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How to make a kite that really flies

Introduction: Devil’s Kite (Super Easy Paper Kite That Really Flies!)

How to make a kite that really flies

What I will show you is a traditional Turkish kite called “Seytan Ucurtmasi”, which means “Devil’s Kite”. It’s so easy, that a 5 year old can make and fly it.

Step 1: Materials You’ll Need

You’ll need a few easy to find household items:

– Square paper of any kind and size. Something light is better. (Even though I’m gonna use origami paper here, newspaper works great)
– String
– Scrap plastic bag for the tail (if you can’t find a plastic bag around, you can use another piece of paper)
– A piece of sticky tape to strenghten the briddle points (optional)
– Small piece of cardboard for the string winder (optional)

Step 2: Making the Kite

Fold the square in half along the center diagonal line. Fold so that the blank side of the paper is inside, and the color side is visible.

Step 3: Making the Kite

Now take one edge and make a fold to the centerline as you may see in picture. Turn the paper and repeat the step for the other side.

Step 4: Making the Kite

Fold the small corner to the center line. Repeat it for the other side as well.

Step 5: Making the Kite

Use some tape to strenghten the sides you see at the pictures. After that, use a paper punch or scissors to make holes at the points.

Step 6: Making the Kite

Cut two 20 cm (8 inch) strings. You’ll tie these to the two holes at the parts, which are looking like wings.

Step 7: Making the Tail

Now, let’s make the tail!

Fold the bag a few times and cut 2 pieces of it. Open up the pieces and you’ll get 4 longer bag parts. Stick them together with a piece of tape to make it even longer and finally attach it to the back of the kite (where you punched a hole before)

Step 8: Making a Winder

Making a winder is not a big deal. Just wrap the string around some piece of cardboard or even a pen and attach the end of it to the briddle of your kite.

Step 9: Go Fly It!

Congratulations, you now have a “Devil’s Kite”.

Go and fly it, it doesn’t need lots of wind.

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How to make a kite that really flies

As kids we tried to make kites and they NEVER flew. All grown up our Turkish brother-in-law showed us this one and we have had so much fun with a kite that flies pretty much every time!

Originally posted on 12/06/2015

In the summer months, playing outside becomes a fun daily adventure. A kite makes for a fantastic way to play outdoors and also makes an entertaining summer craft.

We’ve rounded up 10 creative kite design ideas for you to make your own DIY kite. Below are 10 different ways to make this nostalgic summer toy – from cool tetrahedral designs to colorful confetti kites! Then there are also simple folded paper kites, or ones kids can fill in with their artistic doodles.

Many of these can actually fly high in the sky which makes them a toy worth making. And while you are playing outdoors check out my guide on summer activities to keep you inspired while outside.

Creative Kite Making Ideas

Do you know how to make a kite? If not, don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. With the creative kite design ideas below, you’ll want to try them all! Most of the kites will keep you occupied all day as you play outdoors , others are great for the creative kids to practice their design skills.

How to make a kite that really flies

Simple Paper Kite (via Inner Child Fun )

Paper kite making is fun and simple. This paper kite can easily be made by a kid in less than 5 minutes. And the bonus is you’ll probably already have all the materials needed at home.
How to make a kite that really flies

Tetrahedral Kite (via Instructables )

Make this impressive 10-cell tetrahedral creative kite that’s an eye-catcher in the sky. You’ll need simple materials like straw and wrapping paper.

How to make a kite that really flies

Confetti Kite (via Parent Savvy )

This vibrant confetti kite is one of the most innovative kite-making ideas. Kids can get hands-on in making this decorative kite which looks so pretty flying high up in the sky.

How to make a kite that really flies

Decorative Driftwood Kite (via hello, Wonderful )

Go on a nature walk and turn your collected finds into a rustic driftwood kite drawn in with the kids’ artwork. This is one of the most creative kites to make and allows your child to express their own creativity. Not only that, but they will also learn how to reuse discarded materials – perfect for a thriving eco-warrior.

