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How to open an eps image file on windows

Free EPS File Reader Software to Open EPS Graphics File

  • Open and View EPS File
  • Easily Zoom In & Zoom Out of Images
  • Browse EPS File of Any Size
  • Explore EPS File from Any EPS Format
  • Supports All Windows OS Up to Version 10

FreeViewer EPS Viewer Tool

3-Step Approach to Open EPS File

Step 1. EPS File Reader

Free Download EPS File Viewer Software

Step 2. Open EPS File

Next, Browse and Open EPS File into Software

Step 3. Preview EPS File

View EPS File with Multiple Options: Zoom In/Out & Rotate.

Key Features of Free EPS Viewer

EPS File Reader Software’s Features to Open EPS File

Explore & Read EPS File

FreeViewer EPS Viewer Software is used to read EPS graphics file, display image, view image and provides an option to convert EPS images in other image formats such as .jpg, .gif, .png, etc. This tool provides some basic features such as zoom in & zoom out, rotate image, pan image, resize image, crop image. Free EPS File Reader Tool lets you open EPS file in full screen, and presentation modes and also open corrupted & damaged EPS files without any file size limitation.

High-Quality Photo Manipulation

EPS Reader offers the tools needed for high-quality image manipulation, from retouching to restoring to creative composites, the only limit is your imagination. This tool has some advanced features such as colour balance, hue, saturation, colourize, brightness, contrast, threshold, levels, curves, etc and some EPS file filters like blur, enhance, distort, noise combine, map, etc. EPS file viewer provides image operation tool as box blur, checker board, color, drop-shadow, gaussian blur, motion blur, noise, wave, etc.

Stable & Fast Interface

EPS Viewer is a secure application and does not contain any form of malware and offer very simple and easy to use graphical interface. This provides stable & faster work of the software for end users. EPS file reader contains simple & lightweight user interface a user don’t need any technical knowledge or skills to open EPS file, zoom in/out, resize and save into another image format.

EPS Viewer Supports by Windows

FreeViewer EPS File Viewer Software is a cross platform application which supports by any Windows Operating System such as Windows Server 2003, Windows Server 2008, Windows XP, Vista, 7, 8, 8.1, 10 OS. Free EPS File Reader is a user-friendly Software suited for everyone who wishes a fast visualization of EPS images. Easily view and read EPS graphics file on any Windows OS and save EPS file.

Matt Klein has nearly two decades of technical writing experience. He’s covered Windows, Android, macOS, Microsoft Office, and everything in between. He’s even written a book, The How-To Geek Guide to Windows 8. Read more.

An EPS (Encapsulated PostScript) file is special type of image file containing a PostScript program. If you’ve stumbled upon one of these files, you’ve probably noticed quickly that few programs can open it properly. So how can you view it?

On Windows, you will find dozens of programs that do the trick, but here are the two we recommend.

Keep It Simple with EPS Viewer

The simplest way to view EPS files is to use EPS Viewer, which is a simple single-function application intended to view EPS files only.

After you have installed the application, you need to open your EPS file (if it is not associated with EPS Viewer). EPS Viewer doesn’t come with any preferences, so if your EPS files doesn’t automatically open with it, the right-click on the file and choose “Open with > Choose another app”.

Under “Other options” select EPS Viewer and then check the box next to “Always use this app to open .eps files”.

EPS Viewer has few options beyond just being a simple way to view EPS files. Aside from the ability to open and save your file, you can also resize it, zoom in or out, and rotate it left or right.

When you want to save a file, you can convert it to another more usable format including JPEG, Bitmap, PNG, GIF, and TIFF.

If you’re just looking for something simple that will get the job done, then EPS Viewer will fit the bill.

Do More with Ifranview

If you want something a little more practical that also opens other types of image files, then you might want to try Irfanview. It’s a good program to have around anyway: it’s been around for a long time, and can open the vast majority of image files.

Most of these image files will open in Irfanview as soon as you install it, but with EPS files, you need to take some extra steps.

When you install Irfanview, it will let you automatically associate any or all images with it, but note anything with an * next to it needs the plugins package.

First, you need to install Ifranview’s plugins. This is a simple EXE files you can download from the Irfanview site.

The second item you will need is Ghostscript, an open source PostScript interpreter. Ghostscript also installs with an EXE file, which takes just a few seconds and requires no further configuration. From the Ghostscript downloads page, you want to choose “Postscript and PDF interpreter/renderer”, and then install the package appropriate to your version of Windows (32 bit or 64 bit).

Once you have the Irfanview main application, its plugins, and Ghostscript installed, you’re ready to view EPS files.

Irfanview has the same basic features as EPS Viewer: you can open, save, rotate, and zoom.

It also does a whole lot more, though. Looking at the Edit menu, you see we can insert text, crop the image, and even mark the image up with paint tools.

Open the Image menu and options abound. You can adjust the color depth, sharpen, flip it vertically or horizontally, and much more.

If you go through it menu by menu, you see that Irfanview is packed with many features that go beyond the simple ability to view EPS files (though it does that quite well too).

When it comes to EPS files then, the hard part isn’t necessarily finding an application to open them. There are many out there. Rather, it’s what you want the application to do for you. If you simply need something that opens EPS files, with basic features including the ability to export to other image formats, then EPS Viewer is probably your best bet. However, if you want something that is more a jack-of-all-trades image viewer, something that will open a variety of image file types and also give you some more advanced editing features, then Irfanview is a great choice.

