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How to match colors on your multiple monitors

If you have a multiple monitor setup and your monitors are showing different color variations, then this article will show you how to fix that issue. Although there is no such quick fix of this problem, you can try out these suggestions to get the same color scheme on a multiple monitor setup.

If you have a dual monitor setup and they are showing different color depths, you may get some problems while editing images or videos. Also, you can get issues while watching videos on multiple monitors. To fix that problem, you need to follow these tricks.

Monitors showing different colors

1] Make sure that the manufacturers are the same

If you use monitors from different manufacturers, it is likely that both will show different color variations and the color depth may be different on different monitors.

2] Use same display settings

Almost all manufacturers include some basic settings or options to change brightness, contrast, sharpness, etc. You also get options to use different modes such as Standing mode, Gaming mode, etc. You need to make sure that you have the same settings on all the monitors. If you have enabled Game Mode on the 1 st screen and Standing Mode on the 2 nd monitor, you will get a different color on different screens.

3] Use the same type of ports to connect all monitors

This is one of the most common issues for this problem. If you use different ports (DVI, VGA, HDMI) to connect different monitors, you may get high or low color depth. According to some, you should not use the VGA port. Instead, you should use either DVI or HDMI port to connect all monitors.

4] Display Color Calibration

Display Color Calibration is a simple yet very useful tool provided by Microsoft with Windows operating system. You can search for DCCW in the search box and follow the wizard to set up your monitors. You need to do the same with every single screen. It will let you check the proper brightness, contrast, etc. based on the monitor.

5] Use the same color profile

By default, all monitors use “System default” color profile. However, if you think that the Color profile is the culprit, you can change the color profile and check whether it fixes the problem or not.

To change the color profile, search for Color Management in the search box. Once it opens, select a monitor, check the box that says Use my settings for this device, click on Add button and choose a color profile. Do the same with other monitors.

Hope these tips help you get the same color on different monitors.

Date: August 9, 2019 Tags: Multiple Monitors

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[email protected]

Anand Khanse is the Admin of TheWindowsClub.com, a 10-year Microsoft MVP (2006-16) & a Windows Insider MVP. Please read the entire post & the comments first, create a System Restore Point before making any changes to your system & be careful about any 3rd-party offers while installing freeware.

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(n.) A display monitor capable of displaying many colors. In contrast, a monochrome monitor can display only two colors — one for the background and one for the foreground. Color monitors implement the RGB color model by using three different phosphors that appear red, green, and blue when activated. By placing the phosphors directly next to each other, and activating them with different intensities, color monitors can create an unlimited number of colors. In practice, however, the real number of colors that any monitor can display is controlled by the video adapter.

Color monitors based on CRT technology employ three different techniques to merge phosphor triplets into pixels:

  • Dot-trio shadow masks place a thin sheet of perforated metal in front of the screen. Since electrons can pass only through the holes in the sheet, each hole represents a single pixel.
  • Aperture-grille CRTs place a grid of wires between the screen and the electron guns.
  • Slot-mask CRTs uses a shadow mask but the holes are long and thin. It’s sort of a cross between the dot-trio shadow mask and aperture-grill techniques.

    Recommended Reading: Webopedia’s The Science of Color.

    Last Updated: August 19, 2020 Tested

    This article was written by Jack Lloyd. Jack Lloyd is a Technology Writer and Editor for wikiHow. He has over two years of experience writing and editing technology-related articles. He is technology enthusiast and an English teacher.

    The wikiHow Tech Team also followed the article’s instructions and verified that they work.

    This article has been viewed 2,095,989 times.

    This wikiHow teaches you how to calibrate a computer monitor to ensure that your color and light settings are correct. Monitor calibration is important when you use your monitor to create or edit visual projects for other people, as poor calibration may result in the project appearing washed-out or off on other people’s monitors.

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    Network Engineer & Desktop Support

    Our Expert Agrees: Not every monitor needs calibration. Typically, a monitor straight out of the box doesn’t need calibrating and works fine on its own. They have a specific pre-set resolution, but you can always tweak it if you want.

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    I edited this screenshot of a Windows icon.\n

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    I edited this screenshot of a Windows icon.\n

    I’ve been trying to figure this out for a decent amount of time and it’s driving me nuts now. I have two identical brand and type of monitors, a Nvidia graphics card (1060) with the most up to date drivers (I already re-installed them). The monitors aren’t aligned color-wise. Creating an icc calibration profile (through colour management in windows 10) and setting it as the default for the monitor I’m trying to adjust is temporary, it reverts very quickly. The system defaults are set to “use windows display calibration” and the monitor with the set profile is also set to “use my settings for this device”

    What’s preventing this “default” from being a default setting? How do I make this calibration permanent?

