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How to make hot cross buns

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Nutrition and extra info

Nutrition: per bun

  • kcal 374
  • fat 8g
  • saturates 4g
  • carbs 71g
  • sugars 25g
  • fibre 3g
  • protein 10g
  • salt 0.49g

Ingredients

For the buns

  • 500g strong white bread flour
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 2 heaped tsp mixed spice
  • 50g caster sugar
  • 50g article” data-tooltip-width=”350″ data-tooltip-hide-delay=”200″ data-tooltip-flyout=”true”>butter, chopped into cubes

Butter

Butter is a dairy product made from separating whole milk or cream into fat and…

Yeast

Yeast is a living, single-cell organism. As the yeast grows, it converts its food (in the form…

One of the most widely used ingredients, milk is often referred to as a ‘complete’ food…

The ultimate convenience food, eggs are powerhouses of nutrition packed with protein and a…

For the crosses & glaze

  • 3 tbsp plain flour
  • article” data-tooltip-width=”350″ data-tooltip-hide-delay=”200″ data-tooltip-flyout=”true”>honey or golden syrup, for brushing

Honey

Honey is made by bees from the nectar they collect from flowers. Viscous and fragrant, it’s…

Method

Tip the flour into a bowl and stir in the salt, mixed spice and sugar.

Rub in the butter with your fingertips. Stir in the dried fruit, then sprinkle over the yeast and stir in. Gently warm the milk so it is hot, but still cool enough to put your finger in for a couple of seconds. Beat with the eggs, then pour into the dried ingredients.

Using a blunt knife, mix the ingredients to a moist dough, then leave to soak for 5 mins. Take out of the bowl and cut the dough into 8 equal pieces.

Shape the dough into buns on a floured surface. Space apart on a baking sheet, cover loosely with cling film, then leave in a warm place until half again in size. This will take 45 mins-1 hr 15 mins, depending on how warm the room is.

When the buns are risen, heat oven to 220C/fan 200C/gas 7. Mix the flour with 2 tbsp water to make a paste. Pour into a plastic food bag and make a nick in one of the corners. Pipe crosses on top of each bun.

Bake for 12-15 mins until risen and golden. Trim the excess cross mixture from the buns , then brush all over with honey or golden syrup. The buns will keep fresh for a day. After that they are best toasted and served with butter.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Traditional spiced, sticky glazed fruit buns with pastry crosses. Served as a classic Easter treat, the buns can also be enjoyed at any time of year.

Each serving provides 313 kcal, 8.5g protein, 57g carbohydrates (of which 16.5g sugars), 5g fat (of which 3g saturates), 2g fibre and 0.5g salt.

Ingredients

For the buns

  • 625g/1lb 6oz strong white flour, plus extra for dusting (see tip for alternatives)
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp ground mixed spice (or a combination of ground spices such as cinnamom, allspice, nutmeg, cloves and ginger)
  • 45g/1½oz unsalted butter, cubed, plus extra for greasing
  • 85g/3oz caster sugar
  • 1 unwaxed lemon, finely grated zest only (alternatively use finely grated zest of ½ orange or 1 tangerine/satsuma)
  • 1½ tsp dried fast-action yeast
  • 1 free-range egg
  • 275ml/9½fl oz tepid milk (non-dairy milks are also suitable)
  • 125g/4½oz dried mixed fruit of your choice

For the topping

  • 2 tbsp plain flour (see tip for alternatives)
  • 1 tbsp golden syrup or runny honey, gently heated, for glazing (see tip for alternatives)

Method

For the buns, sieve the flour, salt and mixed spice into a large mixing bowl, then rub in the butter using your fingertips. Make a well in the centre of the mixture, then add the sugar, lemon zest and yeast. Beat the egg and add to the flour with the tepid milk. Mix together to a form a soft, pliable dough.

Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured work surface. Carefully work the mixed dried fruit into the dough until well combined. Knead lightly for 5 minutes, or until smooth and elastic.

Grease a large, warm mixing bowl with butter. Shape the dough into a ball and place into the prepared bowl, then cover with a clean teatowel and set aside in a warm place for 1 hour to prove.

Turn out the proved dough onto a lightly floured work surface and knock back the dough. Shape into a ball again and return to the bowl, then cover again with the teatowel and set aside for a further 30 minutes to rise.

Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured work surface and divide into 12 equal pieces. Roll each piece into a ball, then flatten slightly into a bun shape using the palms of your hands. Cover the buns again with the teatowel and set aside to rest for 5–10 minutes.

Grease a baking tray with butter and transfer the buns to the tray. Wrap the tray very loosely in baking paper, then place inside a large polythene bag (or cover loosely in lightly oiled cling film). Tie the end of the bag tightly so that no air can get in (if using) and set aside in a warm place for a further 40 minutes to rise. Preheat the oven to 240C/220C Fan/Gas 8.

Meanwhile, for the topping, mix the plain flour to a fairly thick smooth paste with 2 tablespoons cold water (you may need to use slightly less or more water to get the right consistency). When the buns have risen, remove the polythene bag and the greaseproof paper. Spoon the flour mixture into a piping bag (or a plastic food bag with a corner snipped away) and pipe a cross on each bun.

Transfer the buns to the oven and bake for 8–12 minutes, or until pale golden brown. As soon as you remove the buns from the oven, brush them with the hot golden syrup, then set aside to cool on a wire rack.

Recipe Tips

For the dough, you can use up to half wholemeal or spelt flour instead of all white, but you may need to add a little extra milk or water. You can even use plain flour at a push, but be aware that the dough won’t rise as much and the end result may be a tad heavy.

For the topping, any white-coloured flour will work, from cornflour to rice flour. Feel free to use what you have in – just ensure the paste is thick enough (different flours will absorb differing amounts of water).

If you haven’t got golden syrup or honey for glazing, any sugar syrup will do (agave syrup, maple syrup etc). Or try dissolving 1 heaped tsp of any granulated sugar in a little hot water.

7 April 2020, 09:31

How to make hotcross buns. Picture: Getty Images

Check out the best hot cross bun recipes to make with your family, including traditional, chocolate and gluten free versions.

With Easter weekend fast approaching and the UK still on lockdown, it’s the perfect time to get our baking hats on.

And what could be better than the ultimate spiced Easter treat in the form of hot cross buns?

Whether you like yours spiced, extra fruity or even full of chocolate, there are plenty of recipes out there to suit your taste buds and dietary needs.

So, check out our round up of the best hot cross bun recipes below:

Traditional hot cross bun recipe

Mary Berry’s fruity hot cross buns are the perfect tea-time treat and are packed full of traditional spices and juicy sultanas.

Using ground cinnamon, lemon zest and finely chopped mixed candied peel, and some extra sweet golden syrup for the topping, your family will be begging for this recipe.

Hot cross buns are an easy Easter treat to make. Picture: Getty Images

You will need a piping bag fitted with a fine 3mm nozzle for Mary’s method, but if you don’t have a nozzle you could use a piping bag and snip the end off.

Chocolate hot cross buns recipe

Why not take your hot cross buns to a whole new level of indulgence with a chocolate dough created by Jamie Oliver.

These soft buns even have a secret melting middle which the kids will love.

This recipe is packed with cocoa powder, quality dark chocolate, dried fruit and runny honey.

Vegan hot cross buns recipe

If you’re trying to cut out animal products, it’s just as easy to ditch the milk and egg for a totally vegan version.

Using dairy-free spread and almond milk as well as cinnamon, mixed spice, sultanas and citrus, it will bring your family all the traditional flavours of hot cross buns.

The added mixed spice and apricot jam will also add something different to these buns.

Gluten free hot cross bun recipe

Don’t miss out on an Easter baking session because of gluten intolerance!

Try out Tesco’s easy gluten-free hot cross buns which are simple to prepare and make a delicious treat.

Using a gluten free bread flour blend and 1 tbsp plain gluten-free flour, you won’t even notice the difference when it comes to these fruity buns.

Follow master baker Paul Hollywood’s ultimate step-by-step guide to creating perfectly decorated fruit buns

Nutrition and extra info

Nutrition: per serving

Ingredients

For the buns

    300ml full-fat article” data-tooltip-width=”350″ data-tooltip-hide-delay=”200″ data-tooltip-flyout=”true”>milk, plus 2 tbsp more

One of the most widely used ingredients, milk is often referred to as a ‘complete’ food…

Butter

Butter is a dairy product made from separating whole milk or cream into fat and…

Sunflower oil

Sunflower oil is made from pressing sunflower seeds and extracting the oil. It’s usually…

Yeast

Yeast is a living, single-cell organism. As the yeast grows, it converts its food (in the form…

The ultimate convenience food, eggs are powerhouses of nutrition packed with protein and a…

Orange

One of the best-known citrus fruits, oranges aren’t necessarily orange – some varieties are…

Apple

Grown in temperate regions, apples are one of the most widely cultivated tree fruits. There are…

For the cross

  • 75g plain flour, plus extra for dusting

For the glaze

  • 3 tbsp apricot jam

Method

Bring 300ml full-fat milk to the boil, then remove from the heat and add 50g butter. Leave to cool until it reaches hand temperature. Put 500g strong bread flour, 1 tsp salt, 75g caster sugar and 7g sachet fast-action or easy-blend yeast into a bowl. Make a well in the centre. Pour in the warm milk and butter mixture, then add 1 beaten egg. Using a wooden spoon, mix well, then bring everything together with your hands until you have a sticky dough.

Tip on to a lightly floured surface and knead by holding the dough with one hand and stretching it with the heal of the other hand, then folding it back on itself. Repeat for 5 mins until smooth and elastic. Put the dough in a lightly oiled bowl. Cover with oiled cling film and leave to rise in a warm place for 1 hr or until doubled in size and a finger pressed into it leaves a dent.

With the dough still in the bowl, tip in 75g sultanas, 50g mixed peel, zest of 1 orange, 1 finely chopped apple and 1 tsp ground cinnamon. Knead into the dough, making sure everything is well distributed. Leave to rise for 1 hr more, or until doubled in size, again covered by some well-oiled cling film to stop the dough getting a crust.

Divide the dough into 15 even pieces (about 75g per piece). Roll each piece into a smooth ball on a lightly floured work surface. Arrange the buns on one or two baking trays lined with parchment, leaving enough space for the dough to expand. Cover (but don’t wrap) with more oiled cling film, or a clean tea towel, then set aside to prove for 1 hr more.

Heat oven to 220C/200C fan/gas 7. Mix 75g plain flour with about 5 tbsp water to make the paste for the cross – add the water 1 tbsp at a time, so you add just enough for a thick paste. Spoon into a piping bag with a small nozzle. Pipe a line along each row of buns, then repeat in the other direction to create crosses. Bake for 20 mins on the middle shelf of the oven, until golden brown.

Gently heat 3 tbsp apricot jam to melt, then sieve to get rid of any chunks. While the jam is still warm, brush over the top of the warm buns and leave to cool.

Larissa Dubecki and Lee Tran Lam

Memo COVID-19: you can close our cafes, but you cannot cancel our Easter.

