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How to make alcohol

How to Make Alcohol

The reasons for fermenting fruit range from the not so obvious, like preserving food for longer to help you save money, to the glaringly obvious, such as turning fermented fruit into alcohol, namely wine.

There are also health benefits to fermenting certain foods. This includes helping your body fight off disease since you will be introducing good bacteria to your system via these foods and assisting in overall gut health.

When it comes to fermenting fruit into alcohol, though, the high sugar content in fruit plays a huge role as long as the right ingredients and steps are involved. So, skip that trip to the winery or liquor store, and try your hand at learning how to ferment fruit to make alcohol right at home with these steps.

How to Ferment Fruit Into Alcohol

The steps for fermenting fruit into alcohol are easier than you might think.

    Start by filling a sanitized bucket with your choice of fruit and sugar. The amount of sugar goes by the 1:1 ratio, so use equal parts sugar to the weight of the fruit.

Next, cover both the sugar and fruit with boiling water and let this cool to around 70 degrees Fahrenheit before adding in 1/4 teaspoon of yeast or more depending on how much fruit and sugar you used.

Mix it together and then cap the bucket closed loosely. The fruit should ferment within a day or two but be sure to give it a good stir once a day.

  • After a week, filter the fruit wine through a strainer into a second jug or bucket that can fit an airlock. Taste it as you go. When the wine is clear and has the right taste, then you can bottle it.
  • How to Ferment Fruit Juice Into Alcohol

    If you ever wondered if you can turn juice into alcohol, the answer is yes. By doing so, it saves you time instead of preparing your own fermented fruit first.

      Start by pouring 2 ounces of whatever kind of juice you are choosing to use (just be sure it’s 100 percent fruit and preservative free). This will help prevent any sort of overflow during the fermentation process.

    Add 1/4 teaspoon of champagne yeast to the juice. You can also add sugar

    however much you’d like.

    3. Lastly, top the bottle with an airlock and let the bottle ferment somewhere warm for around three to five days.

    Tips on Fermenting

    If you want your fermented fruit juice to become less sweet and more alcohol-tasting, you can let it ferment for longer. If you do this, just be sure to replace the original cap each time and release pressure built up in the bottle every couple of days.

    Fruit Moonshine Mash Recipe

    Moonshine has a rich history in the world of alcohol since it has been one of the most popular illegal drinks to make at home. There’s been a lot of trial and error to get it right, but before you make any kind of moonshine, you have to prepare the moonshine mash, which is what gets fermented.

    A gallon of mash will yield you around 3 to 6 cups of alcohol. The basic ingredients that go into making mash are cornmeal, sugar, water, yeast and malt. If you wanted, you could even look into making your own peach moonshine mash recipe.

      Start by mixing all the ingredients into a large container.

    Leave this in a still, which is an apparatus that is used to distill liquid mixtures, and then leave it to ferment for a day or two.

  • From there, you can use this mash to complete the process of making moonshine by distillation.
  • How to Make Alcohol

    Ever wondered how you can turn sugar into alcohol? If you answered with a resounding yes, you’ve come across the right article. You probably have the two essential ingredients – sugar and baking yeast – lying around in your pantry.

    Making alcohol at home is actually a simple process. The only challenging part is that it’s time consuming, but the surprising results of homemade liquor and its taste are certainly worth the effort you put in.

    How to Make Alcohol at Home

    Homemade alcohol only needs two important ingredients. The key ingredient, sugar, is converted into alcohol by the process of fermentation by the second ingredient, yeast. Homemade liquor can be made easily if you have sugar, water (to form a sugar solution) and baking yeast.

    The Process of Fermentation

    Fermentation is the process of colonies of yeast, a single-celled microorganism, digesting the sugar in the sugar solution. As the sugar is digested and eaten by the yeast, two byproducts of this process are produced: alcohol and carbon dioxide. The process of making alcohol from sugar and baking yeast starts off slowly as the yeast gets used to the new environment and grows.

    As yeast begin to multiply, they eat the sugar in the mixture quite quickly. The result is an increase in alcohol content and carbon dioxide which you can see as the bubbles fizz on the top of the fermenting liquid. As the sugar is used up, the resulting alcohol is detrimental to the yeast and ends up killing them. The result of this fermentation process is your very own homemade alcohol.

    Homemade Alcohol Recipe

    This recipe makes 1 gallon of homemade alcohol, sometimes referred to as moonshine, with an alcohol content of approximately 40 percent.

    Ingredients:

    • 12 pounds sugar
    • 6 gallons water
    • 10 tablespoons baking yeast

    Directions:

      Before you start to make alcohol at home, make sure to properly sterilize and clean all the storage containers and utensils. Do this by sterilizing them in boiling water or wiping them down with isopropyl alcohol. This crucial step helps prevent unwanted bacteria from contaminating your homemade alcohol recipe.

    In a large saucepan over high heat, bring water to a boil. Turn the heat to low and add the sugar.

    Using a wooden, nonreactive spoon, stir to dissolve and form a sugar solution.

    4. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature.

    5. Add the baking yeast and stir well to combine. Transfer to a glass jug with a small mouth like a carboy with an air lock. Fill only up to 3/4 of the jug’s entire volume to leave space for the fermenting liquid to give off bubbles of carbon dioxide.

    6. Store the jug in a dark, warm room for the duration of the fermentation process. Shake the jug to give off excess carbon dioxide for 45 to 60 seconds twice a day without removing the airlock.

    7. The homemade alcohol will take anywhere from 3 to 10 days to be ready. You’ll know when there’s no more carbon dioxide fizz, you can smell the alcohol, and sediment has settled to the bottom of the jug.

    8. Strain the homemade alcohol and transfer through a thin tube to a large, nonreactive saucepan over medium heat. Heat until warmed to 122 degress Fahrenheit – this kills any remaining yeast and lets off the remaining carbon dioxide.

    9. Transfer the mixture back to the jug and use a clarifying substance before beginning the process of distilling your homemade alcohol for consumption.

    The rule of thumb is for every 2 pounds of sugar, you add at least 1 gallon of water and 5 teaspoons of dry yeast. You will end up with less than 1/3 of a gallon of homemade liquor with an almost 40 percent alcohol content.

    Letting the sugar solution come to room temperature before adding the yeast is important so as not to kill the active yeast by high heat.

    Your mixture can overflow with foam when using baking yeast. Add a few cracker crumbs to prevent this from happening. This won’t affect the homemade alcohol’s overall taste and quality.

    Homemade Alcohol Variations

    Once you have the fermentation process down, experiment with making alcohol at home by using a different source of sugar. Fruit juice or whole fruits like berries, peaches and grapes all make for perfect sugar substitutes. When using fruit juice, your homemade alcohol will follow a hooch recipe that results in a cheap, homemade wine.

    Introduction: How to Make Alcohol at Home

    How to Make Alcohol

    Note: For a sugar wash, you probably don’t need to sterilize anything. Just wash it with soap and water. The presence of other microbes can alter the taste if you plan to drink it. The alcohol produced in this video will be distilled in a future video.

    This is a very basic way that you can make your own DRINKABLE ethanol at home. The main premise of this video is to show just how simple and easy it is to ferment your own alcohol. In a future video, I will try to dispel some myths regarding homebrewing, such as the exaggerated risk of methanol poisoning. I will also demonstrate how easy and safe it can be to distill your own ethanol from the wash that you produce.

    In this video, I prepare a sugar wash (fermentation of sugar only). The process is similar to the preparation of wine or beer, but uses pure table sugar instead of a variety of different sugars, fruits or other additives. Also, more yeast is used in order to speed things up a little.

    The final product should be ready in a week or two. If you want to drink it, you can. Just clear it first using a clearing solution and clean the taste up using activated carbon. It still won’t taste very good though.

    NOTE: Be aware that there are some things that when added might be dangerous. So, please, if you decide to add something to the fermentation, please verify beforehand that it is safe.

    Here are some calculators to calculate how much sugar you need to make a certain amount of alcohol.

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    Written by: Jacob OBrien How-To 7 Comments Print This Article

    How to Make Alcohol

    Making rubbing alcohol sounds like something you’d need a table full of beakers and glass tubes for, doesn’t it? Fortunately, it’s far easier than most think. Good thing, too!

