have forgotten about or left undone. If you get into the habit of doing a weekly de-clutter or in GTD terms a weekly review, you can start the week relaxed, focused and ready for action.

Exercise

We all know exercise creates energy; it is also a powerful way to reduce stress, as endorphins are released by the pituitary gland to block out feelings of pain or stress. Serotonin, another chemical released while exercising, improves our mood and our sense of happiness. Exercise is also responsible for the creation of new neurons in the brain which enable us to process and store information more easily.

Clarification of Goals

Being clear about our goals and objectives will help us focus and stay on track. It motivates us to continue and persist when we are lacking the inspiration. If your goals is to de-clutter your home and be more organized, your objective maybe to reduce stress and induce calm. For another person the objective may be because they are putting their house up for sale and need the house looking good and attractive. It’s important to clarify your objectives in order to maintain the motivation and ensure that what you are working on is getting you closer to that goal.

Simplify

The more we simplify our lives and our jobs, the more work we get done. But we don’t just want to get work done, we want to get the important tasks done, the tasks that make a difference to the big picture. Many of us busy ourselves doing tasks that are unnecessary, wasting time on things that aren’t adding value to our lives or our jobs. If you can simplify and eliminate the unnecessary from your life you will have more time to focus on what is important, and it will also become a lot easier to maintain this focus.

What other methods do you use to stay focused?

Where and how to start packing your stuff

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How to get stuff done a quick guide

The Spruce / Nelly Cuanalo

Whenever you move, one of the tasks that take the most time and requires the most patience is packing all your belongings and doing it in time for when the moving truck arrives. To help you get started, we’ve created some guides to packing up your home so the stuff you need to get done doesn’t feel so overwhelming.

How and Where to Start Packing up Your Home

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The Spruce / Nelly Cuanalo

Moving is stressful and so overwhelming, and part of the stress has to do with packing up the entire house. At first, it may seem impossible. But with helpful tips and suggestions, packing is a breeze. Just make sure you’re organized and know what you need to do before you even pack the first box.

Make a Packing Supply List

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The Spruce / Nelly Cuanalo

When you move or relocate, to ensure your household goods arrive at your new destination without a scratch, start with a good packing list so you purchase the right packing and moving supplies.

All About Moving Boxes

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The Spruce / Nelly Cuanalo

Moving boxes are generally the same weight and quality as ordinary shipping boxes, unless you purchase some made from thicker cardboard that allows for heavier packing. So, the question most people have is, should I purchase moving boxes or find some slightly-used from grocery stores or friends who’ve just recently moved?

Can I Pack With Used Boxes?

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The Spruce / Nelly Cuanalo

With most of us pinching our pennies right now, finding ways to save on moving costs not only helps keep money in our wallets​ but can also help the planet by reusing packing materials and reducing waste. Used boxes are definitely an option, you just need to know where to find them (and get them for free!) and what to do and not do.

What Not to Pack and Move

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The Spruce / Nelly Cuanalo

Before you pack, find out what you shouldn’t pack or at least what you should be careful when packing.There are some things that need special handling, items that moving companies will not move if they are not properly prepared.

How to Get Rid of Stuff You Don’t Need to Move

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The Spruce / Nelly Cuanalo

The upside of moving is that it forces you to make a clean sweep of the house, getting rid of items that you no longer use or need. The first place to start is to determine what to sell, either online or by hosting a garage sale, and what to give away.

What’s an Essentials Box & How to Pack One

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The Spruce / Nelly Cuanalo

Before moving or relocating, everyone should prepare an essentials box, a box full of items you’ll need for your last few nights before you move and the first few nights in your new home.

Quick and Easy Packing Tips

How to get stuff done a quick guide

If you only have time for one packing guide, this is the one to read as it provides tips that you may not have thought of before. So use it to make your packing quick and easy.

Packing Tips From the Professionals

How to get stuff done a quick guide

When you’re packing for a move, you might want to ask yourself if you should pack it yourself or hire professionals to do it for you. In many of our moves we’ve never used professionals to pack our things; for me, it’s always about saving money.