And this year – this horrible year – a citizens’ army of curve-flatteners will be seeking comfort in the arms of the warmly spiced carbohydrates otherwise known as hot cross buns.

How to Make Hot Cross BunsMelbourne-based Phillippa’s delivers Australia-wide. Photo: Mark Chew

A potent symbol of Christianity co-opted by a secular bunny, the hot cross bun has become both the stuff of rigorous national debate (exactly how soon after Christmas should they start appearing in shops?) and radical experimentation (melted cheese instead of butter: heresy or genius?).

But strip away the layers of post-modernity and the hot cross bun is all the classic comfort of Easter distilled into the spicy-sweet aroma of cinnamon, cardamom, nutmeg and cloves then draped in a sticky glaze. A pot of freshly brewed tea is its companion animal, putting all worldly concerns on hold for a brief, golden window of time.

These little cross-topped yeasty puffs of affordable luxury are needed right now more than ever. And if you’re in self-isolation? Don’t despair. Now is the perfect time to try your hand at making them. We’ve asked the best bakers in Australia for their tips and tricks.

How to Make Hot Cross BunsFlour and Stone by Nadine Ingram. Photo: Simon and Schuster

And a growing number of artisan bakeries have been adding home delivery to their list of superpowers. Yes, this year you can have your buns delivered to your door – and eat them, too.

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Hot cross bun recipe by Nadine Ingram of Flour and Stone, Sydney

The Thursday before Easter is the only day of the year you will hear music coming from the kitchen at Flour and Stone. It’s the day we roll more buns by hand than we ever imagined we could, mixing batch after batch, and still never quite managing to meet the incredible demand.

INGREDIENTS

Dried fruit

  • 60g sultanas
  • 60g currants
  • 60g raisins
  • 50g candied orange peel, finely chopped

How to Make Hot Cross BunsMaking hot cross buns. Photo: Edwina Pickles

Dough

  • 400g strong bakers flour
  • 60g unsalted butter, softened
  • 60g light brown sugar
  • 20g fresh yeast or 10g dried yeast
  • 200ml milk
  • 1 scant tsp salt
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp ground nutmeg
  • ½ tsp ground allspice
  • ½ tsp ground cloves

Cross mixture

  • 50g plain flour
  • 50ml water
  • 1 tbsp sunflower oil
  • ½ tsp orange blossom water
  • ¼ tsp ground nutmeg

Glaze

  • 150g castor sugar
  • 150ml water
  • 1 orange, finely grated zest and juice

METHOD

  1. Before you make the dough, you will need to rehydrate the dried fruit. Put the currants, sultanas and raisins in a heatproof bowl and cover them with boiling water. Allow them to soften in the water for 15 minutes, then drain the fruit, discarding the water. Add the orange peel and mix to distribute it evenly.
  2. To make the dough, place all the dough ingredients in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the dough hook and mix on low speed for 4-5 minutes. You will see that the dough is starting to combine and although it will appear quite sticky, there should now be no flour at the bottom of the bowl. Increase the speed to medium and knead for a further 7 minutes to develop the protein in the dough. At this stage the dough will start to form a ball around the dough hook, peeling away from the sides of the bowl. Add the dried fruit to the bowl and mix for 1 minute longer to evenly distribute the fruit.
  3. Place the dough in a large, lightly oiled bowl. Cover it with plastic wrap and put it somewhere warm to prove for 1 to 1½ hours, or until it has doubled in volume.
  4. Line a baking sheet with baking paper and set aside. Tip the dough out onto a lightly floured surface. The action of tipping the dough from the bowl will “knock back” the air and it will then be ready to cut and shape. Use a large knife or a pastry cutter to divide the dough into 12 even portions, then roll each one into a round bun, dusting your hands with a little flour to prevent the dough from sticking. Arrange the buns on the prepared baking sheet in a neat grid of 12 so that all the horizontal and vertical lines are aligned. Cover the buns with a tea towel and put them in a warm place to prove for 30 minutes or until doubled in volume. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 180C and make the cross mixture.
  5. To make the crosses, place all the ingredients for the cross mixture in a bowl and use a hand whisk to roughly mix them together until they form an elastic batter. I favour a firmer crossing mixture that, when piped, sits proud on top of the buns. A thinner mixture will result in thicker, flatter crosses. You can adjust the mixture by adding a little water to make it thinner or a little flour to make it thicker – it’s entirely up to you. Fill a piping bag fitted with a 7mm plain nozzle with the crossing mixture, then twist the bag where the mixture stops to ensure the batter doesn’t spill out the end.
  6. Once the buns have doubled in volume, pipe the crossing mixture onto the buns – firstly running in one direction in long continuous lines down the middle of the buns and then, after giving the tray a quarter turn, crossing over those lines in the opposite direction, intersecting the lines exactly in the middle of each bun. Place the buns in the oven and bake for 15 minutes, then, without opening the oven door, reduce the temperature to 170C and bake for a further 15 minutes or until the buns are lovely and golden. While the buns are in the oven, make the glaze.
  7. To make the glaze, place all the glaze ingredients in a small saucepan and stir over medium heat until the sugar has dissolved and the mixture begins to boil. Simmer for about 5 minutes or until it is thick and syrupy, then remove the pan from the heat and set aside. If the glaze has become too thick to brush on the buns, briefly return the pan to the heat until it reaches the right consistency.
  8. Remove the buns from the oven and while they are still hot brush the tops liberally with the sticky glaze, using a pastry brush so that it drips down the sides of the buns. It is not important for the glaze to be hot when you brush it over the buns, as it will melt nicely as soon as it hits the buns. Serve the buns fresh with butter or keep them until tomorrow and toast them up.

Makes 12

This is an edited extract from Flour and Stone by Nadine Ingram, published by Simon & Schuster Australia, $55. Photography by Alan Benson.

One a penny, two a penny, hot cross buns!

My opinions about buns are almost as strong as Sir Mix-a-Lot’s. When it comes to hot cross buns, I want them properly hot — and that runs into an immediate difficulty with most American recipes. If you pipe a frosting cross on the baked buns, they have to be cool — and if you warm them up again, that frosting melts into a gloppy mess.

Chef John’s Hot Cross Buns gets it right, piping on a traditional mixture of flour and water before baking. I’ll walk you through the recipe and offer my tips along the way so you can make the best hot cross buns.

What are Hot Cross Buns?

Hot cross buns are an Easter tradition going back to at least the 1500s — and perhaps a few centuries before that, if the myths are true. Enriched with dairy that wasn’t permitted in the Lenten diet, filled with fruit and spices, and marked with the sign of the cross, they’re so pleasurable to eat that Queen Elizabeth I felt the need for a rule that the buns could only be sold on two days out of the year, with an exemption for burials. To circumvent the law (rebellious bakers unite!), everyone started baking them at home. It’s still worth doing, and still a notable pleasure.

How to Make Traditional Hot Cross Buns

Get the recipe for Chef John’s Hot Cross Buns

It’s a sweet, soft, chewy yeast dough bun, enriched with milk, an egg, and a fair amount of sugar. I’ve made the dough by hand, and also added the ingredients to my bread machine, and both methods worked well.

But, rum-soaked currants aren’t my favorite add-in, and I played with the mixture of warm spices. You can flavor these buns with whatever combination of fruit and spice you like; for my version, I replaced the currants with 2/3 cup Candied Citrus Peel. As the candied peel is already soft and pliable, I skipped the rum soak the recipe calls for. I like getting every scrap of money back that I can on fruit, and I find home-candied peel to have a brighter, fresher flavor than store-bought.

Note: I don’t dry the peel overnight; I prefer the stickier, softer texture it has without that extra drying time. Once it has cooled to warm room temperature, you can add it to your dough. If you’ve made it ahead and stashed it in your fridge or freezer, bring it to room temperature before incorporating it (you can even microwave it for 5 to 10 seconds at a time to warm it, if you’re like me and forget to take it out early enough).

These fluffy and soft hot cross buns are lightly spiced, filled with a mix of dried fruit, and glazed with honey or jam for extra shine. They are so perfect that you won’t need any other recipe!

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Hello January! Or more specifically, goodbye December!

These last couple of months have been hectic, crazy, and exciting, but a part of me is glad that the holiday season is behind me, and that I can unwind, relax, and not check my phone every 10 minutes. Oh, and plan out my next vacation of course. Seychelles islands are on my radar now.

As a fresh new start for 2018 I’m posting my ultimate recipe for hot cross buns. They are a favorite around Easter time, but you really don’t need a holiday as an excuse to make these. You can bake them on the weekend or at your next family dinner. I love making my dinner rolls every chance I get, because they go well with everything, but when I want that extra something special to bring to event, I’ll make these instead. The rolls are fluffy, soft, airy and perfect, especially if you spread them with some butter.

The rolls are best the same day they are made, but you can freeze them, and rewarm every time you want a fresh slice. They will taste just as good after freezing. I freeze my rolls and breads all the time, mostly to avoid the temptation, otherwise I’ll eat all the rolls myself within 24 hours. I know that because it has happened to me once. Or twice. Or more.

The recipe is easier than it looks, so don’t let the many steps intimidate you.

  • Total Time 3h 15m
  • Prep Time 180 m
  • Calories 293

A delicious, sweet and spicy treat, which is usually relished on Good Friday, Hot Cross Buns are a total delight to savour! Although there are many tales about how these became a part of the fast observed on Good Friday, the specific reason is still unknown. However, most people enjoy these buns as fast food to limit their temptations and have only wheat and water. Some people say that the Queen of England decided to limit the availability of these delicious buns among people because these were sacred. But the people of England did not want to agree to this rule and they also did not want to disobey the queen. That is when they decided to start preparing them at home and because of the lack of proper equipment, it was a long and dreaded task, that is why they limited making these delicious buns only on special occasions like Good Friday, Christmas and Easter. However, nowadays you can also savour these delicious, hot buns any time and any where! All you need to do is just get your hands on some basic kitchen ingredients like yeast, butter, cinnamon, nutmeg, sugar, all-purpose flour, etc and get going. So, what are you waiting for? Try this recipe given below!

Ingredients of Hot Cross Buns

  • 1/4 cup mixed dry fruits
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon dry yeast
  • 400 gm all purpose flour
  • nutmeg powder as required
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 cup mixed berries

How to make Hot Cross Buns

Step 1 Soak the dried fruits and berries

In a small cup, add all your dried fruits and add 1 cup of boiling water to it and keep aside.

Step 2 Let the yeast ferment

Take another bowl and add about ¼ cup of milk along with 1 tsp sugar and 1 ½ tbsp of yeast. Mix this well and let it sit until the yeast rises or for 10 minutes.

Step 3 Mix the dry and wet ingredients

Now, take a large mixing bowl and add 1 cup of warm milk, 4-5 tbsp butter, ½ cup brown sugar, 2 eggs, beaten, the yeast mixture and 1 pinch of cinnamon and nutmeg. Mix all of these ingredients together until the sugar gets combined with the butter.