How to make a kite that really flies

Tyvek Sled Kite (via Babble Dabble Do)

This bright and colorful Tyvek Sled kite with bright streamers would bring a smile to any kid excited to fly it.

How to make a kite that really flies

Finger Kites (via That Artist Woman )

Make a cute finger kite, they are a great way to show off your kids’ art and fun for little hands to hold. These kites are smaller than the usual kite, so they only fly about a meter high but the kids still love them!

How to make a kite that really flies

Butterfly Kites (via Creative Jewish Mom )

Use colorful tissue paper as your kite decoration material. You’ll be able to create different shapes like these adorable butterfly kites.

How to make a kite that really flies

Simple Paper Kite (via Made by Joel )

Quite possibly the easiest kite for kids to make and the best part is that it actually flies!

How to make a kite that really flies

Stained Glass Kites (via Make and Takes )

These lovely decorative kites make sparkly window decorations and are a fun art project for the kids. These stained glass kites are perfect for bringing out the artistic side of your child, and for decorating windows. But these kites don’t actually fly so this is a perfect creative kite-making activity for winter.

How to make a kite that really flies

Colorful Kites (via Red Ted Art )

Can you believe these gorgeous kites were made by kids? There are endless possibilities here to make your own colorful kite in the simple tutorial above.

Final Thoughts on DIY Kite Ideas

Kite-making for kids is the perfect activity. It is simple and easy and keeps your little one entertained for hours.

What are your favorite summer DIY crafts ? Whether you are playing indoors or outdoors there are plenty of fun ideas to keep you entertained.

How to make a kite that really flies

Kites are a paper made flying object made to be flied in the sky and people like to fly kites on various occasions like independence day, republic day and various other festivals as well. Kites are famous amongst every age groups and can be made at home as well. In order to make kites at home, you need not do much labor and in order to make kite at home, you will need just to follow some simple steps that I am mentioning here.

How to make a kite that really flies

How to Make a Kite at Home that Will Fly

1. Gathering The Essential Raw Material:-

In order to make a kite, first of all you will need some raw material like a broomstick of proper length and some other raw material like colored paper of proper length along with some colored tape, some kite thread, some paper based decorations etc.

2. Cutting Up The Paper:-

Cut up the paper in desired kite like shape and then fix up two broom sticks on it that cut it diagonally. Both will be tied up at the mid part of it but the first one will be fixed upon it in a bow like shape while the other will be fixed in a straight manner. You can choose to fix up these sticks with gum first of all and then fix up them with paper tape so as to enhance the bonding.

3. Making the tail of the kite:-

Now, after your kite has been made, you can cut up some piece of paper or polythene works so as to make the tail of this kite. This tail can be kept as long as you want it, but remember to do it in a favorable way by keeping the kite light enough to be flown in the sky in a proper way.

4. Tying Up the Kite Thread:-

After the kite has been made and the tail has been fixed up, you are advised to tie up the thread to it. Simply make two holes in your kite at a gap of six inches straight along with the straight broomstick that you had fixed up earlier. Break up one meter thread and take out that thread from these two holes, making a proper knot at both the ends along with the broomstick.

5. Make Some Art Work:-

After you have fixed up the kite thread at the respective place, you can choose to make some artworks on your kite so that it easily gets recognized in the sky. One of these is my favorite in which we take a marker and make funny faces on the kite or paste some colored circles or stars by cutting and pasting the colored paper on our kite.

6. Flying Up The Kite:-

After the kite has been decorated, you can choose to fix up the flying thread to the thread that you had fixed up earlier by making a knot and then ask one of your friend to keep holding the kite and then leave it when the air blows so that you may fly it up by pulling up the string and then let your kite reach the heights this way. The sky is the limit. Keep enjoying with yourself made kite.

The basics aren’t too difficult to master, even if you flunked physics. Here’s the science you need to dominate kite flying this season

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  • SHARE

How to make a kite that really flies

When the snow melts it’s time to untangle the old spool and teach your kid how to fly a kite . Kite engineering is a time-honored dad tradition just as kite flying is a rite of passage . But that doesn’t mean you have any clue how to do it and here’s the bad news: You’re not going to figure it out unless you have a solid foundation in aerodynamics. The good news? The basics aren’t too difficult to master, even if you flunked physics .

