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How to help your child ace school exams

The thought of preparing for important school exams will likely fill student hearts with dread. Passing these exams is important, since state tests and other forms of high-stakes testing govern whether a student moves on to the next grade, graduates from high school, or even gets into college. While these exams are not usually fun to take, parents can make test prep bearable—and even fun.

1. Encourage Plenty of ZZZs

Sleep deprivation is significant since well-rested students tend to be healthier and more alert. While children should, naturally, get plenty of sleep throughout the year, parents should pay extra attention to sleep patterns when its time for school exams. According to the National Sleep Foundation, children 6–13 years old require 9 to 11 hours of sleep, and teenagers need 8 to 10 hours.

2. Tie Study Techniques to the Child’s Learning Styles and Interests

Make test prep as fun as possible! Kids may have different ways that they prefer to learn, including visual, verbal, social, and solitary, and parents often have a good idea of which learning style best fits their children. It can be effective to match test prep activities to your child’s learning preference. For example, a social learner might benefit more from studying with a sibling and parent rather than the parent alone. Such a child might also benefit greatly from group tutoring sessions. A solitary learner might benefit from reviewing study guides and taking several practice tests at his or her own pace.

Tying test prep to interests can also provide an extra boost of motivation. For example, parents can incorporate common state test skills such as reading, math, science, and even history into cooking lessons for a child who enjoys cooking.

3. Seek Out Extra Help

Young learners often gain an advantage when parents seek out extra help for state tests. Such help comes in a broad range of possibilities: study groups, tutoring, learning programs, and computer programs, to name just a few. LearnBop is a great online math program to consider. It’s a highly adaptive program for grades 4–12 that simulates one-to-one learning by providing immediate individualized instruction to the child’s needs. With assessments and real-time reporting, parents can identify areas of strength and weakness in their children. View the website for more details.

Avenues such as tutoring also help parents assess how prepared their children are, and they are ideal for providing students with the tools and concepts they need to prepare for exams.

4. Remain Calm

Parents can convey their anxiety to their children easily, which often tends to increase the pressure that students feel. Naturally, parents do not want their children grappling with issues such as sleeplessness, decreased appetite, and panic as an important exam looms; instead, parents need to project a tone of positivity and encouragement.

5. Familiarize the Child with the Exam and Environment

When something becomes familiar, it usually loses its mystique and hold over a student. Students also tend to feel more in control and more empowered when they know exactly what to expect. In many cases, parents can find previous or practice tests online, and teachers can also direct parents to additional resources (as well as serving as valuable test prep resources themselves). Not only should parents encourage their children to take practice exams, whether in one sitting or in chunks, but they also need to discuss the testing environment—for example, if the exam is on paper or on a computer, where the test will be, on what day, and if opportunities for breaks exist.

To learn about other ways you can support your child’s education and increase their chances for success, explore the advantages of online learning at k12.com, and receive a free info kit.

How to help your child ace school exams

Do tests make your teen break out in a cold sweat? Does your child have difficulty settling down to study for an exam? Here, wellness health educator Jane Pernotto Ehrman, MEd, RCHES, ACHT, shares nine ways to help your kids successfully prepare for tests.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Daily tips for reducing test anxiety

To get your child ready well before test day, here are some things you can do regularly.

1. Focus on the positive.

Start noticing the many things your child is already doing well — and tell them. Constant reminders about the consequences of a poor test score on their grades or success aren’t useful.

2. Reinforce healthy habits.

Encourage good nutrition and sleep habits on a daily basis. Don’t reserve them for the day before a test.

Tips for studying

Ehrman recommends the following strategies when test day is fast approaching.

3. Say “no” to multi-tasking.

Help your child focus by minimizing distractions. Turn off music, TV and other devices during study sessions.

4. Help kids envision success.

Like pro athletes prep for a game, kids can mentally rehearse taking a test with confidence and calm, answering questions well.

After study sessions are over

Once your child wraps up a study session, encourage them to step away from their books and take a nice break to recharge. The following activities are good to keep in mind.

5. Allow naps after a good study session.

Let kids who are tired take a nap after hitting the books. Sleep helps lock information into the memory.

6. Or send kids outside for fun and fresh air.

Let kids with energy shoot hoops or jump on a skateboard. Exercise and play relax body, mind and spirit before exams.