Step 4 Add the flour

It is important to add the dough in later. Add 350 gms of all-purpose flour and combine it with the mixture. If you are using an electric mixer, make sure your setting is at 2 and knead for 10 minutes. You will know that dough is ready when it starts to combine but is still a little sticking a bit with the mixer.

Step 5 Add in the soaked dried fruits

Before adding to the dough, pat dry the dried fruits with a paper towel or a cloth. Now add them and knead them into the dough too. Put this dough in a pre-buttered bowl and cover and let it rise for an hour.

Step 6 Make balls out of the dough

Once the dough rises, take it out on the surface and divide into 12 equal parts and make balls out of it. Take a greased pan and start putting the dough balls at a 2-inch distance from each other. Keep it aside.

Step 7 Preheat the oven and apply egg wash

While the dough balls rise, preheat your oven at 190 degrees. Apply some egg wash on the risen dough balls and let them bake for 15 minutes until golden brown on top.

Step 8 Make the crosses and serve

The last and most fun part about the recipe, while the buns cool down, take 5 tbsps of powdered sugar and 3 tbsps of milk. Mix it nicely until a thick glaze is formed. Now transfer to a piping bag, cut the top and start making crosses on warm buns. Your Hot Cross Buns are ready to be served.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

There’s nothing quite like the distinct smell of fresh hot cross buns to get a reluctant riser out of bed in the morning.

(Yes, we all know it’s just fruit loaf with a white cross on top but they still taste different.)

Traditionally, your standard HCB – as the kids call them these days – contain a medley of dried fruits and a couple of choice spices.

What was once considered an extreme departure from tradition – choc-chip, mocha – now pales in comparison to the crossbreeds that have hit the market: Hot cross bun burgers, milkshakes, and this week, Gelatissimo announced it’s crafted a HCB-flavoured gelato.

A post shared by Gelatissimo (@gelatissimogelato) on Apr 2, 2020 at 10:33pm PDT

What’s with the hype?

We all know hot cross buns are best served warm and fresh and with far too much butter, but do we all know why we’re chowing down?

Here’s a brief run-down of the history of the HCB.

There are many theories on the origin of the bun.

One theory dates back to the 14th century when an Anglican monk baked the buns at St Albans Abbey and called them the ‘Alban Bun’. He then distributed them to the poor on Good Friday.

They soon gained popularity around England and became a symbol of the Easter weekend.

In 1582, the London clerk of markets issued a ban on the sale of the buns by bakers. This was because of superstitions that the buns carried medicinal or magical properties.

Elizabeth I of England passed a law permitting them only to be sold at Easter and Christmas. The English got around this law by baking the buns at home and eventually the law was rescinded due to the popularity of the treat.

The first recorded reference to hot cross buns was in ‘Poor Robin Almanac‘ in the 1700s. It read: “Good Friday come this month, the old woman runs. With one or two a penny hot cross buns”.

Best of the bun-ch

According to polling from CHOICE, most Aussies still lean to traditional with their buns.

As such, the consumer advocacy body pulled today 15 people and tasked them with taste-testing eight HCBs from our national supermarkets and bakeries.

These are the top four performers:

Bakers Delight traditional fruit hot cross buns; $1.25 per bun

Woolworths traditional fruit hot cross buns; $0.58c per bun

Coles traditional fruit hot cross buns; $0.58c per bun

Aldi bakers life fruit hot cross buns; $0.50c per bun

Put your own bun in the oven

With all the time on our hands, what with staying home and social distancing, there’s no excuse (OK a couple) not to try making your own hot cross buns this Easter.

We went straight to the top to get you the ultimate bun recipe, from none other than pastry extraordinaire, Darren Purchese, from Burch & Purchese Sweet Studio in Melbourne.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Easy Hot Cross Buns utilizing this simple dough from my Bagel Recipe. No yeast, no boiling, no fancy mixer. Bake them within the oven or within the air-fryer!

Hot Cross Buns

Serve them Easter morning with some laborious boiled eggs and fruit! More candy brunch additions I really like are No-bake Strawberries and Cream Crepe Cake, Honey lemon Bars, and Chocolate Drizzled Coconut Macaroons.

Confession, I’ve by no means had a sizzling cross bun, though I did play it on my recorder in grade faculty! But I checked out a number of recipes and observed the dough was fairly just like my bagel dough, with the addition of raisins, cinnamon and a glaze on high. I examined them out retaining the sugar on the lighter aspect, because the glaze on high provides extra sweetness and we liked them. I suppose you possibly can name them bagel cross buns, if you want!

How To Make Easy Hot Cross Buns

Tips for good sizzling cross buns:

  • Use a silpat or parchment paper sprayed with oil to forestall them from sticking to the baking sheet.
  • Bake them on the highest rack so that they don’t brown an excessive amount of on the underside.
  • Greek yogurt as an alternative of plain is a should, if there’s any liquid within the yogurt you should definitely drain it. I examined with Fage and Stonyfield Greek, each labored nice. Chobani has been giving folks sticky dough, so I’d avoid that model for this recipe.
  • If your dough is sticky add extra flour or use much less yogurt.
  • You can simply double or triple this recipe to make extra. You may half or quarter it to make much less.
  • To make them with self rising flour omit the salt and baking powder.

Tips for dairy-free sizzling cross buns:

I examined this dairy-free a couple of alternative ways with success.

  • You can use a thick dairy-free Greek yogurt, Kite Hill (blue label) was the model I discovered and examined. This yogurt is just not 0 Freestyle Points.
  • Use water as an alternative of milk for the glaze.

Hot Cross Buns

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 25 minutes

Total Time: 1 hr

  • 1 cup 5 ozunbleached all goal flour, entire wheat or gluten-free combine*
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder , ensure that it’s not expired or it gained’t rise
  • 2 tablespoons uncooked sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  • half teaspoon kosher salt , use much less if utilizing desk salt
  • 1 cup 0% Greek yogurt , not common yogurt, it will likely be too sticky
  • 3 tablespoon raisins
  • 1 egg white , overwhelmed (entire egg works effective too)

Icing (solely half will get used)*:

  • 1/4 cup powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon milk or water

Oven Method:

Preheat oven to 375F.

Place parchment paper or a silpat on a baking sheet. If utilizing parchment paper, spray with oil to keep away from sticking.

In a medium bowl mix the flour, baking powder, sugar, cinnamon and salt and whisk nicely.

Add the yogurt and raisins, combine with a fork or spatula till nicely mixed, it’ll seem like small crumbles.

Lightly mud flour on a piece floor and take away dough from the bowl, knead the dough a couple of instances till dough is cheesy, however not sticky, about 10 to 15 turns (it mustn’t depart dough in your hand while you draw back).

Divide into Eight equal balls. Place on the ready baking sheet.

Top with egg wash. Bake on the highest rack of the oven for 25 minutes. Let cool not less than 30 minutes earlier than icing.

Air Fryer Method:

Preheat the air fryer 325F levels and set for 11 to 12 minutes.

Transfer in batches with out overcrowding and bake 11 to 12 minutes, or till golden. No want to show.

Let cool not less than 30 minutes earlier than icing.

*Since solely half will get used on high, I deducted half of the sugar from the evaluation.

Serving: 2 buns , Calories: 230 kcal , Carbohydrates: 46 g , Protein: 10.5 g , Fat: 0.5 g , Sodium: 426 mg , Fiber: 1.5 g , Sugar: 16.5 g

Blue Smart Points: 7

Green Smart Points: 8

Purple Smart Points: 7

Keywords: Air fryer dessert recipes, Easy Hot Cross Buns, Healthy Hot Cross Buns, Hot Cross Buns, Hot Cross Buns Recipe

posted April 7, 2020 by Gina

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Wholemeal Apple Hot Cross Buns

I’m feeling a bit tired and dizzy today as I was up until 1 am last night! No I wasn’t out clubbing but was perfecting my recipe for Wholemeal Apple Hot Cross Buns. I’m not much of a one for planning, indeed I’d intended to make a Hot Cross Bread & Butter Pudding this week. But suddenly I found myself deciding to make Hot Cross Buns which I had only ever made once at school.

I didn’t really have much of a relationship with bread making in my youth and it’s only in the last couple of years that it’s become a passion of mine. Therefore I felt it was high time that I made my own Hot Cross Buns! So armed with my old school recipe I started my bake.

Well the first hurdle was that I only had strong wholemeal flour and not white flour. “I know” I thought, “I’m sure I’ve seen Wholemeal Apple Hot Cross Buns for sale I’ll make those”! A quick google told me that in a taste test some Apple & Cinnamon ones had only scored 4.5 out of 10 so I decided to stick with the traditional mixed spice.

I played about with the recipe I had chopping and changing things here and there but stuck to the one rising, which is where I tripped up. After baking, out came some small, slightly over cooked but delicious hot cross buns which were too close in texture and not like the light fluffy ones you buy in a bakery or supermarket.

Sometimes I might just give up on a recipe but I could see that there was huge potential here. I just needed to tweak a few things like adding a bit more yeast, giving the dough an extra rise, increasing the proving time and lowering the oven temperature.

So at 12.45 am last night (or should I say this morning) I was giving my husband a portion of buttered Hot Cross Bun and asking his opinion. He did protest that he didn’t want to eat just before going to sleep but I was insistent – “perfect” he said, after finally relenting to my request.

“Great, I’ve cracked it” I said and went to bed tired but happy!

So the moral of the story is, Hot Cross Buns don’t like to be rushed. I hope you give these Wholemeal Apple Hot Cross Buns a go this Easter as they are totally delicious and far healthier than their white cousins

For more Hot Cross Bun inspiration you might like to try the following:

For something a little different you might also like:

As my Wholemeal Apple Hot Cross Buns are such good value compared to shop bought ones I’m entering them into Credit Crunch Munch which I am hosting this month and which I jointly run with Helen of Fuss Free Flavours. I’m also entering Simply Food’s Sweet Treats for Easter challenge. Then there’s Jibber Jabber’s Love Cake event where the theme is Springing into Easter, I may be bending the rules here a bit regarding cake!. Spring into Easter is also the theme for Treat Petite this month hosted by Cakey Boi and alternately with The Baking Explorer. Finally I’m entering the Made with Love Mondays which is hosted by Javelin Warrior’s Cookin w’luv as these buns are totally made from scratch.

It might just be us going crazy in isolation, but we have come up with one of the most epic Easter Hot Cross Buns hacks. Taking the base of the vegan hot cross buns, you can completely transform them into a creation worthy of consumption in your indented seat on the couch.

This is what we are making. Epic Vegan Loaded Hot Cross Buns and you won’t need a ton of ingredients to make these.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Vegan Loaded Hot Cross Buns

Course Dessert, Snack

Keyword Hot Cross Buns

Cook Time 10 minutes

Author Simon Hall

Ingredients

  • 2 Vegan Hot Cross Buns We used Bakers Delight
  • 2 scoops Plantitude Vegan Vanilla Ice-Cream
  • 2 tbsp Biscoff Spread
  • 2 tbsp Four Nuts Hazelnut Spread formerly known Local Craft
  • 1 tbsp Plant-Based Milo

Instructions

Slice your Hot Cross Buns in half and put the base out ready to be loaded.