View and edit all your vector files

If you’ve come across an EPS file and can’t open it, you’re going to need to install compatible image viewing or editing software. Luckily, there are plenty of programs that you can choose from.

In this article, we’ll cover what an EPS file is, what it’s used for, and how you can open, edit, and convert EPS files.

What Is an EPS File?

EPS stands for Encapsulated PostScript. EPS files are most commonly used by graphical design applications (such as Adobe Illustrator) to save 2D graphics and vector images. Typically, these images will be drawings, designs, or layouts. The EPS file type also includes an embedded preview image in a bitmap format.

EPS files may also appear with the extensions .EPSF and .EPSI.

How to Open an EPS Image File

EPS image files can be opened using vector-based image editors. If you attempt to open an EPS file with a non-vector-based application, it will likely rasterize the image and remove the vector information from the file. Luckily, there are several programs you can use to open, edit, or convert EPS files without damaging the file.

EPS Viewer

EPS Viewer is a simple and free program that you can use to view, rotate, pan, and resize your EPS files. You can also use EPS Viewer to convert the EPS file into another image format including JPEG or PNG.

  1. Download EPS Viewer from their official page.
  1. Navigate to your downloads folder and double-click epsviewersetup.exe to install the program.
  2. Finish the installation wizard, then open EPS Viewer.
  1. Select OpenFile, then select Encapsulated PostScript in the Files of Type dropdown menu.
  1. Select the image file and select Open.

Google Drive

Among its many other functions, Google Drive can also open an EPS file. Google Drive allows you to do so for free and within your browser (without an installation). All you need is a Google account.

  1. Head to Google Drive and sign in.
  2. Upload the EPS file to your Drive.
  1. Double-click the EPS file to open and view it.

IrfanView

If you need to do more than just view and perform simple translations/rotations, IrfanView is one of the best free options. The set-up is a little more involved, but it’s worth it since IrfanView is able to open a wide range of image files and perform various image editing functions.

Head to the IrfanView download page and download either the 32-bit or 64-bit version depending on your OS. Then, install IrfanView from your downloads folder.

To open and edit EPS files with IrfanView, you are going to need the plugins pack as well as a piece of software called Ghostscript. To install the IrfanView plugins, head to the download page and download either the 32-bit or 64-bit version. Double-click the .exe file and complete the wizard to install the plugins.

To check if these have been installed correctly, open IrfanView, select Help > Installed Plugins and check for “Postscript.dll”.

Next, head to the Ghostscript download page. Select either the 32-bit or 64-bit version of the Ghostscript AGPL Release to download it. Navigate to your downloads folder and double-click the .exe to install it.

Now, you’ll be able to open EPS files in IrfanView. Simply select File > Open and choose the .EPS file you wish to edit.

Make sure that in the file type dropdown menu, PostScript Files is selected.

Adobe Illustrator or Photoshop

If you’re looking to edit your EPS files as well, you’re going to need a more advanced program such as Adobe Illustrator or Adobe Photoshop. Both of these programs will open, edit, and convert EPS files.

Unfortunately, these two programs require monthly or yearly subscriptions to use. To access these programs, head to the Adobe website, create an account (if you don’t have one), and select the subscription plan that you want. Once you’ve installed either Illustrator or Photoshop, you are able to view and edit EPS files as follows:

  1. Open Illustrator or Photoshop.
  2. Select File >Open.
  1. Navigate to and select the .EPS file.
  2. Select Open.
  3. The EPS file will now open in the editor.

How to Convert an EPS File

The easiest way to convert an EPS file is to use EPS Converter. Simply upload your EPS file where it says Upload a file and select your target format, resolution, and background transparency. Finally, select Start. Wait for the file to be converted then download the result using the link provided.

EPS files can also be easily converted using either EPS Viewer or Adobe Illustrator/Photoshop if you have downloaded and installed those programs.

To convert via Illustrator or Photoshop, open the EPS file then select File > Export. In the file type dropdown menu, select the type of file you wish to convert it to.

To convert an EPS file via EPS Viewer, select the Save icon. In the dropdown menu, select the file type you wish to convert to.

Time to Edit!

Luckily, there are plenty of applications to choose from if you need to view, edit, or convert EPS files. Your best free options include EPS Viewer (if you just need to view or perform basic edits) and IrfanView (if you need to do higher-level edits). But, paid programs like Adobe Illustrator or Photoshop may be your best choice if you are going to be doing lots of work with EPS files.

Which solution for opening EPS image files do you use? Let us know in the comments below.

Jake Harfield is an Australian freelance writer whose passion is finding out how different technologies work. He has written for several online publications, focusing on explaining what he has learned to help others with their tech problems. He’s an avid hiker and birder, and in his spare time you’ll find him in the Aussie bush listening to the birdsong. Read Jake’s Full Bio

Two best methods to open EPS images in Windows!

Way back in 1992, Adobe created a standard graphics file format known as EPS. The EPS file extension contains both text and graphics to describe how the vector image is drawn. EPS or Encapsulated PostScript file extension is considered a good choice of format for vector graphic illustrations.

If you have stumbled upon one of these files, let me tell you that you can’t view the file with a native Windows 10 photo viewer. To open or edit EPS files, you would need a vector-based image editing tool. Few photo viewer like IrfanView, GIMP, etc. can open the EPS file, but you can’t edit it.

Steps to Open an EPS Image File On Windows

So, in this article, we are going to share some of the fast and effective tools to open & view the EPS file in Windows 10. Let’s check out.

