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How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

Table of Contents
  1. Steps to Record Sound from a Windows PC without Mic
  2. FAQs
  3. Record Audio Playback on a Mac without Mic

Ever tried to record sound from a computer? If you tried recording system audio using a mic, chances are that it didn’t turn out so good. Microphones pick up background noises which can ruin the quality of the recording. With a very silent environment and a decent mic, you could record sound from your computer with good quality. Luckily, there’s is an even better option to capture system audio be it on Mac or Windows. Interestingly, this method requires no extra setups, microphones or paid softwares. It’s completely free! [sc name=”Gradient-list-nonReversed” ]

Steps to Record Sound from a Windows PC without Mic

  1. How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)Open Control Panel and navigate to “Hardware and Sounds”. Then click on “Sound”. The sound dialog box will now appear.
  2. How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)Now switch to the recordings tab. Right click on stereo mix option and click enable. Disable any other mics if any. If you don’t see the stereo mix option, read the FAQ given at the end of this post.
  3. How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)Now right click on stereo mix and choose properties. Switch to the “levels” tab and set the stereo mix level to 50. This will help record sounds without any distortions.
  4. Click Ok to close the properties panel and again click ok to close the sound dialog box.
  5. Now open up your sound recorder. There is an app called “Voice Recorder” in windows 10 or you can download other from the windows store.
  6. How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)Play the sound with maximum volume and hit record. Disable stereo mix once the recording is over. Re-enable the disabled mics(if any).

FAQs

1. If you cannot find the “Stereo Mix” icon on the “Recording” tab, right-click on an empty space within the box and click “Show Disabled Devices.” Right-click “Stereo Mix” and click “Enable” to turn the function on.

2. Update your audio drivers.

3. If you see an option called Mono Mix or Wave Out Mix instead of Stereo Mix, use that instead.
[/mks_toggle][mks_toggle title=”Can I use this trick to record music from streaming sites?” state=”close”]This trick will work for throughout windows regardless of what you do. But we don’t recommend ripping music from streaming sites.[/mks_toggle]

Record Audio Playback on a Mac without Mic

Before playing the video, you’ll need to install Soundflower, a free utility that allows you to bypass audio to other applications.

How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

Say you want to record the sound coming out of your computer like — a skype call, music from online streaming service or let just say you want to extract a dialogue from an old movie.

For this, you will need to record the system audio i.e. the sound coming out of your computer. But the process is not that obvious. (see the video tutorial at the end)

For instance, the most popular way to record system audio is by enabling the Stereo Mix option under sound settings and then use any sound recorder to capture the system audio.

But unfortunately, in most modern computers the audio drivers don’t support ‘Stereo Mix’. Now, you can look for addition sound drivers on the web and you may get this option. But that’s too much of hassle. Right?

So, here are 2 alternate methods that you can use.

Record Audio Coming Out of Your PC

#1 Using Audacity (WASAPI)

This is the best method if you just want to record HQ sound coming only from Windows computer.

Download audacity (24 MB) from their official website and then install it on your computer just like you normally do.

Once done, open audacity and u nder audio host select Windows WASAPI and under audio source select ‘the relevant loopback device’ (though you can also try other source and pick up the best output here)

Next play the file, you want to record and click the small red button on audacity to start recording. You will see sound waves, this means audacity is picking up your audio.

The advantage of audacity is you can pause the recording or even edit it later. Once done, simply stop the recorder and under file > export your recording. The default is .wav file.

Watch the video tutorial at the end, if you not sure how to use audacity.

Overall the recorded audio sounds exactly the same as original one and without any noise or distortion.

#2 Using Male-to-male Audio jack.

Say the first method don’t work for you or you would like to record audio from an android or mp3 player, then this one is helpful.

You will have to buy a male to male 3.5 mm audio cable. I got mine for 3o rupees (less than 50 cents) from a local store. Usually, people use it to connect their phone to a speaker, so it’s a quite common thing.

Now insert one end of the audio jack to headphones and the other end to microphones slot of your computer. Now what it does is, it redirect the output audio as an input. So basically, you are recording from your microphone like you normally do.

Now play the audio you want to record (you won’t hear anything). Open any audio recording program like audacity and hit the record button. And it should work.

But if you don’t see any waves, make sure right settings are turn on. Like go to the sound recording settings (right-click on the sound icon at the bottom taskbar and click on recording device).

A new window will open with the list of few recording device. Simply right click and disable one and enable the other. And it will work.

Now, since we are just redirecting the audio using the cable, you can also use this method to record audio from your Android, MAC or anything with 3.5 mm audio jack.

Simply remove the audio jack from headphone slots and insert it in the other device’s headphone slot. And it should work.

This time, you might have to tinker with the audio source a little. Like for me, it only work with following settings.

Overall both these method work fine and should let you record system audio without any problem.

Video tutorial

You don’t have to hold up a microphone to your computer’s speakers to record its audio. Even if you don’t have a Stereo Mix option on your PC, you can easily record the sound coming from any Windows PC.
This can all be done with software. No, you don’t even need to connect your computer’s audio output to its audio input with an audio cable to do this — although that is an option.

Option 1: Stereo Mix

Stereo Mix is sometimes called “What U Hear.” It’s a special recording option that may be provided by your sound drivers. If it is, you can select it (instead of a microphone or audio line-in input) and force any application to record the same sound that your computer is outputting from its speakers or headphones.

On modern versions of Windows, Stereo Mix is generally disabled by default — even if your sound drivers support it. Follow how to geek’s instructions to enable the Stereo Mix audio source on Windows. Use any audio-recording program and select “Stereo Mix” as the input device instead of the usual “line-in” or “microphone” option.

On some devices, you may not have this option at all. There may be a way to enable it with different audio drivers, but not every piece of sound hardware supports Stereo Mix. It’s become less and less common.

Option 2: Audacity’s WASAPI Loopback

Don’t have a Stereo Mix option? No problem. Audacity has a useful feature that will can record the audio coming out of your computer even without Stereo Mix. In fact, Audacity’s feature may be even better than Stereo Mix — assuming you’re willing to use Audacity to record the audio, of course. This takes advantage of something Microsoft added in Windows Vista, and it’ll also function in Windows 7, 8, 8.1, and 10. It helps make up for the lack of a Stereo Mix option on modern Windows PCs.

In Audacity, choose the “Windows WASAPI” audio host and then an appropriate loopback device — for example, “Speakers (loopback)” or “Headphones (loopback).”

Click the Record button to start recording the audio in Audacity, and click Stop when you’re done. Because you’re using Audacity, you can easily trim and edit the sound file when you’re done.

Audacity’s tutorial website explains why this feature is actually better than Stereo Mix:

“WASAPI loopback has an advantage over stereo mix or similar inputs provided by the soundcard that the capture is entirely digital (rather than converting to analog for playback, then back to digital when Audacity receives it). System sounds playing through the device selected for WASAPI loopback are still captured, however.”

In other words, your recorded sound file will have be higher-quality when using Audacity’s WASAPI loopback option.

Option 3: An Audio Cable

There’s always the low-tech solution, although it’s a bit of a dirty hack. Just get an audio cable with a male 3.5mm connector on both ends. Plug one end into the line-out (or headphone) jack on your PC and the other one into the line-in (or microphone) jack on your PC. You’ll stop hearing the sound your computer produces, but you can use any audio-recording program to record the “line in” or “microphone” input. To actually hear the sound, you could get a splitter and output the audio to headphones or speakers at the same time you direct it back into your computer.

Sure, this is inconvenient and silly compared to to the above options. But, if you desperately need to capture the audio coming out of your computer in an application that isn’t Audacity and you don’t have Stereo Mix, the cable will allow you to do this.

How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

Table of Contents
  1. Steps to Record Sound from a Windows PC without Mic
  2. FAQs
  3. Record Audio Playback on a Mac without Mic

Ever tried to record sound from a computer? If you tried recording system audio using a mic, chances are that it didn’t turn out so good. Microphones pick up background noises which can ruin the quality of the recording. With a very silent environment and a decent mic, you could record sound from your computer with good quality. Luckily, there’s is an even better option to capture system audio be it on Mac or Windows. Interestingly, this method requires no extra setups, microphones or paid softwares. It’s completely free! [sc name=”Gradient-list-nonReversed” ]

Steps to Record Sound from a Windows PC without Mic

  1. How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)Open Control Panel and navigate to “Hardware and Sounds”. Then click on “Sound”. The sound dialog box will now appear.
  2. How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)Now switch to the recordings tab. Right click on stereo mix option and click enable. Disable any other mics if any. If you don’t see the stereo mix option, read the FAQ given at the end of this post.
  3. How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)Now right click on stereo mix and choose properties. Switch to the “levels” tab and set the stereo mix level to 50. This will help record sounds without any distortions.
  4. Click Ok to close the properties panel and again click ok to close the sound dialog box.
  5. Now open up your sound recorder. There is an app called “Voice Recorder” in windows 10 or you can download other from the windows store.
  6. How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)Play the sound with maximum volume and hit record. Disable stereo mix once the recording is over. Re-enable the disabled mics(if any).

FAQs

1. If you cannot find the “Stereo Mix” icon on the “Recording” tab, right-click on an empty space within the box and click “Show Disabled Devices.” Right-click “Stereo Mix” and click “Enable” to turn the function on.

