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How to not have 100 browser tabs open

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

The 100-tab habit is widespread; it’s nothing to be ashamed of. But a cluttered browser can lower productivity and reduce computer speeds. Maybe it’s time to break that habit with a few simple tips.

Close the Tabs You Don’t Need

Your tab problem has very little to do with what browser you’re using or what extensions are installed on your computer. Really, over-tabbing is just a bad habit. It’s like having a cluttered desk.

What’s the best way to break a bad habit? Build new, positive habits. Keep an eye on the number of tabs that you’re opening, and routinely close tabs that you aren’t using. You can use the CTRL + W (CMD + W) keyboard command to quickly close through tabs, without aiming for any little red Xs. You can also right-click a tab to “Close Tabs to the Right” or “Close Other Tabs.”

Manage Tabs Manually

Tabs exist for a reason. Whether you’re working or shopping, you’ve probably got at least five tabs that need to stay open. The thing is, useful tabs can sometimes get lost in a sea of nonsense.

If you need to cycle through a mess of tabs quickly, try holding CTRL and pressing the Tab key. Each time you press the Tab key (while holding down CTRL), you’ll navigate through a vertical-style tab window that shows the name of each tab alongside a webpage preview.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Alternatively, you could keep track of your useful tabs by pinning them to your browser. You can do this by right-clicking a tab and choosing the “Pin tab” option. When you pin a tab, it locks to the left side of your browser and becomes smaller. New tabs won’t intrude on your pinned tabs, and pinned tabs can’t be closed without right-clicking.

Of course, pinning tabs is only useful if you’re focused on one task. If you’re researching Mark Twain while shopping for a new toilet seat, your pinned tabs can become a big mess. Try organizing separate tasks in separate browser windows. You can use the CTRL+N keyboard shortcut to open a new browser window or hold SHIFT while clicking a link to open it in a new window.

Bookmark Tabs for Later

Your tabs bar can be a useful place to save things for later. But if your tab bar is continuously overwhelmed by YouTube and How-To Geek pages, it may be time to organize those pages in your bookmarks.

If you want to add some tab-organization folders to your bookmarks bar, right-click on your bookmarks bar and choose the “Add folder” option. You could make one folder with a simple name, like “To Read” or “To Watch,” or you could get more specific with folders like “Mark Twain Sources” or “Potential Toilet Seats.” Just make sure to clean out those bookmark folders when you’re done using them. Otherwise, you’ve only converted your 100-tab habit into a 100-bookmark habit.

Use Extensions to Manage and Sync Tabs Across Devices

Manually managing and bookmarking tabs can be a hassle, which is why tab and bookmarking extensions exist. And, while some browser extensions can create privacy issues, their usefulness is unquestionable.

How to not have 100 browser tabs openPocket

Some extensions act as a more advanced version of your browser’s bookmarks feature. Pocket, for example, is excellent for storing pages that you want to read later. You can access your Pocket account on any device, and the service can read articles aloud when you don’t feel like using your beady little eyes. Evernote has similar multi-device functionality, but it’s particularly good for organizing webpages and creating notes for projects. And if you’re trying to organize or share webpages for work, nothing beats Trello.

There are also some Chrome browser extensions that help you navigate and manage your tabs. OneTab can automatically sort your tabs into lists and lower your browser’s memory usage, and SideWise Tree Style Tabs can turn your horizontal tab bar into an easy-to-read, vertical tab window. If you want to hide your useless or distracting tabs for a short amount of time (say, an hour), you could try an extension like Tab Snooze.

Consider Switching Browsers

Again, you can’t blame your 100-tab habit on your browser. But some browsers have useful tab management features that can help you build better habits. Surprisingly, Chrome doesn’t have many built-in tab management features. Maybe it’s time to try a different browser?

Whatever you do, try to use a single browser across all devices, including your phone. Modern browsers have syncing options that can automatically carry over your tabs and bookmarks, so you don’t have to lose track of those Youtube videos when you leave the office.