1. Using EPS Viewer

Well, EPS Viewer is a free tool to open the EPS Graphic file in Windows 10. With EPS Viewer, you can display EPS Image preview easily. Not only that, but you can also use EPS Viewer to convert EPS files into other file formats such as JPG, PNG, etc. Here’s how to use EPS Viewer.

Step 1. First of all, download & install EPS Viewer on your system.

Step 2. Now right click on the EPS file that you want to view and select ‘Open With’

Step 3. From the Open with option, select ‘EPS Viewer’

Step 4. This will open the EPS file.

Step 5. If you want to convert the EPS file into another format, simply click on the ‘Save’ button and select ‘JPG’ or ‘PNG’ on the Save as type.

That’s it! You are done. This is how you can use EPS Viewer on Windows 10 to open EPS File.

2. Using Irfanview

Well, Irfanview is one of the best photo viewer app available for Windows 10. The software has been around for a long time, and it’s one of the best in its section. Here’s how to use Irfanview to open and view EPS files in Windows.

Step 1. First of all, download Irfanview on your system. During the installation, make sure to select the ‘EPS’ file type.

Step 2. Now download & install the Irfanview’s plugins.

Step 3. Now you need to download & install Ghostscript on your system. For that, head to the download page and download the Ghostscript for ‘Postscript and PDF interpreter/render’

Step 4. Once done, install the Ghostscript .exe file on your system.

Step 5. After installing the Irfanview main application, it’s plugins, and Ghostscript, you are ready to open the EPS files.

Step 6. To open the EPS file, you can drag and drop the file on Irfanview, or you can open it via File > Open.

Step 7. To convert EPS into JPG, click on File > Save As. Select ‘JPG’ or ‘PNG’ under the save as type.

That’s it! You are done. This is how you can open EPS files on Windows 10 via IrfanView.

So, that’s all from us for today! I hope this article helped you! Please share it with your friends also. If you have any doubts related to this, let us know in the comment box below.

How to open, edit, and convert EPS files

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What to Know

  • An EPS file is an Encapsulated PostScript file.
  • Open one with Photopea, EPS Viewer, Google Drive, GIMP, or Photoshop.
  • Convert to an image like PNG, JPG, or SVG with those same programs or Zamzar.

This article explains what EPS files are and how they’re different than other image types, which programs are able to open one, and how to convert one to another picture format like PNG or SVG.

What Is an EPS File?

A file with the EPS file extension is an Encapsulated PostScript file. They’re typically used by drawing applications to describe how to produce images, drawings, or layouts. They can contain both text and graphics to describe how the vector image is drawn, but they also usually include a bitmap preview image “encapsulated” inside.

EPS is what early versions of the AI format was based on. Encapsulated PostScript files may also use the .EPSF or .EPSI file extension.

EPS is also short for terms that have nothing to do with a file format, like emergency power system and electronic payment system.

How to Open an EPS File

Open or edit EPS files with vector-based image editing applications. Other programs most likely rasterize, or flatten the file upon opening, which renders any vector information uneditable. However, like all images, EPS files can always be cropped, rotated, and resized.

Photopea is an online image editor that’s probably the fastest way to view it online, from any web browser on any operating system. Google Drive also functions as an online EPS viewer.

EPS Viewer, Adobe Reader, and IrfanView offer fast and effective tools for opening and resizing EPS files on a Windows PC. You can also view EPS files in Windows, Linux, or macOS if you open them in OpenOffice Draw, LibreOffice Draw, GIMP, XnView MP, Okular, or Scribus.

Ghostscript and Evince work for either Windows or Linux, while Apple Preview, QuarkXpress, and MathType are EPS openers for Mac, specifically.

Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Microsoft Word (v2010 and older, through the Insert menu), and Affinity Designer also support the format, but they aren’t free to use.

If a program that you don’t want to use the EPS file with, opens the file when you double-click it, you can change the default program that opens that file extension in Windows.

How to Convert an EPS File

One easy way to convert it is to use Zamzar. It’s a free file converter that runs in your browser to convert EPS to JPG, PNG, PDF, SVG, and various other formats. FileZigZag is similar, and can save it to document file types like PPT, HTML, ODG, etc.

EPS Viewer converts EPS to JPG, BMP, PNG, GIF, and TIFF. Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator can convert an open EPS file through their File > Save As menu. Photopea is a good option if you want to change the EPS file to a PSD file or a number of other formats, like ICO, TIFF, PPM, RAW, or DXF.

Still Can’t Open the File?

Verify that the file you’re using really is an Encapsulated PostScript file. You might have searched for the wrong file extension, which can happen if it’s spelled a lot like EPS.

For example, ESP looks very similar to EPS but is instead the suffix used for plugins in The Elder Scrolls and Fallout video games. You’ll most likely get an error if you try opening an ESP file with the EPS openers and editors from above.

EPP files are similar and are associated with several file formats, but none of them are related to an Encapsulated PostScript file.

Some others you could be confusing for this one are EPM and EAP.

EPS files can contain bitmaps or vectors (or both), while traditional vector file-formats only contain vector files.

Yes, but you’ll need a program capable of editing vector files such as Adobe Illustrator, or you can download the Inkscape freeware. While Photoshop is best for images, vector files work differently from traditional images and are best suited to more specialized applications like Illustrator.