    After all, one of the worst things that can happen to a homesteader or survivalist is having few medical supplies. But if you love being prepared, then you’re going to love this easy recipe to product your own disinfectant. Let’s get to work making some rubbing alcohol.

    Rubbing alcohol is a relatively cheap commodity and can be made relatively easily in a modern lab. However, making store quality disinfectant is a dangerous and EXPLOSIVE endeavor. Let’s take the road that leads to far less pain, shall we?

    In this recipe, we will be making ethanol rubbing alcohol? Please realize that while this will create the same kind of alcohol found in beer, I implore you not to make the mistake so many blind moonshiners made! This is not for drinking.

    Making ethanol has a variety of uses, outside of just medical. Ethanol can be further refined to make a cheap renewable energy source. This fuel can power some generators (with a little tweaking) and even be refined as a replacement for diesel. How cool is that?! Of course, that would require you to make large quantities of it, thus depleting your sugar supply rather quickly.

    Alternatively, you could get your own sugar cane and harvest your own small crop. This would simply mean picking up a stalk of sugar cane from your local farmer supply (or online). You will be ready to harvest in about 7-8 months, depending on where you live, of course.

    Getting Started

    You will need the following:

    1. Roughly 2 pounds of white sugar (preferably not bleached).
    2. 1 gallon of water, purified if possible.
    3. 2 empty water jugs made of HDPE plastic (simply look at the mark on the bottom of the jug), or a glass drinking jug.
    4. 1 jar of simple baker’s yeast.
    5. About 2 ½ feet of coiled copper tubing (not as expensive as you might think).
    6. A bowl of cold water or ice big enough to hold your container (this is not a necessary step but it helps speed up the process).
    7. 1 thermometer.
    8. 1 funnel.
    9. Duct tape.

    As with any process like this, make sure all of your items are sterilized and cleaned. Boiling water works just fine.

    To get started, add 3 teaspoons of yeast into the first jug and simply pour in your 2 pounds of sugar. (Be sure to use your funnel.) There is no need to get messy. Now, take your thermometer and hold it under your running hot water from your tap. Simply adjust the knobs until your water reaches 115 degrees, and fill the jug to about 3 inches from the top. This gives the yeast a wider surface area to work with, as well as helps break down the sugars faster. Shake or stir well to ensure that all of the yeast is broken up into the solution.

    The Fermentation Process

    How to Make Alcohol

    Image source: YouTube screen capture

    Now, put on the lid, making sure not to screw it on enough for an air seal to form, but enough to let the Co2 being created inside the container to escape. Set it in a warm dark place, preferably on the top shelf of a cupboard that isn’t used often. Allow it to ferment for at least 2 weeks. Although you may not enjoy the idea, you will have to give it the ol’ sniff test to judge for yourself if it is fermented enough. The longer you ferment the mixture the stronger your ethanol will be.

    Let’s Make Some Ethanol

    At the end of the 2-week period, simply remove the solution and pour it into the second container. Prepare a pot big enough to hold your gallon jug, with some room left over. Now, fill the pot with water to the point where it won’t boil over.

    Take your jug lid and cut a precise and even hole in the middle, big enough for your tubing. Insert one end of the tubing into the lid and screw it on. From here, you duct tape it down snuggly so there is no chance of the vapors escaping your container.

    Turn on your stove to a high point in order to bring it to a boil. Once boiling, turn it down to maintain a low bubble so your water doesn’t evaporate around the jug too quickly. It is best to keep a watchful eye on the water and refill as necessary.

    Remember to do the same for the other end of the tubing when attaching it to your other container. Set your other container in your bowl of either very cold water or preferably ice. Adjust how it sits until you are comfortable it won’t fall over. Continue boiling until all of your sugar solution has evaporated and condensed into your second container. This will possibly take a day or so!

    If you smell any vapors during this process, then simply add more tape until you are positive there is an airtight seal on both ends. The result should yield a clear liquid that burns blue and clear when lit. Congratulations: You’ve created your first batch of ethanol.

    Seal it in an air-tight container, and then shelve for later use as your disinfectant.

    I hope this tidbit of self-reliance has bolstered your confidence.

    Have you ever made rubbing alcohol from scratch? Share your tips in the section below:

    How to Make Alcohol–>

    People have been making alcoholic beverages for at least the past 7000 years. All that is required is a container to ferment in, yeast and sugar. However, things get a bit more tricky if you want to make something that actually tastes good!

    Want to learn how to make alcohol at home? Here is everything you need to know about beer, wine, cider and more!

    ⇒ NOTE: Every country has their own laws about homemade alcohol… and even though I love fermentation in all its forms, I’m not condoning illegal fermentation.

    Different Types of alcohol:

    Here is a brief overview of the different types of alcoholic ferments, with links to more information and recipes.

    Beer: Beer is fermented grain. First the grain is malted to increase the sugar content and improve the flavour. Then hops is added for flavour and preservation. Beers generally range from 4%-8%.

    Fruit Wines and Ciders: Cider and wine are both made from fruit, using the same basic process. Cider is capped off early so that it is sparkling with an alcohol level of 3%-12%. Wines are fermented until they reach 12%-14%.

    Bread Kvass: Kvass is the original form of beer. It is made from fermented bread and is drunk when fresh and sparkling. It is an easy ferment for beginners, as it doesn’t need any specialized ingredients or equipment.

    Mead: Mead is another traditional form of alcohol. It is made from fermented honey is can range between 8%-20% alcohol.

    Rice Wines: There are many types of alcoholic rice beverages, and the process is more similar to beer than wines. Rice wines generally range from 18%-25%.

    If you have never made alcohol before, then try starting with a simple fruit juice cider. It’s an easy ferment made from juice and yeast that will make a sweet and sparkling beverage within a week.

    How to make alcohol:

    Here is a basic overview of everything you need to know to make alcohol at home. This information is the same whether you are brewing beer or wine.

    1. Sterilize everything:It’s important to make sure that all your equipment and bottles are completely sterile to prevent a fermentation failure.
    2. Carbon Dioxide: Yeasts break down sugars into alcohol and carbon dioxide. Sparkling beverages, like beer and cider, capture the carbon dioxide. For wine and mead, the CO2 released. Either way, you need to account for the pressure that builds up during the fermentation process. Airlocksare used for releasing CO2 during the fermentation stage.
    3. Halting Fermentation: As long as the conditions are right, the yeast will keep fermenting until most of the sugar is gone or until the ferment reaches the maximum alcohol levels for that yeast. (Around 17%-20% for champagne yeast and 5% for wild yeasts.) You can prematurely stop fermentation by refrigerating your ferment or adding sulfur dioxide.
    4. Yeasts: Traditionally all alcohol was made from wild yeasts. However, this doesn’t always result in a tasty brew. Over time, specific strains of yeast were cultivated to make beer, wine, etc. You can buy yeasts online or at your local brewing and wine making shops.

    Specialized Equipment

    There really isn’t any specialized equipment required for homemade alcohol. However, it is handy to have a little more control if you want to make great-tasting beverages or if you are planning to store your homemade alcohol for more than a week or two.

    • Tubing: Food grade tubes and siphons are useful for moving liquids between carboys and bottles. They generally run at about $20 and are worth the investment.
    • Airlocks: Airlocks are very important if you are serious about making alcoholic ferments. It allows the CO2 to escape, while maintaining a sterile fermenting environment. In general I recommend cylindrical airlocks because they are easier to clean than S-shaped airlocks.
    • Hydrometer: A hydrometer measures the approximate alcohol levels of your beverage by comparing the amount of sugar before fermenting and after fermenting. Here’s my tutorial on how to use a hydrometer.
    • Chemicals: There are a number of chemicals that are frequently used in wine and cider making to ensure fruit ripeness, total acidity, and pH. If you are planning on making wine or cider, then I recommend reading about the necessary supplies.

    How to Make Alcohol

    How to Make Alcohol

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced recalls of several hand sanitizers due to the potential presence of methanol.

    Methanol is a toxic alcohol that can have adverse effects, such as nausea, vomiting, or headache, when a significant amount is used on the skin. More serious effects, such as blindness, seizures, or damage to the nervous system, can occur if methanol is ingested. Drinking hand sanitizer containing methanol, either accidentally or purposely, can be fatal. See here for more information on how to spot safe hand sanitizers.