    Sidenote, using the Nvidia control panel to adjust the desktop colour settings yields the same results when any colour adjustments are made. After applying, the change is temporary, a few seconds. Even when the Nvidia control panel is set to use Nvidia settings over other applications

    Replies (3) 

    The reason for Windows not being able to save the display changes is because it heavily depends on the graphic card (Nvidia) settings. Therefore, if the settings are being changed under the Nvidia control panel and the changes made are not saved, same thing would go with the Windows display settings. There were many reports about the Nvidia control panel settings being not saved after the changes made. Uninstalling the driver cleanly, and reinstalling its latest had helped most of the users.

    Regarding the misalignment of the color settings on both identical monitors, they should also have the identical settings under their respective control panels. Try to go to your monitors main menu, and somewhere there should have the restore-default options. For much clear guidelines, please try to contact your monitor maker’s support experts.

    Please keep us updated.

    Was this reply helpful?

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    How satisfied are you with this reply?

    Thanks for your feedback.

    I just want to confirm what you’re saying, so we’re on the same page:

    -graphics card settings are a priority for display settings

    -I assume you meant to say “if the settings are being changed through the Nvidia control panel and the changes made are not saved”. But aren’t changes through the Nvidia control panel changes to the graphics card settings? This is where you will say yes, and the Nvidia drivers are currently having issues. And the issue would be this? A result of a Windows 10 update that happened a year ago: https://forums.geforce.com/default/topic/1003026/geforce-drivers/psa-windows-1703-creators-update-breaks-colour-profiles-with-nvidia-gpus-icc-and-nvidia-/

    When I re-installed the drivers, I did it cleanly, to wipe past settings etc (there was an option for that kind of install)

    The monitors have the exact same manual settings, so default settings shouldn’t change anything. In fact I don’t expect them to look exactly the same with identical settings

    Is there any way to prioritize icc profiles over Nvidia settings in Windows? If the answer is no, the solutions would be?

    -use a third party program to keep a color calibration active

    -change the manual monitor settings to be imbalanced and hope that’s enough

    Is it possible to calibrate correctly and identically (or nearly) 2 monitors? I’m really getting into more professionnal photography so I recently bought an external monitor, and a Spyder to calibrate it. However after calibrating the 2 devices, I find that the result on each monitor is exactly the same as the sRGB ICC profile. Fine by me, but the 2 monitors still show very different results in terms of color and contrast, which makes it impossible for me to work on my photographs.

    How can I fix this? I’m considering sending back the Spyder 5 to get a refund since it’s apparently not having any effect. Should I by a different one?

    I know I don’t have the best equipment, but I’m on a really tight budget so I hope to be able to make the most of it.

    Thanks for your help everyone

    Asus Vivobook s550ca / External Monitor BenQ GW2255 (recently purchased) / Spyder 5 Express (recently purchased) / Sony A33 and recently purchased Sony A77 mII

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    EDIT: There is already a question concerning a similar problem How do I calibrate two displays to the same color? (LCD, LED backlight and CCFL backlight) but I sincerely am not qualified to say whether the other one answers my problem or not – I’m really not an expert, which is why I’m asking a question in the first place.

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    5 Answers 5

    Is it possible to calibrate correctly and identically (or nearly) 2 monitors?

    Only if they’re identical display types. There are many different types of LCD display, and several non-LCD display types besides. Two different display types may simply be incapable of producing the same color gamut, brightness levels, evenness of illumination, contrast, etc.

    ASUS doesn’t say what kind of LCD your laptop has, but it’s probably TN. Your external display is a VA type LCD, which is contrastier than TN, and more even in terms of lighting, but not as good as IPS. Most touch screen technologies also affect image quality, because they put arrays of microscopic stuff in between the actual LCD and your eyes.

    You might feel that these difficulties make calibration pointless, but it isn’t so. Proper calibration brings your monitor as close to the objective ideal as its technology makes possible. If you edit your photos on a properly-calibrated monitor, they will also look good on other calibrated monitors, even if they don’t look exactly the same as on yours. On uncalibrated monitors, your photos may not look as good as you would like, but that’s unavoidable; this was true before you calibrated your display, too.

    I find that the result on each monitor is exactly the same as the sRGB ICC profile.

    Are you setting the per-monitor ICC profile? Simply building the profile with your calibration tool may not be enough. You might have to install it manually, or manually select it in the OS’s display settings, depending on how the calibration software works.

    which makes it impossible for me to work on my photographs

    Nonsense. Your external display is almost certainly a better display, objectively speaking, so do your actual photo edits on that monitor. Use the laptop display for auxiliary things, such as app palettes, email, a web browser, etc.