Things to keep in mind at bedtime

Rest and relaxation are critical for test day success. Ehrman suggests making them both a priority especially on the nights leading up to test day.

7. Kiss phones goodnight.

One hour before bed, dock and recharge phones, tablets, computers and other electronic devices outside the bedroom. (If they’re available, kids will use them.)

8. Help kids relax and recharge.

Relaxation practices can help kids focus. Meditation, guided imagery and relaxing each part of the body (starting at the feet and ending at the top of the head) can improve performance and bring a sense of calm. Schools are even teaching kids to meditate, with positive results!

On test day

9. Remind kids to breathe deeply — and often.

High stress and anxiety trigger shallow breathing and breath-holding. This robs the brain of oxygen, hampering memory recall, focus and concentration at test time. It’s why kids can forget information they know.

Keep these strategies in mind, and you can help your child ace their next big test.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Table of Contents

1. Introduction
2. Preparation tips to help your child ace their maths exam
3. Conclusion
4. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
5. External References

27 January 2021

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Board exams can be one of the most stressful exam situations for both parents and students alike.

These exams are conducted each year towards the end of February, all over India. Hundreds of students flock test centers, anxiously waiting to appear for their exams.

Mathematics is one of the most important subjects for any student aspiring to pursue their careers through competitive exams such as JEE Mains and JEE Advanced.

It’s the only subject that holds the potential for a student to get a perfect score if your child practices well.

Downloadable PDF

If you ever want to read it again as many times as you want, here is a downloadable PDF to explore more.

Prepare better: How to help your child ace the math board exam

Preparation tips to help your child ace their maths exam

Separate notebook for formulae, theories and methods

Math is a conceptual subject that requires a thorough understanding of different formulae and theories. It’s always good to keep a separate notebook for formulae that would help your child revisit them as and when they require. This will also help them revise concepts efficiently and help apply them in the problems they’re solving.

How to help your child ace school exams

Let your child find their own solutions

A mathematical problem can have different ways to reach a solution.

Contrary to what your child may be taught at school, there is no hard and fast rule that dictates that your child has to follow a set pattern to solve a problem to reach the solution.

Let your child understand the concepts behind the math problem and encourage them to ask the WHY behind the WHAT and guide them to find their own way to solve the problem.

Make sure they know and understand the syllabus

It’s equally important for your child to understand the syllabus and what they’re supposed to prepare well in advance to avoid any confusions before or during the exams.

Make sure they know the concepts they need to study for their exam.

A good way to prepare is to keep a chart of the chapters they need to prepare and track their progress through the chart.

Help them find and understand areas of improvement

Let your child solve past exam papers, practice papers and mock test papers that mimic test-like environments.

This will not only help them identify concepts and syllabus portions they need to practice but also help your child be prepared for any surprises that may creep up during the exam like time-management, etc.

It’s good to revisit the concepts your child may have a hard time grasping and help them clear any conceptual doubts they may have about the chapters.

How to help your child ace school exams

Talk to their teachers and tutors

Keeping tabs on your child’s progress can help you understand their pace and how they’re progressing.

It’s always good to talk to your child’s teacher and tutors to understand their performance at school, the areas they need improvement in and how to go about clearing the conceptual gaps they may have.

Reach out to a math expert

Cuemath is a beyond school math learning program designed to help your child understand math concepts in a way that helps them have a better understanding of the overall subject in a way that helps them ask the right conceptual questions, mainly the WHY behind the WHAT of math problems.

We focus on helping your child understand mathematics not as a subject but as a life skill that will help them ace their exams as well.

How to help your child ace school exams

Try to maintain a calm environment

We understand exams can be stressful for you and your child. This makes it all the more important for you to maintain a calm environment at home so as to ensure your child can focus on their preparations better.

Conclusion

This article talks about the tips and preparation needed to help your child ace their Math exams.

  • Separate notebook for formulae, theories and methods
  • Let your child find their own solutions
  • Make sure they know and understand the syllabus
  • Help them find and understand areas of improvement
  • Talk to their teachers and tutors
  • Reach out to a math expert
  • Try to maintain a calm environment

So now it’s time to ensure you implement the ways mentioned above to help your child with Math exam.

