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How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

If you lead worship in a local church, there’s a good chance it is multi generational. Unless you’ve specifically planted a young adult church or are leading a youth movement, you have middle schoolers to great grandparents in your church, gathering to sing together.
Sound like fun?

It’s actually one of the most challenging aspects of local church, worship ministry. Worship wars. Too many preferences. If our goal is to make everyone happy, it’s an impossible task.

It takes big vision. It takes collaboration. It takes have an expansive view of the Kingdom that is more than sounding cool and singing popular songs.

9 Best Practices

Are you up for the challenge? Here are 9 best practices for leading multi-generational worship:

1.Become an Arranger – You can get away with modern, aggressive songs as long as it’s positioned well in a set. Oftentimes a worship set contains three songs that are all driving, rhythmic, and loud. You’re not helping yourself with that. Arrange the set to contain ups and downs, high energy and space. Grow in your skill as an architect the whole worship experience.

2. Focus on the Voice of the People – Don’t be so concerned with how you and your band sound. Place emphasis on the corporate singing of God’s people. No matter the set, I always (every-single-time) utilize voice-only moments for people to sing. Even using drums-only choruses to encourage the church to rise up is so helpful. How you lead is way more important than what you lead.

3. Learn to Love Old & New – The church is old and current. We stand on the shoulders of saints who have gone before. Our worship liturgy should include new and old expressions. If you don’t love that, learn to love it. It’s important.

4. Connect Off the Stage – Rather than just hanging out with your band backstage, go start conversations with the old ladies in the back row. Look them in the eye. Pray with them. Also hang around the youth. Don’t be shy. Force yourself into situations where you have to talk and interact with all generations. Make a connection off the stage.

5. Get Creative – Creativity and relevancy doesn’t have to be edgy and loud. If you’re wanting to shake up your sound, Hillsong Young & Free isn’t the only option. Do a whole set with cello and drum pads. Try three acoustic guitars and no electric. Use more piano. Sing without your acoustic guitar. Bring a vibraphone on stage with an electric guitar playing swells. No approach is sacred. Get creative.

6. Love Jesus – Nothing connects the generations like a love for Jesus. This can’t be overstated. They may not love your music but they will follow your pursuit of God, provided it is genuine and real. Make that the center of all that you do – a wild pursuit of His presence.

7. Cast a Big Vision – Multigenerational worship isn’t simply a battle between soft & loud music, or new and old songs. It’s a leadership problem. It takes a leader who believes in the multigenerational church, deep in their bones. Have conversations with people. Cast vision from the platform. Paint a compelling picture for the church you’d like to see and be ready to fight for it.

8. Collaborate With Your Lead Pastor – It’s possible that no one knows multigenerational worship like your lead pastor. They may not be a musician or have experience leading worship, but they know their people. Be proactive about starting conversations about how you can serve the congregation better in worship.

9. Look At the Big Picture – Most worship leaders think in terms of songs – one fast song, two slow songs. Rather than just thinking in terms of the songs you’re going to sing, consider the wider story of the Gospel. Think in terms of an immersive experience in the presence of God. This includes songs, but can also include Scripture, exhortation, spoken words, videos, and other creative elements.

I’d love for you to add to this list. What is missing? How have you developed a culture of unity among generations?

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

By Paul Russell, co-founder and director of Luxury Academy London

Like it or not, your generation largely defines your values and beliefs in the workplace. A generation is a group of people born around the same time who experienced the same cultural, political, economic and historic moments. It is these experiences that bond them together and form their ethos towards life. Transport the generation to the workplace, and these values and beliefs translate to work and how they want to be led.

That’d be easy enough to contemplate if we had one generation at a time in the workplace, but todays diverse workplaces, even in small businesses, can be a mix of hard-working baby boomers with a dash of cynical generation X and a helping of balance-seeking generation Y. Oh, and not forgetting the newly arrived generation Z.