There’s a lot of stigma surrounding the Microsoft Edge browser, but it’s honestly one of our favorite browsers. Microsoft recently rebuilt the Edge browser with a Chromium engine, and it runs like a dream (and yes, it can use Chrome extensions now). Unlike other browsers, Edge has a fantastic “set aside” tab feature that allows you to hide and organize your tabs for later.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Opera is another great-yet-neglected browser that runs on the Chromium engine. It has an unobtrusive bookmarks feature called “Speed Dial,” which allows you to organize and tuck away links for later. Opera’s Speed Dial can be accessed from the homepage or the Opera sidebar, so your extra tabs are out of sight but still easy to get to.

And of course, there’s Firefox. Mozilla’s famous browser pioneered the Tree Style Tab extension, and it has a useful built-in SnoozeTabs feature that allows you to hide tabs and choose when they automatically reappear. It’s also worth mentioning that the Firefox mobile browser has better tabbing features and syncing options than other mobile browsers, which is useful if you’re always on the go.

Need to Have 100 Tabs Open?

A clean desktop isn’t for everyone. For some people, 100 tabs is a sign of productivity, not a sign of poor digital hygiene. In the words of Einstein, “if a cluttered desk is a sign of a cluttered mind, then what are we to think of an empty desk?”

Actually, Einstein never said this, but the famous physicist did sport a pretty filthy desk. The problem is, you aren’t in Einstein’s shoes. While a desk might be able to handle hundreds of pieces of paper, a computer can’t always handle hundreds of tabs.

If you want your computer to run smoothly with 100 tabs open (not recommended), then you should consider upgrading your PC’s RAM or using an automatic tab-suspension extension like The Great Suspender. A RAM upgrade will give your browser more memory to work with, and a tab-suspension extension will limit the RAM usage of the tabs that you aren’t actively using.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

The 100-tab habit is widespread; it’s nothing to be ashamed of. But a cluttered browser can lower productivity and reduce computer speeds. Maybe it’s time to break that habit with a few simple tips.

Close the Tabs You Don’t Need

Your tab problem has very little to do with what browser you’re using or what extensions are installed on your computer. Really, over-tabbing is just a bad habit. It’s like having a cluttered desk.

What’s the best way to break a bad habit? Build new, positive habits. Keep an eye on the number of tabs that you’re opening, and routinely close tabs that you aren’t using. You can use the CTRL + W (CMD + W) keyboard command to quickly close through tabs, without aiming for any little red Xs. You can also right-click a tab to “Close Tabs to the Right” or “Close Other Tabs.”

Manage Tabs Manually

Tabs exist for a reason. Whether you’re working or shopping, you’ve probably got at least five tabs that need to stay open. The thing is, useful tabs can sometimes get lost in a sea of nonsense.

If you need to cycle through a mess of tabs quickly, try holding CTRL and pressing the Tab key. Each time you press the Tab key (while holding down CTRL), you’ll navigate through a vertical-style tab window that shows the name of each tab alongside a webpage preview.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Alternatively, you could keep track of your useful tabs by pinning them to your browser. You can do this by right-clicking a tab and choosing the “Pin tab” option. When you pin a tab, it locks to the left side of your browser and becomes smaller. New tabs won’t intrude on your pinned tabs, and pinned tabs can’t be closed without right-clicking.

Of course, pinning tabs is only useful if you’re focused on one task. If you’re researching Mark Twain while shopping for a new toilet seat, your pinned tabs can become a big mess. Try organizing separate tasks in separate browser windows. You can use the CTRL+N keyboard shortcut to open a new browser window or hold SHIFT while clicking a link to open it in a new window.

Bookmark Tabs for Later

Your tabs bar can be a useful place to save things for later. But if your tab bar is continuously overwhelmed by YouTube and How-To Geek pages, it may be time to organize those pages in your bookmarks.

If you want to add some tab-organization folders to your bookmarks bar, right-click on your bookmarks bar and choose the “Add folder” option. You could make one folder with a simple name, like “To Read” or “To Watch,” or you could get more specific with folders like “Mark Twain Sources” or “Potential Toilet Seats.” Just make sure to clean out those bookmark folders when you’re done using them. Otherwise, you’ve only converted your 100-tab habit into a 100-bookmark habit.

Use Extensions to Manage and Sync Tabs Across Devices

Manually managing and bookmarking tabs can be a hassle, which is why tab and bookmarking extensions exist. And, while some browser extensions can create privacy issues, their usefulness is unquestionable.