2. Update your audio drivers.

3. If you see an option called Mono Mix or Wave Out Mix instead of Stereo Mix, use that instead.
[/mks_toggle][mks_toggle title=”Can I use this trick to record music from streaming sites?” state=”close”]This trick will work for throughout windows regardless of what you do. But we don’t recommend ripping music from streaming sites.[/mks_toggle]

Record Audio Playback on a Mac without Mic

Before playing the video, you’ll need to install Soundflower, a free utility that allows you to bypass audio to other applications.

How to record computer sound

How to record computer sound and your voice

If you set the sound settings correctly in Bandicam and Windows, you can record all the sounds from your computer.

  • [Windows Vista/7/8/10/11] To record your computer sound
  • [No sound] Solutions for sound recording
  • How to record computer sound in Windows XP

1. [Windows Vista/7/8/10/11] To record your computer sound

How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

2. [No sound] Solutions for sound recording

1) If “(Default OUtput Device)” is selected, but no sound is recorded, select the speaker (or headphone) device directly.

How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

2) If you still can’t record computer sound, check the Windows sound settings as shown below:

How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

  • If you see “Not plugged in,” connect the audio cable to your computer.
  • If you see “Disabled,” select the “Enable” option.
  • If you see “Ready,” set “Speakers (or Headphones)” as the default sound device.
  • Select ‘Open Volume Mixer‘ in the system tray, and set the Device/Applications volume to 70%

3) If the sound settings are correct, you will see the sound bar while recording.

4) If you still have the sound recording problem, try reinstalling the sound card driver and uncheck ” Run this program in compatibility mode for: ” and try again.

3. How to record computer sound in Windows XP

How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

Open Volume control -> Click Properties .

Setting > Control panel > Sound and audio devices.

2. Select the ‘Recording‘ icon from the ‘Properties’ window, and then check the ‘Stereo Mix‘ option .

    If there is no “Stereo Mix” option, you can check “Wake output mix,” “What U hear,” “Stereo out,” “Mixed output,” “Post-mix,” “Loop back,” “SUM,” and the like. If you can’t check “Recording” icon, you should change the “Mixer device” at the top of the ‘Properties’ (number 1)

3. Set the volume of Stereo Mix to 70%

  • If there is a ‘Mute’ check-box instead of a ‘Select’ check-box, the box needs to be left unchecked.

Tip 1) If you use Windows XP, you can’t record computer sounds with the ‘USB headset/sound device‘ .

Tip 2) If the sound is not recorded even after setting as above, try reinstalling the sound card driver again.

Marty9231

Posts: 142 +1
  • Nov 20, 2011
  • #1
  • Hi, as the title suggests I’ve got a bit of a sound problem:

    I wish to record some of my digital sound (e.g. my friends in Skype) using Audacity and stereo mix. However, using the built-in stereo mix record feature Audacity has, no sound is being recorded. So I checked out the stereo mix device under ‘recording devices’ in ‘Sound’ and found that it was not detecting any sound at all.

    I’m not totally sure as to how all it’s settings must be, but it’s like this now:

    Listen to: enabled
    Playback through: Speakers (Realtek HD Audio)

    The device is set to be ‘used’ ofcourse.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    • Nov 21, 2011
  • #2
  • Go to Edit -> Preferences and to the ‘Audio I/O’ or ‘Devices’ tab, and make sure the the audio INPUT is set to the source you want to hear from, in this case, the pc sound card or such, apparently Windows 7 does not change the input device when you select the Stereo Mix function for some reason.

    If that’s not the case, maybe your sound driver isn’t allowing the stereo mix to work, you can try the Control Panel configuring method, which you can find at the audacity website (i can’t set up links yet, but go to wiki.audacityteam.org/ and add this: index.php?title=Mixer_Toolbar_Issues#Using_the_Control_Panel) [sorry for this, but it’s for a good reason, i’m not a bot/spam ]

    kind of a pain to read through and configure everything, but will fix the issue.

    If you don’t want any trouble at all, you can just plug you speaker in the PC’s ‘Line In’ plug (the blue one), and set Audacity’s Input device to “Line in” or such.

    Marty9231

    Posts: 142 +1
    • Nov 24, 2011
  • #3
  • Excuse me for the late reply, but I’ve been very busy.

    I’ve followed every single one of the steps you, or that website, provided and stereo mix is still not picking up ANY sound at all.
    It should pick up music playing on my pc right? Because I’ve used it before and it always has, until I started using a USB headset.

    By the way, I doubt that the problem lies with Audacity, because if I turn on stereo mix as default device it should be picking up my output regardless of what software I’m running. And it’s not even doing that.

    Edit: After typing the last post, I realized the only thing I hadn’t done is take the headset out of the equasion. So I did, and if I use regular speakers, stereo mix works like a charm. The ONLY condition is that I have my headset speakers disabled, which is quite the opposite of what I want. I want my headset microphone to be disabled, is there any fix or workaround to accomplish this?

    JakenBacon

    • Oct 9, 2012
  • #4
  • I had the same issue.

    Stereomix installed, enabled and visible but no sound coming.

    The thing is that I was using:

    1- HDMI AUDIO OUTPUT via my GPU (plugged into my HDTV)
    OR
    2- my USB Audio Headset.
    (as my default listening device)

    I simply plugged an anolog speaker in the sound card’s rear panel and used it as “default listening device” when I had to record sound.

    Seems like Stereo Mix only works when you are actually using your soundcard as default listening device.

    Homer10

    • Dec 2, 2012
  • #5
  • Giuliano

    • Dec 14, 2012
  • #6
  • Ok dudes, I had the same problem and I finally found where the glitch was coming from. Let me explain.
    Granted that your soundcard device is fully recognized in Windows, activated and all that, and that you wonder why nothing is detected on the stereo mix when something is playing on your computer. (nothing to do with audacity, by the way).

    The problem was due to the configuration of the “Line In recording device” in Sound properties. It means you have to go in the properties of this device, BUT you have to do this with something (it can be anything, including a speakers’ or headset’s plug, . ) actually plugged into the Line In connector of your soundcard. Thus then, you will see more tabs in the properties window. In particular the “Listen” tab.

    This tab must be understood as playing the same role than the monitoring process in a DAW software or sequencer. Meaning, if you check the checkbox, you say to Windows itself that you want to monitor what is played through this connector/channel, and also in what you want to hear what you will be monitoring (speakers or headset, . ). And this configuration is most likely going to mess with your stereo mix output, somehow (I haven’t fully understood in which practical way, but I’m sure of the symptoms), if you check the checkbox.

    SO, you absolutely need to uncheck the ‘listen to this device’ in the ‘Listen’ tab of the Line In device, if you want to be able to record something from the stereo mix, in particular if you want to do this with a headset plugged in the soundcard ouput connector.

    I’ve searched some examples and found this:

    it records only microphone, can I record speakers and microphone simultaniously? or separately?

    1 Answer 1

    The ability to do this largely depends on which Windows version are you using.

    If you are still using Windows XP you might have “Software mix” or “Stereo out” recoding channels available.

    But if you are using Windows Vista or newer these channels are no longer available. Well not without the use of some unofficial sound card drivers.

    So in order to achieve what you need you will have to find some custom sound library which would be able to directly play the music from Youtube mix your microphone with hat and output (record) that into some file.

    I think you might be able to achieve this with Bass sound library (http://www.un4seen.com/) but I’m not sure.

    Another option would be to directly connect Wave Out line into Line in port using cable and then record contents from Line in instead from microphone. Also make sure to allow your microphone voice to be played over speakers (disabled by default on most sound cards for avoiding possible sound echo).

    EDIT: After taking a look at program named Audacity I found out that recording of your computers sound output only works if you chose WASAPI as sound interface.

    Looking further about the WASAPI it seems this is new audio interface that has been introduced with Windows Vista. Now I must admit that I haven’t known about this before.

    So it seems that answer would lie in using WASAPI instead of old MME audio interface.

    Quick search on Google does indicate that some people already managed to use WASAPI from Delphi.

    Now since I don’t have any experience with this new sound API I’m afraid that I can’t be of more help to you than recommending you to learn about WASAPI and find some examples for it.

    EDIT2: Managed to find a small example of using WASAPI interface in Delphi for Loopback recording. You can get it here:

    Also found a thread on DelphiPraxis about someone making a specially purposed unit for loopback recording with WASAPI in Delphi but since I’m not a member of DelphiPraxis I can’t download it and test it.

    Last Updated on March 27, 2020 by Amar Ilindra 2 Comments

    Screen recording with audio is a general need that you might sometimes need to make a video tutorial because the video will be more intuitive to show the operations. You might also need to record a clip of the online video so you don’t need to find a way to download the whole of it. There are more needs, such as to record gameplay, record an important online meeting, etc.

    This article teaches two significant ways to record computer screen with audio in Windows 10. One is to use the free inbuilt Windows 10 screen recorder. Another is to record screen with a more professional screen recording software for Windows 10.

    Method 1: Record Screen with the Free Built-in Windows 10 Screen Recorder

    You might have been using Windows 10 for quite a long time but haven’t known there’s a hidden feature that Windows 10 comes with a screen recording function. You can activate it by pressing Win + G . This function is built into Xbox. It is designed primarily for recording Xbox gameplay but it can also be used to record browser video or capture the activities on the applications.