An EPS file (a file that has the .EPS extension at the end) is an Encapsulated PostScript file. EPS files are special kinds of image files that contain PostScript programs – these PostScript programs describe how a vector image is to be drawn to a computer. EPS files can contain both text and graphics, and also almost always have a bitmap preview image “encapsulated” inside them. Files with .EPSI and .EPSF extensions are also classified as EPS files. EPS is basically a file format for vector images. A vector image is an image with a mathematical equation embedded in it, an equation that allows for the vector image to be enlarged to basically any size imaginable without restriction or any fear of pixelation. Vector images are most commonly used for large-scale printing (billboards and the creation of decal wraps, for example).

As you can probably tell if you’ve ever dealt with an EPS file, EPS files are unlike your average image file. That being the case, not every image viewing program out there is capable of opening and viewing EPS files, and an even smaller pool of image editing programs is capable of actually editing EPS files and working with them. EPS files can only be opened and edited in vector-based applications, and other applications simply rasterize (or flatten) them while trying to open them, leading to them losing their ability to be enlarged to virtually any size required without any pixelation whatsoever.

EPS files can be opened on virtually every computer Operating System out there, including the Windows Operating System, but opening an EPS file is not as straightforward and simple as opening, say, a JPEG file. There is a small list of image viewing and editing programs for Windows computers capable of opening and (in some cases) even editing and working with EPS files, and the following are some of the absolute best members of this list:

EPS Viewer

If you would like to keep it simple, EPS Viewer is the way to go. EPS Viewer is basically a single-function application designed to simply open and view EPS files. EPS Viewer (which can be downloaded here) is more than capable of opening and viewing any and all EPS files, and can also be used to resize, rotate 90° in either direction or zoom in and out of EPS files. EPS Viewer can also be used to convert an EPS file into a JPEG, Bitmap, PNG, GIF or TIFF file – all you have to do is open an EPS file via EPS Viewer and select any of these other formats in the Save as type: dropdown menu when saving the EPS file as a new file.

Gravit

Gravit (available here) is an amazing piece of freeware capable of not only opening but also editing and working with EPS vector images. Gravit is available as a standalone application for the Windows Operating System but also has an online client that can be used to view and work with EPS files on your internet browser (after you create a Gravit account, of course).

Irfanview

Irfanview (available here) is an excellent choice when it comes to programs you can use to open EPS files. While getting Irfanview to open EPS files requires some work on the user’s end, Irfanview has been around for a long time and is not only capable of opening EPS files but also editing them to a significant degree. To get Irfanview to open EPS files, you need to:

  1. Make sure that Irfanview is installed on your computer.
  2. Go hereand download the 32-bit or 64-bit (depending on the iteration of Windows you have) Plugins package for Irfanview.
  3. Once the Plugins package has been downloaded, run it to install the plugins and follow the onscreen instructions. The installer will install the plugins to the same directory Irfanview is located in.
  4. Go hereand download the installer for the Ghostscript PostScript and PDF interpreter/renderer. Again, download the 32-bit or 64-bit version of the program depending on what iteration of Windows you have.
  5. Once the download has been completed, run the installer and install Ghostscript on your computer.

Once you have the main Irfanview application with its Plugins installed and the Ghostscript PostScript and PDF interpreter/renderer also installed, you’ll be able to open EPS files using Irfanview. Once you open an EPS file with Irfanview, you will see that the program is capable of doing a lot more than just opening EPS files – it is also capable of allowing you to edit them and work with them to an impressive degree.

Adobe Illustrator

When it comes to Windows applications capable of opening EPS files, Adobe Illustrator basically takes the cake as it is one of the most powerful applications capable of not only opening EPS files but also editing them and working with them and even saving newly created images as EPS files. As feature-rich and polished as Adobe Illustrator may be, however, you are going to have to pay up if you want to use it to open EPS files – Adobe Illustrator is not freeware and needs to be purchased.

Regardless of what application you end up using to open EPS files on your computer, there’s the possibility that files with the .EPS extension won’t be associated with that program from the get go. If that’s the case, opening the EPS file even after you have the application you want to use installed on your computer is simply going to open the file in your usual image viewer, which probably can’t even handle opening EPS files. To make sure an EPS file you want to open opens with the application you want to open it with, you need to:

  1. Locate the EPS file you want to open and right-click on it.
  2. Hover over Open with and click on Choose another app in the resulting menu.
  3. Locate the application you want to open the EPS file with under the Other options section and click on it to select it.
  4. Enable the Always use this app to open .eps files option by checking the checkbox located directly beside it.
  5. Click on OK, and the EPS file will be opened in whatever application you wanted to open it in.
Information, tips and instructions

Open EPS File

EPS file extension is used to store information in Encapsulated Postscript format. Encapsulated Postscript is a subset of Postscript language which is used to deliver commands and information to the printer. EPS files are used to store and exchange graphic content.

Encapsulated Postscript files use similar format as Postscript files and use the same Postscript language. Postscript language is a complex graphic representation language which controls the printing process. It can contain instructions that control the flow of the program, set the page and input tray parameters, define image resolution, or virtually anything that a printer can perform.

Encapsulated Postscript describes a single image and cannot contain certain commands from Postscript language which can break or alter the printing process. The goal of Encapsulated Postscript is to be able to load it and insert into any place in the printing process. All the encapsulating program needs to do is to set a location and size of the EPS image. The rest is controlled by commands inside the EPS file.

To open EPS file you can use any software capable of importing it. This includes many popular software packages including:

  • CorelDRAW
  • Adobe Illustrator
  • Adobe InDesign
  • Adobe Acrobat
  • Adobe Photoshop
  • Autodesk AutoCAD
  • Ghostscript (free)
  • GIMP (free)
  • Inkscape (free)
  • SketchUp

EPS files are transferred over e-mail or internet using application/postscript, application/eps, application/x-eps, image/eps, image/x-eps multipurpose internet mail extensions (MIME) types.