10 Things You May Forget to Pack or Do

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The Spruce / Nelly Cuanalo

Over the years and the many moves, we always think we have moving down to a very fine science; however, usually in the midst of the moving chaos, we forget something and swear that we’ll add it to a growing list of “forgotten items” for the next time we move. To save you the trouble of forehead slapping that usually ensues after you’re fifty miles from your old home, check out my list.

How to Pack and Move the House Room by Room

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The Spruce / Nelly Cuanalo

This is the ultimate guide to packing and moving your home. With step by step instructions, along with packing tips, you won’t need anything else except for packing supplies and time. We provide the motivation.

Genshin Impact is a gacha game slash JRPG, and while our walkthrough will help you with the JRPG part and the gameplay elements, the gacha part relies on Wishes. Through pulling cards, you can unlock new characters to play or new weapons to use, so they’re more useful than just the aesthetic. Here, we’ll go through how the currency works, and how to make the most of what the game gives you.

What Is The Currency In Genshin Impact?

While the menu is called ‘Wishes’, you actually buy the packs with Acquiant Fate and Intertwined Fate, which are similar but different. Intertwined Fate is rarer, and so comes with better rewards when you save enough of them up, but is harder to earn in the game and has a higher price if you’re planning on just buying them outright.

How Do You Get Characters Or Weapons In Genshin Impact?

How to get stuff done a quick guide

Because of the gacha elements, the rewards are randomized. However, at the bottom of the Wishes screen, you’ll be able to click on a details box which will bring up a full list of the rewards and odds for each character or weapon. To even get to this screen though, you’ll need to go to either the Pause Menu and Wishes on the PS4, or click the star in the top corner for mobile and PC.

This brings up the Wishes screen, where you’ll be able to slide through the different banners and decide which ones you want to try for. In the bottom right corner, it will tell you which currency these use. It will also give you the option of buying just one, or buying 10. As we explain below, it’s much better to save up for 10 then buy them one at a time. Either way though, from here the game will give you a randomized reward of either a character or a weapon.

Should I Save Up My Fates In Genshin Impact?

How to get stuff done a quick guide

Absolutely. While you might get lucky buying rewards one by one, buying them in bulk guarantees at least one high level pull, and may have a discount; the specifics of this depend on which banner you’re pulling, but the basic gist is consistent. It’s definitely tempting to try and game the system by buying one by one and hoping to only have to spend three or four to get a high level card, but the odds just aren’t in your favor. Waiting for the bulk buy consumes both time and resources, but it’s more likely to be a successful strategy.

How Do You Get Acquaint Fates and Intertwined Fates In Genshin Impact?

The easy answer, of course, is with money. As with all gacha games, you can just keep buying Fates and spending them until you’ve got the cards you want. You can also gain them in the game by leveling up or as rewards from the Adventurer’s Guild, or by converting other in-game rewards into Fates.

The game will give you 10 Acquiant Fates for reaching Level 5 and 10 for reaching Level 10, meaning you can guarantee two high level pulls by spending each set all at once. It takes less than half an hour to reach Level 5, so if you want to know how to reroll in Genshin Impact, we’ve got you covered.

Everyone procrastinates sometimes. You do it more. Maybe you’re a perfectionist. Maybe you get overwhelmed. Whatever the reason, this “stop putting things off” guide will end the cycle for good.

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Difficulties Getting Started

You have a big project coming up. But it seems overwhelming, and like many people with attention deficit disorder (ADHD or ADD), you’ve been putting off getting started for days, or even months. Knowing that others see failure to complete projects on time as a sign of disrespect, incompetence, or even laziness fuels your anxiety, fear of failure, imperfection, and indecisiveness, making it even harder to break through the paralysis. There’s hope! Cognitive behavior therapy techniques can help even the chronic procrastinator stop putting things off.

Know That You Can’t Do Everything Perfectly!