    How to record your screen with the Win10 inbuilt recorder?

    Step 1: Press Windows key + G key simultaneously to open the recorder.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Step 2: In the Xbox game bar panel, you can adjust the volume for the microphone sound and system sound. After that, click on the recording button as highlighted to start recording your work.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Step 3: The Win10 recorder is recording the screen. You can click the “Stop recording” button when you are going to end the recording process. You’ll find your recorded videos under the “Videos” folder in a subfolder called “Captures“.

    The superiority and inferiority of this free inbuilt screen recording software are quite obvious. The biggest advantage is that it can record “after the fact”. Just imagine you have experienced the best hit in your game playing history but you didn’t turn on the recorder beforehand? You can use the inbuilt recorder to record most recent 30 seconds of gameplay on Windows 10.

    However, the shortcoming of this free inbuilt screen recorder is deadly. It doesn’t allow you to record the desktop and the file explorer. In addition to this, you can’t switch to record the activities on different applications.

    For example, when you are recording the operation on the Chrome browser, and you switch to another software interface, the recording will automatically stop. That means it is almost impossible to record a video tutorial with the inbuilt Windows 10 recorder.

    Don’t worry and keep reading. We will show a more professional way to capture all the screen activities on Windows 10 along with Audio.

    Method 2: Capture Screen with VideoSolo Screen Recorder

    To record anything that happens on the screen, it is necessary to find a more extensive screen recording software. VideoSolo Screen Recorder is a professional tool that perfectly works on Windows 10/8/7. It can record all the screen activities with system audio and microphone audio, whether it is the operation on desktop, file explorer, or other applications.

    With the free version of VideoSolo Screen Recorder, you can record for 3 minutes. However, to record as long as you wish, you need to either buy the Pro version or restart the recording for every 3 minutes. Later you might need to combine them using any video editors.

    There are many output formats for you to choose, such as MP4, WMV, MOV, F4V, AVI, TS, GIF. After recording, VideoSolo Screen Recorder enables you to preview and do a simple clip for the video. You can download the free trial to try.

    Here is how to record computer screen with VideoSolo Screen Recorder

    Step 1: Launch the Program and Click on “Video Recorder”

    Launch VideoSolo Screen Recorder, the program interface looks like this. To record the computer video with audio, you will need to move your mouse to click on “Video Recorder“.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Step 2: Set the Recording Region and Adjust the Sound

    After you click on the “Video Recorder” option, you will be taken to a new set of menu. Here you can customize the recording area: full or part of the screen. And then, you can adjust the system sound and microphone. If you don’t need to record the system sound, you can simply turn it off.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Step 3: Customize the Preferences before Start

    VideoSolo Screen Recorder offers rich customizations. Click on the “Settings” icon on the program interface and it will bring you to the “Preferences” window. Here you can set your own hotkeys in the “Hotkeys” column, or customize many output settings in the “Output” column.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Step 4: Click the “REC” Button to Start Recording

    Go back to the “Video Recorder” interface, and then click on the “REC” button to start the recording process. While recording, you can use the hotkeys to control the process. For example, end the record, pause/resume the record, take screenshots, hide/show the floating bar, and open/close webcam.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Step 5: Preview and Clip the Video

    Click on the “Stop” button the end to the recording process. Before saving, you can preview the video and cut out the unwanted part, and then click on “Save“.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    You can know more features about VideoSolo Screen Recorder in this video guide.

    ” data-lazy-src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/HTWiNo4s7AU?feature=oembed&autoplay=0″ data-lazy-method=”viewport” data-lazy-attributes=”srcdoc,src”>

    Above is how to record your screen with audio in Windows 10. The Windows 10 inbuilt screen recorder is great for recording Xbox gameplay and it is convenient to share the game video to the Xbox online community.

    But comes to record anything you want on the computer screen, you can try VideoSolo Screen Recorder. It is a powerful, efficient and intuitive tool. You can get started very quickly.

    ” data-medium-file=https://cdn.digitaldjtips.com/app/uploads/2019/12/03150856/record_DJ_mix-600×318.jpeg data-large-file=https://cdn.digitaldjtips.com/app/uploads/2019/12/03150856/record_DJ_mix-1204×639.jpeg data-eio=p data-src=https://cdn.digitaldjtips.com/app/uploads/2019/12/03150856/record_DJ_mix-1204×639.jpeg data-srcset=”https://cdn.digitaldjtips.com/app/uploads/2019/12/03150856/record_DJ_mix-1204×639.jpeg 1204w, https://cdn.digitaldjtips.com/app/uploads/2019/12/03150856/record_DJ_mix-600×318.jpeg 600w, https://cdn.digitaldjtips.com/app/uploads/2019/12/03150856/record_DJ_mix-768×408.jpeg 768w, https://cdn.digitaldjtips.com/app/uploads/2019/12/03150856/record_DJ_mix-300×159.jpeg 300w, https://cdn.digitaldjtips.com/app/uploads/2019/12/03150856/record_DJ_mix.jpeg 1208w” data-eio-rwidth=1204 data-eio-rheight=639>

    However you do it, and whatever you do it to (laptop, hard disk recorder, iOS device, etc), you really ought to record your DJ mixes. In this article, we’ll look at the options available to you.

    Phil Morse

    Watch our live show on recording your sets

    We recently dedicated a whole weekly Tuesday Tips Live show to this topic. Hear me talk through all of these options and show you many of them, and hear what the Digital DJ Tips community had to say too, in this recording of the show.

    Every DJ should record his or her DJ sets. There’s a very simple reason: there is only one person in the whole world who doesn’t hear your DJing how it really is, and that person is you.

    Why? Because you’re too busy doing it. Ever heard your own voice on a recording, and thought, “Urgh! Is that REALLY how I sound?” Well, guess what? It’s just the same with your DJing!

    I don’t mean that you’ll think “God, that sounds terrible!” (although you might – I did the first time I heard one of my “live” sets recorded), I just mean that you have to hear your DJing like a member of your audience hears it in order to really know what your mixes sound like.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    The iRig Stream, a simple 2-in audio interface (we use this to record our sets for our videos at Digital DJ Tips).

    Stuff you didn’t like at the time, or thought was too obvious, or too rough, may sound fine. Stuff you were proud of may not hit the mark. You may spot that you have a tendency to bring tracks in too quiet, then correct, or you play with your kick drums too loud, or one of countless other tweaks that only you can make. But only after hearing your sets how the rest of the world hears them will you spot these things.

    Convinced? Good. So now the next thing you’ll be thinking is: Why not just hit record on my DJ software? Job done!

    Start producing world-class mixtapes Pro Mixtape Formula.

    Well, yes – many times, that’s exactly right. But as you’ll see, it’s not always possible. Let’s start with that, though, as we run down seven ways to record your DJ sets…

    7 Ways To Record Your DJ Sets

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Tascam’s DR-05 – this one has been in my kit bag for a decade…

    1. Use your DJ software – The most obvious way. Works well if you’re recording music that you own (ie not streaming services – they all disable this button), and you only want to record what’s running through your software. For instance, it often can’t record microphones, or other DJs playing alongside you on their gear
    2. Using a USB drive plugged into the DJ gear – If you’re using a standalone DJ system (Denon DJ’s Prime 4 for instance, or the XDJ-XZ and others from Pioneer DJ) you can plug in a USB drive, hit “Record”, and record everything you do on that unit straight to USB. Same streaming limitations apply where the hardware has streaming available, though (such as on the Prime 4)
    3. Using your phone – This is a classic old school way. You plug a cable from the mixer or controller output into the required adaptors to feed the audio as a Mic In on your phone. A bit of volume tweakage can usually give you an acceptable recording, albeit in mono. Fewer phones have a headphones/mic socket at all nowadays, though, forcing the purchase of an additional adaptor. You also need a “TRS to TRRS” cable to get the mic part of the equation to work (Rode has a good one, the SC4). You could also try this cable from Headset Buddy that matches the phone’s mic input to your DJ gear’s line out a bit better. Bit of a hack though, this one
    4. Using a standalone recorder – Classic recorders come from companies like Tascam (their DR-05 has been in my kit bag for close to a decade), and a newer mode to consider, the Reloop Tape 2 (which is kitsch, being shaped like an audio cassette, and not particularly cheap, but it works well). You get the finished audio file off of it, usually via a card, into your laptop etc
    5. Using an audio interface, into (usually) a laptop – Any 2-in audio interface will do the job, such as the iRig Stream. Again you feed an output from your controller or mixer into it, and then plug the audio interface into your laptop via USB, your Android device via (usually) USB-C, or your iOS device via a Lightning or USB-C cable. You then record on any recording software (Quicktime, Audacity, Voice Recorder on a phone, etc). A solid way to do it, as long as you set it up right
    6. Using a dedicated recording system into your phone or tablet – There’s actually only one we know of, called Evermix Mixbox (now up to v4) – it is a bit like the audio interface above, but it comes with its own app and sharing software, which greatly simplifies everything from volume level (to get loud records without clipping) to getting your mix out there. Available for iOS and Android. A good route for beginners wanting to break out from using their DJ software for recording
    7. Using Pioneer’s DJM-REC app – If you are DJing on a Pioneer DJM-series mixer equipped with the send/return feature, you can plug a single USB-to-Lightning/USB-C cable from that mixer to your iPhone, and the DJM-REC app set-up will behave very much like the Evermix above, but without the need for extra hardware, as the audio interface in the mixer is being used. Obviously only good for iOS/pro-end Pioneer users, though. Works very well if that’s you

    Finally

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Reloop’s Tape 2 is a rather kitsch but decent way of recording any DJ set directly to an SD card.