There are several file formats which are very similar to EPS.

  • PS file format which is superset of EPS and contains full Postscript program
  • AI file format which is a strict subset of EPS command and used by Adobe Illustrator application.
  • PDF files use different command language but also contain instructions how to render graphics information.
  • EPS files could be easily converted to other vector formats including CDR, PS, AI, SVG, and others.

    Open EPS File on Windows OS

    • Try double clicking on a EPS file in Windows File Explorer.
    • If the EPS reading software is associated correctly then the file will open
    • If the file did not open you should install Ghostscript
    • To open EPS file in Ghostscript you need to launch it and then select File->Open in the main menu
    • If you want to open and edit EPS file you should download CorelDraw

    Get more information about how to open EPS file.

    If you are not able to open file with certain file extension make sure to check if extension for the file is correct. It is possible that information in the file doesn’t match file extension.

    This article explains what EPS files are and how they differ from other image file types, what programs can open them, and how to convert them to another image format like PNG or SVG.

    • How to open and read the .DAT file?
    • What is an AI file How to open an AI file

    The file with the EPS extension is an Encapsulated PostScript file. They are commonly used by drawing applications to describe how to create images, drawings or layouts.

    EPS files can contain both text and graphics to describe how vector images are drawn, but they also often include “packed” bitmap preview images inside.

    EPS is what the early version of the AI ​​format was based on. Encapsulated PostScript files can also use the .EPSF or .EPSI file extensions.

    How to open an EPS file

    Open or edit EPS files with vector-based image editing apps. Other programs can very much rearrange or “flatten” the EPS file when opened, which displays any non-editable vector information. However, like all images, EPS files can always be cropped, rotated and resized.

    EPS Viewer, Adobe Reader and IrfanView provide fast and efficient tools to open and resize EPS files on Windows PCs. You can also view EPS files in Windows, Linux or macOS, if you open them in OpenOffice Draw, LibreOffice Draw, GIMP, XnView MP, Okular or Scribus.

    Ghostscript and Evince work for either Windows or Linux, while Apple Preview, QuarkXpress, and Design Science MathType are EPS openers for Mac.

    To avoid downloading programs to use EPS files, Google Drive can also act as an online EPS viewer via a browser.

    Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Illustrator, Affinity Designer and Microsoft Word (via the Insert menu ) also support EPS files, but they are not free to use.

    Note : If a program that you do not want to use EPS file, open the file when you double-click it, you can change the default program for that file extension.

    How to convert EPS files

    An easy way to convert EPS files is to use Zamzar. It’s a free file converter that runs in your browser to convert EPS to JPG, PNG, PDF, SVG and more. FileZigZag is similar but converts the EPS file into document file types such as PPT, HTML, ODG, etc.

    EPS Viewer converts EPS to JPG, BMP, PNG, GIF and TIFF. Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator can convert open EPS files through the File> Save As menu .

    Still can’t open the file?

    Verify that the file you are using is actually an Encapsulated PostScript file. You may have been looking for the file extension wrong, this could happen if it has a similar name to EPS.

    For example, ESP looks a lot like EPS but it’s the suffix used for plugins in the video games The Elder Scrolls and Fallout. Chances are you will get an error if you try to open the ESP file using the EPS openers and editors above.

    EPP files are similar and associated with several file formats, but none of them are related to an Encapsulated PostScript file.

    Some other extensions that you might mistake for this file are EPM and EAP.

    Matt Klein has nearly two decades of technical writing experience. He”s covered Windows, Android, macOS, Microsoft Office, and everything in between. He”s even written a book, The How-To Geek Guide to Windows 8. Read more.

    About How-To Geek

    An EPS (Encapsulated PostScript) file is special type of image file containing a PostScript program. If you’ve stumbled upon one of these files, you’ve probably noticed quickly that few programs can open it properly. So how can you view it?

    RELATED: What Is Postscript? What Does It Have to Do With My Printer?

    On Windows, you will find dozens of programs that do the trick, but here are the two we recommend.

    Keep It Simple with EPS Viewer

    The simplest way to view EPS files is to use EPS Viewer, which is a simple single-function application intended to view EPS files only.

    After you have installed the application, you need to open your EPS file (if it is not associated with EPS Viewer). EPS Viewer doesn’t come with any preferences, so if your EPS files doesn’t automatically open with it, the right-click on the file and choose “Open with > Choose another app”.

    Under “Other options” select EPS Viewer and then check the box next to “Always use this app to open .eps files”.

    EPS Viewer has few options beyond just being a simple way to view EPS files. Aside from the ability to open and save your file, you can also resize it, zoom in or out, and rotate it left or right.

    When you want to save a file, you can convert it to another more usable format including JPEG, Bitmap, PNG, GIF, and TIFF.

    If you’re just looking for something simple that will get the job done, then EPS Viewer will fit the bill.

    Do More with Ifranview

    If you want something a little more practical that also opens other types of image files, then you might want to try Irfanview. It’s a good program to have around anyway: it’s been around for a long time, and can open the vast majority of image files.

    Most of these image files will open in Irfanview as soon as you install it, but with EPS files, you need to take some extra steps.

    First, you need to install Ifranview’s plugins. This is a simple EXE files you can download from the Irfanview site.