The night before any big test, make sure your child gets plenty of zzz’s, to improve her chances for an A the next day.

About Cuemath

Cuemath, a student-friendly mathematics and coding platform, conducts regular Online Live Classes for academics and skill-development, and their Mental Math App, on both iOS and Android, is a one-stop solution for kids to develop multiple skills. Understand the Cuemath Fee structure and sign up for a free trial.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

1. What is a Warm-up game in education?

A warm-up activity is a short, fun game that a teacher use with students. Warm-up activities are played to encourage students.

2.How long should a child study each day?

A general rule of thumb among teachers is 10 minutes per grade level. 2 What this means is that a third grader might spend 30 minutes on homework.

External References

To learn more about activities that help in increasing student engagement, visit these blogs:

It’s dinnertime and while your child pokes at the peas you cooked, he declares, “I have a test tomorrow in science.” You freeze, peas halfway to your mouth, and rack your brain trying to recall everything you know about elementary school science. Not much is coming to you. You fake confidence and tell her, “We’ll study after you eat your peas.” It’s time to come up with a plan.

Studying with your child can be a challenge. This is especially true as over time you both face more tests with harder material. But there are a few studying techniques you can employ to help your kid prepare for tests effectively.

Get your hands dirty.

No, not literally dirty, but one of the best ways for your child to learn how to study is to watch you do it. Special education teacher Linda Weaver, from St. Charles, Illinois, suggests that parents “model how to do it, as it doesn’t always come instinctively, by talking out loud about the process of studying.”

Sure, it’s great to show your child how to create flashcards and how to put together a study guide. But what’s even more important is your attitude. Jump into each study session with enthusiasm and focus. If you come to the study session excited about long division, your child is more likely to mimic your positivity.

Turn those mountains into molehills.

Studying for tests, particularly midterm and final exams, is a large task. One of the best ways to study is to divide a large task into smaller, more manageable tasks. The part of our brains that allows us to do this doesn’t fully develop until our mid-twenties. This skill is called executive functioning.

What does this mean? It means your child is going to need your help to make studying more manageable. Make a list of all the things you both need to do before the test, and complete them one by one. Your list can include things like making flashcards, reading the textbook, creating a study guide and completing a packet the teacher handed out. If any particular task seems too big, try to make it even smaller.

Create a study space.

Set aside a special spot just for your child to study. It can be anything from a desk in her room to a spot at the kitchen table. When you’re creating a study space, keep your child’s needs in mind. For kids who need absolute silence, communal spaces in the house are not ideal.

The fact that it’s a space for work doesn’t mean it needs to be boring. If you have room, let your child decorate! You can add Justin Bieber posters or posters with motivational sayings. If you have a great picture of you and your child together, putting it in his study space may remind him that you’re always watching and you care.

Stock up.

In your office, at work or at home, you probably have piles of blank paper, stacks of pens, boxes of paper clips and whatever other office supplies you might need. Your child’s space should be the same way. Always have the three P’s: paper, pens and pencils. Some children process information, like vocabulary words, better when they are color-coded. If that’s your child, it may be helpful to have pens in a variety of colors. Index cards are great for creating flashcards for a test and can work for almost any subject.

Write it down.

You and your child should both know the dates for tests. It may sound simple, but one important study technique is writing down the test date. Get a planner or a calendar (or both!) and note test days in a bright color.

If you have more than one school-age child, get a large calendar to put in the kitchen or living room. This way everyone’s extracurricular activities and tests are on display and easy for you and them to see.

Handle those rumbly tummies.

When asked to pick something she could have parents do to help their kids study, the first thing Linda mentioned was nutrition. She encourages parents to help their children by “offering good meal choices with plenty of protein, fresh fruits and vegetables, and water, milk, juices, as appropriate, to replenish and hydrate their brains.”

On test day, offer quality choices for breakfast that are high in protein and relatively low in sugar. Kids need the protein to help them think and concentrate for tests.

Know when and who to ask for help.

It’s every parent’s reality that you can’t be in your child’s classroom every day, every year. And sometimes the textbook or the teacher’s notes aren’t going to make sense to either of you at home.

If you find that you and your child are both in over your heads, it may be time to bring in reinforcements. Typically, the teacher would be who you turn to first. You can ask for tips on what you can do at home to help or for additional study materials. If you’re not feeling satisfied with the teacher’s help, it might be time to find a tutor or academic coach.