So, as a leader of a multi-generational team, do you go for the one-size-fits-all approach and let the different generations adapt or should you be the one doing the adapting?

Nowadays, most leaders aspire to be transformational leaders. The type of leader who is able to transform goals and aspirations, who is visionary and inspires others. Yet as much as transformational leadership is about articulating a shared vision of the future, it is also about attending to differences. It follows then that the leader needs to understand how a particular generation thinks, what motivates them, what doesn’t, their work-related goals, and why they even work at all.

Baby boomers

This generation also expect a lot of their leaders and for them honesty is the most important characteristic a leader should have. This generation expect stability in their role, and a relatively hierarchical structure. Studies also suggest that the older and more experienced you become, the more innovative within your role, the less you would require or expect transformational leadership.

Generation X

The old top-down approach to leadership won’t appeal to this generation, who see collaboration as integral to leading, and expect leadership to be more passive than the previous generation. But, like the previous generation, they still believe in the power of the team and peer-to-peer collaboration will be important.

Generation Y

Generation Y, born around 1977 to 1995, demand more from their leaders. Their preferred leadership style is transformative and they are not scared to challenge a leader that they feel is not, in their eyes, fulfilling the leadership role.

The most marked difference with generation Y though, also known as millennials, is in their attitude to work-life balance, with a strong preference for flexible jobs and a mindset that a career is not the principal motivator. Studies with this generation suggest that millennials are more individualistic, even more narcissistic, and like both structure and praise.

Generation Z

Then there is generation Z, the 1996 and onwards cohort who are the social media generation. From a generation where technology is innate, they expect information to be freely available and this applies to how they are led too. Studies suggest that unlike the previous generation, generation Z are less dependent upon their leaders and more self-reliant.

The benefit of insight into the values and beliefs of different generations is that it allows the leader to acknowledge different perspectives and attitudes. What could be considered as rigidity or aversion to change can be viewed differently if considered through the lens of the boomer generation.

Or, an apparent lack of commitment to the organisation could be the generation Y desire for work-life balance. With understanding, leaders can appreciate the diversity of perspectives that a diverse multi-generational team can offer and this will, ultimately, make them better leaders of people.

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Baby Boomers? Millennials? Gen X? Alistair Shepherd has ideas for the generations working together.

By 2020, most companies will have four or five generations working side by side. These are individuals often with fundamentally different experiences that can lead them to communicate differently, and value different things in the workplace. Regardless of whether HR and L&D leaders embrace this shift in diversity or not, addressing this change presents a challenge.

Generally speaking, we often see misunderstandings between the generations, with one generation blaming another for all the problems in the world.

But actually, if we put aside surface level differences, there’s quite a lot of common ground. The Harvard Business Review reported that the various generations all have the same basic desire – to do meaningful work. However, their definition of meaningful work may be different.

Find a common purpose

As an example, baby boomers tend to be slightly more goal-oriented in their purpose. For generation X, accomplishing career goals is a key component of meaningful work. They also focus much more on maintaining a healthy work-life balance. Millennials, on the other hand, are driven by company culture, values and having a purpose at the workplace as well as how they get along with their coworkers.

While each group’s working style may be different, they all intrinsically have the same desire – to do something meaningful.

Keeping these varied outlooks in mind, what can organisations do to create purpose and make the workplace meaningful for all employees involved? The answer lies in effective team-building. HR, L&D and team leaders need to step in and take an active role in developing their teams, instead of focussing solely on business outcomes.

Consider the above example of meaningful work and adapt that to your strategy on teamwork. While each group’s working style may be different, they all intrinsically have the same desire – to do something meaningful. There are many techniques you can incorporate to ensure your teams are motivated to perform at their best.

If you can agree to this common purpose within the team, their working styles and processes can flow from here. The way you can leverage this, for instance, is through a discussion between the team members.