    However you do it, do try to record your DJ sets, whether live or practice. You’ll improve immeasurably – especially if you record everything, not just your “run through” at the end of a practice session. Sometimes the good stuff comes when you’re not really trying too hard…

    How do you record your sets? Let us now in the coments below…

    How can we help you today?

    How to record audio on your computer or phone Print

    Modified on: Wed, May 16, 2018 at 1:45 PM

    You may find yourself in need of recording audio using your desktop, laptop, or other mobile device. This article will show you how to do so using several popular devices.

    Mac

    All Macs (laptops and desktops) come with a built-in microphone.

    1. Go to your Applications folder
    2. Open QuickTime Player
    3. Click File>New Audio Recording
    4. Click the red record button to begin recording
    5. Click the black stop button to stop recording
    6. Go to File>Save As to save your file to your desired location

    PC

    1. Open the Sound Recorder application in the following location: Start>All Programs>Accessories>Sound Recorder
    2. Click Start Recording to begin recording
    3. Click Stop Recording to stop recording
    4. Choose a filename and destination in the window that pops up
    5. Click Save

    Web

    There are many web-based voice recording tools, such as Online Voice Recorder: https://online-voice-recorder.com/beta/

    1. Go to https://online-voice-recorder.com/beta/
    2. If prompted by your browser, click Allow Microphone Access. You may also click on the Settings button to configure your microphone.
    3. Click the red record button to begin recording.
    4. Click the record button to end recording
    5. Click Save to download your recording
    1. Open the Voice Memos app (all iPhones have this app, and it can’t be deleted)
    2. Press the red record button to begin recording
    3. Press the red stop button to stop recording
    4. Tap Done
    5. Type a name for your recording
    6. Press Save
    7. Tap your recording
    8. Press the share icon and email or AirDrop the file to another computer or device

    Android

    Each Android device is different, and different carriers may load different apps on the device. Because of this, there is no standard voice recorder app for Android like there is for iOS. Your device may have an app installed already (look for apps labeled “Recorder,” “Voice Recorder,” “Memo,” “Notes,” etc.), or you may have to download one from the Google Play store (search for “Voice Recorder” and find an app that meets your needs). Because the apps may vary, the instructions below are more of a guide.

    1. Locate or download a recorder app on your phone and click to open
    2. Press the Record button to begin recording
    3. Press the Stop button to end recording
    4. Tap your recording to share

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    However you do it, and whatever you do it to (laptop, hard disk recorder, iOS device, etc), you really ought to record your DJ mixes. In this article, we’ll look at the options available to you.

    Phil Morse

    Watch our live show on recording your sets

    We recently dedicated a whole weekly Tuesday Tips Live show to this topic. Hear me talk through all of these options and show you many of them, and hear what the Digital DJ Tips community had to say too, in this recording of the show.

    Every DJ should record his or her DJ sets. There’s a very simple reason: there is only one person in the whole world who doesn’t hear your DJing how it really is, and that person is you.

    Why? Because you’re too busy doing it. Ever heard your own voice on a recording, and thought, “Urgh! Is that REALLY how I sound?” Well, guess what? It’s just the same with your DJing!

    I don’t mean that you’ll think “God, that sounds terrible!” (although you might – I did the first time I heard one of my “live” sets recorded), I just mean that you have to hear your DJing like a member of your audience hears it in order to really know what your mixes sound like.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    The iRig Stream, a simple 2-in audio interface (we use this to record our sets for our videos at Digital DJ Tips).

    Stuff you didn’t like at the time, or thought was too obvious, or too rough, may sound fine. Stuff you were proud of may not hit the mark. You may spot that you have a tendency to bring tracks in too quiet, then correct, or you play with your kick drums too loud, or one of countless other tweaks that only you can make. But only after hearing your sets how the rest of the world hears them will you spot these things.

    Convinced? Good. So now the next thing you’ll be thinking is: Why not just hit record on my DJ software? Job done!

    Start producing world-class mixtapes Pro Mixtape Formula.

    Well, yes – many times, that’s exactly right. But as you’ll see, it’s not always possible. Let’s start with that, though, as we run down seven ways to record your DJ sets…

    7 Ways To Record Your DJ Sets

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Tascam’s DR-05 – this one has been in my kit bag for a decade…

    1. Use your DJ software – The most obvious way. Works well if you’re recording music that you own (ie not streaming services – they all disable this button), and you only want to record what’s running through your software. For instance, it often can’t record microphones, or other DJs playing alongside you on their gear
    2. Using a USB drive plugged into the DJ gear – If you’re using a standalone DJ system (Denon DJ’s Prime 4 for instance, or the XDJ-XZ and others from Pioneer DJ) you can plug in a USB drive, hit “Record”, and record everything you do on that unit straight to USB. Same streaming limitations apply where the hardware has streaming available, though (such as on the Prime 4)
    3. Using your phone – This is a classic old school way. You plug a cable from the mixer or controller output into the required adaptors to feed the audio as a Mic In on your phone. A bit of volume tweakage can usually give you an acceptable recording, albeit in mono. Fewer phones have a headphones/mic socket at all nowadays, though, forcing the purchase of an additional adaptor. You also need a “TRS to TRRS” cable to get the mic part of the equation to work (Rode has a good one, the SC4). You could also try this cable from Headset Buddy that matches the phone’s mic input to your DJ gear’s line out a bit better. Bit of a hack though, this one
    4. Using a standalone recorder – Classic recorders come from companies like Tascam (their DR-05 has been in my kit bag for close to a decade), and a newer mode to consider, the Reloop Tape 2 (which is kitsch, being shaped like an audio cassette, and not particularly cheap, but it works well). You get the finished audio file off of it, usually via a card, into your laptop etc
    5. Using an audio interface, into (usually) a laptop – Any 2-in audio interface will do the job, such as the iRig Stream. Again you feed an output from your controller or mixer into it, and then plug the audio interface into your laptop via USB, your Android device via (usually) USB-C, or your iOS device via a Lightning or USB-C cable. You then record on any recording software (Quicktime, Audacity, Voice Recorder on a phone, etc). A solid way to do it, as long as you set it up right
    6. Using a dedicated recording system into your phone or tablet – There’s actually only one we know of, called Evermix Mixbox (now up to v4) – it is a bit like the audio interface above, but it comes with its own app and sharing software, which greatly simplifies everything from volume level (to get loud records without clipping) to getting your mix out there. Available for iOS and Android. A good route for beginners wanting to break out from using their DJ software for recording
    7. Using Pioneer’s DJM-REC app – If you are DJing on a Pioneer DJM-series mixer equipped with the send/return feature, you can plug a single USB-to-Lightning/USB-C cable from that mixer to your iPhone, and the DJM-REC app set-up will behave very much like the Evermix above, but without the need for extra hardware, as the audio interface in the mixer is being used. Obviously only good for iOS/pro-end Pioneer users, though. Works very well if that’s you

    Finally

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Reloop’s Tape 2 is a rather kitsch but decent way of recording any DJ set directly to an SD card.

    However you do it, do try to record your DJ sets, whether live or practice. You’ll improve immeasurably – especially if you record everything, not just your “run through” at the end of a practice session. Sometimes the good stuff comes when you’re not really trying too hard…

    How do you record your sets? Let us now in the coments below…

    I’m trying to record the output from my computer speakers with PyAudio.
    I tried to modify the code example given in the PyAudio documentation, but it doesn’t work.

    Technically, there’s no error. I obtain the file output.wav and I can open it, but there’s no sound. On Audacity, I can only see a straight line.

    What’s going wrong?

    5 Answers 5

    In case someone is still stumbling over this like me, I found a PyAudio fork to record the output on windows.

    The official PyAudio build isn’t able to record the output. BUT with Windows Vista and above, a new API, WASAPI was introduced, which includes the ability to open a stream to an output device in loopback mode. In this mode the stream will behave like an input stream, with the ability to record the outgoing audio stream.

    To set the mode, one has to set a special flag (AUDCLNT_STREAMFLAGS_LOOPBACK). Since this flag is not supported in the official build one needs to edit PortAudio as well as PyAudio, to add loopback support.

    I got to record my speaker output with pyaudio with some configuration and code from pyaudio’s documentation.

    Code

    Configuration

    First, with pulseaudio running, create a loopback device:

    Then set the default (fallback) to this loopback device in pavucontrol:

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Then you can start the script, wait 5 seconds, and you should have an output.wav.

    If you create an application on windows platform, you can use default stereo mixer virtual device to record your PC’s output.

    2) Connect PyAudio to your stereo mixer, this way:

    where dev_index is an index of your stereo mixer.