You don’t need to know how to divide fractions or the scientific explanation behind the seasons to help your child study well. The seven study tips described here will teach your child some valuable lessons. After a while of doing these things regularly with your child, you may be able to loosen the reins over time.

Every parents wants to help their child do the best they can on their GCSE Maths exam. But how to actually go about doing that?

Passing an exam requires knowledge, but it also requires skills such as the ability to revise efficiently, to manage time under pressure and to concentrate for long periods.

You might not have the knowledge to help your child to revise for an exam, but you will be able to help them to gain the skills they need to maximise their success. You can also help to build their confidence, ease their stress and support them if things don’t go quite to plan.

Not everybody learns in the same way. Some people cement a topic in their minds when they hear someone talk about it or discuss it themselves. Others find the best way to remember things is to write them down.

Identify Your Child’s Learning Style to Help Them Ace Their GCSE Maths Exam.

How to help your child ace school exams

Work with your child to help identify the best way for them to revise. Do they remember something better when you tell them about it or do they need to discuss a topic to grasp it fully? Some children are social learners who prefer revising in a group. Others need solitude and quiet to study effectively. This is particularly the case with GCSE Maths, which can require a lot of focus and concentration.

While it is worth identifying the methods your child feels most comfortable with, it is often best to combine a mixture of approaches. This will prevent boredom and give your child the full range of skills they need for each subject.

“Teachers are frequently criticised for “teaching to the exam”. I can understand parents’ concerns, but it’s often necessary to focus on the exam to get students to understand what’s required of them. A child may have great knowledge, but they won’t be able to show it without the right exam skills.”

To learn more about how to help your child ace their GCSE Maths exam, check out our “Parent’s Guide to Supporting Your Child Through Exams.”

Dr. Patricia Nan Anderson

Development & Learning

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Now that school is well underway, you may have noticed that your child is doing less-well on exams than you think she should. You think she knows the material but she’s just not being successful on tests. You’re worried, of course.

Taking exams successfully is a skill, just like everything else. A person isn’t born knowing how to do it. And the idea that exams are somehow “experience-neutral” – that it doesn’t matter how much a person knows about how to take a test as much as it matters that he knows what’s on the test – is just bunk. Of course knowledge of a test’s content is important. But a student has to know how to display that knowledge. She has to know how to take a test.

Good test-taking starts with good preparation. Most children don’t understand the cause-and-effect connection between practice and exam results. They don’t realize that studying – and studying effectively – are key activities. So you can help your child study for exams better in five ways:

1. Incremental study. Help your child to study a little bit every day, especially in areas he’s not done well in the past. Little by little works far better than cramming.

2. Frequent review. Every so often – maybe once a week – have a review session. What are the big ideas presented in the class so far? What areas is the child still fuzzy on?

3. Take practice tests. If practice tests are available – as they are for the SAT, ACT, and entrance to many private schools – use them. If your child stumbles over spelling tests, tests of multiplication facts, and other rote learning, make up your own practice tests.

4. Create your own test questions. As part of your child’s weekly review, ask her to create some questions that might be on the next test. If she were the teacher, what would she ask? Your child can create a test for you to take, letting her be the examiner and you be the student.

5. Review test results. It’s a temptation to just stuff quiz results into the Trapper Keeper and just move on without looking at what went right and what went wrong. But if improving test-taking is the goal, your child has to figure out how he’s getting the grades he’s getting. Sitting down together and going over a quiz is the only way to learn.

All of this works best when you keep things light and unstressful. Remember that you’re teaching important skills, not taking your child to task. If you’re teaching, it’s assumed that he doesn’t know, so it’s not fair to be judgmental.

Whether you’ve helped your child with test-taking skills or not, you can help him do better on exams just by being positive. There’s a big emotional component to any achievement. The old saying, “If you think you can, you can but if you think you can’t your right!” is true. Believing you can do it is essential.

So ahead of a big test help your child with these five preparations:

1. Treat her as if she’s in training. Any test requires clear thinking and stamina and that means good health. So just as if she had a big game to prepare for, ahead of a big exam focus on good nutrition, plenty of rest, and lots of outdoor play. Did you know that sleep is essential to memory and learning? Make sure she’s getting her sleep.