Whether conducted anonymously or openly, allowing the different generations to give a clear view of what motivates them and how they would define the team’s purpose, lays the groundwork for a well-functioning team. Once a shared purpose is established, it becomes easier to agree on actions. Each action can be based on the question ‘does this align with our purpose?’.

Goal-setting across the generations

Effective goal-setting can help improve employee engagement and elevate overall performance, and these need to be tailored appropriately.

Vishen Lakhiani, author of ‘The Code of the Extraordinary Mind’ breaks goal setting down across the generations. Baby boomers tend to want recognition for the effort they make. They are not afraid to work, but want to be appreciated. When setting goals with them, it is useful to allow them to feel that they will get some status from it. It doesn’t necessarily have to be a promotion, but they need to feel relevant.

Gen X generally value their independence and want to feel in control of their lives. As mentioned before, work life balance is important for them. One way of setting goals for them is through empowerment.

Make them accountable for the results, but give them flexibility in the delivery. Help them to define clear goals that are measurable and time based, and don’t need to be micromanaged. Trust them to deliver but hold them accountable to it.

Millennials seek challenges and value experiences that enrich their lives. Help them set goals where the results get them excited. Give them mentors and autonomy to manage on their own. Mentors can come from the baby boomers and autonomy can be guided by the gen X group. Allow them to experiment, but remember to hold them accountable for the results.

Establish team norms

Working as a team to formally define norms can have positive benefits for the team as well as your company. A set of agreed behaviours can provide both control and security within relationships. Norms also build trust, accountability and responsibility.

A norm can be anything from what time to arrive at the office, to how to behave during a meeting, or how the team makes decisions. Let’s look at an example of dress code: What is the appropriate dress code for the office? Baby boomers may very well believe that a suit and tie is the only option. Millennials on the other hand may insist on a t-shirt and a pair of jeans.

A set of agreed behaviours can provide both control and security within relationships. Norms also build trust, accountability and responsibility.

Let the team decide on a norm that they’re most comfortable with, something that satisfies all parties through open communication and discussion. The conversation isn’t always going to be straightforward, but once you all agree, you will have a team that’s secure in what is acceptable and what is not.

Policies should really be there to support employees in doing meaningful work, not get in the way or serve as a set of arbitrary rules for the sake of giving management a sense of control.

Leverage available technologies

According to a recent Gallup report, 87% of millennials value professional development and career growth as very important to them. HR and team leaders need to facilitate learning experiences that foster engagement and support autonomous working.

New developments in tech, such as AI-powered chatbots, democratise team development in a completely new way. For the first time ever, digitised coaching is available to all employees, not only to members of the c-suite.

Cross generational team members might have different experiences and motivations, but ultimately this is what’s going to foster new ideas and drive growth within organisation. It’s important we focus on ensuring that different generations work well together and with a little bit of work and experimentation, we can lay the groundwork for running successful companies with happy employees.

Bringing the magic of play to communities.

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

The joy of making music on the playground can now be enjoyed at any age. We’ve expanded the collection of Rhapsody® Outdoor Musical Instruments with six instruments that are a bit smaller and lower to the ground—sized just right for kids ages 2 to 5.

Rhapsody was originally introduced in January 2016, and has been a hit at playgrounds, community centers, schools, senior centers and more. That’s why we’ve added the junior Rhapsody instruments to the mix. This music playground activity is now ideal for
childcare centers, preschools and other early childhood facilities.

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

See below to learn more about the new junior-sized chimes, metallophones and drums:

  • Warble™ Chimes Kids can bing and bong their way along one full octave on this richly toned instrument.
  • Jingle™ Metallophone Eight brilliant notes ring out on this fully inclusive instrument.
  • Ditty™ Metallophone Little ones will enjoy making up tunes with the eight major notes these flat bars make.
  • Drums High-quality drum skins are made from polycarbonate, textured on the underside for a professional finish to stand up to the rigors of play and temperature extremes; choose from the Kundu Junior Drum, Kettle Junior Drum or Goblet Junior Drum.