    I don’t really “trust” it, seems even after calibration, manual and with the Spyder, it’s still really bright and saturated. My pics look really good straight from the camera, it seems really weird to have such quality from my old camera to be honest. Also it looks like all my old pictures suffer too much contrast due to my former photoshop editing – but they dont look so contrasted on the prints i used for an exhibition a while ago. I’m lost!

    Out of the box, most displays are too bright. Manufacturers do that to make them “pop” under bright fluorescent retail store lighting. Home and office lighting is typically much dimmer, so you need to turn the display brightness down quite a bit.

    Calibration should have taken care of saturation; it should now be correct. If your previously-edited photos look overly saturated on the new, calibrated monitor, it’s because you (or your camera) punched the saturation up to compensate for the poorer capabilities of the old display. You might want to go back and recheck your best photos, to see if their adjustments should be dialed back a bit. It’s happened to me, too.

    As for the rest of your frustration, I offer this bit of wisdom: A man with a watch always knows what time it is. A man with two watches is never sure.

    Hi, I have 2 identical Acer monitors displaying different resolutions and can’t figure out how to resolve.

    Both monitors are attached to a Dell docking station via displayport cables. The docking station is hooked up to a Dell Latitude laptop via mini usb.

    The first monitor is displaying at 2560 x 1440 and the other is at 1920 x 1080. Any help fixing this is appreciated!

    Replies (5) 

    My name is Andre Da Costa; an Independent Consultant, Windows Insider MVP and Windows & Devices for IT MVP. I’m here to help you with your problem.

    Did you check if the display scaling for the second monitor is set to the same as the first monitor? Sometimes this can be a limitation of the type of connection you are using.

    Press Windows key + X
    Click Device Manager
    Expand Display adapters
    Right click the current display adapter

    Click Update driver

    Click Click Search automatically for updated driver

    If it doesn’t find an updated driver and says the best one is already installed, in that same window, click Search for updated drivers on Windows Update

    This should launch Windows Update and scan for newer drivers.

    Still not working?

    First, try restarting your graphics driver:
    Press Windows key + Ctrl + Shift + B

    If that does not work.

    Press Windows key + X
    Click Device Manager
    Expand Display adapters
    Right click the current display adapter
    Click Properties
    Click Driver tab
    Click Rollback driver if the option is available

    If not
    Right click the current display adapter
    Click Uninstall
    Check the box that says, “Delete the driver software for this device.”
    Exit Device Manager
    Restart

    Go to Start -> Settings -> Update & security, then Check for updates and install any available updates.

    You might need to update the display driver from the manufacturer of your computers website.

    If you have an nVidia, AMD ATI video card or Intel HD graphics installed, you can download the latest drivers from their website.

    First, determine what type of graphics you have installed.

    Press Windows key + X
    Click Device Manager
    Expand Display adapters

    Once you have determined the graphics driver, go the vendors website and search for the driver in the download section:

    Intel – Downloads for Graphics Drivers – Drivers & Software – Intel
    https://downloadcenter.intel.com/product/80939/.

    Some of these sites offer autodetect options.

    Information in the above link is sourced from a trusted Microsoft MVP Blog.

    If you have a multiple monitor setup and your monitors are showing different color variations, then this article will show you how to fix that issue. Although there is no such quick fix of this problem, you can try out these suggestions to get the same color scheme on a multiple monitor setup.

    If you have a dual monitor setup and they are showing different color depths, you may get some problems while editing images or videos. Also, you can get issues while watching videos on multiple monitors. To fix that problem, you need to follow these tricks.

    Monitors showing different colors

    1] Make sure that the manufacturers are the same

    If you use monitors from different manufacturers, it is likely that both will show different color variations and the color depth may be different on different monitors.

    2] Use same display settings

    Almost all manufacturers include some basic settings or options to change brightness, contrast, sharpness, etc. You also get options to use different modes such as Standing mode, Gaming mode, etc. You need to make sure that you have the same settings on all the monitors. If you have enabled Game Mode on the 1 st screen and Standing Mode on the 2 nd monitor, you will get a different color on different screens.

    3] Use the same type of ports to connect all monitors

    This is one of the most common issues for this problem. If you use different ports (DVI, VGA, HDMI) to connect different monitors, you may get high or low color depth. According to some, you should not use the VGA port. Instead, you should use either DVI or HDMI port to connect all monitors.

    4] Display Color Calibration

    Display Color Calibration is a simple yet very useful tool provided by Microsoft with Windows operating system. You can search for DCCW in the search box and follow the wizard to set up your monitors. You need to do the same with every single screen. It will let you check the proper brightness, contrast, etc. based on the monitor.