Biscoff Bun

Spread the Biscoff Spread on the base layer followed by a large scoop of vanilla ice-cream, then top with Biscoff and the top of the Hot Cross Bun.

Chocolate Bun

Spread the Four Nuts Spread on the base layer followed by a large scoop of vanilla ice-cream, Sprinkle with Milo then top with another tbsp of Four Nuts and the top of the Hot Cross Bun.

Watch then getting eaten!

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

This is an easy recipe for How to Make Traditional Hot Cross Buns. Enjoyed for Easter on Good Friday, these buns will have your mouth watering as you smell them baking in the oven.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

With spices like cinnamon, all-spice and ginger just the aroma of these buns baking will have you eagerly waiting them. Studded with currants, these buns are best warm out of the oven served simply with butter.

This is the same great recipe that I first published in 2014, with updated pictures and a step-by-step video.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

If there was ever a food that reminds me of Easter as a child, it’s the hot cross bun. Traditionally eaten in the UK, New Zealand, Australia, South Africa and Canada for breakfast on Good Friday.

In fact, all kids growing up in England are made aware of the Easter nursery rhyme about these buns that was published in London in 1798.

Hot cross buns!
Hot cross buns!
One a penny, two a penny,
Hot cross buns!

If you have no daughters,
Give them to your sons.

One a penny, two a penny,
Hot cross buns!

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

We all know good food takes time, so there’s a little kneading involved and a little rising, the buns, not you. The dough is kneaded after mixing and then left to rise.

After the first rise, the dough is kneaded again, shaped into buns and risen for the second time. Before they are baked a cross is made across the top of the buns. This is a paste of flour, sugar and water is piped into the cuts so when the buns are baked the cross is visible.

Tips for working with yeast

  • Make sure your yeast is fresh. If it is not, it will not activate.
  • The water for the yeast must be around 105– 115 °F (40 – 46°C) warm enough to feel comfortable on your skin to not under activate or kill the yeast. A thermometer can help with this.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

How long do hot cross buns keep?

They are best eaten the day they are made. Any that I don’t eat, I keep in an airtight container at room temperature for a couple of days. Beyond that, I freeze them up to 3 months. To reheat, wrap the frozen buns in foil and bake at 350°F/ 177°C for 15-20 minutes.

If you’ve tried these Traditional Hot Cross Buns or any other recipe on the blog, then don’t forget to rate the recipe and let me know it turned out in the comments below. I love to hear from my readers!

As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Please read my Full Affiliates Disclosure here.

Love it? Share it!

Hot cross buns! An easy Hot cross buns recipe; delicious lightly spiced soft buns filled with raisins and brushed with a sweet glaze. Traditionally served around Easter in the Uk. If you never knew this was an Easter bun, I am sure you remember hot cross bun the song way from nursery school when we chanted the song happily without any care in the world. Well let’s learn how to make th

Hot cross buns recipe

Recall that nursery rhyme? Want the truth? I never tasted hot ‘crust’ buns until very recently. In fact when I was a child singing away the rhyme I thought it was ‘crust’ not cross and I thought the bun was our Nigerian buns which is more like a fried cake and not a bread.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

What is Hot cross buns?

Hot cross buns the song and lyrics

Hot cross buns! Hot cross buns!

One a penny, two a penny,

If you have no daughters,

give them to your sons.

One a penny two a penny,

How to make Hot cross buns

Ingredients

How to make hot cross buns without eggs

Funny I tell you. I also recently found out it was synonymous with Easter. Hmmm. Well I decided to give it a go and I found it tasted similar to cinnamon rolls. Now anything ‘cinnamonny’ appeals to me. But i am not too crazy about the raisins but I put them anyway. But not so much of it. I also added some candied peel because I had some at home. Some recipes call for orange peel so you can use that if you don’t have the candied peel.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Now why the name hot cross buns? The cross on the bread is the reason for that and the popularity during Easter particularly in the Uk, I believe has everything to do with the cross of our Savior Jesus Christ. The hot part of the name is obviously because it is sold warm. My daughter said o mummy no wonder it’s called ‘hot’ cross buns it’s hoooot.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

It is said that it’s usually hawked on the streets at the end of lent that is Good Friday. I guess that’s the background story.

Now to this British Easter spice bun. It’s pretty easy to make and yummy too. You need some cinnamon and all spice you can use nutmeg as well but I didn’t. The cinnamon and all spice was good enough for me so I went with those ?

Actually a good description for these buns would be the ‘Sugar and Spice and everything nice’ Does that phrase sound familiar?? Of course it does it’s from the power puff girls show. Oh well I had to borrow it because it describes these buns perfectly.

The sugar would be the simple syrup glaze, the spice would be cinnamon and allspice +/- nutmeg then everything nice would have to be raisins and citrus peel lol.

Ok ok Enough of this, Let’s get to this delicious hot cross buns already. Hope you get to try it out and let me know how it goes..

Alice Arndell

Who can resist a warm-from-the-oven hot cross bun, smothered in butter? The key to great hot cross buns is generous helpings of spices and fruit, and taking your time with the dough. Don’t skimp on kneading or rising time, as this is what makes buns light and airy.

INGREDIENTS

1 1/4 cups milk, warmed to body temperature (37°C)

1 tbsp active dried yeast

1/4 cup brown sugar

4 1/2 cups high-grade flour

5 tsp ground mixed spice

5 tsp ground cinnamon

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3 tsp ground nutmeg

1 1/2 tsp ground cardamom

1 1/2 tsp ground cloves

2 tsp vanilla extract

100g butter, softened

1 cup sultanas or raisins

1/2 cup chopped mixed peel

For the crosses and glaze

2 tbsp castor sugar

METHOD

1. Put the warm milk, yeast and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer (or a large bowl) and stir to combine. Stand for 5 minutes to allow the yeast to activate. Using the dough hook (or a large spoon) stir in the flour, spices, salt, eggs and vanilla extract until it is a shaggy mess.

2. Continue to knead on a low speed, adding the butter a tablespoon at a time (this can also be done by hand on the bench – just try not to add too much flour as you knead). It will be sticky but will come together in a smooth ball as the ingredients combine.

3. Once all the butter has been added, increase the speed a little and knead for 10-12 minutes until the dough is a smooth ball. Stop for 30 seconds every 2 minutes to give the gluten time to rest. To test if it’s ready, stretch it – it should stretch a fair way before breaking.

4. Tip the dough into a large lightly oiled bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Leave in a warm place to rise for 2 hours or until doubled in size. Add the dried fruit and use the dough hook to mix well. Cover with plastic wrap and leave to rise for 1 hour in a warm place.

5. Tip the dough on to a lightly floured bench and use a sharp knife to divide into 16 equal lumps (mine were about 105g each). Shape into balls and place on a baking paper-lined baking tray. The balls should be just touching or have just a little space around them.

6. Cover with a clean tea towel and put the tray in a warm place for 30 minutes to rise. To test if the buns are ready to bake, press the top of one gently. If it springs back slowly they are ready. (If it springs back quickly they need a bit longer; if it stays dented they’re over-proved so get them in the oven quickly!)

7. Preheat the oven to 200C. While the buns are rising, make the cross paste by putting the flour in a small bowl with ½ cup water and stirring until smooth.

8. Spoon the flour paste into a piping bag (or small sealable plastic bag). Fit a piping tip to the bag or cut a 3mm hole in one corner. Carefully pipe the crosses over the risen buns.

9. Bake for 20 minutes or until risen and golden brown. While they are cooking, make the glaze by dissolving the caster sugar in 2 tablespoons boiling water. Brush over the hot cooked buns then cool on a wire rack for 10 minutes before serving.

Baker’s note: You can start the recipe a day in advance if you like – after mixing in the fruit and letting the dough rise again, knock it down gently by folding it in towards itself then cover with plastic wrap and leave it in the fridge overnight. You can then complete the shaping, rising and baking the next day. Just keep in mind that the rising will take a bit longer with cold dough (1 to 1½ hours instead of 30 minutes).

Recipe and food styling by Alice Arndell, Photography and styling by Tamara West.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

The Spruce / Diana Rattray

  • Total: 45 mins
  • Prep: 20 mins
  • Cook: 25 mins
  • Bread Machine: 60 mins
  • Yield: 16 servings
Nutritional Guidelines (per serving)
171 Calories
7g Fat
22g Carbs
5g Protein

×

Nutrition Facts
Servings: 16 servings
Amount per serving
Calories 171
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 7g 9%
Saturated Fat 3g 16%
Cholesterol 122mg 41%
Sodium 304mg 13%
Total Carbohydrate 22g 8%
Dietary Fiber 1g 4%
Protein 5g
Calcium 47mg 4%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Hot cross buns are traditionally eaten on Good Friday in some areas of America and other countries, though these days people enjoy them any time of the year. The signature cross—representing the crucifixion—is formed on the top of each bun with icing.

These classic hot cross buns are started in the bread machine, so there no manual kneading required.

The dough is mixed and kneaded in the bread machine and then the rolls are shaped and baked by hand. The delicious thin vanilla icing is drizzled over each bun to form the classic “cross.”

These are very easy to prepare, and so soft and delicious!

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup milk (low-fat is fine; lukewarm)
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 large egg (room temperature)
  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt (scant)
  • 3 teaspoons active dry yeast
  • 1/4 cup softened butter (cut into 4 to 6 pieces)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 3/4 to 1 cup currants (or finely chopped dried peaches)
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • For the Icing:
  • 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar
  • 2 tablespoons milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla (or vanilla bean paste)

Steps to Make It

Gather the ingredients.

Whisk together the 3/4 cup milk, 2 teaspoons of vanilla, and the egg.

Add the milk mixture, flour, granulated sugar, salt, yeast, and butter to the bread machine, adding in the order suggested by your bread machine manufacturer.

Set the machine on the dough cycle; add cinnamon and currants or chopped dried fruit at the beep. If the mixture seems too dry, add water in very small amounts.

When the dough is done and doubled in volume, remove to a lightly floured surface. Punch down, knead about 6 to 8 times, and let it rest for 10 minutes.

Grease a 9-inch square baking pan.

Tear off small pieces of dough (about 2 to 2 1/4 ounces each) and shape them into balls. Place the dough balls in the prepared baking pan. Cover the pan with a cloth and let the dough rise in a warm place for 40 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 350 F.

Stir together the egg yolk and 2 tablespoons water. Lightly brush the tops of the buns with the egg yolk mixture. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, until the tops are nicely browned. Remove the pan to a rack to cool completely.

Combine the confectioners’ sugar with 2 tablespoons of milk and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla; stir until smooth. Add small amounts of hot water or more confectioners’ sugar, as needed, for drizzling consistency. With a spoon or decorating bag, drizzle crosses on the tops of the buns.

WITH Easter fast approaching this weekend, it’s not all about chocolate eggs and daffodils but rather another tasty treat – hot cross buns.

The spring-time delicacy can be enjoyed at breakfast or as a cheeky snack smothered in butter and bitter marmalade or sweet strawberry jam – perfect for coronavirus lockdown.