How to not have 100 browser tabs openPocket

Some extensions act as a more advanced version of your browser’s bookmarks feature. Pocket, for example, is excellent for storing pages that you want to read later. You can access your Pocket account on any device, and the service can read articles aloud when you don’t feel like using your beady little eyes. Evernote has similar multi-device functionality, but it’s particularly good for organizing webpages and creating notes for projects. And if you’re trying to organize or share webpages for work, nothing beats Trello.

There are also some Chrome browser extensions that help you navigate and manage your tabs. OneTab can automatically sort your tabs into lists and lower your browser’s memory usage, and SideWise Tree Style Tabs can turn your horizontal tab bar into an easy-to-read, vertical tab window. If you want to hide your useless or distracting tabs for a short amount of time (say, an hour), you could try an extension like Tab Snooze.

Consider Switching Browsers

Again, you can’t blame your 100-tab habit on your browser. But some browsers have useful tab management features that can help you build better habits. Surprisingly, Chrome doesn’t have many built-in tab management features. Maybe it’s time to try a different browser?

Whatever you do, try to use a single browser across all devices, including your phone. Modern browsers have syncing options that can automatically carry over your tabs and bookmarks, so you don’t have to lose track of those Youtube videos when you leave the office.

There’s a lot of stigma surrounding the Microsoft Edge browser, but it’s honestly one of our favorite browsers. Microsoft recently rebuilt the Edge browser with a Chromium engine, and it runs like a dream (and yes, it can use Chrome extensions now). Unlike other browsers, Edge has a fantastic “set aside” tab feature that allows you to hide and organize your tabs for later.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Opera is another great-yet-neglected browser that runs on the Chromium engine. It has an unobtrusive bookmarks feature called “Speed Dial,” which allows you to organize and tuck away links for later. Opera’s Speed Dial can be accessed from the homepage or the Opera sidebar, so your extra tabs are out of sight but still easy to get to.

And of course, there’s Firefox. Mozilla’s famous browser pioneered the Tree Style Tab extension, and it has a useful built-in SnoozeTabs feature that allows you to hide tabs and choose when they automatically reappear. It’s also worth mentioning that the Firefox mobile browser has better tabbing features and syncing options than other mobile browsers, which is useful if you’re always on the go.

Need to Have 100 Tabs Open?

A clean desktop isn’t for everyone. For some people, 100 tabs is a sign of productivity, not a sign of poor digital hygiene. In the words of Einstein, “if a cluttered desk is a sign of a cluttered mind, then what are we to think of an empty desk?”

Actually, Einstein never said this, but the famous physicist did sport a pretty filthy desk. The problem is, you aren’t in Einstein’s shoes. While a desk might be able to handle hundreds of pieces of paper, a computer can’t always handle hundreds of tabs.

If you want your computer to run smoothly with 100 tabs open (not recommended), then you should consider upgrading your PC’s RAM or using an automatic tab-suspension extension like The Great Suspender. A RAM upgrade will give your browser more memory to work with, and a tab-suspension extension will limit the RAM usage of the tabs that you aren’t actively using.

When I am in a web page and click on a link, I stay on the tab I was originally in, but a separate new tab opens up with the link.

This never used to happen – you used to click on a link and you went straight to that page. In IE Explorer, it was possible to decide whether links opened in the same or a new page.

I end up with 20-30 tabs all open, and they are so small, I can’t tell which is which – it is a real nuisance. Help please?

Thank you for posting on Microsoft Community. I understand the inconvenience you are facing. I will certainly help you with this.

Kindly try the below troubleshooting methods and check if it helps.

As a basic one, I want you to check if Ctrl key on your keyboard is got stuck. Because, if we click on any link by keep on pressing Ctrl key it will open in a new tab.

If this doesn’t help, try the below.

Method 1:

I suggest you to reset the browser and check.

a. Navigate to the location:

b. Delete everything in this folder.

c. Type Windows Powershell in search box.

d. Right click on Windows Powershell and select Run as administrator.

e. Copy and paste the following command.

Get-AppXPackage -AllUsers -Name Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge | Foreach

Method 2:

You may check if this issue occurs in a new user account.