    3) List your devices to get required index:

    Alternatively, you can automatically get index by device name:

    4) Continue to work with pyAudio as in the case of recording from a microphone:

    You can’t record from an output stream as though it were input. To record, you need to connect PyAudio to an input device, like a microphone. At least that’s the normal way to do things.

    Try connecting to a microphone first, and see if you get anything. If this works, then try doing something unusual.

    As a small speedup to your iterations, rather than recording and looking at the file, it’s often easier just to print out the max for a few chunks to make sure you’re bringing in data. Usually just watching the numbers scroll by and comparing them to the sound gives a quick estimate of whether things are correctly connected.

    Sound Recorder is an app you can use to record audio for up to three hours per recording file. You can use it side by side with other apps, which allows you to record sound while you continue working on your PC. (While there is also a desktop program called Sound Recorder, this article is about the Sound Recorder app.)

    To start recording, tap or click the circular button with a microphone in the center. This is your Record button.

     How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    To pause recording, tap or click Pause.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    To resume the same recording you paused, tap or click Pause again.

    To save the recording tap or click Stop. You’ll see the recording appear in your list of recordings.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    (The next time you tap or click Record, you’ll start a new recording.)

    Tap or click the recording you want to rename.

    Tap or click Rename.

    Enter a new name for your recording. Tap or click Rename.

    Your recordings are stored within the Sound Recorder app. If you uninstall the app, your recordings will be deleted. To send the recording file to someone through another app, use the Share charm.

    Open Sound Recorder.

    Tap or click the recording you want to share.

    Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Share.
    (If you’re using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Share.)

    You’ll see a list of the apps you have that can share. To mail your recording, tap or click Mail and follow the instructions. To share your recording to an app, tap or click the app and follow the instructions.

    You can also send recording files as attachments right from the Mail app. Tap or click Sound Recorder from the menu when you’re choosing a file to attach to an email.

    Tap or click the recording you want to trim.

    Tap or click Trim.

    Drag the left and right ends of the timeline to the new start and stop points you want.You can play the trimmed recording to make sure it starts and stops where you want. Adjust the start or stop points as needed. Tap or click OK.

    Do one of the following:

    If you’d like to save the trimmed portion as a new recording file, tap or click Save a copy.

    If you’d like to replace your recording with the trimmed portion, tap or click Update original.

    Note: You can’t trim if you have minimized Sound Recorder to take up less than 672px of width on the screen—you’ll have to make Sound Recorder larger in order to trim.

    Your USB audio port can be surprisingly useful–giving you even better sound than your computer’s regular audio output. Here’s how to use it.

    Eliot Van Buskirk

    Evolver.fm Editor Eliot Van Buskirk has covered and occasionally anticipated music and technology intersections for 15 years for CNET, Wired.com, McGraw-Hill, and The Echo Nest. He is not currently an employee of CNET.

    Once upon a time, there was this scary idea that computer manufacturers would lock down our machines with a purely-digital, “protected,” end-to-end music delivery system. The fear driving this shift, which did not happen: the so-called “analog hole.”

    The analog hole can allow someone to record otherwise “protected” audio on its way to speakers. The person who recorded the song can then share it via P2P with millions of music fans who would never bother connecting an analog recording device to a computer’s output and hijacking the audio that way.

    One solution that was bandied around back then: to create a Secure Audio Path (SAP) all the way from the playback software to our speakers, protecting then whole chain with digital rights management (DRM). This would close the analog hole. Happily for music fans, that vision was never realized, meaning that USB Audio devices–a standard compatible with Mac, Windows, and Linux–can play music from any source normally handled by your regular analog output–the one most people connect to headphones or speakers.

    Connected devices have largely obviated the need for onerous DRM technologies in the first place by letting listeners prove they have the right to listen to a piece of music simply by signing in to an app or Web site. DRM is invisible. Luckily for us, it doesn’t care whether your output is analog (the regular kind) or digital (USB).

    Now, to the main topic at hand: your computer’s USB audio port, which can connect to external audio devices that play music from any Web site, file, music service, or app.

    So why would you want to use USB Audio instead of your computer’s regular input?

    The answer is simple: mainly, because USB Audio devices tend to sound better than your computer’s regular output, because they process the audio (turning it from digital to analog) farther away from your computer’s other electronics, which tend to add audio interference. (Using the regular output, you can actually hear a buzz from some computers with sensitive headphones–especially with a laptop.) In addition, USB Audio devices can offer surround sound (5.1- or 7.1-channel sound), even if your computer lacks that option.

    This is probably the simplest tutorial I have ever written in terms of the steps you’ll need to take. The trick is mainly just knowing that USB Audio works with everything.

    You can buy any USB Audio-compatible module, amplifier, speaker, headphone, or microphone (examples below), and simply plug it into your computer and you’re pretty much good to go. It will be able to play music from any desktop or web app: MOG, Spotify, Rdio, Hype Machine Radio, Turntable.fm–you name it.

    Here’s how you switch your output to a USB audio device in Windows:

    Eliot Van Buskirk/Evolver.fm

    Then select the USB audio device:

    Eliot Van Buskirk/Evolver.fm

    And here’s how you do it on a Mac (I’m not on a Mac today, so this screenshot comes courtesy of Chris Bowler):

    Plenty of options exist for USB Audio devices online and at your local tech store. All of them will work with all of your desktop and web music apps, making them sound better.

    Altec Lansing Orbit Stereo USB PC speakers have a nice, tubular design, and any USB-powered speakers make for easier travel, because you don’t need to carry a power cord with you–they get all the juice they need from your computer. (Frequent travelers might also consider a completely cordless Bluetooth option like the Jawbone Jambox.)

    Courtesy of Glow Audio

    That said, larger speakers that get their power from the wall rather than from your computer’s USB port will always sound better. If you’re looking to boost your sound quality in your home, dorm room, or office, go with a USB audio module like the ones listed here on CNET (disclosure: I worked at CNET from 1997 to 2005) and then connect those to powered speakers or your sound system of choice.

    There is one more, far more “out there” option for music fans with some extra scratch (about $800) who want to turn extremely “digital” sources like Spotify into warm, tube-amplified sound: the Glow Audio Amp One (manufacturer’s Web site), pictured to the right, which runs your sound through four vacuum tubes–the same kind found in some high-end audiophile systems.

    It’s a great conversation piece, and sounds great too, although it’s definitely for the desktop at 5 watts per channel for powering speakers (you can also use headphones). More practically-minded folks will want to stick with the less-expensive (and still great-sounding) digital options listed here.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    There are many reasons why one sees the need to record audio on laptop. For music enthusiasts, this is a great way to promote their songs. Instrument devotees on the other hand record audios on their PC to make editing much more convenient. Then there are those who love to rip mp3s from streaming websites such as Vimeo or YouTube. Some even do this to save a copy of their favorite radio programs. Interestingly, this is equally necessary if someone needs to create fantastic voice covers and better sounding videos.

    However, how to record audio from laptop is not as easy as counting 1-2-3. Problems will always arise such as grounding issues, static noise, inability to record on time, failure to capture best sound quality, recording program turns unresponsive, audio recorder with too many bundled applications, and the list goes on and on. If you don’t know how to record audios from your PC or are confused on which program to use, check out these recommended apps below.

    3 Best Tools to Record Audio on Laptop

    Apowersoft Free Online Audio Recorder

    One of the best tools you can use to capture anything that is playing on your computer or microphone is Apowersoft Free Online Audio Recorder. With this application, you can record sounds from various audio inputs such as system sound, microphone or both. As long as you can hear it, you can record it.

    What makes this program wonderful is that aside from being free, it is also an online app that needs not to be installed. All you need is an internet connection and it can run on any browser without the need to install any plug-ins or subscribe to various services. You can use it to record streaming audio on laptop, radio stations, in-game sounds, voice chat and many more.

    To use this nifty tool, all you need to do is:

    • Visit Apowersoft Free Online Audio Recorder and click “Start Recording” button.
    • Select appropriate audio source. For first-time users, a one-time only “Download launcher” needs to be installed.
    • Open the audio that needs to be recorded and play it. Click the “Red” recording button to start recording and hit “Stop” once done. It will then automatically save the audio file on the library that you can find on your PC.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Free Sound Recorder

    Another program that you can use to capture sounds from your PC is Free Sound Recorder. It supports various audio sources like microphone, stereo, line-in, online streaming, sound players, VoIP, voice chats, multimedia players and many more. You could also use it to record meeting audio from laptop. This tool is further equipped with various functions such as sound editor, audio encoder, scheduler, gain control functions, file list manager and all others.

    How to record audio from laptop using Free Sound Recorder is very easy, just:

    • Download and install the program on your computer. Launch it and click “Show mixer window” and select right audio source.
    • Choose the appropriate recording device and adjust volume and balance if necessary.
    • To adjust audio format, output date, gain controls and to schedule recordings, click “Options” and hit “General Settings”.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

  • When you’re ready, click “Start recording” button to record and “Stop” once done.
  • Streaming Audio Recorder

    If you want a tool that can basically do all recording jobs with advanced functions, check out Streaming Audio Recorder. This program allows you to record streaming audio on laptop, video platforms, radio stations, voice chats and many more with such ease and comfort. Everything you record with Streaming Audio Recorder comes in high quality and there are various audio formats as well as device compatibility to choose from.