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

The sweet treats, which are traditionally eaten on Good Friday to mark the end of Lent, come in mouth-watering flavours at the shops, from M&S’ salted caramel to Aldi’s rocky road stuffed buns at Tesco.

But as we celebrate Easter in lockdown this year, there’s no need to pop to the stores to pick up your stash when you can make your own at home.

Hot cross buns are surprisingly easy to make in a bread maker and taste fantastic when devoured still warm from the oven.

Whether you’re at home with the kids, by yourself or with your housemates; why don’t you give this recipe from AO.com a go, which serves eight and promises to not get your hands dirty either.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

To make eight buns, you’ll need flour, butter, sugar, yeast, water, mixed dried fruit, an egg, as well as some milk powder, salt, cinnamon and mixed spice.

Don’t fret over the ingredients as the bread maker will do all the hard work.

First place all the ingredients for the buns in the bread pan, except the mixed dried fruit, which can be place in the raisin / nut dispenser of your bread maker.

Then choose the ‘basic bake raisin’ program on your device, which will go for two hours 20 minutes. Once it’s finished, take the mixture out and divide into eight balls.

Easy Hot Cross Buns In The Bread Maker

For the buns:

  • 250g strong white flour
  • A half tsp yeast
  • One tsp sugar
  • 25g butter
  • One tbsp milk powder
  • A half tsp salt
  • One medium egg
  • 100ml water
  • 1 tsp Cinnamon
  • A half tsp mixed spice
  • 100g Mixed dried fruit

For the glaze:

  • 40g sugar
  • Four tbsps of water

Method:

  1. Place all the ingredients in the bread pan in the order listed above, except the mixed dried fruit
  2. The dried fruit can be put in the raisin / nut dispenser
  3. Select the BASIC BAKE RAISIN program – two hours 20 mins
  4. When the program has finished divide the dough into eight balls.
  5. Place on a lightly greased baking tray cover with oiled cling film and allow to prove until doubled in size. Approx 30 minutes
  6. Make the paste with approx two tbsps of flour mixed with two tbsps water. Pipe a cross over the buns
  7. Bake in a preheated oven at 220ºC for 15-20 mins or until golden brown
  8. While still hot, brush with the sugar glaze

Place the divided mixture on a lightly greased baking tray and cover with oiled cling film to prove for about 30 minutes until they’re doubled in size.

Once proved, mix two tablespoons of flour with two tablespoons of water and pipe a cross over the buns.

Your buns are now ready to go into a preheated oven at 220ºC for 15-20 mins or until golden brown.

When your buns are nearly ready to come out start making the glaze.

Mix 40g of sugar in four tablespoons of water and boil for around five minutes until a syrup consistency is achieved.

While your buns are still hot, brush with the sugar glaze and you’re all set to enjoy with a nice cup of tea.

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How to Make Hot Cross Buns

The UK is currently under lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic. But many Brits have taken to their kitchens in the current climate to take part in some good old fashioned baking. So if you’re looking for a freshly baked centrepiece for your Easter feast, look no further.

Hot cross buns are traditionally eaten by Christians on Easter to mark to end of Lent.

Many of the ingredients which go into a hot cross bun are dairy, food people traditionally gave up during the 40 days of Lent.

Different parts of the hot cross bun hold special meaning, with the cross on the bun representing the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

READ MORE

  • How to Make Hot Cross BunsHot cross buns taste test 2020: The best buns to buy this year

Some people believe the hot cross bun originates from centuries ago.

In St Albans in 1361, a monk developed the ‘Alban Bun’, which had a very similar recipe to the hot cross bun of today.

Brother Thomas Rocliffe is said to have delivered these buns to the local poor people on Good Friday.

Across the world, people still eat hot cross buns on Good Friday.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

How to make hot cross buns

Ingredients (Serves 8-12 approximately):

  • 500g strong bread flour
  • 200-300ml milk (you may not need all the milk)
  • 50g butter
  • 50g caster sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 2 tsp mixed spice or cinnamon
  • 200g mixed fruit such as sultanas or raisins
  • 7g sachet of fast-action dried yeast
  • Plain flour (for the cross)
  • Golden syrup or honey, for glazing

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Method:

  1. Sift the flour into a large mixing bowl, and combine with the sugar and the spices.
  2. Add the yeast and the salt.
  3. In a saucepan warm the milk, then take it off the heat.
  4. Let it cool slightly before adding the butter and mixing until melted.
  5. Make a well in the centre of the dry ingredients, add the two eggs and gradually add the milk mix to the bowl, combining until it forms a soft dough.
  6. Mix your fruit into the dough, and knead on a floured work station until elastic in texture (this will take around 10 minutes).
  7. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover and allow it to rest for an hour and a half.
  8. Divide the dough into portions, roll into balls and place them on a lined baking tray.
  9. Cover the dough for around 20-30 minutes, and preheat the oven to gas 6, 200C, fan 180C.
  10. Mixing plain flour and water into a paste, drizzle it over the buns in a cross pattern.
  11. Bake for around 20 minutes, until the buns are golden brown.
  12. After leaving the buns to cool, glaze with the honey or syrup and serve!

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Tips for your hot cross buns

While hot cross buns are usually filled with dried fruit like raisins, you don’t have to limit yourself to these options.

Try adding chocolate chips or small chunks of fudge to your mix, or other fruit like raspberries or apple.

And if you’re happy with a simple hot cross bun, you can always omit any additions altogether!

As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. Please read my Full Affiliates Disclosure here.

Love it? Share it!

Hot cross buns! An easy Hot cross buns recipe; delicious lightly spiced soft buns filled with raisins and brushed with a sweet glaze. Traditionally served around Easter in the Uk. If you never knew this was an Easter bun, I am sure you remember hot cross bun the song way from nursery school when we chanted the song happily without any care in the world. Well let’s learn how to make th

Hot cross buns recipe

Recall that nursery rhyme? Want the truth? I never tasted hot ‘crust’ buns until very recently. In fact when I was a child singing away the rhyme I thought it was ‘crust’ not cross and I thought the bun was our Nigerian buns which is more like a fried cake and not a bread.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

What is Hot cross buns?

Hot cross buns the song and lyrics

Hot cross buns! Hot cross buns!

One a penny, two a penny,

If you have no daughters,

give them to your sons.

One a penny two a penny,

How to make Hot cross buns

Ingredients

How to make hot cross buns without eggs

Funny I tell you. I also recently found out it was synonymous with Easter. Hmmm. Well I decided to give it a go and I found it tasted similar to cinnamon rolls. Now anything ‘cinnamonny’ appeals to me. But i am not too crazy about the raisins but I put them anyway. But not so much of it. I also added some candied peel because I had some at home. Some recipes call for orange peel so you can use that if you don’t have the candied peel.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Now why the name hot cross buns? The cross on the bread is the reason for that and the popularity during Easter particularly in the Uk, I believe has everything to do with the cross of our Savior Jesus Christ. The hot part of the name is obviously because it is sold warm. My daughter said o mummy no wonder it’s called ‘hot’ cross buns it’s hoooot.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

It is said that it’s usually hawked on the streets at the end of lent that is Good Friday. I guess that’s the background story.

Now to this British Easter spice bun. It’s pretty easy to make and yummy too. You need some cinnamon and all spice you can use nutmeg as well but I didn’t. The cinnamon and all spice was good enough for me so I went with those ?

Actually a good description for these buns would be the ‘Sugar and Spice and everything nice’ Does that phrase sound familiar?? Of course it does it’s from the power puff girls show. Oh well I had to borrow it because it describes these buns perfectly.

The sugar would be the simple syrup glaze, the spice would be cinnamon and allspice +/- nutmeg then everything nice would have to be raisins and citrus peel lol.

Ok ok Enough of this, Let’s get to this delicious hot cross buns already. Hope you get to try it out and let me know how it goes..

Here’s how to make hot cross buns, plus everything you should know about the tasty tradition.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Easter Sunday is all about tradition. When it comes to your brunch spread or dinner menu, one of the most delicious ways to honor the holy day is with a fresh batch of classic hot cross buns. These sweet, doughy rolls aren’t just a tasty treat to serve as a dessert or to pair with a cocktail—they actually have an interesting and significant history behind them.

Named, naturally, for the cross on top, the seasonal British specialty is customarily made and enjoyed on Good Friday, when Jesus is said to have died on a cross, as well as Easter Sunday, the day he rose from the dead. The cross, either slashed with a knife before baking or formed with frosting after, as in our hot cross buns recipe, serves as a religious reminder.

Some say the history of hot cross buns dates to the 12th century, and Smithsonian Magazine traced text references back to the 16th. Suffice it to say that people have been making the sweet buns for a long, long time.

They’re not your ordinary pastry: People once believed that hot cross buns baked on Good Friday wouldn’t go stale all year long—and they were believed to ward off evil spirits, provide good luck, and secure friendships, too. These superstitions supposedly even led Queen Elizabeth I to restrict their sale to special occasions only: Christmas, funerals, and, of course, Good Friday.

You used to be able to buy the baked good on the street (you can still buy hot cross buns in most grocery stores today), and the merchants’ call even inspired the nursery rhyme: “Hot cross buns! Hot cross buns! One a penny, two a penny, Hot cross buns!”

Today, there are many variations on the recipe, but we think ours, made with raisins, candied citrus peel, and crosses of sweet white icing, is one of the best. Find out how to make hot cross buns below.

HOT CROSS buns make for a delicious Easter treat, and they’re much simpler to make then you might think. Here’s how you can make hot cross buns at home.

The UK is currently under lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic. But many Brits have taken to their kitchens in the current climate to take part in some good old fashioned baking. So if you’re looking for a freshly baked centrepiece for your Easter feast, look no further.

Trending

Hot cross buns are traditionally eaten by Christians on Easter to mark to end of Lent.

Many of the ingredients which go into a hot cross bun are dairy, food people traditionally gave up during the 40 days of Lent.

Different parts of the hot cross bun hold special meaning, with the cross on the bun representing the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

How to make hot cross buns (Image: GETTY)

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Hot cross buns are traditionally eaten by Christians on Easter to mark to end of Lent (Image: GETTY)

READ MORE

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Some people believe the hot cross bun originates from centuries ago.

In St Albans in 1361, a monk developed the ‘Alban Bun’, which had a very similar recipe to the hot cross bun of today.

Brother Thomas Rocliffe is said to have delivered these buns to the local poor people on Good Friday.