Here’s the science you need to dominate kite flying this season:

Meet The Four Forces

We’re getting ahead of ourselves but, once your kite is in the air, Newton’s Second Law is how it will stay aloft and climb. Newton tells us that all flying objects are subject to four forces —weight ( the force pulling the kite downward), lift (the force pushing the kite upward), tension (your force pulling the kite toward you), and drag (the wind’s force pushing the kite away). When these forces are perfectly balanced (life=weight; tension=drag), the kite hovers in equilibrium. When lift dominates weight, the kite ascends. When drag beats out tension, the kite speeds away.

So whether or not your adventure ends in humiliation (and shelling out cash for a new kite), depends entirely on the give-and-take between these four forces. Your kite won’t fly unless you overcome weight and tension—and it’ll crash the moment you fall victim to those two forces.

The Four Phases Of Flight

From airplanes to rockets, everything airborne must pass through four stages of flight (release, launch, climb, and cruise). Your kite is no exception. It begins its fight against gravity with a sort of combined release and launch phase, in which the kite must generate enough lift to counteract its own weight. That’s usually not too difficult—a well-designed kite will have an aerodynamic shape and low weight to begin with—but you can help it along by adding velocity. And yes, that means convincing your kid to run with your kite on a less windy day to generate sufficient lift.

The tricky part is the climb and cruise phase. There is, in fact, a science to maintaining kite strings at altitude. One tip is to pull the string occasionally, because this increases the velocity of the kite and boosts its lift, helping it climb or maintain a comfortable cruise. In the hands of an amateur—or when your kid demands a turn—the balance between the four forces can become disturbed. This causes the kite to dip and twirl until it either fixes its own equilibrium or crashes.

So What Makes A Great Kite And Kite Flyer?

The perfect kite will have an aerodynamic shape (to increase drag) and very low weight so that it’s easy to conquer the release and launch phase. Keeping your kite climbing is a matter of increasing lift (best accomplished by strategically tugging on the string). Maintaining a cruising altitude is a balancing act between the four forces, but not one that’s impossible to figure out. If your kite is descending, add lift. If your kite is traveling too far laterally, add tension.

Ok, But Why Does My Kite Need A Tail?

Most kite makers recommend a tail between two and 8 times the length of the kite. There’s a good reason for this. The tail’s main function is to add stability to the kite during the climb and cruise phase, by adding weight and drag. But stability can be a double-edged sword. First of all, more stability means less maneuverability—fighter planes are traditionally quite unstable, while your average Cessna is so stable it practically flies itself. So if you’re hoping to pull off some rad moves ( or try some of that Eastern kite battling ) you may want less tail or no tail at all.

Even if you’re looking for a peaceful flight, however, too much tail can cause problems. Because every inch of tail contributes to a little more weight and drag—the two forces keeping your kite from taking off. A longer tail might mean you’ll need stronger wind or a faster kid to run your kite into the air. In a word, the tail helps the kite climb and cruise, but makes the launch far trickier.

How to make a kite that really flies
Illustration by Luke Boushee

Making a kite with turkey feathers is one of those projects that scores really high on the effort-to-fun ratio. To improve on that ratio even more, gather a group of friends, have everyone make their own kites, and have a fly-off.

Stuff You’ll Need

  • Six wild turkey wing feathers. (If you can’t find them in the wild, ask a turkey hunter or look on eBay or Etsy online.) You need three from one wing and three from the other.
  • Scissors or a knife
  • Scotch tape
  • Two 4-inch lengths of dogbane. (You can also use drinking straws—the heavier, the better.)
  • Two 4-foot lengths of surveyor’s flagging
  • Twine or string
  • A pool of fishing line. (If the line is connected to a fishing pole and reel, even better!)