Stop the negative self-talk! Think of positive, realistic things you can say to yourself to stay motivated. Write down “positive affirmations” and keep them nearby. For example: “I’m going to feel great when I hand this in to my boss on time.” Or, simply, “I can do this!” Instead of saying “This will take forever,” say “I might not finish this today, but I can do the first two steps within the next 30 minutes.” What we silently say to ourselves about doing the task at hand has a strong impact on how (or whether) we do it.

Create the Right Environment

Create the workspace that’s right for you. Some people with ADHD get more done when listening to loud music. Others need clutter-free, distraction-free zones — many college students with ADHD go straight to the library, not their chaotic dorm room. If noise distracts you, noise-reducing headphones can be a lifesaver. If your racing thoughts are distracting, putting them on paper can banish them from your mind. Lock your door. Put your phone on silent. Do what works for you.

Set Up the Task

Before even starting the project, give yourself the task of collecting everything you’ll need in one place — papers, graphs, directions from the boss — and place it in your inbox, on your desk, or on your chair. For ADDitude blogger Stacey Turis, this includes a cup of green tea and a square of dark chocolate. The setup doesn’t take long, but it makes it much easier to jump into the task.

Break Big Projects Up

Break projects into smaller projects, and assign a deadline for completing each step. Most of the time, we’re given a deadline for the date by which the entire project has to be completed. To keep yourself on track, mark the date by which you should complete one-quarter of the project, one-half, and so on. Those dates will alert you to problems while there’s still time to play catch-up.

Post Your Deadlines

Post deadlines for each step of your project where you can see them. This will remind you to use your time wisely. When ADHD coach Sandy Maynard was struggling to finish her long-delayed thesis, she created a computer screensaver that read “February 26 or Bust.”

Do the Fun Stuff First

To get started, many people with ADHD find that once their brain is both relaxed and active, they can transfer that positive involvement to begin a daunting project. So, light up your brain by going for a walk, listening to music or practicing breathing exercises or short meditations. You can also just start with the project’s fun stuff. Set a timer for fifteen minutes if you are worried about getting lost in the fun zone.

Start Somewhere, Start Anywhere

After your project is broken into small pieces, you face the moment when you have to start. Set a timer for fifteen minutes and tell yourself that you can do anything for fifteen minutes. Even if your first completed work is a bit sloppy, hey, at least you’re moving! Half the time, you’ll get in a groove and be ready to move forward with the next steps.

Make It Public

Knowing that we need to answer to other people can be a tremendous motivator. Ask a friend to call you at a prearranged time to make sure you’re sticking to your deadlines. It’s okay to ask for help — that’s what friends are for, right? You can return the favor later on when she needs a boost.

Beware of Multitasking

You know what they say, “Out of sight, out of mind.” Only have on your desk what you’re currently working on and don’t try to multitask. If you absolutely must work on two projects at a time, don’t bounce back and forth haphazardly. Stop the first project at a point where you can easily pick up, and shift your focus completely to the second task.

Everyone procrastinates sometimes. You do it more. Maybe you’re a perfectionist. Maybe you get overwhelmed. Whatever the reason, this “stop putting things off” guide will end the cycle for good.

Share Article Menu

Difficulties Getting Started

You have a big project coming up. But it seems overwhelming, and like many people with attention deficit disorder (ADHD or ADD), you’ve been putting off getting started for days, or even months. Knowing that others see failure to complete projects on time as a sign of disrespect, incompetence, or even laziness fuels your anxiety, fear of failure, imperfection, and indecisiveness, making it even harder to break through the paralysis. There’s hope! Cognitive behavior therapy techniques can help even the chronic procrastinator stop putting things off.

Know That You Can’t Do Everything Perfectly!

Stop the negative self-talk! Think of positive, realistic things you can say to yourself to stay motivated. Write down “positive affirmations” and keep them nearby. For example: “I’m going to feel great when I hand this in to my boss on time.” Or, simply, “I can do this!” Instead of saying “This will take forever,” say “I might not finish this today, but I can do the first two steps within the next 30 minutes.” What we silently say to ourselves about doing the task at hand has a strong impact on how (or whether) we do it.