Don’t forget… musical playgrounds welcome all ages and abilities! The original Rhapsody Outdoor Musical Instruments are perfect for kids and adults ages 5 and up. Add all 12 instruments to your play space to encourage multigenerational play.

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

Music is joy. A joy that can be heard and felt. And that’s why we’re so excited to introduce our newest playground innovation—Rhapsody™ Outdoor Musical Instruments! Rhapsody was developed with a highly skilled music advisor to ensure every instrument produces a best-in-class musical quality.

Our outdoor musical instruments invite kids and adults of all abilities to join the band, be creative and express themselves. There are six different instruments available within the Rhapsody collection:

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

  • Grandioso™ Chimes Accommodating both solo and ensemble performances, these chimes soar two full octaves in a major key.
  • Vivo™ Metallophone Tubes make up the lush notes on this captivating instrument.
  • Animato™ Metallophone Flat bars make up 15 major notes on this instrument.
  • Drums High-quality drum skins stand up to the rigors of play and temperature extremes; choose from the Kundu Drum, Kettle Drum or Goblet Drum.

Our playful and elegant music collection can be installed anywhere—playgrounds, community centers, schools, museums and other public spaces—to encourage individuals of all ages and abilities to explore the power of music. Learn more at playlsi.com.

Today marks the eighth annual World Autism Awareness Day. This day brings autism organizations around the world together to help raise awareness about the disorder affecting nearly 1 in 68 children. Because of these stats and the fact that there are one in seven children in the U.S. living with a disability, we took a close look at public playground requirements for children with disabilities by conducting a survey of nearly 900 parents of children 12-years-old and younger.

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

More than half (57 percent) of all parents asked about playground requirements for children with disabilities, mistakenly believe playgrounds are required to have elements designed for children with autism spectrum disorders, Down syndrome, and visual and hearing impairments. That means that people who think they’re designing an inclusive playground based upon ADA standards are really only designing to the minimum requirements and could be missing a huge need in their community.

Over the past few years, we’ve learned about a desire to include sensory play experiences and multigenerational opportunities for social interaction. Planners also want to make sure the community or school playground offers enough challenge for children who are typically developing as well so that there are opportunities for healthy interaction among children of all abilities. Our survey echoed that idea… nearly 75 percent of parents believe it is important that their children have an opportunity to play with a variety of children, including those with disabilities.

By Malcolm McColl

The residential school system has led to a multi-generational catastrophe in First Nation life. The schools were such a complete disaster that the Government of Canada had to make a formal apology in 2008. Financial compensation is underway, but healing requires grassroots action.

That’s where people involved with the Residential School Gathering Committee in Lytton come into the picture. “[The committee] is made up of about 10 to 15 people, and at times there were up to 20 to 25 in the group,” said Gilbert Isaac, one of the organizers. “Lorraine Hance is in charge, and Verna Miller is also heavily involved. Jean York is the president of the group.”

It is a busy committee, currently organizing an event to accelerate the healing process by gathering together residential school survivors in Lytton, B.C. this Fall. The organizing committee is putting together a three-day program scheduled for August 1st-3rd, 2009. “We started in April to get things done with posters, invitations, news releases, First Nation news outlets, and recruiting entertainers,” said Gilbert.

Gilbert expects it to be a good-sized gathering. “It will be at the site of the St. George’s Residential School that burned down in the 1980’s. We have people from all over the province who attended the school in Lytton. We have heard from Prince Rupert where a lot of families with school survivors will be coming to Lytton. This gathering is open to any residential school survivor.”

Nkixsten James, a member of the Gitxsan Spirit group, wrote to tell Gilbert Isaac, “We must honour the Gitxsan for their devoted efforts to end the battle of the Residential School Syndrome. You can come and greet them as they enter into Lytton heading towards the battlefield where the Residential School Survivors Gathering is going to take place on August 1, 2, and 3. We need your voices to sing our chants of welcome to them as they arrive.” Nkixsten explained that the Gitxsan Spirit is a group of residential school survivors established in February 2004 “to support, encourage, and educate survivors and their families in healing and healing issues.”