How To Do It

  1. On two of the feathers, clip the end of the shaft so that the shafts of two other feathers can be pushed into them. The two feathers you clip need to be from the same wing, and the two feathers you insert need to be from the other; this orientation is important for proper flight (just ask any bird)!
  2. Insert the feather and wrap the joint in tape.
  3. Using an X pattern, lash the feathers to the lengths of dogbane or straws with twine as shown in the illustration. The two lengths of dogbane should be almost, but not quite, parallel—with the rear tips slightly farther apart than the front tips. The front pair of feathers should be directly at the front tips of the dogbane, while the back pair should be located about an inch forward of the rear tips.
  4. Insert the remaining two feathers into the pithy end of the dogbane.
  5. Tie a piece of twine to the center of each side of the rectangle formed by the dogbane and the pairs of feathers. The pieces hanging down should be about 4 inches each. Now tie the loose ends of these together into a knot.
  6. Tie one end of your fishing line to the knot.
  7. Tie a length of surveyor’s tape to the end of each tail feather. This helps with stability.
  8. Wait for the breeze to pick up, head for an open space, and let ’er fly!

More from The Young Adventurer’s Guide to (Almost) Everything:

  • Birch Bark Knife Sheath
  • Bread on a Stick
  • How to Navigate by the Stars

How to make a kite that really flies

From The Young Adventurer’s Guide to (Almost) Everything by Ben and Penny Hewitt © 2019 by Ben Hewitt. Illustrations © 2019 by Luke Boushee. Reprinted in arrangement with Roost Books , an imprint of Shambhala Publications, Inc.

How to make a kite that really flies

Kites are a paper made flying object made to be flied in the sky and people like to fly kites on various occasions like independence day, republic day and various other festivals as well. Kites are famous amongst every age groups and can be made at home as well. In order to make kites at home, you need not do much labor and in order to make kite at home, you will need just to follow some simple steps that I am mentioning here.

How to make a kite that really flies

How to Make a Kite at Home that Will Fly

1. Gathering The Essential Raw Material:-

In order to make a kite, first of all you will need some raw material like a broomstick of proper length and some other raw material like colored paper of proper length along with some colored tape, some kite thread, some paper based decorations etc.

2. Cutting Up The Paper:-

Cut up the paper in desired kite like shape and then fix up two broom sticks on it that cut it diagonally. Both will be tied up at the mid part of it but the first one will be fixed upon it in a bow like shape while the other will be fixed in a straight manner. You can choose to fix up these sticks with gum first of all and then fix up them with paper tape so as to enhance the bonding.

3. Making the tail of the kite:-

Now, after your kite has been made, you can cut up some piece of paper or polythene works so as to make the tail of this kite. This tail can be kept as long as you want it, but remember to do it in a favorable way by keeping the kite light enough to be flown in the sky in a proper way.

4. Tying Up the Kite Thread:-

After the kite has been made and the tail has been fixed up, you are advised to tie up the thread to it. Simply make two holes in your kite at a gap of six inches straight along with the straight broomstick that you had fixed up earlier. Break up one meter thread and take out that thread from these two holes, making a proper knot at both the ends along with the broomstick.

5. Make Some Art Work:-

After you have fixed up the kite thread at the respective place, you can choose to make some artworks on your kite so that it easily gets recognized in the sky. One of these is my favorite in which we take a marker and make funny faces on the kite or paste some colored circles or stars by cutting and pasting the colored paper on our kite.

6. Flying Up The Kite:-

After the kite has been decorated, you can choose to fix up the flying thread to the thread that you had fixed up earlier by making a knot and then ask one of your friend to keep holding the kite and then leave it when the air blows so that you may fly it up by pulling up the string and then let your kite reach the heights this way. The sky is the limit. Keep enjoying with yourself made kite.

The basics aren’t too difficult to master, even if you flunked physics. Here’s the science you need to dominate kite flying this season

  • EMAIL
  • SHARE

How to make a kite that really flies

When the snow melts it’s time to untangle the old spool and teach your kid how to fly a kite . Kite engineering is a time-honored dad tradition just as kite flying is a rite of passage . But that doesn’t mean you have any clue how to do it and here’s the bad news: You’re not going to figure it out unless you have a solid foundation in aerodynamics. The good news? The basics aren’t too difficult to master, even if you flunked physics .