Across the world, people still eat hot cross buns on Good Friday.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Many enjoy hot cross buns toasted and buttered (Image: GETTY)

How to make hot cross buns

Ingredients (Serves 8-12 approximately):

  • 500g strong bread flour
  • 200-300ml milk (you may not need all the milk)
  • 50g butter
  • 50g caster sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 2 tsp mixed spice or cinnamon
  • 200g mixed fruit such as sultanas or raisins
  • 7g sachet of fast-action dried yeast
  • Plain flour (for the cross)
  • Golden syrup or honey, for glazing

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How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Method:

  1. Sift the flour into a large mixing bowl, and combine with the sugar and the spices.
  2. Add the yeast and the salt.
  3. In a saucepan warm the milk, then take it off the heat.
  4. Let it cool slightly before adding the butter and mixing until melted.
  5. Make a well in the centre of the dry ingredients, add the two eggs and gradually add the milk mix to the bowl, combining until it forms a soft dough.
  6. Mix your fruit into the dough, and knead on a floured work station until elastic in texture (this will take around 10 minutes).
  7. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover and allow it to rest for an hour and a half.
  8. Divide the dough into portions, roll into balls and place them on a lined baking tray.
  9. Cover the dough for around 20-30 minutes, and preheat the oven to gas 6, 200C, fan 180C.
  10. Mixing plain flour and water into a paste, drizzle it over the buns in a cross pattern.
  11. Bake for around 20 minutes, until the buns are golden brown.
  12. After leaving the buns to cool, glaze with the honey or syrup and serve!

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

You can swap dried fruit for other flavours if you wish (Image: GETTY)

Related articles

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Tips for your hot cross buns

While hot cross buns are usually filled with dried fruit like raisins, you don’t have to limit yourself to these options.

Try adding chocolate chips or small chunks of fudge to your mix, or other fruit like raspberries or apple.

And if you’re happy with a simple hot cross bun, you can always omit any additions altogether!

Hot Cross Buns are a soft, sweet bread roll made with a vanilla icing cross on the top, traditionally eaten on Good Friday in some countries, but they should definitely be enjoyed all year long!

If you’re new to yeast baking make sure to try my Cinnamon Rolls Recipe! They’re amazing and easy enough for beginners!

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns Are A Classic Easter Recipe

Hot Cross Buns are a treat I grew up eating on Easter morning. I know there are lots of different traditions when it comes to Hot Cross Buns, but I always looked forward to having them once a year. Honestly, though, there is no reason why these can’t be enjoyed all year long! They are a sweet bread, usually made with dried currants or raisins (I used Craisins), and topped with a sweet icing. We always had them warm with a nice spread of butter too. SO good!

Baking With Yeast Is Easy!

I have been on a roll lately baking with yeast, and I am not about to stop anytime soon. My Sweet Dinner Rolls have been a weekly recipe! To imagine there was a time when the idea of baking bread from scratch made me a little nervous is crazy! It’s actually very easy and using Rapid Rise (Instant) Yeast makes it quick too!

Honestly, if you think about yeast as just another ingredient it takes the worry out of it. AND once you do it once, you will see how uncomplicated the process really is. You can make bread by hand, or if you have a mixer with a hook attachment that works for the kneading portion too!

My Main Bread Making Tip

Knowing when to be done kneading is the question I get most. So here’s my PRO TIP: After you knead the dough for the recommended period of time, press it gently with two fingers, and it springs back, you’re done kneading! It should be smooth and elastic to the touch.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

What Are Hot Cross Buns?

I did a little research to find out the history of Hot Cross Buns and found lots of interesting facts. They say that the cross on the bun represents…well, a cross, and the bread represents the end of Lent. There are also many theories on the origin of Hot Cross Buns.

One of the interesting myths behind the recipe is that buns baked and served on Good Friday will not spoil or grow moldy during the subsequent year. Another myth is if the buns are hung in the kitchen, they are supposed to protect against fires and ensure that all your bread turns out perfectly! I kind of like that idea!!

Anyhow, there are countless stories and traditions around Hot Cross Buns, but what I know is that they are delicious!

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

How Do You Make Hot Cross Buns?

  • Working with RapidRise® Yeast makes the process easy! The dough comes together very quickly, and requires about 4-6 minutes of knead time, which you can do with your hands, or with the dough hook attachment on your stand mixer!
  • The dough will be soft for these, so add your flour in small increments, to make sure you don’t add too much!
  • Allow 350-45 minutes for the dough to rise. I like to cover the dough and put into an oven that was heated just to warm, and then turned off.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns should be soft, and chewy, like any good bread. You have the subtle sweetness from the dried fruit, and the icing on top, paired with that distinct yeast flavor.

I hope these become a tradition in your house too!

The UK is currently under lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic. But many Brits have taken to their kitchens in the current climate to take part in some good old fashioned baking. So if you’re looking for a freshly baked centrepiece for your Easter feast, look no further.

Hot cross buns are traditionally eaten by Christians on Easter to mark to end of Lent.

Many of the ingredients which go into a hot cross bun are dairy, food people traditionally gave up during the 40 days of Lent.

Different parts of the hot cross bun hold special meaning, with the cross on the bun representing the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

Some people believe the hot cross bun originates from centuries ago.

In St Albans in 1361, a monk developed the ‘Alban Bun’, which had a very similar recipe to the hot cross bun of today.

Brother Thomas Rocliffe is said to have delivered these buns to the local poor people on Good Friday.

Across the world, people still eat hot cross buns on Good Friday.

How to make hot cross buns

Ingredients (Serves 8-12 approximately):

  • 500g strong bread flour
  • 200-300ml milk (you may not need all the milk)
  • 50g butter
  • 50g caster sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 2 tsp mixed spice or cinnamon
  • 200g mixed fruit such as sultanas or raisins
  • 7g sachet of fast-action dried yeast
  • Plain flour (for the cross)
  • Golden syrup or honey, for glazing

Method:

  1. Sift the flour into a large mixing bowl, and combine with the sugar and the spices.
    Add the yeast and the salt.
  2. In a saucepan warm the milk, then take it off the heat.
  3. Let it cool slightly before adding the butter and mixing until melted.
  4. Make a well in the centre of the dry ingredients, add the two eggs and gradually add the milk mix to the bowl, combining until it forms a soft dough.
  5. Mix your fruit into the dough, and knead on a floured work station until elastic in texture (this will take around 10 minutes).
  6. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover and allow it to rest for an hour and a half.
  7. Divide the dough into portions, roll into balls and place them on a lined baking tray.
  8. Cover the dough for around 20-30 minutes, and preheat the oven to gas 6, 200C, fan 180C.
  9. Mixing plain flour and water into a paste, drizzle it over the buns in a cross pattern.
  10. Bake for around 20 minutes, until the buns are golden brown.
  11. After leaving the buns to cool, glaze with the honey or syrup and serve!

Tips for your hot cross buns

While hot cross buns are usually filled with dried fruit like raisins, you don’t have to limit yourself to these options.

Try adding chocolate chips or small chunks of fudge to your mix, or other fruit like raspberries or apple.

And if you’re happy with a simple hot cross bun, you can always omit any additions altogether!

WITH Easter fast approaching this weekend, it’s not all about chocolate eggs and daffodils but rather another tasty treat – hot cross buns.

The spring-time delicacy can be enjoyed at breakfast or as a cheeky snack smothered in butter and bitter marmalade or sweet strawberry jam – perfect for coronavirus lockdown.

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

The sweet treats, which are traditionally eaten on Good Friday to mark the end of Lent, come in mouth-watering flavours at the shops, from M&S’ salted caramel to Aldi’s rocky road stuffed buns at Tesco.

But as we celebrate Easter in lockdown this year, there’s no need to pop to the stores to pick up your stash when you can make your own at home.

Hot cross buns are surprisingly easy to make in a bread maker and taste fantastic when devoured still warm from the oven.

Whether you’re at home with the kids, by yourself or with your housemates; why don’t you give this recipe from AO.com a go, which serves eight and promises to not get your hands dirty either.

To make eight buns, you’ll need flour, butter, sugar, yeast, water, mixed dried fruit, an egg, as well as some milk powder, salt, cinnamon and mixed spice.

Don’t fret over the ingredients as the bread maker will do all the hard work.

First place all the ingredients for the buns in the bread pan, except the mixed dried fruit, which can be place in the raisin / nut dispenser of your bread maker.

Then choose the ‘basic bake raisin’ program on your device, which will go for two hours 20 minutes. Once it’s finished, take the mixture out and divide into eight balls.

Easy Hot Cross Buns In The Bread Maker

For the buns:

  • 250g strong white flour
  • A half tsp yeast
  • One tsp sugar
  • 25g butter
  • One tbsp milk powder
  • A half tsp salt
  • One medium egg
  • 100ml water
  • 1 tsp Cinnamon
  • A half tsp mixed spice
  • 100g Mixed dried fruit

For the glaze:

  • 40g sugar
  • Four tbsps of water

Method:

  1. Place all the ingredients in the bread pan in the order listed above, except the mixed dried fruit
  2. The dried fruit can be put in the raisin / nut dispenser
  3. Select the BASIC BAKE RAISIN program – two hours 20 mins
  4. When the program has finished divide the dough into eight balls.
  5. Place on a lightly greased baking tray cover with oiled cling film and allow to prove until doubled in size. Approx 30 minutes
  6. Make the paste with approx two tbsps of flour mixed with two tbsps water. Pipe a cross over the buns
  7. Bake in a preheated oven at 220ºC for 15-20 mins or until golden brown
  8. While still hot, brush with the sugar glaze

Place the divided mixture on a lightly greased baking tray and cover with oiled cling film to prove for about 30 minutes until they’re doubled in size.

Once proved, mix two tablespoons of flour with two tablespoons of water and pipe a cross over the buns.

Your buns are now ready to go into a preheated oven at 220ºC for 15-20 mins or until golden brown.

When your buns are nearly ready to come out start making the glaze.

Mix 40g of sugar in four tablespoons of water and boil for around five minutes until a syrup consistency is achieved.

While your buns are still hot, brush with the sugar glaze and you’re all set to enjoy with a nice cup of tea.

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An artisan twist on an Easter classic from one of London’s best bakeries

The latest lifestyle, fashion and travel trends

Time, at the moment, feels as if it’s in some sort of limbo state.

With most Brits isolating themselves in their homes due to the coronavirus pandemic, it’s easy to lose track of which day it is. Which is why you’d be forgiven for forgetting that Easter is just around the corner, next weekend in fact.

Next Friday, April 10, is Good Friday which marks the death and crucifixion of Jesus. At some point in history, it also became a day synonymous with hot cross buns.

While the history of the hot cross bun is unclear, the ‘cross’ on top of the bun is believed to be religious symbolism, signifying Jesus’ crucifixion on the cross on Good Friday.

Historically, these buns were only allowed to be eaten on Good Friday, Christmas and at funerals. In the sixteenth century, Queen Elizabeth I banned the sale of hot cross buns and any other sweet buns on every day except for these occasions, believing the buns to have medicinal qualities that could be abused.

While hot cross buns can now be consumed whenever we feel like a touch of spice in a warming bun, most people still tend to eat them at Easter. If you’re in the baking mood (like everyone else currently cooking sourdough ), award-winning London artisan bakery Gail’s has provided its hot cross bun recipe below.