    If you purchased any hand sanitizer containing methanol, you should stop using it immediately. Return it to the store where you purchased it, if possible. If you experienced any adverse effects from using it, you should call your healthcare provider. If your symptoms are life threatening, call emergency medical services immediately.

    When it comes to preventing the spread of infectious diseases like COVID-19, nothing beats good old-fashioned handwashing.

    But if water and soap aren’t available, your next best option, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) , is to use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol.

    Unless you have a stockpile of store-bought hand sanitizer, you’ll likely have a hard time finding any at a store or online right now. Due to the rapid spread of the new coronavirus, most retailers can’t keep up with the demand for hand sanitizer.

    The good news? All it takes is three ingredients to make your own hand sanitizer at home. Read on to find out how.

    A word of warning

    Hand sanitizer recipes, including the one below, are intended for use by professionals with the necessary expertise and resources for safe creation and proper utilization.

    Only use homemade hand sanitizers in extreme situations when handwashing isn’t available for the foreseeable future.

    Don’t use homemade hand sanitizers on children’s skin as they may be more prone to use them improperly, leading to a greater risk of injury.

    How to Make Alcohol

    How to Make Alcohol

    Have you heard the phrase, there’s more than one way to garble an herb? If so, you can certainly apply that to herbalism when it comes to making various herbal preparations. There are many variations and methods of making herbal infusions, tinctures, syrups, and yes, even herb-infused oils—there’s something for everyone’s skill level and preference.

    Some of these variations speed up the time it takes to make a preparation, some cut down on complicated measurements, and others work to create a more potent end product.

    I’m over on the Herbal Academy blog this week sharing a lesser-known way to make herb-infused oils. These oils are known as “alcohol intermediary herb-infused oils.” This preparation will not only take your herbal preparation skills up a notch, but will also help save you time, increase the shelf life of your oils, and create a strong oil that will help you get the results you’re looking for.

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    How to Make Alcohol

    I’m Meagan, a registered nurse turned herbalist, and I want to live life naturally. Follow along as my husband and I and our four sons figure out what natural living looks like for our family. And of course, I’d love for you to join me on this journey, too! There’s nothing better than having a good hiking buddy with a compass!

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    How to Make Alcohol

    How to Make Alcohol

    Have you heard the phrase, there’s more than one way to garble an herb? If so, you can certainly apply that to herbalism when it comes to making various herbal preparations. There are many variations and methods of making herbal infusions, tinctures, syrups, and yes, even herb-infused oils—there’s something for everyone’s skill level and preference.

    Some of these variations speed up the time it takes to make a preparation, some cut down on complicated measurements, and others work to create a more potent end product.

    I’m over on the Herbal Academy blog this week sharing a lesser-known way to make herb-infused oils. These oils are known as “alcohol intermediary herb-infused oils.” This preparation will not only take your herbal preparation skills up a notch, but will also help save you time, increase the shelf life of your oils, and create a strong oil that will help you get the results you’re looking for.

    Reader Interactions

    Leave a Reply Cancel reply

    Primary Sidebar

    WELCOME

    How to Make Alcohol

    I’m Meagan, a registered nurse turned herbalist, and I want to live life naturally. Follow along as my husband and I and our four sons figure out what natural living looks like for our family. And of course, I’d love for you to join me on this journey, too! There’s nothing better than having a good hiking buddy with a compass!

    • Bloglovin
    • Email
    • Facebook
    • Instagram
    • Pinterest
    • YouTube

    Categories

    CAN I SEND YOU LETTERS?

    Sign up to my bi-monthly letters to get new blog posts in your inbox, get exclusive information on simple, natural, seasonal living, and to become better friends!

    How to Make Alcohol

    Rubbing alcohol is good for so many things, not only is it an essential ingredient in hand sanitizer but it is also an excellent substance that can be used for cleaning and sterilizing. I use rubbing alcohol with a spray nozzle on top to clean my mirrors and I even clean the surface unit for my stove after I scrub with soap and water and dry because it gives an amazing shine to all my surfaces. I also use rubbing alcohol to clean the oil off my glasses, it works phenomenally for all kinds of personal care purposes. However, because of overbuying many people have been faced with showing up at the store only to find a vacant space where it used to be. It’s very upsetting to many so I went searching on Youtube for a recipe and method of making your own homemade alcohol and I was so thrilled when I found this excellent video by Nile Red who ingeniously teaches us step by step how to make rubbing alcohol from ordinary ingredients you can find at the grocery store such as yeast and sugar. I was so amazed and could not wait to share this in the hope that it may help someone through a difficult time.

    Materials:

    • Water (distilled is recommended because you want your water to be free of any possible contaminants)
    • .25 kilograms of Sugar per liter of water
    • 1 packet of Yeast for every two liters of water
    • An Air Lock

    Directions:

    In this video, you will learn to do all the steps to make rubbing alcohol. First, you will dissolve your sugar in the distilled water.

    How to Make Alcohol

    Then you will learn how to dissolve and add your yeast, then will be guided step by step through the next process of fermentation. The fermentation process takes about a week.

    How to Make Alcohol

    This video helped me a lot, I hope it can enlighten someone else and make them aware of the fact that being self-sufficient does not have to difficult.

    How To Make Alcohol

    Around two months ago, at around 9.40 pm, I saw a post on Twitter that made my face scrunch up and my mouth to silently say, ‘what the fu…?’. Unbeknown to me, around 4 hours earlier, the Thai government announced that a ban on the selling of all alcohol would begin at 10 pm that very night. I and the rest of Thailand were entering an alcohol lockdown. Within roughly six minutes of sharing the news with my wife, she proclaimed that we would make our own alcohol. This post is dedicated to how to make alcohol in Thailand.

    Booze Ban

    The ban was to remain in place until the 1st of May, and as I measured up how much gin we had left, I felt confident that we would make it. By keeping a strict eye on measurements we’d have enough gin to keep the crazy wolves from the door. Neither of us are big drinkers despite how the last sentence may sound. For us to decide to make our own within minutes of being told a ban was underway sounds like we may like alcohol too much. It has much more to do with being told you can’t have something than actually wanting booze.

    How To Manufacture Your Personal Tipple

    The best way to make your alcohol is to prepare well; for us, this meant my wife researched ingredients and technique. Meanwhile, I shook my head in disbelief that the Thai government had been so thoughtless to take away my ability to buy the odd tipple now and again. (I realise that with every sentence that I mention alcohol I sound more and more like I have a problem).

    The research having been undertaken the following day we had a plan.

    The water in Thailand is undrinkable even after boiling, so the water was needed.

    How to Make AlcoholWater

    The sugar. Any sugar will do.

    How to Make AlcoholSugar

    Yeast. Neither of us had ever bought yeast before, so this wasn’t so easy. Finding it was tricky – not that it’s hard to get here but when you don’t know what it looks like there is a slight chance you could walk past it several times even after asking a member of staff where it is. I couldn’t comment on whether this happened to us, but we did eventually find the yeast.

    How to Make AlcoholYeast

    As you can see, we bought the brand named ‘Instant Success’ so things were already going well.

    Roselle. Roselle is, according to Google, a species of Hibiscus. I ignored the fact I have zero ideas on what Hibiscus is and nodded dutifully when the wife said we could use it to make alcohol. On further investigation, I found out that Hibiscus is a popular alcohol substitute in Thailand, passed down by generations of Thai people for the use of getting utterly mortal.

    How to Make AlcoholDried Roselle

    Put the Roselle in water and give it a good old soaking and cleaning. Then take a blurry photograph of it due to a shaking hand because of alcohol withdrawals.

    How to Make AlcoholSoaking Roselle

    Brew The Liqour

    Add the roselle to the water and boil and simmer and all that jazz. I can’t recall how long we cooked it for, but it wasn’t too long.

    How to Make AlcoholBoiling Roselle

    After seperating the roselle and the water, empty the liquid into a bottle and add the yeast. Now, we had little idea how much yeast to add but we added a tea spoon’s worth. Then after some discussion about not wanting to go to all this trouble only to have weak alcohol, we added a little bit more…

    How to Make AlcoholAdding The Yeast

    Then we (the wife) filled the top of the bottle with some cotton wool. This initially confused me but after a lively conversation between us both I learnt that this was common practice for home brewing. Who knew? (Apart from the wife and a lot of other people!)