Here’s the science you need to dominate kite flying this season:

Meet The Four Forces

We’re getting ahead of ourselves but, once your kite is in the air, Newton’s Second Law is how it will stay aloft and climb. Newton tells us that all flying objects are subject to four forces —weight ( the force pulling the kite downward), lift (the force pushing the kite upward), tension (your force pulling the kite toward you), and drag (the wind’s force pushing the kite away). When these forces are perfectly balanced (life=weight; tension=drag), the kite hovers in equilibrium. When lift dominates weight, the kite ascends. When drag beats out tension, the kite speeds away.

So whether or not your adventure ends in humiliation (and shelling out cash for a new kite), depends entirely on the give-and-take between these four forces. Your kite won’t fly unless you overcome weight and tension—and it’ll crash the moment you fall victim to those two forces.

The Four Phases Of Flight

From airplanes to rockets, everything airborne must pass through four stages of flight (release, launch, climb, and cruise). Your kite is no exception. It begins its fight against gravity with a sort of combined release and launch phase, in which the kite must generate enough lift to counteract its own weight. That’s usually not too difficult—a well-designed kite will have an aerodynamic shape and low weight to begin with—but you can help it along by adding velocity. And yes, that means convincing your kid to run with your kite on a less windy day to generate sufficient lift.

The tricky part is the climb and cruise phase. There is, in fact, a science to maintaining kite strings at altitude. One tip is to pull the string occasionally, because this increases the velocity of the kite and boosts its lift, helping it climb or maintain a comfortable cruise. In the hands of an amateur—or when your kid demands a turn—the balance between the four forces can become disturbed. This causes the kite to dip and twirl until it either fixes its own equilibrium or crashes.

So What Makes A Great Kite And Kite Flyer?

The perfect kite will have an aerodynamic shape (to increase drag) and very low weight so that it’s easy to conquer the release and launch phase. Keeping your kite climbing is a matter of increasing lift (best accomplished by strategically tugging on the string). Maintaining a cruising altitude is a balancing act between the four forces, but not one that’s impossible to figure out. If your kite is descending, add lift. If your kite is traveling too far laterally, add tension.

Ok, But Why Does My Kite Need A Tail?

Most kite makers recommend a tail between two and 8 times the length of the kite. There’s a good reason for this. The tail’s main function is to add stability to the kite during the climb and cruise phase, by adding weight and drag. But stability can be a double-edged sword. First of all, more stability means less maneuverability—fighter planes are traditionally quite unstable, while your average Cessna is so stable it practically flies itself. So if you’re hoping to pull off some rad moves ( or try some of that Eastern kite battling ) you may want less tail or no tail at all.

Even if you’re looking for a peaceful flight, however, too much tail can cause problems. Because every inch of tail contributes to a little more weight and drag—the two forces keeping your kite from taking off. A longer tail might mean you’ll need stronger wind or a faster kid to run your kite into the air. In a word, the tail helps the kite climb and cruise, but makes the launch far trickier.

Originally posted on 12/06/2015

In the summer months, playing outside becomes a fun daily adventure. A kite makes for a fantastic way to play outdoors and also makes an entertaining summer craft.

We’ve rounded up 10 creative kite design ideas for you to make your own DIY kite. Below are 10 different ways to make this nostalgic summer toy – from cool tetrahedral designs to colorful confetti kites! Then there are also simple folded paper kites, or ones kids can fill in with their artistic doodles.

Many of these can actually fly high in the sky which makes them a toy worth making. And while you are playing outdoors check out my guide on summer activities to keep you inspired while outside.

Creative Kite Making Ideas

Do you know how to make a kite? If not, don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. With the creative kite design ideas below, you’ll want to try them all! Most of the kites will keep you occupied all day as you play outdoors , others are great for the creative kids to practice their design skills.

How to make a kite that really flies

Simple Paper Kite (via Inner Child Fun )

Paper kite making is fun and simple. This paper kite can easily be made by a kid in less than 5 minutes. And the bonus is you’ll probably already have all the materials needed at home.
How to make a kite that really flies

Tetrahedral Kite (via Instructables )

Make this impressive 10-cell tetrahedral creative kite that’s an eye-catcher in the sky. You’ll need simple materials like straw and wrapping paper.