Create the Right Environment

Create the workspace that’s right for you. Some people with ADHD get more done when listening to loud music. Others need clutter-free, distraction-free zones — many college students with ADHD go straight to the library, not their chaotic dorm room. If noise distracts you, noise-reducing headphones can be a lifesaver. If your racing thoughts are distracting, putting them on paper can banish them from your mind. Lock your door. Put your phone on silent. Do what works for you.

Set Up the Task

Before even starting the project, give yourself the task of collecting everything you’ll need in one place — papers, graphs, directions from the boss — and place it in your inbox, on your desk, or on your chair. For ADDitude blogger Stacey Turis, this includes a cup of green tea and a square of dark chocolate. The setup doesn’t take long, but it makes it much easier to jump into the task.

Break Big Projects Up

Break projects into smaller projects, and assign a deadline for completing each step. Most of the time, we’re given a deadline for the date by which the entire project has to be completed. To keep yourself on track, mark the date by which you should complete one-quarter of the project, one-half, and so on. Those dates will alert you to problems while there’s still time to play catch-up.

Post Your Deadlines

Post deadlines for each step of your project where you can see them. This will remind you to use your time wisely. When ADHD coach Sandy Maynard was struggling to finish her long-delayed thesis, she created a computer screensaver that read “February 26 or Bust.”

Do the Fun Stuff First

To get started, many people with ADHD find that once their brain is both relaxed and active, they can transfer that positive involvement to begin a daunting project. So, light up your brain by going for a walk, listening to music or practicing breathing exercises or short meditations. You can also just start with the project’s fun stuff. Set a timer for fifteen minutes if you are worried about getting lost in the fun zone.

Start Somewhere, Start Anywhere

After your project is broken into small pieces, you face the moment when you have to start. Set a timer for fifteen minutes and tell yourself that you can do anything for fifteen minutes. Even if your first completed work is a bit sloppy, hey, at least you’re moving! Half the time, you’ll get in a groove and be ready to move forward with the next steps.

Make It Public

Knowing that we need to answer to other people can be a tremendous motivator. Ask a friend to call you at a prearranged time to make sure you’re sticking to your deadlines. It’s okay to ask for help — that’s what friends are for, right? You can return the favor later on when she needs a boost.

Beware of Multitasking

You know what they say, “Out of sight, out of mind.” Only have on your desk what you’re currently working on and don’t try to multitask. If you absolutely must work on two projects at a time, don’t bounce back and forth haphazardly. Stop the first project at a point where you can easily pick up, and shift your focus completely to the second task.

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KaosK

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Updated for Thaumcraft 4.2

If you quickly want access to all the aspects, with a minimum of manual aspect combining, then read on.

This Mini-Guide does not cover anything added by other mods. Depending on your modpack, there might be better ways to get to an aspect.

It doesn’t matter which item/block you choose for discovering an aspect. For every newly discovered aspect you will gain a flat bonus of two research points. (I believe the bonus used to be item-dependent)

Pro-Tip: Go scan some Bedrock! It’s worth a lot of Research Points.

Start by combinig Aqua and Terra in the “Research Table” to get Victus.
There is no easy way to scan for Victus (at least that I know of) and it is a prerequisite for a lot of other aspects. While you’re at it, combine Aer and Aqua to make Tempestas, the weather aspect, it’s not a prerequisite for other aspects but since you can’t scan the weather, you’ll have to combine it anyway. (Weather you like it or not)

Now, scan these items and blocks in order:

  1. Torch –> Lux
  2. Coal, Coal Ore –> Potenia
  3. Grass Block –> Herba
  4. Trapdoor –> Motus & Arbor
  5. Chest, Bowl –> Vacuos
  6. Glass Block –> Vitreus
  7. Potion of weakness –> Mortuus & Praecantatio
    • or alternatively:
    • Research: (Victus + Perditio) –> Mortuus
    • Any Shard, Mossy Cobble, Chiseled Sandst. –> Praecantatio
  8. Chicken –> Volatus & Bestia
  9. Soul Sand –> Spiritus & Vinculum
    • or if you not have been to the nether yet:
    • Skeleton Skull, Zombie Head –> Spiritus
    • Amber –> Vinculum
  10. Paper –> Cognito
  11. Rotten Flesh –> Humanus & Corpus
  12. Wheat, Bread, Apple, Carrot, Potato –> Fames & Messis
  13. Flint –> Instrumentum
  14. Obsidian –> Tenebrae