Gail’s Hot Cross Buns

Ingredients

  • 20g fresh yeast
  • 1 tbsp whole milk
  • 1 tsp caster sugar
  • 400g plain flour
  • 0.5 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 0.5 tsp freshly ground nutmeg
  • 1 tsp mixed spice
  • 200ml whole milk
  • 70g caster sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 70g soft unsalted butter (cut the cold butter into 2cm cubes and leave at room temperature for an hour before using)
  • 40g sultanas
  • 40g dry currants
  • 40g dried unsweetened cranberries
  • 70g mixed peel
  • 0.5 tsp fine sea salt
  • 200g plain flour
  • 230g icing sugar
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 3 tbsp milk
  • 300g caster sugar
  • 200g water
  • 1 whole nutmeg
  • 1 whole star anise
  • 1 whole clove
  • 0.5 vanilla pod split in half lengthwise

Method

Making the buns

In a large mixing bowl melt the yeast with a tablespoon of whole milk and a teaspoon of caster sugar. Make sure the yeast has completely dissolved and leave for 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes, you should notice mini bubbles on top of your yeast liquid: that means your yeast is alive.

In a separate bowl, sieve the flour with the spices. Add the spiced flour to the yeast mixture. Keep adding the rest of the milk, the sugar and egg.

Begin to bind the mixture together using your hands, for 4-5 minutes until it forms a rough dough, and then add the butter a chunk at a time whilst kneading the dough.

After adding all the butter slowly, it should take around 2-3 minutes you will have a nice sticky dough. Continue kneading for 5 minutes more until you get a smooth, shiny dough.

Add the salt and fruits and continue kneading for 3 minutes more. Cover the bowl with a tea towel and leave at room temperature for 1.5 hours, until it grows to almost double in size.

Pour your dough onto a lightly floured surface and divide into 20 pieces at 50g each. Roll the dough pieces into shape by rolling them on a surface against your palms to create smooth buns.

Arrange the buns on a baking tray lined with a baking paper (all the buns onto one tray) and make sure you keep an even gap between them all. Cover the tray with a clean tea towel and leave to rise at room temperature until almost double in size.

When the buns are ready (the sides of each bun should be touching and you almost shouldn’t be able see the tray) make an eggwash by whisking 1 whole egg, 1 egg yolk and a teaspoon of milk. Brush the buns carefully with this eggwash and leave to dry out for 10 minutes. Brush again.

Pre heat the oven to 200°C.

Making the X topping

Using a hand whisk, gently combine all the ingredients into a smooth paste.

Fill a plastic piping bag with the topping mixture and cut a small hole using scissors. Always cut a smaller hole than you think you might need as you can cut it again to make a bigger hole – but you can’t make a big hole smaller!

Pipe thin crosses on top of the buns on the tray and pop it into the hot oven.

Immediately, reduce the oven temp to 180°C until thoroughly baked and golden (around 20-22 minutes).

Making the syrup (while the buns are cooking)

Put all the syrup ingredients in a small saucepan and over a low heat bring to a boil, stirring occasionally. Once the sugar has dissolved completely, increase the heat and simmer for couple of minutes until you have a syrupy consistency.

Remove from the heat and fish the spices out.

Once the buns are ready, take them out of the oven and carefully brush them with the hot syrup.

Leave to cool for 15 minutes before serving.

With the Easter weekend on the horizon, people across the UK are getting ready to celebrate with delicious hot cross buns

And if life under lockdown has limited your trips to the supermarket, why not have a go at making your own this year?

Here are three recipes for hot cross buns, whether you like them classic, vegan or gluten free.

Classic Hot Cross Buns

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This recipe is from Paul Hollywood, so you know they’re going to be the best traditional hot cross buns around.

Ingredients for the buns:

– 300ml full fat milk, plus an extra two tablespoons

– 500g strong white flour

– One teaspoon of salt

– 75g of caster sugar

– One tablespoon of sunflower oil

– 7g sachet of fast action or easy blend yeast

– 75g of sultanas

– 50g of mixed peel

– The zest of one orange

– One apple, peeled, cored and finely chopped

– One teaspoon of cinnamon

Ingredients for the cross:

– 75g plain flour

– Five tablespoons of water

Finally, for the glaze you’ll need three tablespoons of apricot jam.

Method to make hot cross buns:To start making your buns, begin by bringing your milk to a boil and then remove it from the heat and add your butter. Leave to cool until it reaches room temperature.

In a separate bowl, add your bread flour, salt, caster sugar and yeast and mix together, making a well in the centre of the dry ingredients. Pour the milk and butter mixture into the well, adding your beaten egg too.

Using a wooden spoon, mix everything together thoroughly, until it becomes a sticky dough. Tip your dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead with your hands for about five minutes, until the dough is smooth and elastic. Lightly oil a bowl and place your dough inside and leave it to rise in a warm place for about an hour, or until it’s doubled in size. You should cover your dough with well oiled cling film, this stops the dough from sticking or from forming a crust.

Once that’s happened, tip in the sultanas, mixed peel, orange zest, apple and cinnamon into the bowl and knead it all together, making sure everything is evenly distributed. Leave the dough to rise again for another hour, covering again with well oiled cling film.

Next, divide your dough into 15 equal pieces and roll them into a smooth ball on a lightly floured surface. Arrange your buns on a lined baking tray, but make sure you’re leaving enough space for the dough to expand because you’re going to be leaving them to prove one more time for about an hour. Cover them with a clean tea towel or more oiled cling film, but don’t wrap them tightly.

Heat your oven to 220C/200C fan/gas mark seven. Whilst your dough is rising and your oven is heating, mix together your plain flour with about five tablespoons of water to make a paste, adding one tablespoon of water at a time. Spoon your mixture into a piping bag, or you can make a homemade piping bag by cutting the tip off the corner of a sandwich bag and pipe the paste onto the buns in a cross shape.

Bake for 20 minutes until nice and golden brown. Gently heat up three tablespoons of apricot jam until it’s melted and then pass it through a sieve to get rid of any big chunks. Whilst the jam is still warm, brush over the top of your buns and then leave to cool.

Maria Fitzpatrick tries her hand at making hot cross buns at Gail’s bakery in London

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

7:10AM BST 11 Apr 2014

In 1792 hot cross buns almost caused a riot. The Chelsea Bun House in London had them for sale at Easter and so many people queued things got rather out of hand. Thankfully, the residents of Dulwich Village, in south London, are a decorous bunch, because here at Gail’s bakery there are buns worth fighting for. Glossy, pillowy soft and fragrant, they’re the edible equivalent of Disney birdsong, and the bakers can’t put them out fast enough.

“The winter was so grey. Everyone really needed a sign of change, so the moment the hot cross buns went out it went mad,” says Roy Levy, head baker for Gail’s, who is teaching me how to make my own. “A hot cross bun is like an old friend’s face. The familiarity is comforting.”

As is the ritual. They’ve been around a while. “Hot cross buns appeared in the Oxford English Dictionary in 1733, although the street cry was familiar long before,” says the food historian Monica Askay. “Enriched, sweetened bread dough dates back to the Romans, but there are many theories about how the tradition evolved.”

Small, spiced cakes were also baked to honour the Saxon goddess Eoestre, and to celebrate spring, but it was the Tudors who began to link the spiced currant buns we know today with feast days, celebrations and eventually Lent. “Long before Christianity, loaves and buns were baked with symbols on them, one of which was a cross,” Monica says. “Then, right up to the Reformation, cutting a cross into your dough was supposed to ward off evil spirits that would prevent it from rising.”

I only have my limited kneading experience to worry about – although Roy’s recipe, while it takes time (the buns require two sessions of proving), is not as tricky as I expected. “It’s very easy,” he assures me, as I set about rubbing my fresh, crumbled (very cold) yeast into the sieved flour and sugar. With a well in the middle, we add the spices, which bring a rush of Easter memories from childhood as they reach my nose. “Feel free to adjust the spices to your own taste,” Roy says, “but I wouldn’t use too much – it shouldn’t taste richly ‘festive’, like Christmas, because it’s nice to keep a distinction. We’re aiming for a clean, light flavour. I think of them as the anti-cupcake. They’re meant to be humble.”

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How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Hard at work: Maria piping the crosses on her hot cross buns (Andrew Crowley)

Roy didn’t know what a hot cross bun was when he arrived in London seven years ago, having grown up in Tel Aviv, where baking at this time of year is unfermented. “It was exciting to work on something that stirs up so much affection,” he says. With no preconceptions of how it “should be”, he aimed to create “the best possible bun that I could”, taking the public’s anticipation seriously.

What’s his secret? “This.” He strokes the packets of French unsalted butter, which always come back in his suitcase from Brittany. “When they hear you’re a chef, they nod you through. They understand,” he giggles. “I’m with Julia Child, When in doubt, more butter.” But first, the egg and milk go into a well in the centre, and I bind the mixture, gradually working the flour in from the sides with my fingers, creating a dough. The butter is then smoothed in, a chunk at a time, in a gliding, kneading motion. The dough now feels silky-smooth. In with the salt and fruit, then more kneading until it’s velvety. “You want to make sure you stretch out the protein, the gluten,” Roy says. But avoid overdoing it, or you end up with buns of steel.

The dough proves, covered, for two hours, doubling in size. We divide it into little buns and “turn the ugly bits underneath” to form a smooth, rounded top, then seal the undersides by gently rolling them on the work surface. In a baking tray, evenly spaced (they join up when properly proved), they are left to puff up again.

For the “crosses”, we whisk together flour, icing sugar, milk and olive oil (butter would solidify). After glazing the buns with egg and letting them dry, it’s show time. I get the honour of piping the crosses on top – a better effort than my bun-shaping. Into the oven they go, and 20 minutes later we’re golden.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

The buns need to be glazed before they go in the oven (ANDREW CROWLEY)

Despite Roy’s butter theory, for me it’s his vanilla and spice-infused syrup glaze, brushed on and left to set, that elevates the buns. It creates a delicate shell, a foil for the softness underneath.

Later, as I walk to the bus stop, a box of cinnamony perfume in my hands, I’m aware of bystanders’ noses twitching like bunnies. Yes, folks – that’s spring in the air.

*’Gail’s Artisan Bakery Cookbook’ (£20) is out on June 5 (Ebury Press); Monica Askay is working with Stork margarine

More Easter baking recipes

The UK is currently under lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic. But many Brits have taken to their kitchens in the current climate to take part in some good old fashioned baking. So if you’re looking for a freshly baked centrepiece for your Easter feast, look no further.

Hot cross buns are traditionally eaten by Christians on Easter to mark to end of Lent.

Many of the ingredients which go into a hot cross bun are dairy, food people traditionally gave up during the 40 days of Lent.

Different parts of the hot cross bun hold special meaning, with the cross on the bun representing the crucifixion of Jesus Christ.

Some people believe the hot cross bun originates from centuries ago.

In St Albans in 1361, a monk developed the ‘Alban Bun’, which had a very similar recipe to the hot cross bun of today.

Brother Thomas Rocliffe is said to have delivered these buns to the local poor people on Good Friday.

Across the world, people still eat hot cross buns on Good Friday.