    How to Make AlcoholAlcohol Brewing

    We then left the holy creation to work its magic for a couple of weeks.

    The Taste Test

    We were quite patient, and it wasn’t until two weeks that we finally took the plunge and poured our beautiful creation into our appreciative gobs. The taste was terrific. It wasn’t perfect and had a slight mulled wine body and warmth to it.

    Besides the taste, it was…strong. It was somewhat more ‘robust’ than we anticipated. In fact, by the end of the first glass, we were laughing and red in the face. I am even have been sweating a little…

    Who needs gin when you can make your own weird wine…thingy. Cheers!

    How to Make AlcoholAlcohol

    I don’t just make alcohol or write about it, or even dream about it. I also write other stuff – The Top 6 Things You Must Do In Bangkok….

    If the above method sounds to difficult you could always just follow the crowd 😉

    Homemade Extracts Can Be Alcohol-Free

    Erin Huffstetler is a writer with experience writing about easy ways to save money at home.

    How to Make Alcohol

    Flavoring extracts are typically made with vodka, bourbon or some other type of alcohol, but they can be made without alcohol. The alcohol flavor may not be desirable if you are adding it to a recipe that doesn’t cook it out. Fortunately, it’s just as easy to make your extracts without alcohol, and it is no more expensive.

    How to Make Alcohol-Free Extracts

    To make your non-alcoholic extracts, just substitute the alcohol called for in any extract recipe with three parts food-grade liquid glycerin and one part water. Stir the two ingredients together until well combined. Then, proceed with the recipe as usual. You’ll get the same great taste you’re used to, without any of the alcohol.

    Store your homemade extracts in brown bottles to maximize their shelf life. Extracts made with glycerin should keep for up to four years in your pantry. There’s no need to refrigerate them.

    Allow two months for your extracts to develop before you start using them. Homemade extracts make great gifts. Start a big batch now, so you’ll be ready for the holidays.

    How Does Glycerin Work for Extracts vs. Alcohol?

    Extracts made with glycerine are called glycerites. They have more of a syrupy consistency than traditional alcohol-based extracts but work just the same in recipes. And they’re both sugar-free and gluten-free.

    Extracts have that name because flavor compounds are extracted with a solvent, which is usually alcohol. Alcohol performs this action faster than glycerin, and it extracts a different variety of substances than glycerin will extract. It can result in a different flavor of the finished product than you may be used to with an alcohol extract. Both inhibit bacterial growth in the extract, which is why you can store them at room temperature. One difference is that alcohol denatures proteins and enzymes, while glycerin does not. That can be a factor when it is used for pharmaceuticals.

    What Is Liquid Glycerin?

    Liquid glycerin is an organic compound of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen that is derived from animal fats or vegetable oil. Most of it is produced as a by-product of soap making. It’s widely used in soaps, lotions, foods, medications, and cosmetics. Because it has a sweet taste, it is often used as a sweetener.

    Where Can I Buy Liquid Glycerin?

    You can find liquid glycerin at most pharmacies, but it probably won’t be food-grade. For this reason, ordering it online is probably your best bet. If you’re vegetarian or vegan, vegetable glycerin is available.

    Ready to Give It a Try?

    Making a non-alcoholic vanilla extract is simple and a great first extract to try. Just grab some vanilla beans, and you’ll be well on your way to your first batch.

    Are You Trying to Cut the Alcohol Out of All Recipes?

    You may be avoiding alcohol for various reasons. If you or a member of your household is in recovery from alcohol addiction, you may want to ensure there is none in the cupboard, even in small quantities. Your spiritual tradition may require the elimination of all alcohol. There are many alcohol substitutes that you can use to find the right replacement for any recipe.

    Erin Huffstetler is a writer with experience writing about easy ways to save money at home.

    How to Make Alcohol

    Jupiterimages / Getty Images

    Vanilla extract doesn’t have to be made with alcohol, but finding a non-alcoholic version at the store can be difficult and costly. Fortunately, it’s really easy to make at home and it can save you money. Just follow this simple recipe to create your own non-alcoholic vanilla extract.

    Why Skip the Alcohol?

    Typically, extracts are made with alcohol because it is the most efficient way to extract the flavors from herbs and spices. That’s why most vanilla extracts are made with an alcohol base. However, it isn’t right for everyone, which is why a non-alcoholic alternative such as this recipe is good to have.

    Since it’s alcohol-free, this vanilla extract is okay for children and adults who are abstaining from alcohol. It also won’t add the underlying taste of alcohol to the recipes you use it in. As an extra benefit, you’ll often find that glycerin costs less than a bottle of rum or vodka, so this version is actually cheaper to make.

    Ingredients

    To make vanilla extract at home, you will need three simple ingredients: vanilla beans, food-grade vegetable glycerin, and water. You will also need a bottle to make and store the extract in. A dark brown glass bottle works best, but a clear one will work as well.

    The vanilla beans are the most expensive ingredient. While you can find them at your local grocery store, they can be very pricey and are often sold as a single bean. Since you may need as many as three beans, you can often find them cheaper online (buy vanilla beans from Amazon). The good news is that they can be reused for a few batches of extract.

    You might be able to find glycerin at your local pharmacy, but it may not be food-grade. There are different grades of glycerin and it is used for a number of things, including homemade beauty products. Many online retailers, including Amazon, sell vegetable glycerin, which is perfect for non-alcoholic extracts (buy glycerin from Amazon). Just make sure that you’re buying one listed as “food-grade.”

    Preparation

    Making vanilla extract is not difficult, though you do need to be patient. The flavor of the vanilla bean is slowly extracted into the glycerin, so it will take at least two months before it’s ready to use. Because of this, it’s important to plan ahead and prepare it well before you run out.

    To make the extract, begin by mixing together three parts glycerin and one part water, then pour it into a glass bottle. Cut three vanilla beans open lengthwise for every cup of glycerin you use. Add the beans to the glycerin, making sure they’re completely submerged. Then cap the bottle and store it in a cool, dark place. Shake the bottle once a week. It will be ready to use in two months.

    Your finished extract may not get as dark as alcohol-based vanilla extract and it will have a consistency similar to syrup. However, it will have just as much flavor and work just as well as any other vanilla extract.

    Tips and Tricks

    While the recipe is easy enough, a few tips and tricks will help you out along the way.

    How to Make Alcohol

    • If you’re self-isolating at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic, you probably have some extra time on your hands and are slowly running out of closets to clean.
    • If you want to test out a new activity with a tasty result, try making your own alcohol at home — from home-brewed beer to sparkling wine and DIY classic cocktails, there are plenty of options.
    • But don’t try to make your own hard liquor, as it is a highly flammable process that could lead to explosions.
    • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

    If you find yourself with extra time on your hands during self-isolation at home, you may be tempted to make your own alcohol.

    Although many liquor stores luckily fall under the “essential services” category and are still open, it’s still a great time to get started on your home-brewing skills and whip up some DIY drinks from the comfort of your own home.

    It’s important to note that you should not try making your own hard liquor at home, even if you think you’d master it after your late-night Google searches. Hard liquor and high-proof alcohol are extremely flammable, and the process could lead to a deadly explosion.

    “Distilleries have all sorts of equipment that are explosion proof,” said Joseph Magliocco, president of whiskey-maker Michter’s Distillery.

    So if you’re looking for something with a little stronger kick, look into delivery — or playing around with what you have. A lot of open stores are offering delivery, online ordering, and curbside pick up. Some services, like Drizly, are specifically geared toward bringing drinks to your door, assuming you’re of age. Obviously, there are rules and regulations restricting the sale of alcohol online — especially across state lines — but it’s not an impossible buy.

    But beer lovers are in luck. Erica Shea and Stephen Valand are the owners and cofounders of Brooklyn Brew Shop, a New York-based company that they began to make “to make beer and brewing feel more like baking and cooking.” They designed kits scaled down to produce just one gallon of beer, allowing customers to save on space and brew time.