    Streaming Audio Recorder is a one-stop program for all your recording needs. It can automatically add ID3 tags, convert audios into different formats, do batch conversions, comes with a built-in mp3 downloader, audio editor, radio station, media player, CD burner and features the ability to seamlessly transfer audios to iTunes. Moreover, the simple user interface is very easy to operate.

    To record audio on laptop using Streaming Audio Recorder, just follow these steps:

    • Download and install the program on your PC. Click “Settings” and adjust audio source, audio quality, output format and directory.
    • If you want to split audio and skip silence, click “Advanced options”. Prepare the audio that needs to be recorded and click “Red” button to record. Hit “Pause” or “Stop” when done.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

  • Click “Library” on the left pane to check the recorded audio file.
  • Conclusion

    For simple recordings, you can use Apowersoft Free Online Audio Recorder because it doesn’t need to be installed and it’s very easy to setup. For more advanced jobs, Free Sound Recorder is great but be warned that even free, this tool requires you to register before you can actually use the program. And finally for demanding tasks such as to record meeting audio from laptop, doing file conversions and sound editing, Streaming Audio Recorder is perfect because it is equipped with advanced functions you’ll ever need for a breezy recording.

    Whether you make music with a couple of compact desktop synths, a wall of modular units, or a rack of keyboards that would make Rick Wakeman jealous, you’ve probably thought about putting some of those bleeps and boops down on (virtual) tape.

    While you may be comfortable operating an array of knobs and switches, learning the ins and outs of recording gear can be daunting. But have no fear: This article and the video above will lay out a streamlined solution for recording your synthesizers. We’ll also elaborate on a few upgrades worth considering and a couple of cool extra tricks to try.

    Interested in learning the easiest way to record more instruments? Check out the other tutorials we have in this series: electric guitars, bass guitars, and acoustic guitars.

    • An audio interface and/or USB mixer (any mixer with a built-in USB audio interface)
    • Speakers and/or headphones for monitoring
    • Assorted cables to connect your instruments and speakers
    • Recording software (also known as a DAW, or Digital Audio Workstation)

    Choosing an Audio Interface and/or Mixer

    If your rig is small and you’re only trying to record one synth to start, there’s no easier way to connect it to your computer than via a small, two-channel audio interface.

    In the video above, Justin is plugging his Korg Minilogue into the Universal Audio Apollo Twin, which is a high-quality, professional-level interface. If you’re looking for a less expensive alternative, check out the Focusrite 2i2, PreSonus AudioBox iTwo, and Apogee Duet 2.

    If your synth rig is already a bit more substantial or if you envision it growing in the near future, you can use a standard mixer along with your interface to keep multiple synths connected and ready for recording. In the video above, Justin uses a four-channel Mackie 402VLZ4 to augment the two channels available in his interface—but any size mixer could work. Or, your ideal piece of kit may be a USB mixer, which combines an analog mixer with a digital audio interface, putting everything you need in one convenient unit.

    They also come in a variety of shapes and sizes to suit your budget and feature needs, from the compact Behringer Xenyx Q502USB to the flexible, mid-size Allen & Heath ZEDi-10 and the full-featured Soundcraft Signature 12 MTK. (Later in the video above, Justin uses a Yamaha MG12XU.)

    When it comes to choosing what’s right for you, you’ll first need to decide how many channels you require and what types of inputs your devices require. Mixers can be found with anywhere from two channels to 32 or more, with several types of audio inputs available. Most synthesizers use simple line-level quarter-inch TRS connections, so you don’t necessarily need mic preamps with XLR inputs, but most mixers feature them in addition to line inputs. Unbalanced RCA jacks or Hi-Z instrument inputs can be useful for incorporating guitars and certain vintage equipment.

    Once you’ve settled on the size of mixer you’re looking for, consider any other features you may need (or not need). Do you want full four-band parametric equalizers on every channel, or can you make do with just a high and low knob? Do convenient onboard effects appeal to you, or would you prefer auxiliary sends for integrating your own effects? And while long-throw faders are cool, would you rather save some desk space and opt for simple trim knobs?

    Whatever your ideal mixer looks like, some of the most important factors to look into are the capabilities of the USB connection that will allow you to record into your computer. Some models are only capable of recording the two-track master mix, while others can output each channel discreetly (pre- or post-EQ), giving you more control over mixing later. And of course, the sample rate and bit depth will determine the audio quality you’re able to record (go for 44.1kHz/24 bits at the minimum).

    Setting It All Up

    Start by connecting the outputs of your synthesizers to the inputs of your audio interface or mixer. Then, hook up a pair of speakers to the main left and right outputs (or headphones to the headphone jack). Start with the master volume low, and play your instruments one by one to make sure signal is getting to the outputs. If you can’t hear anything, turn the channel volume up (via knob or fader) and make sure the channel is not muted and no pads are engaged. On some models of mixers you may need to manually assign each channel to the master output (or other destinations).

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Before you can actually record, you’ll need to get your interface or USB mixer talking to your computer. First, make sure your operating system is updated, and install the most recent drivers for your mixer—this may happen automatically when you plug it in, or you may need to install them from an included CD or download from the manufacturer’s website. Next, open the audio preferences in your recording software (DAW) and select the drivers you just downloaded instead of the default (your soundcard). Make sure the inputs and outputs available correspond to your interface or USB mixer.

    Finally, create as many tracks as you need to record—whether that’s a single stereo track to capture the whole mix or individual tracks for each channel. Assign each track’s input to the corresponding mixer channel and arm them for recording. There are many ways to avoid distracting latency when using an interface. One trick, if you’re using a USB mixer, is to disable the input monitoring in your DAW so that you can instead monitor directly from the mixer. If you’re playing along to a metronome or backing track, make sure it’s routed to the mixer so you can hear it along with your synthesizers.

    The Next Level: Pro Interfaces with MIDI + Outboard Gear

    While USB mixers are a convenient way to get started, you may eventually feel like upgrading to a more versatile system with better sound quality. The preamps and digital audio converters in professional interfaces are often higher quality, and faster connections like USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt mean less latency and smoother performance. Many interfaces also include MIDI connectivity, which enables you to record every detail of your performance to edit later or play back with a different synth.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Perhaps the biggest benefit of standalone interfaces is that they allow you to use any gear you like on the front-end, instead of having your entire signal path baked into one unit. Much like building a modular synthesizer, you’ll be able to pick and choose just the components you want: a Lunchbox full of boutique preamps, a rackmount multi-effects unit, a real spring reverb—even a full analog console. And when your gear addiction starts to fill up your rack, adding a patchbay to your setup can make navigating your equipment a lot easier.

    Before you take the dive into professional recording gear, know that this newfound freedom comes with a learning curve. Without the streamlined control surface of a USB mixer, you’ll need an advanced knowledge of signal flow to keep track of multiple input paths, hardware inserts, and especially monitoring.

    Want to learn how to record more than just your synth rig? Check out our guides on the Easiest Way to Record Your Electric Guitar and the Easiest Way to Record Your Acoustic Guitar. For more tips about home recording, see our Home Recording Basics series.

    For questions, answers and opinions

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    Noise when recording stereo-mix

    Forum rules
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    Noise when recording stereo-mix

    Post by cazorla » Tue Jun 24, 2014 6:27 pm

    When I record system audio with stereo-mix, there is a noise throughout the recording. It’s not really annoying or noticeable, except if there is a silence or when using headphones. I’ve added a sample of only the noise, you might have to increase volume to the max to hear it. Is there any way I can get rid of that noise without using filters or effects like noise removal? And if not, what settings should I use?

    I’m recording with the Windows WDM-KS setting and Audacity 2.0.4 for Windows 7 (32-bit on 64-bit machine). I also have a filter/effect/equalizer (not sure how to call it) active called SRS Audio Sandbox. Even when I turn that thing off or uninstall it, the noise stays.

    Re: Noise when recording stereo-mix

    Post by kozikowski » Tue Jun 24, 2014 7:36 pm

    Frying mosquitoes. We’re getting to be old friends with this. Typically that happens with a USB microphone and rarely with a line-level device. It’s computer digital housekeeping getting into the sound. I’m fairly sure about that because when it happens to me, I can hear my computer shifting gears for different tasks.

    We’re not entirely sure how it gets into the show. It’s a chimera. Every time we get close, it changes into something else. We were almost 100% sure it was caused by digital interference leaking down the USB cable right up to the day I got it with a system that had no cable.

    Stereo Mix is a deadly service to troubleshoot because you’re recording “The Computer” and everything in it. At minimum, the sound is going through the computer twice: once in the playback service and then again in the record. Two opportunities to pick up trash.

    So we know in the very generic sense what it is, but there’s no clue how to cure it. It’s wide band enough that Noise Removal only helps a little bit and then only until the noise changes. Remember, Noise Removal only works on noises that do not change over time.

    Your particular show might benefit from Noise Removal. Pick the first value, noise reduction in the 9-12-18 (gentle) range to avoid damage to the show.