1. Go to Settings.

2. Choose Accounts and then select Family and other users.

3. Select add someone else on this PC.

4. Enter a user name and hit next.

5. Click on Finish.

6. Sign out from the current Account and Log into the new account.

Kindly let us know if you need any further assistance with Windows. We are glad to assist you.

Through all of human history, a mess of tabs has been a sign of poor productivity. But that 100-tab habit could be the secret to your productivity, so long as you have the right extensions and hardware.

The Case for 100 Tabs

When it comes to productivity, everyone has different needs. Some people like to write to-do lists, some people like to stand while they work, and others like to keep 100 tabs (or more!) open at a time. If you’re the kind of person that loves a mess of tabs, then congratulations, society despises you for the one thing that makes you unique.

At some point in the last 20 years, civilized society decided that a mess of browser tabs is like a stack of dirty dishes or a hoarder’s front porch. Today, tab-junkies are treated like savages, as if they were never disciplined as children for opening too many tabs.

But, in reality, a mess of tabs can be a sign of productivity. There are situations where you need to have 100 tabs open, especially if you’re researching a dense subject or juggling a handful of projects.

Sadly, society’s misconceptions have made it difficult for tab-junkies to optimize their special form of productivity. Google (among other browsers) refuses to improve its tabbing system, so if you want your tabs to feel more like an organized bookshelf and less like Einstein’s messy desk, then you have to hunt down extensions and learn annoying tab-cleaning habits.

Not to mention, modern browsers require a ton of system resources, and webpages can demand more than 2 GB of RAM. Even the most productive tab-junkies will run into lag, stuttering, and crashes while running 100 tabs on an underpowered PC.

So, if you’re a tab lover, then it’s time to take things into your own hands. You can easily optimize your 100-tab productivity by using browser extensions, and you can make the most of your PC (even if it’s a crappy PC) by upgrading a few pieces of hardware.

Or, if those tabs get in your way and slow down your computer, there are some good ways to close tabs and save them for later.

It’s Time to Wrangle Those Tabs

Whether you’re blessed with a 100-tab-capable computer or you’ve just ordered some new PC parts, you’re going to run into a fundamental 100-tab problem. The horizontal tab list on the top of your browser just isn’t made to handle a ton of tabbage.

Sure, you can right-click a tab to pin it to your browser, dump your tabs into bookmarks, or open multiple browser windows to organize disparate clusters of tabs. But these primitive forms of tab organization are far from convenient or effective. If you want to wrangle 100 different tabs in one window, then you’re going to need some browser extensions.

How to not have 100 browser tabs openTabs Outliner Extension

Vertical style tab extensions are essential for tab-junkies. Tabs are easier to read and organize while they’re vertical, and most vertical tab extensions have built-in grouping or “tree” features. Firefox popularized vertical tabs with its Tree Styled Tabs extension, but users of Chrome, Opera, and the Chromium-based Edge browser can use the Tabs Outliner extension.

If you want an extension that automatically organizes tabs into groups, then you should check out OneTab. It’s available for both Chromium browsers like Chrome and Firefox, and it turns a mess of tabs into an organized tree-style list with a single click.

Without good hardware, these extensions are basically worthless. Browsers are extremely resource-heavy, and a ton of tabs can turn a weak computer into a stuttering mess. Thankfully, it’s easy to pinpoint hardware problems on a computer, and some extensions can reduce your need to perform expensive (or impossible) hardware upgrades.

If You Want 100 Tabs, You Need Good Hardware First

Generally speaking, your browser’s ability to handle tabs depends on your PC’s CPU and RAM. Those words can strike fear into the heart of any computer user, but they’re actually two of the most approachable ideas in computing.

A CPU (central processing unit) is basically the brain of a computer. It’s continually crunching numbers and doling out commands to the other components in your PC. If a rogue surgeon decided to replace your brain with an old, bargain-bin brain, then your motor skills and multi-tasking abilities would take a hit. The same goes for your PC; a crappy CPU slows everything down.

Similarly, a PC’s RAM (random access memory) is like a brain’s short-term memory. It keeps track of what you’re doing in a given moment and makes sure that multi-tasking (running multiple tabs) goes without a hitch. RAM is measured in terms of bytes, and as it turns out, more bytes allow for more multitasking.