    5] Use the same color profile

    By default, all monitors use “System default” color profile. However, if you think that the Color profile is the culprit, you can change the color profile and check whether it fixes the problem or not.

    To change the color profile, search for Color Management in the search box. Once it opens, select a monitor, check the box that says Use my settings for this device, click on Add button and choose a color profile. Do the same with other monitors.

    Hope these tips help you get the same color on different monitors.

    Date: August 9, 2019 Tags: Multiple Monitors

    Related Posts

    How to move a Fullscreen game window to another monitor

    How to force applications to open on primary monitor in Windows 10

    How to turn off Laptop Screen when using External Monitor

    [email protected]

    Anand Khanse is the Admin of TheWindowsClub.com, a 10-year Microsoft MVP (2006-16) & a Windows Insider MVP. Please read the entire post & the comments first, create a System Restore Point before making any changes to your system & be careful about any 3rd-party offers while installing freeware.

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    If you’re using two or more monitors, there are a few things you can do to optimize your computer setup.

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    Whether you’re working hard or playing hard, multiple monitors give you more space to get things done. Write a document on one screen while referencing web pages on your other screen, or game on one while chatting in Discord on the other. But don’t just plug in a second display and call it a day—these tips will help make that multi-monitor setup work for you.

    Make the Displays Match

    If your monitors are the same make and model, you can probably skip this section—once you plug them both in, Windows should automatically extend your desktop horizontally. Just adjust each monitor’s stand so they line up perfectly, and you’re off to the races.

    If you have two different monitors, however, you may need to do a bit more work to make them play nicely with each other. For example, maybe you’re plugging your laptop into an external display and using them side-by-side, or maybe you have one 4K monitor next to a 1080p monitor. This will produce some weird behaviors, but they’re easy to fix: just right-click the desktop and choose Display Settings.

    Under Select and rearrange displays, click and drag the rectangles around so they match the monitors’ orientation on your desktop; say, if one is slightly lower than the other. That way, when you move your cursor to the left, it’ll appear in the same spot on the left monitor rather than jump up or down on the screen. You may have to do a little trial and error to get them lined up properly.

    Scroll down to the Scale and layout section to adjust the resolution of each monitor and its scaling. So, if one monitor is 4K and the other is 1080p, you can set each monitor to its native resolution but increase the scaling on the higher-resolution one, so your windows appear the same size on each. (If you want to set up a monitor in portrait mode, you can do that here too).

    If you want to go even further, you can use each monitors’ built-in settings to adjust brightness and color to make them match as closely as possible. (An app like ClickMonitorDDC can make this a little easier, if your monitor supports software controls). Once you’re done tweaking all these settings, your monitors should match up much more closely, making it easier and more pleasant to move windows between them.

    Tweak Your Taskbar

    By default, Windows 10 will extend your taskbar onto both monitors, which can be handy—though you can customize it a bit further to your liking. Right-click on the taskbar and choose Taskbar Settings. There are a lot of useful options here, but if you scroll down to the Multiple Displays section, you’ll see what we’re interested in.

    The first switch removes the taskbar from your secondary display. This is how I personally choose to use multiple monitors, since it puts all my shortcuts in one place.

    If you choose to keep it extended across both displays, though, you can decide where you want individual icons to appear: on both monitors, on the main taskbar and the taskbar where that app’s window is open, or on only the app’s active monitor. You can also choose if you want the taskbar buttons to have labels, Windows XP-style.

    Seek Out Super-Wide Wallpapers

    While fancy wallpapers aren’t going to increase your productivity, they are one of the coolest parts of having multiple monitors, so we have to include it here. While most wallpaper sites will have some multi-monitor options, there are a few places that specialize in super wide wallpapers, including Dual Monitor Backgrounds, WallpaperFusion, and subreddits like /r/multiwall.

    Once you have a wallpaper (or collection of wallpapers) you like, right-click the desktop and choose Personalize. Browse to the image or folder in question and choose Span to fill the space across all your displays.

    Study Your Shortcuts

    The beauty of multiple monitors—especially when compared with ultrawide and superwide monitors—is the ability to “dock” windows to the edges of each display, making it easy to view tons of windows at once. And while you can always drag your windows around and resize them with the mouse, that’s arduous and time consuming. That’s why Windows 10 has a few shortcuts that can help, including:

    Win+Left and Win+Right: snap the active window to the left or right side of the current monitor. You can press the keys again to move it between monitors, or snap it back to its original location.

    Win+Up and Win+Down: maximize or minimize the current window. If the window is currently snapped, this will also resize the window from its snapped position.