    The second item you will need is Ghostscript, an open source PostScript interpreter. Ghostscript also installs with an EXE file, which takes just a few seconds and requires no further configuration. From the Ghostscript downloads page, you want to choose “Postscript and PDF interpreter/renderer”, and then install the package appropriate to your version of Windows (32 bit or 64 bit).

    Once you have the Irfanview main application, its plugins, and Ghostscript installed, you’re ready to view EPS files.

    Irfanview has the same basic features as EPS Viewer: you can open, save, rotate, and zoom.

    It also does a whole lot more, though. Looking at the Edit menu, you see we can insert text, crop the image, and even mark the image up with paint tools.

    Open the Image menu and options abound. You can adjust the color depth, sharpen, flip it vertically or horizontally, and much more.

    If you go through it menu by menu, you see that Irfanview is packed with many features that go beyond the simple ability to view EPS files (though it does that quite well too).

    When it comes to EPS files then, the hard part isn’t necessarily finding an application to open them. There are many out there. Rather, it’s what you want the application to do for you. If you simply need something that opens EPS files, with basic features including the ability to export to other image formats, then EPS Viewer is probably your best bet. However, if you want something that is more a jack-of-all-trades image viewer, something that will open a variety of image file types and also give you some more advanced editing features, then Irfanview is a great choice.

    Try CorelDRAW and edit your file now.

    What is an EPS file?

    EPS is short for Encapsulated PostScript, which is a graphics file format developed by Adobe back in 1992. It’s more like a postscript program that holds 2D vector graphics, bitmap images and text together. EPS file format is widely used for sharing artwork, logos and drawings. Because of it’s compatibility with different OS and the embedded preview feature, many publishers prefers this format. EPS files are different than other graphics format, because it’s a program itself. You will need specialized software like CorelDRAW.

    How to open EPS file format

    1. Create New Document
    Launch CorelDRAW and select New Document. Select desired canvas size and colors

    2. Select your EPS file
    File> Import. The file browser will appear. Select the EPS File you want to import and click Import

    3. Position Image on Canvas
    Using the cursor select where you want the image to be placed and click and drag to position the image on the canvas

    4. Edit your EPS file
    Make your edits to the image

    5. Save your document
    Save the file before closing to the your desired location on your computer

    Open EPS File on Windows with CorelDRAW Graphics Suite

    • Windows 10
    • Windows 8.1

    CorelDRAW opens EPS files and the other files formats listed below

    We created CorelDRAW Graphics Suite to open many kinds of file formats, including all of the following:

    • pdf
    • eps
    • svg
    • png
    • psd
    • ai
    • tif
    • dxf
    • dwg
    • rtf
    • pub
    • Cal
    • bmp
    • ico
    • exe
    • gif
    • vsd
    • jpg
    • cdr
    • dng
    • docx
    • ps
    • prn
    • htm
    • doc
    • img

    Try CorelDRAW now and open your EPS file(s) and then enjoy all this graphic design software has to offer.

    Encapsulated PostScript File

    What is an EPS file?

    An EPS file is a vector graphic saved in the Encapsulated PostScript (EPS) format. It contains PostScript-formatted image data, which is ideal for scaling high-resolution images, and may include bitmap image data and text. EPS files also store a low-resolution embedded bitmap image for previewing the graphic.

    Adobe developed the EPS format in the late-1980s to become a standard for exchanging images across different platforms and devices. While various applications and users adopted the format, other image formats, such as .JPEG and .PNG, overshadowed it.

    Although EPS never became as widely used as Adobe intended, graphics professionals commonly save their artwork, such as icons and drawings, in the format. In addition, graphic designers often utilize EPS for large print jobs, such as posters, banners, and billboard advertisements, because of its scalability.

    Most graphic designers use professional vector image editors, such as Adobe Illustrator or Serif Affinity Designer, to save artwork as EPS files. For example, to create an EPS file with Illustrator, select File → Save As. and choose the EPS format from the format dropdown menu.

    How to open an EPS file

    You can open an EPS file with various image editors, including Adobe Illustrator, QuarkXpress, and Serif Affinity Designer.

    While Windows does not natively support the EPS format, Macs have built-in support for EPS. You can preview thumbnails of EPS images with the Finder utility and view EPS images at full size with Apple Preview.

    How to convert an EPS file

    Various applications, including Adobe Illustrator, Corel PaintShop Pro, Corel PaintShop Pro, and Apple Preview, can convert EPS files to other formats.

    For example, Adobe Illustrator can convert EPS files to the following formats:

    • .AI – Adobe Photoshop Cloud Document
    • .AIT – Photoshop Large Document Format
    • .PDF – Portable Document Format
    • .JPG – JPEG Image
    • .PNG – Portable Network Graphic
    • .TIF – Tagged Image File Format
    • .DWG – Graphical Interchange Format
    • .DXF – WebP Image
    • .EMF – Adobe Illustrator Artwork
    • .WMF – Adobe Illustrator Artwork
    • .BMP – Bitmap Image
    • .PCT – DICOM Image
    • .PSD – DICOM Image
    • .TGA – DICOM Image
    • .SVG – Encapsulated PostScript
    • .SVGZ – Encapsulated PostScript

    Because of a security vulnerability in EPS files, Office 2019, Office 2016, Office 2013, Office 2010, and Microsoft 365 have turned off the ability to insert EPS files into Office documents. This change is effective as of the April 11, 2017, security update.

    All Windows-based versions of Office are affected. (This change had already been in place in Office 2007 since 2015.)