The group’s thirty-plus members gather informally on a monthly basis, and are organizing the Gitxsan Spirit Walk in BC from Hazelton to Lytton (about 600 miles apart). The main purpose of the Gitxsan Spirit Walk will be to continue to raise awareness of residential school survivors and their families’ life long healing process. Family members and supporters are encouraged to walk beside survivors and attend the reunion in Lytton, BC. They will be making their entrance into Lytton this coming July 31st, which is the National Day of Reconciliation.

Nkixsten recounts some of the history: “Up to five generations of Aboriginal children had attended residential schools, with the BC province having the most government and church-operated schools. Children were relocated from their families, nations, and lands. On a national level, the past nine years have had healing programs and projects open and close, all dependent on short-term funding.”

Nkixsten says, “Healing is a lifelong issue crossing generational boundaries. And the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal is also at a critical moment.” He adds that a real commitment to genuine reconciliation and a renewed relationship will affect the social conditions faced by all future generations.

Comments

The only thing is could something like punk work in the world we live in now.

Punk worked in the 70s because of the way the world was back then.

If a new band came along today trying to recreate the anarchy of the Sex Pistols, I reckon they would be laughed out of the TV studio within 60 seconds.

Look at Linkin Park. I’ve never been a fan of their faux-metal music but their latest single is so removed from their original sound, it could be any male singer collaborating with Kiiara. They’ve become so anonymous with this new single.

It’s basically Linkin Park’s way of saying “rock doesn’t sell so we’re going all synth pop instead”. The Killers were doing the same type of music much better 10 years ago.

Linkin Park are so late to the party, they arrived after everyone else left.

Punk worked in the 70s because of the way the world was back then.

If a new band came along today trying to recreate the anarchy of the Sex Pistols, I reckon they would be laughed out of the TV studio within 60 seconds.
.

What good about the Internet is discovering all the old underground music from era that past by.

The only thing is could something like punk work in the world we live in now.

I agree back in the 70’s life was gaps away from what it has been in the last decade.

If there was a decade that made the last movement it was Manchester with the Joy Division,Smiths,The Stone Roses the Monday’s and the birth of rave culture.And then there was London with it’s warehouse party,that soon spread north and Acid House and Drum and Bass.

And America was making way for the Hip Hop as it became Mainstream too the mass,and Techno and House come from New York,Chicago,Detroit.

Hardcore Punk,Collage Radio that gave way too Grunge and Alternative.

And around 1998 and 2000 that stopped.

I agree back in the 70’s life was gaps away from what it has been in the last decade.

If there was a decade that made the last movement it was Manchester with the Joy Division,Smiths,The Stone Roses the Monday’s and the birth of rave culture.And then there was London with it’s warehouse party,that soon spread north and Acid House and Drum and Bass.

And America was making way for the Hip Hop as it became Mainstream too the mass,and Techno and House come from New York,Chicago,Detroit.

Hardcore Punk,Collage Radio that gave way too Grunge and Alternative.

And around 1998 and 2000 that stopped.

I think the charts are uninspiring and even more contrived by the digital technology available. Ed Sheeran has held the number one anf two slot ages now.

The music a in the charts is also dire and as previously mentioned quite dreary.

I think it is mostly down too taste and style.

Right now live music in Bars and clubs and on the Internet are doing well.As Music in the mainstream is kind of dire and sameish,if you hear one Girl band you notice it the same one with the same beat vocal.Or the same guy sound alike as Ed and Olly or same Kanye,and there is not much of alternative anymore you have lookout too find it.

I think the charts are uninspiring and even more contrived by the digital technology available. Ed Sheeran has held the number one anf two slot ages now.

The music a in the charts is also dire and as previously mentioned quite dreary.