2. Make last-minute review positive. The night before a big test is not the time to focus on negatives. So go over what your child knows and is confident of and don’t worry about cramming in what he doesn’t know. Make any last-minute review a positive experience.

3. Give him a lucky charm. You might not call it that, but you know what I mean – a talisman, something to give him comfort and support when his courage starts to fail. It could be a “lucky coin,” a religious medal, some sort of superhero action figure (make sure he won’t get in trouble for bringing toys to school), or, for an older child, an inspirational saying on a piece of paper. Something he can tuck in a pocket. Why not?

4. Give her a mental blank slate. Remember that “past performance is not an indicator of future results.” Just because math or English or whatever has bedeviled your child in the past is no reason to think that today will be the same. Instead of reminding her that she has to do better than last time, as she walks out the door to school, tell her that she’s going to have a great day and you’ll be thinking of her.

5. Avoid adding pressure. It’s tempting to try to motivate a child with promises of money, gifts, or concert tickets if he does well this time. But this is almost certain to backfire. Instead of focusing your child’s mind, it will distract him with anxious thoughts about how much he wants the reward and how much he fears he won’t get it. At the same time, of course, don’t try to motivate your child with punishment for a poor showing. Again, this doesn’t motivate; instead it sabotages success.

Keep in mind that your child is not you. Certainly you want her to do well, but you cannot make her do well. You cannot take her tests for her. Your role is one of teacher, guide, supporter and cheerleader.

Fill those roles to the best of your ability. That’s the best way to help your child.

© 2012, Patricia Nan Anderson. All rights reserved.

Table of Contents

1. Introduction
2. Preparation tips to help your child ace their maths exam
3. Conclusion
4. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)
5. External References

27 January 2021

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Board exams can be one of the most stressful exam situations for both parents and students alike.

These exams are conducted each year towards the end of February, all over India. Hundreds of students flock test centers, anxiously waiting to appear for their exams.

Mathematics is one of the most important subjects for any student aspiring to pursue their careers through competitive exams such as JEE Mains and JEE Advanced.

It’s the only subject that holds the potential for a student to get a perfect score if your child practices well.

Downloadable PDF

If you ever want to read it again as many times as you want, here is a downloadable PDF to explore more.

Prepare better: How to help your child ace the math board exam

Preparation tips to help your child ace their maths exam

Separate notebook for formulae, theories and methods

Math is a conceptual subject that requires a thorough understanding of different formulae and theories. It’s always good to keep a separate notebook for formulae that would help your child revisit them as and when they require. This will also help them revise concepts efficiently and help apply them in the problems they’re solving.

How to help your child ace school exams

Let your child find their own solutions

A mathematical problem can have different ways to reach a solution.

Contrary to what your child may be taught at school, there is no hard and fast rule that dictates that your child has to follow a set pattern to solve a problem to reach the solution.

Let your child understand the concepts behind the math problem and encourage them to ask the WHY behind the WHAT and guide them to find their own way to solve the problem.

Make sure they know and understand the syllabus

It’s equally important for your child to understand the syllabus and what they’re supposed to prepare well in advance to avoid any confusions before or during the exams.

Make sure they know the concepts they need to study for their exam.

A good way to prepare is to keep a chart of the chapters they need to prepare and track their progress through the chart.

Help them find and understand areas of improvement

Let your child solve past exam papers, practice papers and mock test papers that mimic test-like environments.

This will not only help them identify concepts and syllabus portions they need to practice but also help your child be prepared for any surprises that may creep up during the exam like time-management, etc.

It’s good to revisit the concepts your child may have a hard time grasping and help them clear any conceptual doubts they may have about the chapters.

How to help your child ace school exams

Talk to their teachers and tutors

Keeping tabs on your child’s progress can help you understand their pace and how they’re progressing.

It’s always good to talk to your child’s teacher and tutors to understand their performance at school, the areas they need improvement in and how to go about clearing the conceptual gaps they may have.

Reach out to a math expert

Cuemath is a beyond school math learning program designed to help your child understand math concepts in a way that helps them have a better understanding of the overall subject in a way that helps them ask the right conceptual questions, mainly the WHY behind the WHAT of math problems.