    Discord is a proprietary freeware application and digital platform that is designed for video gaming communities which specialize in text, image, audio and video communication between users. Discord runs on Windows, Android, iOS, Linux and in other web browsers. There is a good chance if you play games online, you’ve heard about Discord. According to a survey in December 2018, there are over 200 million users of this platform. It is a free voice, video and text chat app for teens and adults ages 13 and up. It was created to bring people together through a love of gaming. Teens can access Discord via their PC, browser, or mobile phone. It uses the microphone as an input to send the voice to other users and is very beneficial especially for gamers. Although this easy to use voice chat service has taken the gaming world by storm, gamers can be distracted when discord picking up computer sounds.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    The app makes chatting pretty easy and offers search functions that can help you find other people and add them to a friends list for quick communication. Lots of people use it not just for talking to each other while playing games, but as an organizational and social tool. While most of the servers are related to gaming, you can also find public Discord servers that focus on a variety of topics, including things like anime, cryptocurrency, self-improvement, and just making friends and hanging out. The versatility has led large groups of users to embrace Discord as a place to meet and chat with people who have similar interest, not just friends.

    Cause of the Discord picking up computer sounds

    The Cause of the issue of Discord picking up computer sounds in some cases is usually related to certain sound settings or sound drivers. Make sure that the input device isn’t “Stereo Mix” or something similar to that as that will pick up system audio. Here are some common causes of this issue-

    • If in the sound settings the input device or the output device is selected as “stereo mix” it prompts the speakers and the sound of the microphone to mix which causes a problem where the audio of the computer can be heard from the mic.
    • Another possible issue might be that the correct sound drivers are not installed or maybe the sound drivers that are installed are corrupted.
    • Lastly, another common reason for this problem to occur is when the headphones are connected in the keyboard. Some keyboards provide USB connectors for other devices to plugin and due to certain bugs, it can cause this problem.

    So how does Discord work?

    Discord lets you set up a chat room it refers to as a server, to which you can invite people. When you invite someone to the server, they get a link that lets them join it, where they can either text or voice chat with other people using that server. Each server can be broken down further into “channels,” small spaces for discussions on specific topics, as opposed to one giant live forum. Channels come in text and voice versions, to further make them easier to use. You can also make individual channels on your server private, so only people who are invited into those rooms can use them. The whole server can be either public, which anyone can join, or private, which makes it invite-only.

    However, there has been an issue of the Discord sending the game audio along with the voice which means that the Discord picks up the audio of the computer as well as the voice and projects it to other users.

    How to solve the problem of Discord picking up computer sounds

    Following are the solutions to the issue of Discord picking up computer sounds-

    • Try reinstalling discord. Also, check for newer audio drivers you can install. Discord shouldn’t be doing this since it knows how to differentiate between mic and system audio. Reinstalling might fix it.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    • By disabling the “Stereo Mix” Setting

    The problem can be solved by disabling the stereo mix setting. The stereo mix setting is used to send the input sound of the computer as output, so it has no use while using Discord or gaming.

    1. Right–Click on the Speaker Icon in the bottom right of the taskbar.
    2. Select the “Sounds” option
    3. Go to the “Recording” tab
    4. Right–Click on the stereo mix and select Disable
    5. Open the Discord application
    6. Click on the “User Settings” icon
    7. Select the “Voice and Video Settings” option
    8. Make sure to select the Headphones as the “Output Device” and the microphone as the “Input Device“.
    • By plugging-In to Another Audio Jack

    Sometimes, the problem causes if the USB plugin or the Audio Jack is fitted inside the keyboard, so plug the audio jacks into a different port.

    1. Unplug both the Headphones and the Microphone from the Keyboard
    2. Plugin the Microphone and the Headphones into the audio jacks on the motherboard
    3. Check to see if solves the issue.
    • By changing Microphone settings

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    The microphone can be activated all times if a certain microphone setting is enabled which can cause the problem with the input being mixed with the output. Therefore,

    1. Right–Click on the Speaker Icon in the bottom right of the taskbar
    2. Select the Sounds option
    3. Go to the Recording tab
    4. Right-Click on your microphone and select “Properties”
    5. In the Microphone Properties, click on the “Listen” Tab
    6. Make sure the “Listen to this Device” box is unchecked
    7. Then click on the Advanced tab
    8. Make sure both the options under the “Exclusive” heading are checked
    9. Apply the settings

    • By Disabling Sound Drivers

    Another solution would be to disable all the drivers that are installed except for the “Windows Default Driver”.

    1. Right–Click on the Volume icon in the bottom right hand
    2. Select the “Sounds” option
    3. Select the “Playback” tab
    4. Right–Click and disable both “Realtek” and “Nvidia High Definition” Drivers.
    5. And Restart your PC.

    Therefore, the above mentioned were the solutions that can prevent the problem of Discord picking up computer sounds.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    Hi music fan! I am Jeff. Hope that you enjoy some stuff I shared here in my personal blog.

    About myself, Currently I am in charging as Artist Manager/Music Supervisor at 72 Music Management. I did managed album to Grammy Award in 2017 with 7 Nominations from 2014-2020 and had the opportunities to work with : A.J. Croce, Blind Boys of Alabama, Bobby Rush, Dom Flemons, Dustbowl Revival, Sarah Grace

    Governor of the Memphis Chapter of The Recording Academy is one of a award that I am lucky to achieved.

    When it comes to the search for an audio recording tool on PC, the internet will always show you a lot of options. Finding a free, reliable, and easy-to-use audio recorder among them may be a time-costing task. If you are wanting to record audio from your computer and are stuck in multiple choices. It’s exactly the right place for you.

    In this article, we will review and compare 4 popular audio recorders for PC, which perfectly work on different platforms including Windows and Mac. All of them are specially designed to meet your needs of recording your computer system sound, external audio sources, and even online media such as streaming audio, online lectures, interviews, podcasts, and others. Also, we will provide you with step-by-step guidance on how to record audios from the computer.

    Read on and choose the best and suitable tool for recording audio from the computer.

    Best Audio Recorder on PC for Windows and Mac (Recommended)

    The first and top recommendation for recording audio on computer is FonePaw Audio Recorder. It is a straightforward recording tool that helps skip all complicated set-ups and enables you to directly record internal sound on computers and external audio sources. You can conveniently record your microphone sound once it connects to the computer. Besides, this audio recorder supports noise cancellation so you don’t have to worry that there will be damage to the audio quality of the recorded sound. It’s also very easy to set up recording audios from internal and external sources respectively or simultaneously.

    The Windows version also supports a highlight feature—schedule recording, which allows you to end an audio recording automatically at a specific time so that you don’t need to be around the computer all the time. When the recording is ended, the recorded audio can be saved and converted to MP3, WMA, AAC, M4A audio files.

    Beyond recording computer sound, this audio recording tool can serve as a convenient streaming audio recorder. You can use it to record streaming audio from Internet radio stations, music sites, video platforms (YouTube, Vimeo, etc.), record Skype/VoIP phone calls, and virtually every audio material.

    • As audio recording is just one of the functions in the three-in-one recording software, you can utilize the program to record computer screen with audio, record gameplay, and take screenshots.

    How to Record Audio from Computer with FonePaw Audio Recorder

    STEP 1. Free download FonePaw Audio Recorder and install it on your computer.

    STEP 2. Launch the program and you’ll find this intuitive screen recording tool is designed with three sections: Audio Recorder, Video Recorder, and Game Recorder. To record audios on the computer, simply select Audio Recorder.

    STEP 3. Turn on System Sound button if you need to record the internal sound from computer. And turn on Microphone button when you need to capture your voice. Toggle on the two buttons if you need both. You may drag the slider to control the volume.

    • If you are going to record the microphone sound, it’s recommended to turn on Microphone noise cancellation and Microphone enhancement to make your voice clearer in the audio output. Besides, it’s suggested to click on the settings icon and do a soundcheck beforehand in Preferences to guarantee a high audio recording quality.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    STEP 4. When you are ready, click the REC button to start recording.

    The pop-up prompt window shows that you can also use hotkeys to control. Click Preferences, you can set and change keyboard shortcuts to the ones you like.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    STEP 5. During the recording, you can control the audio volume in real-time. To end the recording, click the rectangle icon.

    Then just preview, trim (if you need), and save the audio recording to your computer.

    • 1. If You need the recording to end automatically at a specific time, click the clock icon, and enter the expected duration of the recording. When the time is up, the recording process will stop and the program will save the recording automatically.
    • 2. You can decide on what format the audio file should be saved by going to More Settings> Output >Audio Format.
    • 3. If you accidentally quit the recording, you can relaunch the program to save the canceled project.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    A Great Alternative: Audacity (Best for Recording Music on PC)

    To record audio on Windows 10, a professional and popular alternative to FonePaw Audio Recorder is Audacity. It is an open-source and free audio recorder on PC that is perfectly compatible with Windows, Mac, and Linux. In addition to audio recording, this lightweight program also comes with options for editing audio. And while recording or editing audio, the sound will appear in waveforms helping you easily notice the noise and edit the unwanted parts.

    Compared with FonePaw Audio Recorder, Audacity has the support for processing and mixing multiple soundtracks. Technically, you can record both your computer audio and microphone sound with Audacity. But if you have the need for recording multiple tracks, ensure that you have a sound card that has the ability to have multiple inputs simultaneously available for input.

    Still, you may prefer some solutions that don’t require downloading extra software. The following parts will show you how to record computer audio with some built-in tools on Windows and Mac.