And then you can scan the rest (no particular order necessary):

  • Any one block tall vanilla Flower –> Sensus
  • Wool –> Fabrico & Pannus
  • Spider Eye –> Venenum (and also Sensus)
  • Snow, Ice –> Gelum
  • Milk Bucket –> Sano
  • Any Hoe –> Meto
  • Any Pickaxe –> Perfodio
  • Arrow –> Telum
  • Leather, any Armor –> Tutamen
  • Hopper, Cinnabar Ore(has also Venenum) –> Permutatio
  • Fence Gate –> Machina & Iter
  • Iron Ingot, Iron Ore –> Metallum
  • Gold –> Lucrum
  • Zombie, Skellington –> Exanimis
  • Ender Pearl, Blaze , Obsidian Totem –> Alienis
  • Slimeball –> Limus
  • Tainted Goo –> Vitium (and also Limus)
  • Ethereal Essence (any Aspect) –> Auram

Old Thaumcraft 4.0 Guide:

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

To revist this article, visit My Profile, then View saved stories.

If you thought your time-management skills were up to scratch, think again. David Allen’s personal-productivity guidebook Getting Things Done has become a call to arms for webheads who want to accomplish more tasks in less time.

But who is the author followers call “the guru,” and what do you need to join his merry band? Here are a few pointers to get you started.

What is Getting Things Done and what’s the big idea?

Depending on your politics, Getting Things Done is either a how-to for drones to perform harder and faster, or the book that will help you wipe out anxiety through streamlining your approach to work. According to the back cover, “our productivity is directly proportional to our ability to relax; only when our minds are clear and our thoughts are organized can we achieve results and unleash our creative potential.”

Sounds a bit Zen. Who is this guy?

Funny you should say that. As a teenager, the author studied Zen Buddhism and Beat poetry, and later put a master’s university program on hold to study black-belt karate. This path to spiritual enlightenment led him down the road of personal-growth consultancy, in which he uses his books and seminars to teach others how to simplify their thoughts and increase efficiency by achieving a state of “mind like water.” Today, Ojai, California-based Allen’s star is rising as CEO of a company that bears his name and a leading coach and speaker on the international personal-development seminar circuit.

So what’s the Getting Things Done approach?

Like all the best self-help schemes, GTD followers must submit to a five-step plan. First, empty the thoughts and ideas swirling around your overtaxed brain into what Allen calls a “collection bucket” — this can be any trusted place, from a writing pad to Microsoft Project, as long as those memes live somewhere other than your head.

Next, decide what you need to do, if anything, to act on those ideas. Then organize and review your actions routinely to ensure your new to-do system stays in shape. “The single most important discipline that is essential if you are going to be successful at integrating GTD principles into your life is review,” according to GTD practitioner Marc Orchant. “If you review your action lists, your commitments, your inboxes on a regular basis, the system works.”

So project management is a cult? You mean, like Waco?

Not exactly — David Allen is no David Koresh. Merlin Mann, proprietor of a weblog inspired by GTD, said the reality is “far less glamorous or menacing than this cult label.” Still, with over 350,000 copies sold, Getting Things Done is pitched as a code by which to lead a tranquil, organized life, and many who realize the book’s promise end up spreading the word to others online.

What’s the best productivity tech?

Allen’s company sells its own Microsoft Outlook plug-in to bring GTD to your inbox, but followers find all kinds of applications and devices to run their “life hacks.” Mac users, for example, can use NoteBook as an outliner tool that replicates the look and feel of a ruled writing pad, while Life Balance even processes all of your tasks and to-do lists to generate pie charts depicting work time versus downtime. The 43 Folders wiki carries a good list of software recommendations for rookie time-management worshippers.