We focus on helping your child understand mathematics not as a subject but as a life skill that will help them ace their exams as well.

How to help your child ace school exams

Try to maintain a calm environment

We understand exams can be stressful for you and your child. This makes it all the more important for you to maintain a calm environment at home so as to ensure your child can focus on their preparations better.

Conclusion

This article talks about the tips and preparation needed to help your child ace their Math exams.

  • Separate notebook for formulae, theories and methods
  • Let your child find their own solutions
  • Make sure they know and understand the syllabus
  • Help them find and understand areas of improvement
  • Talk to their teachers and tutors
  • Reach out to a math expert
  • Try to maintain a calm environment

So now it’s time to ensure you implement the ways mentioned above to help your child with Math exam.

The night before any big test, make sure your child gets plenty of zzz’s, to improve her chances for an A the next day.

About Cuemath

Cuemath, a student-friendly mathematics and coding platform, conducts regular Online Live Classes for academics and skill-development, and their Mental Math App, on both iOS and Android, is a one-stop solution for kids to develop multiple skills. Understand the Cuemath Fee structure and sign up for a free trial.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

1. What is a Warm-up game in education?

A warm-up activity is a short, fun game that a teacher use with students. Warm-up activities are played to encourage students.

2.How long should a child study each day?

A general rule of thumb among teachers is 10 minutes per grade level. 2 What this means is that a third grader might spend 30 minutes on homework.

External References

To learn more about activities that help in increasing student engagement, visit these blogs:

It is never too early for examination tips! We know that examination papers are the bane of most, if not all, students. The entire process is even more painful for you as parents, as you try to ensure that your child can ace their examination papers. While we are still in February, the past few months have flown by in a flash! In the same manner, we understand that you will not want to find yourself rushing at the last moment for the best preparation tips for your child.

Among the many different subjects your child will take, the English Language examination papers form one of the key subjects your child needs to ace. We know that this is easier said than done. The English Language examination format is multi-faceted, drawing upon your child’s various skills. In fact, your child has to be formidable in terms of content, versatile in terms of delivery and credible in terms of the answer quality. Balancing these three aspects is no easy task, especially if you want to ensure that your child comes out top for his/her papers.

Today, we will extract and consolidate three examination tips that we have picked out from our experience and our students in our classes. We present to you – your child’s examination Care Package!

Tip #1: Understanding the Syllabus and Requirements

Just like playing a game, beating an examination paper requires you to know all the rules at the outset. For an examination, this would mean reading, understanding and knowing the syllabus of the English Language subject. It is important to pick out the objectives that your child must meet to secure the top grade for his/her examinations. Knowing these objectives will also help your child to create an effective study plan and ensure the revision is thorough.

One oft-neglected aspect of the examination papers, especially for your child, is understanding the examination format for the English Language papers. By going through the format with your child, he/she will be able to map out the broad structure of the examination papers and tailor their study plan accordingly. For example, your child may appreciate that a large component of the examination paper will involve writing skills and language aspects such as grammar and vocabulary. This understanding, especially for your child, will ensure that he/she is in tune with the nuances of the examination papers.

Whilst taking the English exam papers, be sure to instil the habit of reading and understanding the instructions of each component, especially situational & continuous writing. Indeed, the instructions for paper 2 components will be as per the practice papers that your child has done. For instance, instructions for the comprehension open-ended will always be the same. However, that can’t be said for situational writing. Upon seeing the storyboard or image shown in the instructions refer to a particular incident, your child might instinctively think that the task is to write a report about the incident. However, the instructions might indicate the writing of a proposal instead. Moral of the story? Read and understand the instructions & requirements!

After getting back the exam paper and realising the careless mistake…

Tip #2: Cover all Bases!

After your child is comfortable with the format of the English Language examination papers, the next step is to design a study plan that best fits his/her learning goals. The first aspect that your child’s study plan should aspire to be is to be complete. Ensure that your child covers the various parts of the English Language syllabus in his/her revision. Your child should be able to cover all bases – from general writing skills to linguistic abilities, such as grammar or comprehension.