    They say that while you may be unable to share them with your friends just yet, if you start your own home-brew kits now, in a month or so you can enjoy the fruits of your labor.

    That’s right: Home-brewing beer or wine can take about four weeks, sometimes longer, so it does require patience. But if you’re impatient, you can also create your own cocktails at home using whatever you have in your liquor cabinet — and share your work of art over a virtual happy hour.

    “There are so many great recipes online, you can get very creative with whiskeys and spirits, Zoom to drink together — there’s a lot of things you can do to stay connected,” Magliocco said.

    Home-brewing has grown in popularity in recent years, and there are plenty of options for at-home kits that make things like brewing your own batch of beer relatively simple. Brooklyn Brew Shop also offers sparkling white wine and sparkling rose‎ kits for those more inclined toward a refreshing bubbly beverage.

    So whether you’re looking for an activity to pass the time or a quick fix, here’s what these experts recommended for getting a little boozy.

    Art aficionados are always looking for different mediums and unique methods to exercise their creative streak. So why not try alcohol ink; it can be easily made at home and has varied uses in painting. Check out four ways to make alcohol ink and some amazing ways in which you can use it, in this ArtHearty write-up.

    How to Make Alcohol

    Art aficionados are always looking for different mediums and unique methods to exercise their creative streak. So why not try alcohol ink; it can be easily made at home and has varied uses in painting. Check out four ways to make alcohol ink and some amazing ways in which you can use it, in this ArtHearty write-up.

    How to Make Alcohol

    How to Make Alcohol

    How to Make Alcohol

    Less is more!

    Even a little amount of alcohol ink goes a long way, so don’t use too much. Start with a little, and use more if required especially when stamping.

    All the artistic souls out there are always looking for something new, different, and unique to beautify their work. Art has no dearth of mediums, and one of these are alcohol inks. If you are looking for inks to paint on glossy papers or metals, or try the stamping effect; then alcohol ink is perfect for you.

    Would you like to write for us? Well, we’re looking for good writers who want to spread the word. Get in touch with us and we’ll talk.

    Buying alcohol ink from an art and craft store can be expensive, and if you are a fan of the DIY trend, then read on. We have four different methods in which you can make your own alcohol ink. Plus, we give you some creative and offbeat ways in which you can use it. All the methods are very easy, and you require only two ingredients in each of them.

    How to Make Alcohol Ink

    Using old markers

    Dried up old markers have a better use, rather than just discarding them. You can use them to make your very own alcohol ink. It’s cheaper, and you are recycling your old markers as well.

    What You Need

    • Old markers in different colors
    • Rubbing alcohol
    • Glass Jars

    Instructions

    • First fill 2/3rd the glass jars with rubbing alcohol and then, insert the tips of the old markers in the jar.
    • Let them soak for an hour till the color mixes properly with the alcohol.
    • To quicken the process, you can remove the ink reservoir and insert it directly in the jar. You can even insert more than one markers at a time.

    Tip: For an intense color, let the marker stay in the jar overnight. You can also use organic vodka instead of rubbing alcohol.

    Using Food Coloring

    What You Need

    • 91% isopropyl alcohol
    • Food coloring (any colors)
    • Glass jars

    Instructions

    • First add the alcohol to the glass jars. Cover about 2/3 rd of the jar.
    • Now add 2 -3 drops of food coloring of your choice. You can increase the quantity later if you want a darker shade. That’s it! Your alcohol ink is ready.

    Tip: It is better to use liquid food coloring as powders won’t mix properly.

    Using Powdered Rit Dye

    Would you like to write for us? Well, we’re looking for good writers who want to spread the word. Get in touch with us and we’ll talk.

    What You Need

    • Powered Rit dye
    • Rubbing alcohol
    • Small glass jars

    Instructions

    • Using powdered rit dye is a good idea if you want a little grainy texture for your alcohol ink.
    • Take alcohol in the jar; add a spoonful of rit dye and shake well till the powder mixes properly with the alcohol. and you are done!

    Tip : Ensure that you shake the jar well, otherwise the ink will be too grainy to use.

    Using Liquid Rit Dye

    What You Need

    • Liquid Rit fabric dye
    • Isopropyl alcohol
    • Small jars

    Instructions

    • Using liquid rit fabric dye is a good idea if you want a smooth ink.
    • Just mix isopropyl alcohol and the liquid rit fabric dye; mix well and your ink is ready to use!

    Tip : Use just 2 – 3 drops of rit dye initially. Add more later if you want a darker shade.

    How to Use Alcohol Ink

    Other than a basic limitation; you cannot use alcohol ink on very soft or thin paper as it will look smudgy; you can go crazy with alcohol ink; literally! Get creative and experiment all you like. We do have some suggestions on using alcohol ink.

    Decorations

    How to Make Alcohol

    Transform your old or plain decorations in to cool new ones instantly. Alcohol ink makes for attractive colorful glass decorations.

    Trendy Coasters!

    How to Make Alcohol

    Use old coasters or jazz up the plain ones; make patterns or just colorful abstract designs! You can even paint old CD’s with some abstract patterns or any designs of your choice.

    Funk it up!

    Why not liven up your old jewelry with some fun colors. Just mix and match different colors and transform your old pendants, rings, or earrings in to funky accessories.

    Paint it up!

    Now that you have made your own ink why not try it as a medium of painting.

    How to Make Alcohol

    How to Make Alcohol

    Cool Covers!

    How to Make Alcohol

    Colorful phone cases is a trend to stay. Why spend so much when you can make your own. Flaunt your own style and unique designs using alcohol ink. You can even write your initials or zodiac with amazing calligraphy.

    Greeting Cards

    How to Make Alcohol

    Show off your artistic talent with a beautiful card for your friend, family, or colleague. A cool way to make someone feel special and appreciated.

    Most importantly, don’t forget to have fun making and using your own alcohol ink!

    How to Make Alcohol

    How to Make Alcohol

    Like it? Share it!

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    Uncategorized

    How to Make Alcohol

    Vodka is an pretty easy spirit to make, as it requires no aging or maturation. While vodka can be made from most grains, arguably the best source for the alcohol is the humble potato. You simply ferment it and then distill it. Distillation is the trickiest part, but with a short trip to your local sciences shop, you can pick up the parts to build a stove-top still and start making homemade vodka in your own kitchen.

    Wash and peel your potatoes, and then chop them up into cubes. About 1 lb. of potatoes is enough to make about 1 pt. of vodka.

    Put the potatoes into a pressure cooker. Fill the pressure cooker with enough water to cover the potatoes, plus about an inch or two more. Then clamp the lid on and cook until the potatoes have fallen apart and dissolved into a mash. This should take about an hour.

    Pour the potato mash into a plastic vat and let it cool to room temperature. There is no need for a thermometer. Just put your hand over the mash and if it doesn’t feel warm, it’s cool enough. Pour in some yeast and start fermenting the potato mash; 1/3 tbsp. will do, and the best yeast you can find commercially is probably going to be distiller’s or wine-making yeast. Let your potato mash ferment in the open for one to two weeks, depending on the local climate. When the bubbling starts to slow down and become less frequent, you will know that fermentation is concluding.

    Fill a heat-safe beaker sufficient to hold at least 6 qts. with fermented potato mash, and put a rubber stopper with a hole for both piping and a thermometer into the top. If you cannot find rubber stoppers with the requisite holes, cut them yourself with a pocket knife. Put that beaker on a stove burner.

    Put a coil of copper or glass tubing into the stopper. Install the condensing jacket around the tubing, and fill it with ice water.

    Put a second rubber stopper with a hole for tubing into another beaker and then put the other end of the tubing into that stopper. This second beaker needs to be big enough to hold at least 1 pt. Set this on the countertop.

    Light the burner, and heat your potato mash to a point between 173 and 200 degrees. This causes the alcohol in the mash to vaporize, but not the water. The alcohol vapor will then rise into the cooling coil, condense and drop down into the second beaker.

    Clean your cooking beaker and distill the results a second time. Most vodka you buy on the shelf is 40 percent alcohol, and it is unlikely you will achieve that concentration in only one distillation using stove-top methods.

    The parts for building a stove-top still are available at most chemistry or science supply stores.