    Office for Mac 2011 and Office 2016 for Mac are unaffected by this change.

    Changes beginning in May 2018

    Beginning with the April 2017 security update, support for inserting EPS files was turned off, by default. But it has been possible to turn back on the ability to insert EPS files with changes to a registry key. Beginning in May 2018, the registry-key method was turned off for Microsoft 365 subscribers and Office 2019 customers. This change will roll out gradually to everyone during May and June. It will no longer be possible for subscribers to insert EPS files in Office documents by any means.

    It looks like a product bug, but it’s intentional

    If you attempt to insert an EPS file into an Office document, you’ll only get an image placeholder with a message that says the picture can’t be displayed:

    In the case of EPS files, this message means that Office has turned off the ability to insert EPS files, because we think the vulnerability to malicious attacks is too great.

    Beginning with Office 2010, the vulnerability was addressed by automatically converting EPS files to a more secure metafile format (EMF) upon insertion into an Office document. Files containing these converted EMF files continue to behave normally—the metafiles are retained and remain visible in the document.

    Why this change was made

    This change was done in response to active security incidents involving files. EPS files allow embedded scripts , which makes them a means of malicious attack for anyone who inserts an EPS file or opens a document that has an EPS file in it. In spite of previous efforts to mitigate the problem in Office documents, the EPS format continues to be a source of malicious attacks. To completely eliminate the risk of EPS files containing malicious code, Office decided to entirely turn off the ability to insert them.

    Can I still use EPS files in Office?

    • Which version of Office are you using?
    • Office 365 or Office 2019
    • Office 2016
    • Office 2013
    • Office 2010

    No. For Microsoft 365, Office 2019, and future releases of Office, there is no way to use EPS files in Office documents. This change is being rolled out to customers during April and May.

    Although we strongly recommend against it, it’s possible for you to turn back on the ability to insert EPS files. Read KB article 2479871 for the instructions, which are complicated and involve making changes to the Windows registry. It is important to be aware that making this change would increase your vulnerability to malicious code.

    If you perform the change to the registry, you will be able to insert EPS files in the application on which you have applied the registry change. The EPS files will be automatically converted to EMF, saved, and visible in the saved document, even by people who haven’t performed the registry change. Be aware that making this change to the registry makes you vulnerable to malicious attacks based on EPS files.

    We recommend that you no longer add EPS images to your Office documents, and instead use a substitute, as described in the next section.

    Although we strongly recommend against it, it’s possible for you to turn back on the ability to insert EPS files. Read KB article 2479871 for the instructions, which are complicated and involve making changes to the Windows registry. It is important to be aware that making this change would increase your vulnerability to malicious code.

    If you perform the change to the registry, you will be able to insert EPS files in the application on which you have applied the registry change. The EPS files will be automatically converted to EMF, saved, and visible in the saved document, even by people who haven’t performed the registry change. Be aware that making this change to the registry makes you vulnerable to malicious attacks based on EPS files.

    We recommend that you no longer add EPS images to your Office documents, and instead use a substitute, as described in the next section.

    Although we strongly recommend against it, it’s possible for you to turn back on the ability to insert EPS files. Read KB article 2479871 for the instructions, which are complicated and involve making changes to the Windows registry. It is important to be aware that making this change would increase your vulnerability to malicious code.

    If you perform the change to the registry, you will be able to insert EPS files in the application on which you have applied the registry change. The EPS files will be automatically converted to EMF, saved, and visible in the saved document, even by people who haven’t performed the registry change. Be aware that making this change to the registry makes you vulnerable to malicious attacks based on EPS files.

    We recommend that you no longer add EPS images to your Office documents, and instead use a substitute, as described in the next section.

    Substitutes for EPS files

    EMF and SVG are other graphics metafile formats that can be substituted for the EPS file format:

    Vector images come in several formats like .EPS, .SVG, . AI, .CDR, .PDF. If you are a newcomer to vector images, you may want to know how to open and use a vector file. I will try to help you with that in the next paragraphs.

    First, let me explain briefly what is a vector file and how you can benefit from this graphic format.

    Vector graphics are an image format that allows scaling to any size, the images are created using mathematical expressions. You don’t see the math, but you see the results as shapes, lines, dots, and colors.

    The first benefit of this type of image is that, as said before, you can scale them to any size without losing sharpness or quality since is not dependent on resolution.

    Also, these files are very light, it is very easy to share online and save in any other media.

    The vector images are flexible, with suitable software, are easy to edit, change colors, deform, place on other images, etc.

    Vector format is the best way to keep a master file of your logo, you can use it in any way, to any size. If you do not have your logo in vector format, your brand is limited to the number of pixels your logo has.

    Opening vector graphic files.

    There is plenty of software to open and edit your vector files. Professional designers use and recommend software like Adobe Illustrator and Corel Draw to open, edit, and create these images.

    However, if you are a casual user of vector images you might find this software expensive.

    There are several free options and good enough for users that do not need advanced features.

    Inkscape is one of the favorites, with a large community and a lot of tutorials and help online. Works mainly with .SVG formats. I find only one crucial weakness with this software, it is hard to find a way to open EPS files.

    One more free software to open and edit vectors is Gravit Designer. This is an easy-to-use program, and you can work with vectors and combine them with photos and other images. You can import .EPS as well as .SVG files. This program is free, but you will have to see advertising from third parties.

    Gravit Designer is a free software with a premium paid version

    Try any of these two programs and pick the one that fits better to your needs.