Luddites can play, too. GTD followers cobble together project-management solutions compatible with the book’s philosophy using simple index cards, Post-It notes and even scraps of paper. Moleskine notebooks, too, are a favorite dead-tree palmtop for many fans. “The tactile experience of writing in a journal is very gratifying for many of us,” said Marc Orchant of Albuquerque, New Mexico, a GTD practitioner. “The cool factor of having a life hack like the Hipster PDA is a Luddite indulgence practiced by people who have too much technology in their lives already.”

You can’t hide from your to-do list forever. Use these 11 strategies for de-cluttering, managing paper, overcoming distractions, and getting things done.

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Overcome the Overload

Every day we’re confronted with information, distractions, work, and lots of other stuff. Is it a surprise anyone gets anything done, never mind those with attention deficit disorder (ADHD or ADD)? People with ADHD are easily overwhelmed by the fast pace and interruptions, so they need some stay-focused strategies to keep them on track. Consider this your “how to get things done” guide.

Capture All That Information

Instead of going crazy trying to write down all those bits of information that come your way, try these solutions:

  • Call important information into your voicemail and leave yourself messages. Your smartphone’s voice recorder app can also come in handy for this.
  • Convert verbal information into text, using apps like Google Keep (Android, iOS, Web) and Evernote (iOS, Android, Windows, Mac)

Finish Something, Anything, Early in the Day

Completing a chore — a small task or something larger that you worked on yesterday — gives you a sense of closure, making the rest of the day meaningful. No matter how the day goes, you can say you got something done, which gives you a sense of satisfaction that will encourage you to keep going the next day.

Get a Grip

If a phone call or a request from your spouse distracts you from a task you’re working on, hold on to a physical artifact to remind you what you were doing, An unopened envelope, for instance, will remind you that you were opening mail before the interruption, and will focus your attention more quickly.

Put It on the Calendar

It’s not enough to write down a task on your to-do list. You have to enter your it into your calendar. Assigning a task to a specific day increases your chances of getting it done. With a to-do list only, you have a 40 to 50 percent chance of doing the task. Scheduling the task increases your chances of completing it by 70 percent or so.

Just Do It

Don’t get overwhelmed about where or when to start a de-cluttering task. It doesn’t matter where you start; begin at any spot in a room. After you start, continue in some kind of logical order. If you start on the left side of the room, keep going to the left. If you start on the top shelf of a cabinet, work your way down. There is no ideal time to tackle clutter.

Change the Scene

People with ADHD can optimize their focus and attention by doing different tasks in different kinds of places. If you have to do your taxes, rent a room in a local hotel for a day or two. You can spread out all the papers and receipts, with fewer distractions than at home. Some people with attention deficit can’t get anything done — studying, writing, reading — in the quiet of a library. Finding a setting like a Starbucks, with some background noise, will help them be more productive.

Enlist a Support Team

Stop trying to be an ordinary person who keeps it together in the same way that people without ADHD do. Support might mean another set of hands, someone to keep your morale up, or someone to function as a body double. A body double is somebody who is physically present as you do a task but doesn’t do the task with you. Your body double anchors you to the chore at hand.

Switch Up Your Routine Every Quarter

People with ADHD get bored with their routines more quickly than those without the condition. The higher boredom factor keeps them from tackling things they once completed with ease. Routines — whether it’s opening mail, doing dishes, or tackling a project at work — can be kept fresh by changing them up every three months. This doesn’t mean a complete overhaul, just a tweak.

Play It Loose with Deadlines

Schedule extra time to finish a task. Rather than trying to precisely estimate how long a task will take, just say, “Screw it. I’m going to need 30 percent more time for everything I plan, no matter what.” Just pick a number: Twenty percent more, 50 percent more, and allot that. The worst that could happen is that you finish it early.

Keep Calm and Carry On

As you start your day, do the first three things that worry you the most to get them off your plate. The internal distraction of worry plays more on people with ADHD than on other people and prevents them from getting things done. If you do any small part of what is worrying you, chances are you’ll break the anxiety and move forward.