    6 Tips to Save Using the Most Popular Food Delivery Apps

    If you are planning on hosting a party for adults only, alcohol is sure to be an ingredient. Unfortunately if you are on a budget, alcohol for an adult party can be an expensive thing to buy. As long as you are in a jurisdiction where it is legal to make your own alcohol for personal consumption, you can save a lot of money by making your own alcohol to add to a party punch mix or another alcoholic beverage for an adults-only party.

    Clean a 1-gallon jug. Use a milk jug, old water jug or any other plastic container.

    Use a funnel to pour 31/2 cups of sugar into the jug. Add 14 cups of warm water to the jug and shake vigorously to make sure the sugar dissolves.

    Hydrate the yeast. Follow the directions on the package. Add the yeast to warm water and do not disturb it. Allow the yeast to foam up approximately 1 inch before you consider it hydrated. Pour the yeast and warm water into the 1-gallon jug.

    Poke a small number of holes into the balloon, ensuring that gas under pressure will be able to escape without letting oxygen in. Place the balloon over the opening of the 1-gallon jug. Store the jug in a warm place, where it will not be disturbed.

    Ensure that the balloon stays slightly inflated while you are allowing the alcohol to form. Place the jug in a refrigerator as the balloon deflates; the longer you refrigerate the fermented sugar wine, the more the taste will improve.

    Return the cap to the fermentation bottle when you place it in the refrigerator after fermentation; this will also help improve the flavor.

    Warnings

    Don’t drink the sugar wine alcohol by itself; it is only meant to be an ingredient in an alcoholic adult punch. Check your local laws to make sure that brewing your own alcohol is a legal activity before creating your own alcohol for a party punch.

    David Somerset has been a writer intermittently for 11 years. He attended New Mexico Tech and earned a Bachelor of Science in technical communication in 2007. From being published in the “Bucksworth Community News” to writing how-to articles for eHow, his experience is quite diverse.

    Art aficionados are always looking for different mediums and unique methods to exercise their creative streak. So why not try alcohol ink; it can be easily made at home and has varied uses in painting. Check out four ways to make alcohol ink and some amazing ways in which you can use it, in this ArtHearty write-up.

    How to Make Alcohol

    Art aficionados are always looking for different mediums and unique methods to exercise their creative streak. So why not try alcohol ink; it can be easily made at home and has varied uses in painting. Check out four ways to make alcohol ink and some amazing ways in which you can use it, in this ArtHearty write-up.

    How to Make Alcohol

    How to Make Alcohol

    How to Make Alcohol

    Less is more!

    Even a little amount of alcohol ink goes a long way, so don’t use too much. Start with a little, and use more if required especially when stamping.

    All the artistic souls out there are always looking for something new, different, and unique to beautify their work. Art has no dearth of mediums, and one of these are alcohol inks. If you are looking for inks to paint on glossy papers or metals, or try the stamping effect; then alcohol ink is perfect for you.

    Would you like to write for us? Well, we’re looking for good writers who want to spread the word. Get in touch with us and we’ll talk.

    Buying alcohol ink from an art and craft store can be expensive, and if you are a fan of the DIY trend, then read on. We have four different methods in which you can make your own alcohol ink. Plus, we give you some creative and offbeat ways in which you can use it. All the methods are very easy, and you require only two ingredients in each of them.

    How to Make Alcohol Ink

    Using old markers

    Dried up old markers have a better use, rather than just discarding them. You can use them to make your very own alcohol ink. It’s cheaper, and you are recycling your old markers as well.

    What You Need

    • Old markers in different colors
    • Rubbing alcohol
    • Glass Jars

    Instructions

    • First fill 2/3rd the glass jars with rubbing alcohol and then, insert the tips of the old markers in the jar.
    • Let them soak for an hour till the color mixes properly with the alcohol.
    • To quicken the process, you can remove the ink reservoir and insert it directly in the jar. You can even insert more than one markers at a time.

    Tip: For an intense color, let the marker stay in the jar overnight. You can also use organic vodka instead of rubbing alcohol.

    Using Food Coloring

    What You Need

    • 91% isopropyl alcohol
    • Food coloring (any colors)
    • Glass jars

    Instructions

    • First add the alcohol to the glass jars. Cover about 2/3 rd of the jar.
    • Now add 2 -3 drops of food coloring of your choice. You can increase the quantity later if you want a darker shade. That’s it! Your alcohol ink is ready.

    Tip: It is better to use liquid food coloring as powders won’t mix properly.

    Using Powdered Rit Dye

    Would you like to write for us? Well, we’re looking for good writers who want to spread the word. Get in touch with us and we’ll talk.

    What You Need

    • Powered Rit dye
    • Rubbing alcohol
    • Small glass jars

    Instructions

    • Using powdered rit dye is a good idea if you want a little grainy texture for your alcohol ink.
    • Take alcohol in the jar; add a spoonful of rit dye and shake well till the powder mixes properly with the alcohol. and you are done!

    Tip : Ensure that you shake the jar well, otherwise the ink will be too grainy to use.

    Using Liquid Rit Dye

    What You Need

    • Liquid Rit fabric dye
    • Isopropyl alcohol
    • Small jars

    Instructions

    • Using liquid rit fabric dye is a good idea if you want a smooth ink.
    • Just mix isopropyl alcohol and the liquid rit fabric dye; mix well and your ink is ready to use!

    Tip : Use just 2 – 3 drops of rit dye initially. Add more later if you want a darker shade.

    How to Use Alcohol Ink

    Other than a basic limitation; you cannot use alcohol ink on very soft or thin paper as it will look smudgy; you can go crazy with alcohol ink; literally! Get creative and experiment all you like. We do have some suggestions on using alcohol ink.

    Decorations

    How to Make Alcohol

    Transform your old or plain decorations in to cool new ones instantly. Alcohol ink makes for attractive colorful glass decorations.

    Trendy Coasters!

    How to Make Alcohol

    Use old coasters or jazz up the plain ones; make patterns or just colorful abstract designs! You can even paint old CD’s with some abstract patterns or any designs of your choice.

    Funk it up!

    Why not liven up your old jewelry with some fun colors. Just mix and match different colors and transform your old pendants, rings, or earrings in to funky accessories.

    Paint it up!

    Now that you have made your own ink why not try it as a medium of painting.

    How to Make Alcohol

    How to Make Alcohol

    Cool Covers!

    How to Make Alcohol

    Colorful phone cases is a trend to stay. Why spend so much when you can make your own. Flaunt your own style and unique designs using alcohol ink. You can even write your initials or zodiac with amazing calligraphy.

    Greeting Cards

    How to Make Alcohol

    Show off your artistic talent with a beautiful card for your friend, family, or colleague. A cool way to make someone feel special and appreciated.

    Most importantly, don’t forget to have fun making and using your own alcohol ink!

    How to Make Alcohol

    How to Make Alcohol

    Like it? Share it!

    • Share
    • Tweet
    • Pin
    • LinkedIn
    • Email

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    No-alcohol beer gets the craft-brew treatment, and it’s shockingly good.

    How to Make Alcohol

    People hear ‘nonalcoholic beer’ and think the worst,” says Bill Shufelt, cofounder of Athletic Brewing Company and Taproom in Stratford, Connecticut. “The standard commercial production gives you a bland or metallic taste. There hasn’t been a satisfying option with no compromise.”

    That may explain why non-alcoholic beer makes up only about 2 percent of the beer market. Shufelt took this as a challenge—and an opportunity: to create beer with no alcohol but so much flavor that anyone would enjoy drinking it.

    Creating a Better (Non-Alcoholic) Beer

    How to Make Alcohol

    The craft beer renaissance we’re enjoying in the U.S. right now is built on flavor, flavor, and more flavor. Lighter brews like session ales (the name reportedly comes from mid-20th-century England, when factory workers drank low-alcohol beer during their allotted “drinking sessions”), and the newly resurgent shandy (beer + lemonade) are less about getting a buzz than they are about enjoying a delicious beverage.

    For a brewery to give the same kind of love and attention to brewing flavorful nonalcoholic beer seems a logical next step.

    “The established methods were dead ends.”

    “We’re firm believers that utter lack of innovation is responsible for generating the nonalcoholic-beer stigma in the U.S.,” says Shufelt. “The established methods were dead ends.”