I don’t take all that much notice but it seems pretty bland and uninspiring.

I grew up in the seventies into the early eighties , saw singles charts consisting(various rise and falls) of eg Glam Rock, Rock, Metal, Pop, Disco, Middle of the Road,Punk,Country, New Wave, Ska, New Romantic and a whole host one off curiosities and novelties. The chart was a truly national talking point-largely because TOTP and Radio 1 were driving it to a multi generational audience every week. To be honest Im glad I grew up then, clearly people are still sampling music in droves but the chart itself seems niche and outwardly boring in the way that streaming appears to be affecting it.

I think the charts are uninspiring and even more contrived by the digital technology available. Ed Sheeran has held the number one anf two slot ages now.

The music a in the charts is also dire and as previously mentioned quite dreary.

I don’t take all that much notice but it seems pretty bland and uninspiring.

I grew up in the seventies into the early eighties , saw singles charts consisting(various rise and falls) of eg Glam Rock, Rock, Metal, Pop, Disco, Middle of the Road,Punk,Country, New Wave, Ska, New Romantic and a whole host one off curiosities and novelties. The chart was a truly national talking point-largely because TOTP and Radio 1 were driving it to a multi generational audience every week. To be honest Im glad I grew up then, clearly people are still sampling music in droves but the chart itself seems niche and outwardly boring in the way that streaming appears to be affecting it.

agreed. pity you werent a bit older to appreciate the 60’s too

but sampling, when done right, is a useful method of creating new music .

A virtual pre-event learning opportunity and onsite interactive learning event at World of Concrete will focus on the six pillars of the Talent Generation model.

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

The Mason Contractors Association of America (MCAA) has contracted with XYZ University to research the intergenerational issues impacting todays jobsites. In particular, they are exploring how employees can more effectively communicate across generational boundaries to be more productive and retain workforce.

XYZ University has written an in-depth white paper on the topic and have developed a two-day program debuting at World of Concrete that will train employees on how to adapt skills to mitigate generational conflict. This two-day program is fantastic for anyone in a supervisory role and/or anyone who deals with multiple generations in their daily work.

Day 1 – Jan. 20, 2019:
8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. – MCAA Workforce Initiative – Part 1, including: seminars, workshops, and interactive learning activities
4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. – Happy Hour Networking Event

Day 2 – Jan 21, 2019:
8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m – MCAA Workforce Initiative – Part 2, including: seminars, workshops, and interactive learning activities
3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. – Talent Generation Book Signing and Networking Event (included with the price of seminar)

Location: Las Vegas Convention Center, N212

The experienced team at XYZ University will share tools and insights they’ve developed over 16+ years of generational research and expertise, including improving internal workforce culture (and ultimately productivity) and best practices for effective workforce development.

The class is available to non-member firms for $1100, however, the MCAA is offering a special discount to Concrete and Masonry Related Association (CAMRA) members through Dec. 21. CAMRA-affiliated organizations can use the discount code CAMRA to bring the cost down to $950.

The price includes two light continental style breakfasts, two lunches, a happy hour reception and the book Talent Generation: How Visionary Organizations Are Redefining Work and Achieving Greater Success.

I recently had the privilege of visiting the Medal of Honour Museum aboard the USS Yorktown in beautiful Mt. Pleasant, South Carolina. Showcased in this museum is a moving tribute to our military heroes who served our country with honour, valour and bravery.

What caught my eye was recognition given to the youngest recipient of the Medal of Honour, William “Willie” Johnston. Born in St. Johnsbury, Vermont in 1850, Johnston was a drummer boy in Company D of the 3rd Vermont Infantry. His service in the Seven Day retreat in the Peninsula Campaign was exemplary.

During the retreat many of the men threw away their equipment so they had less of a load to carry. Johnston retained his drum and brought it safely to Harrison’s Landing. It was there that he had the honour of drumming for the division parade. He was the only boy to bring his instrument to the battlefield. Upon receiving word of Johnston’s bravery, President Lincoln suggested he be given a medal; a Medal of Honour.