If you’re a tab junky with a clunky computer, then it may be time to upgrade your CPU or invest in some additional RAM. On most desktop PCs (and some laptops), upgrading your RAM or CPU is quick and easy, especially if you’ve done it in the past. And while computer parts can be a little expensive, a simple hardware upgrade is always cheaper than buying a new PC.

Fixing Your Hardware Problems is Easy

Figuring out your PCs shortcomings is relatively easy. First, you’ll want to check your PC’s specs. Take note of your “Processor” (your CPU) and your “Installed RAM.” Then, you’ll want to check your CPU and RAM usage in the Windows Task Manager. You can do this by right clicking the Task Bar and clicking the “Task Manager” option. You could also bypass this (easy) process by running an automated benchmark test.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

When a PC is running a comfortable number of applications (not 100 tabs), a CPU usage of 10% or less and RAM usage of 50% or less is considered ideal. If one of these percentages is unusually high, then you’ve found your culprit.

Again, upgrading your RAM and your CPU can be a breeze on desktop PCs, but it isn’t always possible on small desktops and modern laptops. If you’re trying to maximize your tab-ability on an underpowered machine, then you should reduce your background app usage and stick with a RAM-friendly option, like Firefox Quantum.

If switching your browser doesn’t work, then you can use an extension like Tab Suspender (for Firefox) or The Great Suspender (for Chromium browsers) to “freeze” unused tabs, and reduce your browser’s memory usage. Anti-tracker and ad-blocking extensions like Privacy Badger or Ghostery also help, as they reduce the amount of web content that your browser has to handle.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Are you a digital packrat? Specifically, are you the type of person that has 50 browser tabs open all the time? The top bar of your browser is so squished that you have memorized the Favicon on every site for which you’re a frequent flyer. Those little icons are basically the only way you can discern anything as you drown in a browser tab sea of your own making.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Here’s some tough love: This process is harmful to not only your computer, but also your brain. It’s time to get it together.

The Trouble With Tabs

When you are jumping from tab to tab your brain is releasing dopamine receptors that are giving you the illusion that you are being more productive. Your brain, however, is not actually processing all of these stimuli. Rather, it’s frantically jumping from focus point to focus point, called spotlights , desperately trying to dial in on one item at a time in rapid succession .

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

One study from the University of Sussex used fMRI scans to study the brains of people who engaged in differing degrees of multitasking. What they found was that the more a person multitasks, the less gray matter they possess in their anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the part of the brain associated with cognitive and emotional processing.

In other words, multitasking is literally altering your brain chemistry.

Having multiple tabs open isn’t making you more productive, it’s actually just making you scatterbrained, thus decreasing your ability to remember any single piece of information. Not to mention, it’s killing your RAM .

Don’t do this to yourself (or your computer). Here is a breakdown of the different types of tab hoarders, and what to do about each one:

Type 1: Going Browser Bankrupt

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

The Behavior: Letting the tabs pile up until the browser dies on its own, forcing you to declare browser tab bankruptcy and start all over.

While forcefully shuttering all tabs may produce a fleeting moment of zen, it can also be disastrous if you want to recover those lost tabs later. Plus, if your computer is so overloaded it needs to force quit an application to make room, then there’s a problem!

The Solution: Onetab Chrome Extension

Onetab converts all open tabs into one single page of bookmarks. This can reduce memory usage from GBs to mere MBs of space, and it allows for easy perusing when you’re ready to scroll through them and tab triage.

Type 2: The Compulsive Compartmentalizer

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

The Behavior: Creating new windows for each “genre” of tabs: work, personal, to read, etc., then letting the tabs accumulate in each window into oblivion.

Most of these tabs will get lost in a Favicon pile up, and you’ll forget where or how or why you got to them in the first place. Curating various subjects into different windows simply allows you to pile them on systematically. But you’re still just piling them on all the same.

The Solution: Flipboard

Flipboard is an app that mimics this behavior exactly: it presents curated content in categories of your choosing, from “Content Management,” to “Human Rights,” there is a category for any subject or interest. When you’re ready to explore content, it’s all nicely sorted into specific topics on one page. That eliminates at least two overloaded browser windows right there.

Type 3: The Social Media Sourcer

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

The Behavior: Clicking every link you see on all your various social media feeds. In the age of clickbait, this behavior is only getting more tempting as listicles taunt you with sub headers like, “You won’t believe #3!”