How to make a kite that really flies

Confetti Kite (via Parent Savvy )

This vibrant confetti kite is one of the most innovative kite-making ideas. Kids can get hands-on in making this decorative kite which looks so pretty flying high up in the sky.

How to make a kite that really flies

Decorative Driftwood Kite (via hello, Wonderful )

Go on a nature walk and turn your collected finds into a rustic driftwood kite drawn in with the kids’ artwork. This is one of the most creative kites to make and allows your child to express their own creativity. Not only that, but they will also learn how to reuse discarded materials – perfect for a thriving eco-warrior.

How to make a kite that really flies

Tyvek Sled Kite (via Babble Dabble Do)

This bright and colorful Tyvek Sled kite with bright streamers would bring a smile to any kid excited to fly it.

How to make a kite that really flies

Finger Kites (via That Artist Woman )

Make a cute finger kite, they are a great way to show off your kids’ art and fun for little hands to hold. These kites are smaller than the usual kite, so they only fly about a meter high but the kids still love them!

How to make a kite that really flies

Butterfly Kites (via Creative Jewish Mom )

Use colorful tissue paper as your kite decoration material. You’ll be able to create different shapes like these adorable butterfly kites.

How to make a kite that really flies

Simple Paper Kite (via Made by Joel )

Quite possibly the easiest kite for kids to make and the best part is that it actually flies!

How to make a kite that really flies

Stained Glass Kites (via Make and Takes )

These lovely decorative kites make sparkly window decorations and are a fun art project for the kids. These stained glass kites are perfect for bringing out the artistic side of your child, and for decorating windows. But these kites don’t actually fly so this is a perfect creative kite-making activity for winter.

How to make a kite that really flies

Colorful Kites (via Red Ted Art )

Can you believe these gorgeous kites were made by kids? There are endless possibilities here to make your own colorful kite in the simple tutorial above.

Final Thoughts on DIY Kite Ideas

Kite-making for kids is the perfect activity. It is simple and easy and keeps your little one entertained for hours.

What are your favorite summer DIY crafts ? Whether you are playing indoors or outdoors there are plenty of fun ideas to keep you entertained.

27 Better Kites! Step-By-Step.

If you want to learn how to make a kite or two, you have definitely come to the right spot!

Perhaps you have made plenty, but are always on the lookout for more designs and ideas. In any case, some of the most popular single-line designs being flown in the Western world are covered here.

For example, there’s.

  • The quick and easy Sled.
  • The universally recognized Diamond.
  • The bird-like Delta, which is nearly as well known.
  • The Barn Door is uniquely American.
  • The classic Roller has German origins.
  • Plus a number of others for even more of a building challenge.

And the kiting culture of Japan is represented with the Rokkaku and the Sode. There’s my Dowel Rokkaku in the photo!

( If you purchase the kite line recommended below I may receive a small commission – at no extra cost to you )

Do you need some kite line ? This 3-pack of simple winders with 300ft lines from Amazon should be ideal. They are all ready to go with 50 pound line. This strength is good for bridles and flying lines for all the MBK kites up to the 1.2m (4ft) sizes.

My instructions for connecting a flying line don’t mention swivel clips, but the swivels included in this product are good and strong. So go ahead and use them if you want to 🙂 Otherwise they can just be snipped off.

How To Make A Kite – Cheaply!

The emphasis here is on very cheap materials. Make them all for just a few dollars!

Not only that, but hardly any tools are required. Who hasn’t got a pair of scissors and a ruler lying around somewhere? Perhaps you might need to beg borrow or steal, I mean buy, a small hack-saw. But that’s about it! No special fittings or expensive specialized tools.

Learning how to make a kite from bamboo skewers or dowel and plastic is fun and they do fly really well! You can see for yourself in the video for each design, showing the original in flight.