    He and John Walker—a multiple Great American Beer Festival medal winning brewer—performed more than a hundred trials over several years to reengineer the de-alcoholizing process into a revolutionary system that leaves the full character of the malt and hops intact.

    “The fact that John would take the leap into the nonalcoholic world is amazing and a testament to his intellectual curiosity,” Shufelt says.

    Shufelt chose the name Athletic to emphasize the healthier quality of his beer. He doesn’t preach abstinence, though his product is the best we’ve tasted for people who can’t or don’t drink alcohol. “We’re here to expand the craft beer world with a lot of new drinking occasions. Everyone can find a place where NA beer fits into their lives: Anytime you want to be more mindful—if you’ve just worked out, if you’re at a work dinner, if you’re with your kids, if you have to drive.”

    Upside Dawn, one of Athletic’s signature beers, won a Silver Medal in the Gold or Blonde Ale category at the 2018 New York International Beer Competition, going up against beers that contain alcohol.

    How They Get the Booze Out

    How to Make Alcohol

    Standard de-alcoholization on a mass scale typically comes down to one of two techniques: (1) restricting the alcohol through a shortened brewing process that arrests fermentation, usually by cooling the yeast into inactivity before it can convert the grain sugar into alcohol, or (2) removing the alcohol, typically done by heating (alcohol boils at a lower temperature than water), or by filtration (beer is pressure-pushed through a semipermeable membrane that allows only alcohol and water to pass through. The alcohol is heated off and the water is returned to the beer.

    In both cases, the beer’s flavor is compromised, as are the quality of the body and foaming properties. “In shortened processes, you get a more tea-like product and miss out on finished beer-flavor compounds,” says Shufelt. “With heat treatment, no matter how gently it’s done, you lose the potential for hop character because myrcene (the most common hop oil) starts to burn off at 147 degrees versus alcohol at 173 degrees.”

    The removal of alcohol within the Athletic Brewing process isn’t as easy to isolate. Shufelt and Walker went back to the textbook level, reading entire curriculums on beer-making. They wanted to know how to make a less fermentable wort (one that will still undergo a significant fermentation over several weeks, but not a typical fermentation that turns wort directly into alcohol) that retains the esters and other chemical compounds that result from fermentation—the nuances of beer that transform it from a tea into a beer.

    How to Make Alcohol

    To get there, they took the standard nonalcoholic brewing process apart—tweaking variables with each trial—and reengineered it.

    “For example, if you flare acidity or temperature at different moments during the brew day, you can ultimately affect the emergence of a compound during fermentation a week later,” Shufelt says. “There were definitely single moments on process development when we made huge strides, but there is just no single breakthrough point in the process to isolate and say, ‘This is how we de-alcoholize the beer.’ Our process is different at every stage and in every vessel. It is entirely new and entirely proprietary. But I can tell you this: John Walker’s recipes will expand the beer world to offer everyone a great-tasting nonalcoholic brew that stands up to today’s discerning taste and ingredient standards, something that is long overdue.”

    This article originally ran in the November 2018 issue of Popular Mechanics.

    How to Make Alcohol

    Before you get started: If you didn’t purchase Culinary Solvent for your 70% alcohol solution recipe, please check the ABV of your alcohol, and ensure you are following the right recipe with proper dilution ratios of alcohol to water. Links to additional recipes for different starting alcohols at the bottom of this page. -Mr.Tincture

    Recipes to Make 70% Alcohol Solution for Disinfecting Spray

    The CDC recommends alcohol solutions of at least 70% alcohol (ethyl alcohol or isopropyl alcohol) for effective surface disinfection. See the CDC’s complete recommendation here including their list of FDA approved disinfectant brands. We recommend diluting your surface disinfectant to a minimum ABV of 80%, see our recommended recipes below.

    Customers seeking to maximize the alcohol solution they can create with the starting alcohol they have on hand may follow the recipes below to make an alcohol solution that is exactly 70% alcohol by volume. Diluting below the recommended concentration of 70% ABV may result in the spreading of germs, please take extra care to measure ingredients when diluting to 70% alcohol.

    Recipes to make 70% Alcohol Solution for Disinfecting Sprays

    • 70% Alcohol Solution [Recipe] using 190 proof Culinary Solvent
    • 70% Alcohol Solution [Recipe] using 200 proof Culinary Solvent
    • 70% Alcohol Solution [Recipe] using 95% ethyl alcohol
    • 70% Alcohol Solution [Recipe] using 100% ethyl alcohol
    • 70% Alcohol Solution [ Recipe] using 190 proof Everclear
    • 70% Alcohol Solution [ Recipe] using 151 proof Everclear
    • 70% Alcohol Solution [ Recipe] using 99% isopropyl alcohol
    • 70% Alcohol Solution [ Recipe] using 91% isopropyl alcohol
    • 70% Alcohol Solution [Recipe] using 70% isopropyl alcohol

    How to Make Alcohol

    Recipes to make 80% Alcohol Solution for Disinfecting Spray

    The more alcohol in your disinfecting solution, the better. It’s the alcohol that does the germ and virus killing, higher concentrations have been proven to kill more germs quicker, essentially reducing the required wait time of 30 seconds for effective surface disinfection. Read more here >> Source.

    Recipes for Making Hand Sanitizer

    • Homemade Hand Sanitizer 60% ABV [Recipe] using 200 Proof Culinary Solvent
    • Homemade Hand Sanitizer 60% ABV [Recipe] using 100% Ethyl Alcohol
    • View all of our Hand Sanitizer Related Blog Posts

    How to Make Alcohol

    Additional Resources

    • More information about making Homemade Hand Sanitizer
    • More information about making disinfectant spray and wipes

    Does ethyl alcohol kill germs, viruses, and bacteria on surfaces?

    Answer: Yes, so long as the concentration and contact time minimum requirements are met. For a detailed answer with links to authoritative sources, visit Does Ethyl Alcohol Kill Germs, Viruses, and Bacteria?

    November 29, 2018 by Mary 2 Comments

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    Have you ever wondered how to make eggnog without alcohol? This easy non-alcoholic homemade eggnog is the perfect companion for any holiday gathering. Homemade custard, maple whipped cream and a dash of nutmeg will make this a new holiday tradition for your family.

    How to Make Alcohol

    Store bought eggnog is pretty gross, in my opinion. After trying the overpowering, sickeningly sweet drink from that green carton several times growing up, I was decidedly against eggnog.

    That is, until I got brave enough to try my mom’s homemade eggnog. From then on, my aversion was replaced with love for this frothy winter drink that tastes a lot like ice cream!

    This homemade eggnog recipe begins with a simple custard, then adds whipped egg whites and homemade maple whipped cream. It is nothing short of divine! Even my boys love what they call “the ice cream drink.”

    Even better, this recipe is non alcoholic, which makes it the perfect drink for any gathering. No need to worry about serving it to underage people or those who don’t drink (including myself). It’s great for everyone!

    Originally, alcohol was used in this recipe to preserve the eggs and eliminate the risk of bacteria. We’ll talk more in a bit about why this recipe is still safe sans alcohol.

    Right up there with homemade wassail, this might just be my new favorite Christmas drink.

    How to Make Alcohol

    Why homemade eggnog is better than store bought

    Is it really worth the effort to make your own eggnog? Definitely yes. I’ll tell you why.

    Here are the typical store bought eggnog ingredients:

    Grade A Milk & Cream, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Egg Yolks, Sugar, Nonfat Milk, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Spices, Carrageenan, Annatto (color), Turmeric (color).

    HFCS as the #2 ingredient? Carrageenan? No thank you. We can do better.

    Additionally, the FDA is so strict about the use of raw eggs in commercial products that the egg yolk solids are restricted to 1% of the final product. So basically, you’re buying a non-eggy eggnog.

    Which kind of defeats the purpose.

    That being said, you do have to be careful with the consumption of raw eggs (especially young children, pregnant women or people with health issues). But know that the risk of contamination is extremely small. Read this quote from The Nourished Life about the safety of raw eggs:

    …only 1 in 30,000 eggs even has a salmonella problem. If I eat three raw eggs a day, statistics say it would take more than 27 years before I’d actually run across one with salmonella. Of course, I know life isn’t about statistics, but you get the point.