How to make hot cross buns

Ingredients (Serves 8-12 approximately):

  • 500g strong bread flour
  • 200-300ml milk (you may not need all the milk)
  • 50g butter
  • 50g caster sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 2 tsp mixed spice or cinnamon
  • 200g mixed fruit such as sultanas or raisins
  • 7g sachet of fast-action dried yeast
  • Plain flour (for the cross)
  • Golden syrup or honey, for glazing

Method:

  1. Sift the flour into a large mixing bowl, and combine with the sugar and the spices.
    Add the yeast and the salt.
  2. In a saucepan warm the milk, then take it off the heat.
  3. Let it cool slightly before adding the butter and mixing until melted.
  4. Make a well in the centre of the dry ingredients, add the two eggs and gradually add the milk mix to the bowl, combining until it forms a soft dough.
  5. Mix your fruit into the dough, and knead on a floured work station until elastic in texture (this will take around 10 minutes).
  6. Place the dough in a lightly oiled bowl, cover and allow it to rest for an hour and a half.
  7. Divide the dough into portions, roll into balls and place them on a lined baking tray.
  8. Cover the dough for around 20-30 minutes, and preheat the oven to gas 6, 200C, fan 180C.
  9. Mixing plain flour and water into a paste, drizzle it over the buns in a cross pattern.
  10. Bake for around 20 minutes, until the buns are golden brown.
  11. After leaving the buns to cool, glaze with the honey or syrup and serve!

Tips for your hot cross buns

While hot cross buns are usually filled with dried fruit like raisins, you don’t have to limit yourself to these options.

Try adding chocolate chips or small chunks of fudge to your mix, or other fruit like raspberries or apple.

And if you’re happy with a simple hot cross bun, you can always omit any additions altogether!

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Hot Cross Buns are traditionally served on Good Friday. This Hot Cross Buns recipe is made of sweet yeast dough and spiced with cinnamon and raisins.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

What are Hot Cross Buns?

Hot cross buns are an Easter staple in many parts of the world, especially in Australia and the United Kingdom. The crosses on the bread are in honor of Good Friday, marking the end of Lent.

There are numerous variations of this popular Springtime bread. We’re sticking with the classic version in this recipe. Once you’ve mastered the original, free feel to start experimenting with chocolate, orange-cranberry, and caramel varieties.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

These buns are best enjoyed warm, fresh from the oven. That’s when they’re at the peak in terms of softness. As the bread cools down, its texture will change. At room temperature, the texture of the hot cross buns are similar to that of a bagel and pretzel. It has a tight and dense crumb.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

The dough for these hot cross buns is easy and straightforward. While it’s easiest to use a stand mixer, you can mix and knead this dough by hand. After the dough is formed and has had enough time to double in volume, the dough is divided into 12 equal parts. (For exact measurements, I suggest using a kitchen scale to equally portion out the dough.) The dough is rolled into round balls and placed on a parchment lined baking sheet. The shaped dough is covered with a kitchen towel and allowed to rise a second time. It’s time to bake once the balls of dough have risen enough to touch each other.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

What is the Cross Made of on a Hot Cross Bun?

There are a few variations on how the cross is produced. Some recipes call for a shortbread or cookie dough that is cut into stripes and placed on top. Others use a sugar icing mixture that is piped on top after the bread is baked.

For this recipe, I use a mixture of flour, sugar, and milk to create a piping paste. The paste is piped on the risen bread prior to baking.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

After baking, the warm buns get brushed with a sweet syrup to give the bread that nice shiny, attractive crust. The syrup is a simple mixture of apricot preserves thinned out with some water. It adds a pleasant sweetness to the finished baked good.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

It’s best to eat hot cross buns while they’re warm. I suggest you slice the bun half, lightly toast it, and then slather on some salted butter or whipped cream cheese on top. It’s absolutely delightful!

How to make the dough ahead of time:

You can prepare the dough the night before up to Step 6 in the instructions. Instead of letting the dough rest at room temperature for 30 to 40 minutes to rise, cover it and let it chill in the fridge overnight. The following day, allow the dough to come to room temperature (about 20 to 30 minutes). Proceed by piping the crosses before baking.

Little and Friday

Ponsonby, Newmarket, Belmont and Auckland CBD.

Kim Evans started Little and Friday in the depths of Auckland suburbia almost 10 years ago. It’s all about making delicious food from scratch, and her success shows the Little and Friday ethos is a good one. We had heard just how good these hot cross buns are, and Kim generously shared the recipe. This recipe involved a lot of waiting while the dough proves, so make sure to allow yourself plenty of time. Fresh yeast is best, but hard to find, so use dry yeast if needed (add to the milk and leave for 10 minutes to bring it back to life).

Hot Cross Buns

Mix into a paste, pour into a piping bag and set aside.

Place in a saucepan and boil together until sugar is dissolved.

300 mL lukewarm milk

80g fresh compressed yeast (or 8 teaspoons of instant yeast or 4 sachets)

60g castor sugar

5 cups high grade flour

2 tablespoons of mixed spice

2 tablespoons of cinnamon

1 pinch of ground cloves

1 teaspoon salt

3 cups sultanas

1⁄2 cup mixed peel

Pour the milk over the yeast and stir to dissolve. Add the sugar to the milk/yeast mixture. Put the dry ingredients into a bowl and stir to combine, add the milk mixture and egg and knead for approximately ten minutes.

Take a small ball of dough and using your thumb and forefingers pull the dough apart until you get what is called a “window” where you can see through the dough and it doesn’t break, then add the fruit to the dough and knead through until combined evenly through the dough.

Leave to prove for 30-40 minutes until the dough doubles in size. Be careful not to place the buns in a draft or it will struggle to rise.

Tip dough onto a floured bench and roll out to 4cm thick. Using a knife cut into squares approximately 4cm in width. leave on the bench to prove for 20 minutes, then squash the air out of the buns and roll back into a ball shape.

Place on a lined tray and let them prove until doubled in size, around 40 minutes. Using the prepared flour paste, pipe the crosses over the buns.

Place in a preheated oven 180 degrees Celsius and bake until golden brown, approximately 20mins. Remove from oven and paint prepared glaze over the buns.

  • 8 Apr 2020, 10:31
  • Updated : 8 Apr 2020, 11:59

WITH Easter fast approaching this weekend, it’s not all about chocolate eggs and daffodils but rather another tasty treat – hot cross buns.

The spring-time delicacy can be enjoyed at breakfast or as a cheeky snack smothered in butter and bitter marmalade or sweet strawberry jam – perfect for coronavirus lockdown.

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

The sweet treats, which are traditionally eaten on Good Friday to mark the end of Lent, come in mouth-watering flavours at the shops, from M&S’ salted caramel to Aldi’s rocky road stuffed buns at Tesco.

But as we celebrate Easter in lockdown this year, there’s no need to pop to the stores to pick up your stash when you can make your own at home.

Hot cross buns are surprisingly easy to make in a bread maker and taste fantastic when devoured still warm from the oven.

Whether you’re at home with the kids, by yourself or with your housemates; why don’t you give this recipe from AO.com a go, which serves eight and promises to not get your hands dirty either.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

To make eight buns, you’ll need flour, butter, sugar, yeast, water, mixed dried fruit, an egg, as well as some milk powder, salt, cinnamon and mixed spice.

Don’t fret over the ingredients as the bread maker will do all the hard work.

First place all the ingredients for the buns in the bread pan, except the mixed dried fruit, which can be place in the raisin / nut dispenser of your bread maker.

Then choose the ‘basic bake raisin’ program on your device, which will go for two hours 20 minutes. Once it’s finished, take the mixture out and divide into eight balls.

Easy Hot Cross Buns In The Bread Maker

For the buns:

  • 250g strong white flour
  • A half tsp yeast
  • One tsp sugar
  • 25g butter
  • One tbsp milk powder
  • A half tsp salt
  • One medium egg
  • 100ml water
  • 1 tsp Cinnamon
  • A half tsp mixed spice
  • 100g Mixed dried fruit

For the glaze:

  • 40g sugar
  • Four tbsps of water

Method:

  1. Place all the ingredients in the bread pan in the order listed above, except the mixed dried fruit
  2. The dried fruit can be put in the raisin / nut dispenser
  3. Select the BASIC BAKE RAISIN program – two hours 20 mins
  4. When the program has finished divide the dough into eight balls.
  5. Place on a lightly greased baking tray cover with oiled cling film and allow to prove until doubled in size. Approx 30 minutes
  6. Make the paste with approx two tbsps of flour mixed with two tbsps water. Pipe a cross over the buns
  7. Bake in a preheated oven at 220ºC for 15-20 mins or until golden brown
  8. While still hot, brush with the sugar glaze

Place the divided mixture on a lightly greased baking tray and cover with oiled cling film to prove for about 30 minutes until they’re doubled in size.

Once proved, mix two tablespoons of flour with two tablespoons of water and pipe a cross over the buns.

Your buns are now ready to go into a preheated oven at 220ºC for 15-20 mins or until golden brown.

When your buns are nearly ready to come out start making the glaze.

Mix 40g of sugar in four tablespoons of water and boil for around five minutes until a syrup consistency is achieved.

While your buns are still hot, brush with the sugar glaze and you’re all set to enjoy with a nice cup of tea.

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How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Perfect Hot Cross buns are easy this Easter with my simple recipe. This recipe makes super soft, deliciously fluffy buns. The addition of a bit of milk and butter gives the buns a richer taste and texture. Best of all the whole house will smell delicious as the buns bake!

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

Our family always celebrates Easter with freshly made bread. We usually make hot cross buns, but in years past we have made brioche cooked with tye dye boiled eggs, Filipino Ensaymada and many other special Easter bread. I started this tradition because I wanted to make sure the kids had something in there stomachs before they launched in the chocolate Easter eggs.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

I could have just given the kids cereal for breakfast, like any other morning… but then it would be special.

The recipe I’m sharing was printed in the recipe booklet which came with my breadmaker. The breadmaker is more than 20 years old so I’ve been making these hot cross buns for a long time. Over the years I’ve altered the recipe slightly and they always work out perfectly.

However, once I bought my Thermomix there was no need for the breadmaker. So I kept the hot cross bun recipe and adjusted it for the Thermomix and gave away the breadmaker.

How to Make Hot Cross Buns

If you would like to make the Bakers Delight style chocolate Easter Buns the recipe is easily adjusted.

Chocolate Hot Cross Buns Variation

Using the recipe above;

  • omit the spices and substitute 2 teaspoons of dutch process cocoa powder.
  • omit sultanas and add 200gm chocolate bits.

Iced Hot Cross Buns Variation

I also like to use icing sugar to make the cross on my hot cross buns instead of the traditional flour paste cross. If you want to add an icing cross you will still need to glaze the buns with the sugar glaze whilst they’re hot. Once the buns have cooled decorate with a thick white icing sugar cross.

Before you BAKE!

Would you like to eat these Hot Cross Buns fresh in the morning without all the work??

You can prepare the dough the night before and bake them in the morning.

Simply complete the method up to the point where the buns are doing their second proof in the baking tray.

  1. Spray some plastic film with oil and cover the Easter buns.
  2. Place them in the fridge.
  3. leave overnight
  1. Remove the hot cross buns from the fridge
  2. Allow them to come to room temperature
  3. Make your cross mixture and pipe the cross onto the buns.
  4. Preheat the oven.

To cook, bake as normal. Glaze and enjoy.

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