Dowel Series

(fairly big, light to moderate winds)

2-Skewer Series

(medium, light to moderate winds)

1-Skewer Series
(quite small, mainly moderate winds)

In addition, there are three Box kites.

These all fly well in moderate winds, and the 2-Skewer design can cope with much stronger winds as well.

Wind Speed Handy Reference

Light Air
1-5 kph
1-3 mph
1-3 knts
Beaufort 1

Light breeze
6–11 kph
4–7 mph
4–6 knts
Beaufort 2

Gentle .
12–19 kph
8–12 mph
7–10 knts
Beaufort 3

Moderate .
20–28 kph
13–18 mph
11–16 knts
Beaufort 4

Fresh .
29–38 kph
19–24 mph
17–21 knts
Beaufort 5

Strong .
39–49 kph
25–31 mph
22–27 knts
Beaufort 6

High Wind
50-61 kph
32-38 mph
28-33 knts
Beaufort 7

Gale
62-74 kph
39-46 mph
34-40 knts
Beaufort 8

Some Odds’n’Sods

Most of those Dowel kites employ a bowed cross spar. Follow that link for tips on how to get the curvature and weight just right.

See how I made a simple winder for our 20 pound line. Good for the Skewer kites.

Since doing a page on single-surface star kites from around the world, I thought ‘why not do a Skewer version?’ So here they are – instructions for an MBK Skewer Star.

Finally, with plenty of people successfully making and flying the original 2-Skewer Delta, a link to that page is retained here.

(Note: MBK Skewer Kites are made from thin 12″ bamboo skewers, which come in packs of 100. The Metric size is 300mm long x 2.5mm thick. 3mm skewers are usable but 2.5 mm is best!)

More MBK Kite Info

For each kite in the lists of links up there, plus the box kites, there is.

  • A 20 second video of the kite in flight.
  • A template graphic showing you the sail shape and dimensions.
  • A detailed set of step-by-step instructions, with a photo for each step.
  • A launch photo or an in-flight close-up of the kite.

Although this is quite basic kite making, the designs do get a little more complex and time consuming as you move from Sled right through to Dopero.

The 2-skewer designs have about 4 times as much sail area as the 1-skewer designs. Hence, it’s easier to make them accurately. Plus, for any given sail material, a 2 skewer kite will be better in light breezes than a 1-skewer kite. The 1.2 meter Dowel kites are another step up again, with a roughly 4-fold increase in sail area compared with the 2-Skewer kites! However, the strength-to-weight ratio of hard-wood dowel is not as good as bamboo.

If you haven’t made many before, I hope you really enjoy learning how to make a kite!

Have a bit of fun trying to figure out which of my kites is zipping around the sky in a gusty moderate breeze, in the video up there!

You might like these.

Make A Kite For Kids – The MBK Tiny Tots Diamond

This MBK kite for kids is about as simple as a Diamond can get! Do you have some bamboo BBQ skewers, tape and some plastic bags?

How To Make Paper Kites – Even The ‘Sticks’ Are Just Paper & Tape!

Learn how to make paper kites, from just A4 or Letter copier paper and sticky tape. Explained step by step with close-up photos. Only sound and well-tested designs here.

Knot Tying Instructions – All The Kiting Knots Used For MBK Designs

These knot tying instructions cover every knot used in making the whole range of MBK designs.

Kite Plans For The MBK Series Of Kites.

Kite plans, as opposed to step-by-step instructions, are handy for experienced kite builders. Here’s plans for dowel / bamboo sparred kites with plastic sails.

How To Make Soft Kites – Easily And Very Cheaply!

Learn how to make soft kites, from nothing more than plastic bags and packing tape. Only sound and well-tested designs here. All is explained, step by step with large photos.

How To Make Indoor Kites – Just Paper, Tape and Plastic Sheet!

Learn how to make indoor kites, from just A4 or Letter 80gsm paper, sticky tape and plastic sheet. Step by step with photos. Well-tested designs.

How To Build Kites – 3 Extremely Simple Kites For Adults Or Big Kids!

If you want to know how to build kites, you are at the right place. These 3 simple kites are super quick and easy, yet fly really well.

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