    Elizabeth Walling from The Nourished Life
    So, raw eggs are generally safe – as long as you’re healthy and the eggs are really fresh. But consume at your own risk.

    The nutmeg and vanilla extract may also act as a bit of a natural preservative.

    How to Make Alcohol

    Homemade eggnog nutrition

    Homemade eggnog is actually really good for you! Here’s the ingredients list:

    Whole milk, eggs , organic sugar, whipping cream (with maple syrup), vanilla extract and nutmeg.

    And here are some of the nutritious things inside:

    • Great balance of carbs, fat, and protein.
    • Eggs contain fat soluble vitamins and lots of B vitamins.
    • Eggs are also a great source of Omega-3s (for brain health) and lecithin (for liver and skin).
    • Milk and whipped cream are great sources of calcium and healthy fats.
    • Nutmeg has a high concentration of manganese, which is wonderful for the blood among other benefits (source).

    How to Make Alcohol

    Homemade eggnog recipe notes

    • This homemade eggnog has cooked yolks, but the whites are raw. So it’s very important that you use the freshest, best quality eggs you can find. Consume at your own risk.
    • When making the custard, keep in mind it will not be very thick. The main point is to heat it to steaming but DO NOT boil. It will thicken slightly and coat the spoon lightly, but the egg whites and cream are what really thickens the mixture.
    • You may use store bought whipped cream, but homemade is super easy and sooooo much better. It only takes a minute or so to whip the cream with an electric mixer.
    • Keeps in the fridge for 3 days (although eggnog never sticks around in our house).

    How to Make Alcohol

    How to Make Alcohol

    Easy Homemade Eggnog (non alcoholic)

    Have you ever wondered how to make eggnog without alcohol? Homemade custard, maple whipped cream and a dash of nutmeg create the perfect holiday eggnog!

    Prep Time 10 minutes

    Cook Time 15 minutes

    Total Time 25 minutes

    Ingredients

    • 1/3 cup pure cane sugar organic
    • 2 egg yolks
    • 1/4 tsp salt
    • 1/8 tsp ground nutmeg
    • 4 cups whole milk
    • 2 egg whites
    • 3 TBSP pure cane sugar
    • 1 tsp vanilla extract
    • 1/2 cup heavy whipping cream
    • 1 TBSP maple syrup

    Instructions

    Beat 1/3 cup sugar into egg yolks. Add salt, stir in milk, and heat on medium heat to make the custard.

    Stir frequently as the mixture heats for approximately 15 minutes. Do not allow mixture to boil. It will thicken slightly until it lightly coats the spoon. Remove from heat and allow to cool.

    Beat whipping cream and maple syrup together until peaks form. Set aside.

    Beat egg whites until foamy. Gradually add 3 tablespoons sugar, beating until soft peaks form.

    Add egg whites, vanilla, and half the whipped cream to custard and mix thoroughly.

    Chill 3-4 hours before serving.

    Garnish with additional whipped cream and a dash of nutmeg, if desired.

    How to Make Alcohol

    • The news of a lockdown extension has triggered a surge in Google searches about home-made alcohol.
    • The topic was especially of interest in the Free State, North West, Mpumalanga and Limpopo.
    • Pineapples seem to be a go-to ingredient.
    • For more stories, go to Business Insider’s home page.

    Google saw a surge in searches about how to make home-made alcohol in South Africa, triggered by president Cyril Ramaphosa’s announcement that the national lockdown will be extended by another two weeks.

    South Africans are not allowed to purchase liquor during the lockdown to slow down the spread of Covid-19 in the country.

    Google South Africa said the Free State, North West, Mpumalanga and Limpopo showed the highest interest for homemade liquor, while the Northern Cape showed very low levels of alcohol-related search terms.

    There was a spike in the search term ‘How to make your own alcohol’ on the evening of April 9, following Ramaphosa’s televised announcement.

    Other popular search queries included ‘homemade beer recipes south africa’, ‘can homemade pineapple beer make you drunk’, ‘homemade gin’, homemade alcoholic pineapple beer’ and ‘how to make alcohol at home fast’.

    All of the top results, however, require specialised equipment such as an airlock for the fermentation process.

    Google said overall search teams related to South Africa’s alcohol ban spiked by over 500% the week leading up to Easter.

    (compiled by James de Villiers)

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    Also from Business Insider South Africa:

    DISINFECTANT WIPES are still somewhat hard to come by as people buy new supplies of them as soon as they are in stock, but how do make your own disinfectant wipes at home?

    We will use your email address only for sending you newsletters. Please see our Privacy Notice for details of your data protection rights.

    Cleaning and sanitising yourself and your home is on everyone’s mind as the coronavirus pandemic continues. Germs can live on surfaces up to three days according to experts and disinfectant wipes and spray can help to protect against spreading the infection. Express.co.uk has compiled a guide explaining how you can make disinfectant wipes yourself.

    Trending

    How to make your own disinfectant wipes at home

    Disinfectant wipes are relatively easy to make if you cannot buy any.

    For bleach-based disinfectant wipes:

    • Bleach
    • Water
    • Paper towels or microfiber cloths
    • An airtight storage container.

    How to Make Alcohol

    Disinfectant wipes: How do you make your own disinfectant wipes? (Image: GETTY)

    How to Make Alcohol

    Disinfectant wipes: You should wear gloves when making these wipes (Image: GETTY)

    READ MORE

    How to Make Alcohol

    Instructions:

    You should begin by putting on gloves and open a window for proper ventilation.

    Next, you should mix the ingredients in an airtight container depending on the volume you are looking for.

    The ratios are either five tablespoons of bleach to one gallon of water or four teaspoons of bleach to one quart of water.

    Submerge your paper towels or clothes completely into the diluted bleach for at least five minutes to soak up the solution effectively.

    You should tightly close the container and then you can use these wipes for up to 24 hours.

    According to authorities, after that time has passed the solution will be ineffective and you should create a new batch of diluted bleach.

    How to Make Alcohol

    Disinfectant wipes: It is advised you open a window when making your own wipes (Image: GETTY)

    How to Make Alcohol

    If you love to use mixed media to create pages in your art journals, then you’ll know that alcohol inks are perfect for staining and adding transparent color. I generally use them with stencils and also for adding aged effects and subtle shading effects to both paper and fabric.

    Although I do have a collection of alcohol inks that I purchased, it always seems that I never have quite the right color when I need it. Purchasing a new bottle each time I need a new color can become quite expensive and unrealistic, so I’ve been making my own alcohol inks for years after watching this video on Youtube which shows you just how easy it is to make your own inks using cheap felt tipped markers and rubbing alcohol.

    As I was working on these fabric journal pages to add some dark stains, I realized that I needed some new ink colors so the timing was perfect to also share this tutorial with you.

    How to Make Alcohol

    How to Make Your Own Alcohol Inks

    All you need to make your own alcohol inks is a set of felt tipped markers, rubbing alcohol, and some small plastic bottles or containers to hold the ink. I found the markers and some small spray bottles at the dollar store. I don’t generally use alcohol inks as a spray however I found some small spray bottles of hand sanitizer which were the perfect size to use for the inks so I removed the hand sanitizer and cleaned the bottles. Using these type bottles gives me the option of using the inks as a spray, with a dropper, or to pour onto a piece of sponge to use as a stain. And of course you need some rubbing alcohol which can be found at your local pharmacy.

    How to Make Alcohol

    Pull the markers apart and remove the felt strip inside. I used a pair of small craft pliers to remove the felt strip then I cut it into small sections. Soak the pieces in a small container filled with rubbing alcohol and you should see that the ink is drawn out of the felt.

    How to Make Alcohol

    I did this with several different colors and ended up with a nice selection of alcohol inks with quite vivid colors.

    How to Make Alcohol

    I tested one of the colors by spraying it over a stencil onto a collaged background.

    How to Make Alcohol

    It added a lovely subtle design to the surface.

    How to Make Alcohol

    If you’re going to try this, the only thing I would add is that rubbing alcohol is highly flammable so keep it away from flames. And if spraying alcohol ink I would also suggest using it in a well-ventilated area or even wearing a mask because inhaling the overspray is not good for your health. Otherwise it works a treat! Go try it!