    The common file formats are .EPS, .SVG, .PDF, .AI, .CDR., you may follow the next link if you want to know more about vector file formats.

    Converting EPS and SVG files to JPG or other formats.

    If you only want to convert an EPS file to import to any other document like Word or Excel, you may need to convert your vector image to JPG or PNG
    You may find helpful this page
    https://www.epsconverter.com
    Also, this other page can convert more formats to jpg, png, or others
    https://image.online-convert.com/convert-to-jpg

    I hope this article was helpful, please do not forget to comment in the section down below and share so it can serve others.

    With Python turtle I’m trying to save the canvas as a png. I’ve researched it and found a way to save it as an eps file without any modules, but I’m finding it hard to convert the eps file into a png.

    Is there a way to convert eps to png without downloading another module? If not can someone tell me more about ImageMagick, because I have looked at it, but I’m confused how to use it? I’ve also seen it being linked to linux and is it outdated?

    If not converting eps to png, is there a even simpler way to save the canvas as a png?

    2 Answers 2

    You can now choose to sort by Trending, which boosts votes that have happened recently, helping to surface more up-to-date answers.

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    From the link you show, there is this Imagemagick command:

    Most EPS files are vector images. They have no physical size in pixels, since it a vector drawing with commands that describe how to draw each object. It is not a raster image containing pixels and does not have any particular pixel set of dimensions.

    So with vector files, you set the printing density to tell Imagemagick (which passes it off to Ghostscript to do the rasterizing work) to convert the vector data to raster data and then save it as a raster format output image. Nominal density is 72 dpi (sometimes 92 or 96). So if you use -density 288 with the following command:

    It would result in an image that is 4 times larger in each dimension than if you just did

    which for default dpi of 72 would be the same as

    Note that 72*4=288.

    Now you have a large high quality raster png, especially if the eps file was line drawing with thin lines like blue-prints.

    However if that is too large and you want to reduce it back to its nominal size by 1/4, you could do (note 1/4 = 25%)

    This process is sometimes called supersampling and would produce a better looking result than just doing

    In the original command, they decide to get a high quality raster image and just resize to 1024×1024.

    So you can resize to any size you want after producing a high definition raster image from the EPS vector image.

    The larger the density you use, the higher the quality will be in the PNG, but it will take longer to process. So you have to trade time vs quality and pick the smallest density that produces good enough quality in a reasonable amount of time.

    I do not know if Python Wand supports setting the density or if it supports reading PDF file, which requires Ghostscript. But you can use Python Subprocess module to make a call to an Imagemagick command line. See https://www.imagemagick.org/discourse-server/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=32920

    I’ve been having problems with ImageMagick having had its security policy changed so it can’t interact with Ghostscript. (for good reason. but it’s questionable that it doesn’t allow you to locally override the default policy so web apps can be protected while whitelisted uses can still work.)

    For anyone else slamming into convert: not authorized , here’s how to invoke Ghostscript directly:

    • -dSAFER puts Ghostscript into sandboxed mode so you can interpret untrusted Postscript. (It should be default, but backwards compatibility.)
    • -dEPSCrop asks Ghostscript to not pad it out to the size of a printable page. (details)
    • ImageMagick’s -density 300 becomes -r300 when it invokes Ghostscript. (details)
    • -sDEVICE is how you set the output format (See the Devices section of the manual for other choices.)
    • -o is a shorthand for -dBATCH -dNOPAUSE -sOutputFile= (details)

    You could then use ImageMagick’s mogrify command to resize it to fit exact pixel dimensions:

    ( mogrify is like convert but replaces the input file rather than writing to a new file.)

    UPDATE: In hindsight, I should have checked whether Pillow supported EPS before posting that first answer.

    The native Python solution would be to use Pillow’s support for invoking Ghostscript (like ImageMagick in that respect, but with a native Python API).

    However, Pillow’s docs don’t explain how they arrive at a size in pixels and only take an optional multiplier ( scale ) for the default size rather than an absolute DPI value.

    If that doesn’t bother you, and you’ve got both Pillow and Ghostscript installed, here’s how to do it without ImageMagick:

    Download CorelDRAW to open your file now.

    A full 15-Day free trial of this graphic software. No credit card required.

    What is a EPS File?

    Encapsulated PostScript, shortly EPS is a standard graphics file format created by Adobe in 1992. It is more like a postscript program that instructs images and drawings to be placed on a document. EPS file format is very popular among publishers for its versatility on different OS platforms. EPS files are usually complex and require specialized applications like CorelDRAW. But EPS files also have low resolution preview feature, which can be accessed by common bitmap graphic viewers.

    How to open EPS files with CorelDRAW

    1. Launch CorelDRAW
    2. Choose File > Open
    3. Find the EPS file you wish to open
    4. Select the File(s)
    5. Edit & Save Your File!

    Open EPS files on Windows

    • Compatible with:
    • Windows 10
    • Windows 8
    • Windows 7

    Open EPS files on Mac

    • Compatible with:
    • macOS 10.14
    • macOS 10.13
    • macOS 10.12

    CorelDRAW Opens EPS Files and many more file formats

    We designed CorelDRAW Graphics Suite to open a wide range of file format, including all of the following:

    • pdf
    • eps
    • svg
    • png
    • psd
    • ai
    • tif
    • dxf
    • dwg
    • rtf
    • pub (Windows only)
    • bmp
    • ico
    • exe (Windows only)
    • gif
    • vsd
    • jpg
    • dng
    • docx (Windows only)
    • ps
    • prn
    • htm
    • doc (Windows only)