The truth is, you’re missing more content than you’re “saving” by clicking every link. That, and “Reason #3” probably wasn’t as astounding as the headline claimed.

The Solution: Nuzzel

Nuzzel is a nifty little tool that aggregates the links being posted by people in your social media networks into a feed for your perusal. The content is inherently curated by the people you already follow, so it has essentially been pre-vetted for clickbait. Plus, the interface provides you with the headline and brief snippet of the article, in addition to what your friends and influencers have already said about it.

Pro tip from time management expert Kevan Lee of Buffer: create a new Twitter account and only follow people who post on a specific subject, then link that account to Nuzzel. Instantly you have a relevant feed to one particular interest or work endeavor. Genius.

The bottom line is neither you, your brain, or your computer need all of those tabs open. They’re not doing you any good, and, admit it, you’re not reading all of them anyway. Technology has created this problem, but technology can also solve it. Now get out there, and get mono-tabbing. Your productivity will thank you later.

Good or bad, we’d love to hear your thoughts. Find us on Twitter ( @trello )!

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

As a PC enthusiast, you know the joke that Google Chrome sucks up your entire RAM when you open 5 to 10 tabs. The mess opening tabs create for your PC is something all of us hate. No matter how much RAM you have, opening up many tabs will still be a problem you will have. Let’s just agree to disagree, you can’t open 100 tabs on the PC you currently have.

So What Happens When You Open 100 Tabs At The Same Time?

The amount of tabs you open depends on what you’re working on. If you’re a researcher, it is normal for you to open 20 to 30 tabs at the same time, and if you’re a designer or a developer, it is extremely normal for you to open to up to 50 tabs. There are only a few people on our planet that need to open 100 tabs on Google Chrome or another web browser, but if you’re one of those few people, here is what would happen if you actually open 100 tabs.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Google Chrome, which is one of the most used browsers on our planet, refuses to improve their tabbing system. This means the more tabs you open on Google Chrome, the more RAM it would consume. This will lead your PC to lag and even crash in the worst cases. In 2019, most of the browsers that we use require over 2 Gigabytes of RAM at one go. The more tabs you add and the more add-ons you have on your browser, the heavier it will get.

So when you actually open up more tabs, your CPU usage will go high and your PC temps will too. You will also see a performance drop in some cases. Some of the performance drops that you will see are going to include slower app open times, time to time lags, and app crashes.

How To Open 100 Tabs At The Same Time

We got it, you want to be that person who managed to open 100 tabs at the same time and didn’t have a problem with it. First of all, you can’t open 100 tabs at the same time, a normal browser can’t open it, as they are not built to handle that type of pressure. So the first thing you would like to do is download a browser extension.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Also, you will need to download a vertical style tab extension so you can open 100 tabs at the same time. A vertical style tab extension will allow you to open 100 tabs at the same time, a normal browser will not open 100 tabs at the same time because it is not capable for it and it was never made to do that. You will also need at least 16 gigabytes of DDR4 RAM clocked at over 3000 MHZ along with a 6 core or more processor. To boost the performance of your PC, you will also need a SSD or an NVMe M.2 SSD and a HDD with high RPM. Overclocking your PC will also help.

How To Upgrade Your PC So You Can Open 100 Tabs

Knowing your PC parts is important. You should know your RAM, Processor, SSD, HDD, Video Card, Power Supply, and its cooling system. Your processor has cores and threads, the more they are, the better your PC will perform. Your RAM is responsible in running the apps that you open on your PC, so having a RAM with high clock speeds would help a lot. SSD’s are used for applications so they can have better loading speeds. You will need a higher power supply because your PC needs to have a steady electricity flow, and believe it or not, with overclocking and higher usage, your PC can take to up to 1000 watts.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

When your PC is on idle, which means you’re not using it, your CPU usage is at 2 to 10 percent and your RAM is at 10 to 20 percent (depends on the apps you have running in the background). So upgrading your RAM and CPU is the first thing you should do. 16 gigabytes of RAM that are clocked at 3000 Mhz or more would do and a processor with 6 cores and 6 threads or more would do the job too.