Heroic acts by leaders like Johnston give cause for us to reflect on our motives and how we might better serve those we lead. An 11 year‑old drummer boy on a battlefield 149 years ago teaches us three leadership traits worth emulating.

Leaders carry their own weight. While the other men in the infantry threw away their equipment, Johnston held to his. So often during difficult times, the leader is not the one who discards the weight of responsibility but carries it on his shoulders. Think about it. How many people in your organization are shirking their responsibilities and how many are stepping up and being responsible? See a disparity?

Dietrich Bonhoeffer said, “Action springs not from thought, but from a readiness for responsibility”. At a tender young age, Johnston exemplified leadership beyond his years of understanding. As a drummer, he teaches us that it is not about rank or role within the organization, but heroes in our midst can be found if we dare to look.

Leaders know how to stand alone. At the conclusion of the retreat it was only Johnston who returned his drum from the battlefield. And it was only Johnston who had the honour of drumming for the division parade. When others exempt themselves from the bravery of the moment, they exempt themselves also from the honour that follows.

It’s been said, “When you are forced to stand alone, you realize what you have in you”. When you march to the beat of your own drum you do so knowing that there are certain places where only few leaders go. When others choose to tread the path of least resistance, you will cast your lot with the company of the brave. Those ranks may be few but you have grown to understand that there are worse things than standing alone. By standing alone today you will lead the parade tomorrow.

Leaders summon uncommon courage in uncommon times.

By shedding their gear, the other men did what was expedient. By holding on to his drum, Johnston did the exceptional. C.S. Lewis said, “Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point”.

Testing points come and go, but the enduring qualities of honour, sacrifice, and valour shine in unexpected ways from unlikely persons. This 11 year‑old drummer boy distinguished himself among men and earned a medal from The President.

Consider the ranks of your organization. Who are the ones that stand out by their service, sacrifice and dedication to the organization?

These are the ones who march to the beat of their own drum‑ called to stand out, not to blend in. They may not have the title, but are leaders worthy of respect.

About Author

How to march to today’s multigenerational drum

Doug Dickerson is an internationally recognized leadership speaker and columnist. He is the author of the books Leaders Without Borders, and Great Leaders Wanted. Visit https://dougdickerson.net for more information.

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Inspired by this year’s protests against racial injustice, this Derek Fordjour painting reimagines the stars and stripes of the American flag.

Lockstep!
March!”
(2020) by Derek Fordjour.

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“Boom!
Lockstep!
March!”
(2020) by Derek Fordjour.

Credit. Courtesy of the artist and Night Gallery, Los Angeles

In each installment of The Artists , T highlights a recent or little-shown work by a Black artist, along with a few words from that artist putting the work in context. This week, we’re looking at a painting by Derek Fordjour , whose solo show at the Petzel Gallery, “ Self Must Die ,” is on view through Dec. 19.

Name: Derek Fordjour

Based in: New York City

Originally from: Memphis

When and where did you make this work? I completed this work in June at the height of the B.L.M. protest marches, hence the title, “Boom! Lockstep! March!” I added the birds flying in the opposing direction after biking home from my studio through a protest march in the South Bronx, where police helicopters were hovering above.

Can you describe what is going on in the work? Three marchers move in unison playing drums while birds gather overhead. I thought a lot about patriotic symbols — stars and bars from the flag have been remixed here. I think about these figures as shaking up democracy and quite literally moving to the beat of their own drum.

What inspired you to make this work? Like most people, I am excited and intrigued by the frequency and intensity of the national protests. It’s important to me that there is something at stake with every work that I make, especially now. I really wanted to connect what was happening in my studio with what was happening in the streets.

What’s the work of art in any medium that changed your life? My life continues to be changed by works of art. It is impossible for me to isolate a single moment. I hope this never stops.