The second aspect of your child’s study plan to master is to ensure that the plan is versatile. This goes beyond simply covering all the topics under the English Language syllabus. Instead, try to build your child’s flexibility to transit between the different components of the examination papers. For example, instead of dedicating different full weeks for various components (e.g. one week on writing, and another for comprehension), try incorporating various components within a revision day (e.g. 15 minutes of grammar exercise, followed by 1 – 2 hours of writing). This will help your child get comfortable with the multi-faceted nature of the English Language examination papers.

Tip #3: Let the Mind Rest!

The final tool in the Care Package is unorthodox – remember to give your child time to relax! It goes without saying that your child’s study plan should include a break between study blocks. These breaks should be more than simply taking a 15-minute breather. Instead, allow them to completely disengage from the ‘study mode’ by allocating a longer period for them to wind down and engage in other fruitful behaviours (such as running, taking a nap or even playing a quick game).

Beyond simply a time-out, a break, to us, is also a fantastic opportunity for your child to digest the theory behind the lessons taught or revised. Gift your child time to understand and internalise the various techniques for the examination, before putting them into practice. You may even facilitate this process by testing their recall ability or encouraging them to ask clarifying questions after they had their break.

All the Best for the Paper!

Everyone knows the uncontroversial tips to prepare for examinations – a well-structured study plan, ample rest and consistent practice. The three points in our Care Package above go beyond that to provide you and your child precise tips and techniques they can apply immediately in their routine. We hope that the Care Package we shared above will help you and your child achieve success in their next examination!

How to help your child ace school exams

You can’t avoid math exams in Singapore. Here are 8 ways to ace them instead of spending your time dreading them!

There’s no way to avoid math in Singapore. From primary all the way to tertiary, math is one of the key subjects. Many of my students have a frustrating time studying and preparing for math exams, but it doesn’t always have to be so. Here are 8 tips to make studying for math a little less painful and get one step closer to ace your math exams!

1. Start from the basics

Start from the basics and make sure you get them right before progressing on to more advanced topics. This isn’t something you can do at the last minute. Be conscientious from the start of the new school year and. Trying the advanced topics without having a strong foundation will make you lost and frustrated.

2. Stay attentive in class

When I’m teaching, there will always be some students who are day dreaming, secretly using their mobile phones or just talking with them friends. This is a huge waste of time and makes studying for their exams an uphill battle. Make sure that you are attentive in class. If for any reason you have to skip any classes, ensure that you catch up with it soon. Take notes from fellow students or talk to the teacher if you have to.

3. Always ask questions

Many students are too shy to ask questions, even if it is one of the best ways to clear their doubts. If you are looking to ace your math exams, make sure that you ask questions in class. You can ask questions during class or privately after the lesson. Many students in Singapore have private tuition or attend lessons at tuition centres. These lessons typically have lesser students, which makes it easier to ask the tutor to explain and clear any doubts.

4. Always complete your homework

Completing homework on time at all times is one of the best ways to learn the concepts of mathematics. This allows you to follow what your teacher is teaching and makes your time in school so much more productive! If you are doing your homework on time, you will be able to cover majority of the topics even before you start revising for the exams.

5. Designate a space to study for math exams

This applies not just to math, but to revising for exams in general. This is the reason why you need immense amount of focus and concentration. So, isolate a place for yourself to study where you can avoid all the distractions. Create a habit of studying in the same place at the same time.

6. Practice a lot

If you want to ace math exams just make sure that you practice the a lot of math problems. Try all kinds of questions, not just questions that you can solve. When you will have practiced a particular problem in all different forms you will have no difficulty solving them during the exam.

One additional tip that I give my students is to remember which questions they got wrong. After learning the correct way to answer the question, try doing the question again the next day. If you are able to do the question, you have learnt well and is now one step closer to acing your exams.

7. Sleep and eat well

Make sure that you sleep and eat well before the exam. You will want to be completely relaxed at the time of the exam. Lack of sleep will not allow you to focus properly. Also, do not go empty stomach inside the exam room. Eat something light and healthy.

8. Calm yourself before the exams

Once you are at your desk in the examination hall or room, breathe deeply a few times before the question paper is handed to you in order to calm yourself. When you are calm and relaxed you will be able to focus better. Try not to do last minute revision and be furiously flipping through your notes right before entering the exam hall. This makes you frazzled and not in the right frame of mind.

Apply these 8 tips and take a big step towards acing math!

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