With all that power, you will also need a proper cooling system. We recommend you to install at least 3 intake fans and 1 fan for an outtake. If you’re planning to overclock your CPU, we recommend you to buy a liquid cooler with 120 mm fans or bigger.

Home » Technologies » Desktop » What Happens When You Open 100 Tabs Open At The Same Time?

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

If you’re anything like me, you likely have dozens of tabs open at this very moment. Whether it’s news stories you mean to read later, podcast episodes you want to listen to when you have a chance, or just various email and social media accounts, your browser is probably cluttered with numerous, often unnecessary tabs—and your computer is working slower as a result. So, why do we leave so many tabs open? Metro recently provided some answers to this question, which we spotted via Travel + Leisure.

The key phrase to know, according to the Metro’s Ellen Scott, is “task switching,” which is what our brains are really doing when we think we’re multitasking. Research has found that humans can’t really efficiently multitask at all—instead, our brains hop rapidly from one task to another, losing concentration every time we shift our attention. Opening a million tabs, it turns out, is often just a digital form of task switching.

It isn’t just about feeling like we’re getting things done. Keeping various tabs open also works as a protection against boredom, according to Metro. Having dozens of tabs open allows us to pretend we’re always doing something, or at least that we always have something available to do.

It may also be driven by a fear of missing information—a kind of “Internet FOMO,” as Travel + Leisure explains it. We fear that we might miss an important update if we close out of our social media feed or email account or that news article, so we just never close anything.

But this can lead to information overload. Even when you think you’re only focused on whatever you’re doing in a single window, seeing all those open tabs in the corner of your eye takes up mental energy, distracting you from the task at hand. Based on studies of multitasking, this tendency to keep an overwhelming number of tabs open may actually be altering your brain. Some studies have found that “heavy media multitaskers”—like tab power users—may perform worse on various cognitive tests than people who don’t try to consume media at such a frenzied pace.

More simply, it just might not be worth the bandwidth. Just like your brain, your browser and your computer can only handle so much information at a time. To optimize your browser’s performance, Lifehacker suggests keeping only nine tabs open—at most—at one time. With nine or fewer tabs, you’re able to see everything that’s open at a glance, and you can use keyboard shortcuts to navigate between them. (On a Mac, you can press Command + No. 1 through No. 9 to switch between tabs; on a PC, it’s Control + the number.)

That said, there are, obviously, situations in which one might need many tabs open at one time. Daria Kuss, a senior lecturer specializing in cyberpsychology at Nottingham Trent University, tells Metro that “there are two opposing reasons we keep loads of tabs open: to be efficient and ‘create a multi-source and multi-topic context for the task at hand.’” Right now, for example, I have six tabs open to refer to for the purposes of writing this story. Sometimes, there’s just no avoiding tabs.

In the end, it’s all about accepting our (and our computers’) limitations. When in doubt, there’s no shame in shutting down those windows. If you really want to get back to them, they’re all saved in your browser history. If you’re a relentless tab-opener, there are also browser extensions like OneTab, which collapses all of your open tabs into a single window of links for you to return to later.

By Amanda | Follow | Last Updated March 30, 2020

Summary :

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Sometimes, the Microsoft Edge opens multiple windows automatically, which is really an annoying problem for users. This post displays several solutions from MiniTool to help you troubleshoot this issue.

Quick Navigation :

  • Fix 1: Clear Browsing Cache
  • Fix 2: Scan Your Computer for Malware
  • Fix 3: Reset Your Browser
  • Fix 4: Clean Boot Your Computer
  • User Comments

Some users have reported an issue with Microsoft Edge that it keeps opening multiple windows or tabs as soon as the computer starts up. Faced with this annoying issue, users have to close all the extra windows as the browser will consume lots of system resources under this situation. However, when they start Microsoft Edge again, the same issue might come up again.

Actually, this issue is also reported by users of Google Chrome, Firefox and other browsers, and it might be caused by various reasons including corrupted browsing data, virus attacks, and etc.

If you are experiencing browser opening multiple windows issue, just keep reading this post to get some feasible methods to fix it.

Fix 1: Clear Browsing Cache

At first, you can go to clear your browsing cache, as most of browser issues are mainly caused by corrupted browsing data. Here’s how to do that in Microsoft Edge.