    Shift+Win+Left and Shift+Win+Right: move the active window to the next monitor, without snapping it to the edge.

    Shift+Win+Up: Maximize the window vertically—particularly useful if you don’t have a taskbar on your secondary display.

    Win+Home: Minimize all windows except the one you’re working on, to banish distractions. You can press it again to bring all the windows back.

    Most of these shortcuts work when you only have one monitor, too, but the more monitors you add, the more useful they become.

    Curse You, Wandering Cursor!

    While triple monitors allow you to span the game across all your displays—using the Nvidia Surround or AMD Eyefininity settings—dual monitors don’t work as well for super-wide gaming, since your crosshair would be right on the monitor bezels. You can, however, game on one monitor while having a walkthrough, chat window, or GPU monitor up on the other, which is quite useful.

    Most games can work this way without hiccups, but you may find that in some cases, your cursor can “drift” onto the other monitor while you’re still in-game. I’ve had this happen with multiple titles, including The Witcher, Doom, and Metro: Last Light.

    Thankfully, one enterprising developer set out to fix this problem with a tool called Cursor Lock, and in my experience, it works beautifully. Start the program, check the Open Program box, and then enter the path to the game’s EXE file. It’ll create a new shortcut for you—when you launch the game from that shortcut, your cursor should stay “locked” to the game window unless you Alt+Tab out of it.

    If that doesn’t work, the game in question may need a few extra options, which you can learn about in Cursor Lock’s video tutorial.

    Do Even More with DisplayFusion

    If, after all that, you’re still left wanting more, a third-party tool called DisplayFusion was designed with multiple monitors in mind. With DisplayFusion running in your system tray, you can gain more control over your wallpapers, create custom keyboard shortcuts, align windows to the edges of any display, or automatically dim the inactive monitor so you don’t get distracted.

    Seriously, this program is chock full of useful options, so download the free version to try it out for yourself. It’s a bit more limited in features than the paid version, but if you like what you see, you can buy a license for $30. I purchased it seven years ago and haven’t regretted it for a second.

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    Although Windows 10 can automatically detect and configure the appropriate display settings, it’s not just about making elements bigger or changing the screen resolution. You also want to make sure your photos, videos, and games look at their best by manually calibrating your monitor, which is something the operating system can’t accurately do automatically.

    Fortunately, Windows 10, similar to previous versions, includes a color calibration utility to make sure your monitor is set to display the most accurate colors and black levels.

    In this Windows 10 guide, we’ll walk you through the steps to calibrate the display on your PC, laptop, or tablet using the built-in Display Color Calibration utility.

    How to calibrate a monitor for accurate colors

    1. Use the Windows key + I keyboard shortcut to open the Settings app.
    2. Click Display.

    Click the Advanced display settings link.

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    Make sure you’re using the Recommended screen resolution for your display, and click the Color calibration link to launch the utility.

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    Click Next to start the process.

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    The wizard will now walk you through the steps to access the on-screen display menu on your monitor to set specific color settings. Click Next to continue.

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    Quick Tip: Before moving to the next step, the utility recommends restoring the default display color settings whenever possible. If you’re using a custom configuration, it’s a good idea to note those settings in case you want to revert the changes.

    Adjust the gamma settings by moving the slider up or down until the small dots are barely visible, and click Next.

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    Find the brightness controls on your monitor and adjust the brightness higher or lower as described in the image below, and click Next to continue.

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    Find the contrast controls on your monitor and set it high enough as described in the image below, and click Next to continue.

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    Adjust the color balance by moving the slider for the red, green, and blue colors until removing any color cast from the gray bars, and click Next.

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    Click the Previous calibration or Current calibration button to compare the new changes. If the new color configuration is reasonable, click Finish to apply the settings or Cancel to discard the new configuration.

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

    Note: You’ll also notice that in this last step, you can start the ClearType Tuner to make sure text are displayed correctly.

    Remember that changes made through the display menu will be kept even if you click Cancel. However, if you’re not happy with the new settings, you can revert the changes manually, or reset your display to the default settings.

    It’s worth pointing out that there are many other paid and free tools available to calibrate your computer’s monitor, but the utility that comes bundled with Windows should be more than enough for most users to ensure images look at their best colors and with accurate black levels.

    What color calibration tool do you use? Tell us in the comments below.

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    For more help articles, coverage, and answers on Windows 10, you can visit the following resources:

    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

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    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

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    Outriders has been one of the most anticipated co-op games of 2021. Did People Can Fly manage to deliver a looter shooter that stands above its contemporaries? Here’s our review.

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    How to match colors on your multiple monitors

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