Step 1: After opening Microsoft Edge, click the 3-dot icon and click Settings in the drop-down menu.

Step 2: Click Choose what to clear in Clear browsing data section.

Step 3: Check all the listed item and click Clear button.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

After your browser finishes clearing data, restart it and check if this issue has been fixed. If Microsoft Edge opens multiple tabs on startup still, move on to the next method.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

What is a cache? How to clear cache on your PC? In this post, I will introduce cache for you and provide some methods to help you clear system cache Windows 10.

Fix 2: Scan Your Computer for Malware

Microsoft Edge opens multiple windows might because of virus, malware or adware. So, it is always a good choice to perform a full scan for your computer to get rid of this kind of threaten.

To do that, you can either use the built-in antivirus tool Windows Defender or adopt a professional third-party program, such as Malwarebytes and CCleaner.

Fix 3: Reset Your Browser

You can also choose to reset your browser to fix Microsoft Edge opening multiple windows issue. This operation will restore all the settings of your browser to their default and here is a simple guide.

Step 1: Press Windows + R to open Run window. Type %localappdata% and click OK.

Step 2: Then, go to Packages > Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge_8wekyb3d8bbwe folder.

Step 3: Delete all the items in this folder.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Step 4: Right-click Start button and choose Windows PowerShell (Admin).

Step 5: Input the command line Get-AppXPackage -AllUsers -Name Microsoft.MicrosoftEdge | Foreach and press Enter to execute it.

By doing this, the core data of Microsoft Edge will be re-registered. Once it’s done, exit PowerShell and restart your computer. The Microsoft Edge opening multiple windows issue should has been removed.

Fix 4: Clean Boot Your Computer

If your Microsoft Edge opens multiple tabs on startup, perhaps certain third-party software or service is interfering with it. In this case, you can clean boot your computer to find out the problematic program or service.

Step 1: Type msconfig in Run window and click OK to open System Configuration.

Step 2: Switch to Services tab, check Hide all Microsoft services and click Disable all button.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Step 3: Go to Startup tab and click Open Task Manager. Then, disable all the listed programs and go back to System Configuration window to save the changes.

After that, restart your computer. If the issue disappears, you can go to enable the involved programs one by one to find the problematic one and keep it disabled or remove it.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Microsoft Edge not working in your Windows 10? Don’t worry. This article gives several effective methods to help you fix this problem.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Position: Columnist

Amanda has been working as English editor for the MiniTool team since she was graduated from university. She enjoys sharing effective solutions and her own experience to help readers fix various issues with computers, dedicated to make their tech life easier and more enjoyable.

She has published many articles, covering fields of data recovery, partition management, disk backup, and etc. In order to provide more useful tips and information, she is still committed to expand her technical knowledge.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

When your browsing the web you probably have tons of tabs open at the same time. Over time and having so many tabs open at once, things can start to get confusing. It starts to be harder to keep track of what’s what. Having what seems like hundreds of tabs open can make it difficult to stay organized.

Microsoft Edge has a feature that alleviates the craziness with Tab Groups. It allows you to create groups of open tabs to help you better organize the pages. At the time of this writing, the feature is not enabled by default so you need to access the experimental settings to turn it on.

Here’s a look at how to turn the Tab Groups feature on so you can better organize all of your open tabs.

Tab Groups for Microsoft Edge

To get started you might need to enable one of the experimental settings in Edge. To do that launch Microsoft Edge and type the following path into the address bar:

Then under the Tab Groups section select Enabled from the dropdown menu.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

For the change to go into effect you will need to restart Edge. Click the Restart button.

To use the new Tab Groups feature launch Microsoft Edge and launch a few tabs. Right-click a tab and click Add to new group from the menu.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Give the group a name and you can color code the group as well. If you want to add an open tab to an existing group right-click the tab and choose the group to add it to.

How to not have 100 browser tabs open

Getting Microsoft Edge

If you don’t have it yet, read our article on how to install the new Edge. If you are familiar with Google Chrome, you should have no problem diving in. Check out our other articles on the browser like how to add Chrome extensions or how to block crapware with Edge.

The new Microsoft Edge is built on top of Chromium. It is truly cross-platform and available for Windows 7, 8, 10, macOS, Android, and iOS with a Linux version in the works.