    How to Use Stereo Mix to Record Sound from Windows 10 (No Download)

    We all know that Windows 10 computer has a built-in Voice Recorder, and disappointingly, the recorder can only record sound from the microphone. But once you enable the Stereo Mix option on your PC, you can record the sound on your computer system as well as the sound that comes out of your speakers.

    What is Stereo Mix

    Stereo Mix, also called “What you hear”, is the name of the output stream after all channels have been mixed. Sound drivers on your computer probably support Stereo Mix, however, the option is usually disabled by default on most Windows (Windows 10/8/7). By enabling the Stereo Mix option, Voice Recorder can record system sound on your PC through Stereo Mix instead of microphone.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    For all its positives, Windows sometimes acts in unexpected ways—like a sudden lack of audio. If your computer abruptly stops playing sound, try these easy steps to fix the issue:

    No sound in one app

    1. First, reboot your computer.
    2. Confirm the program’s volume isn’t turned down or muted. In browsers like Chrome and Firefox, each tab can be muted individually—right-click a tab to see its status. (The option will say “Unmute tab” if currently silenced.)
    3. If you still can’t hear anything in this program, try uninstalling and reinstalling it. Before doing so, first back up any data and/or write down how your settings are currently configured, as applicable.

    Note: For paid software, your license for the program may be tied to a specific version—if that’s the case, you may need to do a little hunting to find its installation program on the vendor’s website. This same advice applies if you just prefer your version of the app over the current one.

    No sound at all

    First thing to check: The audio output device. Windows can sometimes change it to a different source unbeknownst to you. (To view this image full-size, right-click on it and choose “Open in new tab.”)

    1. First, check to make sure Windows is using the correct device for speaker output by clicking on the speaker icon in the taskbar. (Sometimes Windows will switch output to a different device, unbeknownst to you.) At the top of the pop-up window, you’ll see the name of the speaker currently in use—e.g., Speakers (2-Anker PowerConf). Click on that name to switch to the proper device, if applicable. If using external speakers, make sure they are powered on.
    2. Reboot your computer.
    3. Verify via the speaker icon in the taskbar that the audio is not muted and is turned up.
    4. Ensure that the computer isn’t muted via hardware, such as a dedicated mute button on you laptop or keyboard. Test by playing a song.
    5. Right-click the volume icon and click Open Volume Mixer. Ensure that all options are on and turned up.
    6. Internal speakers still not working on your laptop? Plug headphones into the audio jack and test again. If the headphones work, remove them to continue troubleshooting the internal speakers.
    7. For desktop systems with speakers plugged into the 3.5mm jack, try a USB speaker or USB headphones. (Or visa versa.) If the alternative device works, remove it to continue troubleshooting the initial set of speakers. (See our roundup of best budget computer speakers if you are in need of a new set.)
    8. Right-click the volume icon again and choose Open Sound settings (Windows 10) or Sound settings (Windows 11). For Windows 10, find Related Settings in the window that opens, then click on Sound Control Panel. For Windows 11, scroll down to the Advanced section of the window that opens, then click on More sound settings. For both operating systems, a new, smaller window labeled Sound will appear. Click on the Playback tab, and then confirm that your audio device (likely “Speakers”) has a green checkmark next to it. Then click Properties and make sure that Use this device (enable) is selected.

    If your sound still doesn’t work by this point, you may have a missing or corrupt driver for your audio controller.

    Try Movavi Screen Recorder!

    • Capture system sounds and microphone
    • Record high-quality audio and video
    • Trim recorded audio
    • Home
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    • 12 Best Free Internal Audio Recorders in 2022 – Movavi

    We’ve detailed some of the best internal audio recorders for you. The list includes desktop programs such as this screen recorder for PC, online services, browser extensions, and Android apps.

    View all programs Hide the table

    Desktop screen recorders with internal audio

    When you need a quick solution for grabbing sound or video, utilizing desktop software for all of your screen recording needs can be your superhero. Relying on internal audio recorders on a PC allows you to have everything you may need from the comfort of your personal computer. While having direct access is great, it can turn into a disadvantage if your software of choice takes up too much space on your PC.

    Movavi Screen Recorder

    OS: Windows, macOS

    Best for: capturing screen, webinars, and online calls

    G2 rating: 4.5 out of 5 stars, 41 good reviews out of 44

    Created to give you the best chance at capturing webinars, important tutorials, online calls, and much more, Movavi Screen Recorder is designed with the individual user in mind. You can capture screens in one click, making it simple to record internal audio.

    • Basic editing tools to tweak recorded clips.
    • Useful functions like scheduled recording, drawing on videos, webcam output capture.
    • A simple and versatile app.
    • You cannot enhance the initial video quality.
    • Filters and effects are not included.

    Audacity

    OS: Windows, macOS, Linux

    Best for: professional sound processing

    G2 rating: 4.4 out of 5 stars, 314 good reviews out of 331

    Audacity is an all-in-one internal audio recorder. The software is made to be accessible when looking at ways to record internal audio and works seamlessly with Windows 10. You can fully manipulate tracks using keyboard shortcuts to perfect your final product. Unlimited redo/undo tabs assist in going back steps to ensure your audio is exactly what you need.

    • Supports LADSPA, LV2, Nyquist, VST, and Audio Unit effect plugins, making it simple to adjust sound quality, add real-time effects, and export to the file of your needs.
    • The software takes up minimal room on a hard drive and can even be loaded to a flash drive.
    • It is an internal sound recorder for Windows 10 that allows you to effortlessly change the speed, pitch, or tempo of a recording.
    • A reasonably steep learning curve when it comes to learning how to use the interface of Audacity. It can be a powerful screen recorder with internal audio, but it can take time to understand tutorials.
    • Making major edits, such as removing background noise, requires the use of third-party plugins and is a little challenging to accomplish.

    Affordable and high-quality computer microphones.

    If you want to create unforgettable content, you can’t do without the best computer microphone. Aside from purchasing a high-quality camera, make sure to buy a decent mic as your audio needs to be clear and crisp so as not to spoil your viewing experience. People who watch your live-streams might leave if there is the slightest problem with audio. As a rule, the more expensive a microphone is, the better quality it delivers. Therefore, the amount you are willing to spend will directly affect the quality of a device.

    Top 6 Best Computer Microphones

    1. HyperX QuadCast – Best mic for livestreaming
    2. Shure MV88 – Best lightning iPhone microphone
    3. Rode NT-USB – Great beginner
    4. Blue Yeti X Professional – For videochats
    5. Samson G-Track Pro – Ultimate mic for podcast
    6. Audio Technica AT2020 – For studio recording

    Whether you are using a Windows PC or Mac, you can choose the best computer microphone from a variety of options. The first thing to decide on is your budget, a microphone type and a purpose of use.

    We’ve put together a list of 6 microphones that come with built-in or detachable stands, which makes them perfect for desk use. Check out this article to select the best computer microphone for your needs.

    1. HyperX QuadCast

    Power Source: 5V | Polar patterns: Stereo, omnidirectional, cardioid, and bidirectional | Connectivity: USB | Frequency response: 20Hz–20kHz

    • ✚ Great response
    • ✚ Easy to use
    • ✚ Obvious when it’s muted
    • USB-only
    • Boosts sibilants

    HyperX Quadcast is the perfect standalone microphone for amateur streamers who demand high-quality audio. With a two-ways modes, you can switch easily between cardioid and omnidirectional pattern. QuadCast has an internal pop filter, a built-in subwoofer port, and a three-band equalizer. Quickly check sound levels with the large LED indicator, adjust mic signal level with the conveniently-placed gain knob, and monitor noise via headphone or cable connection.

    The HyperX QuadCast computer microphone is perfect for casual and professional performers alike. You can stream your recordings live to let everyone hear how great your voice sounds. Even if you are recording your own music, you can add effects and bass to make the track even more exciting. There are also several sound effects to enhance your music like gated rhythms, ring modulation, compression, full range compression, and the classic tape recorder echo. The Mic preamp output is compatible with nearly all sound cards including RealTek, PCI, AGP, USB, ISE, MAC, Microsoft Windows, Linux, Unix, etc.

    2. Shure MV88

    Power Source: 5V | Polar patterns: Stereo, Mono Cardioid, Mono Bidirectional, Raw Mid-Side | Connectivity: Lightning Connector | Frequency response: 20Hz–20kHz

    Introduction: How to Record Cassette Tapes

    Cassettes are an old medium for recording things such as music, but hi-fi enthusiasts like myself still record to them to the sound quality and the fun experience that recording them is. In this Instructable I will show how to record music on to a cassette tape with use of a hi-fi receiver and a tape deck. This will also go over tape bias for different types of cassettes as well as Dolby noise reduction and receiver setup.

    Step 1: Getting the Right Tape

    When recoding music, it’s best to record on blank tapes. You can find tapes at places like hardware stores or thrift stores, or buy them in bulk online. I bought the two chrome tapes still wrapped in plastic at my local hardware store and the other at a thrift store.
    There are four types of cassette tapes. They are:

    Type I (shown): Standard ferric oxide magnetic tapes, called Type I, normal bias, or ferric tapes, etc.
    Type II (shown): made of chromium dioxide formula, called Type II, high bias, or chrome tapes. These record better highs, and sound generally better than Type I tapes.
    Type III: FeCr formulation. These tapes combined the formulas for Type I and Type II as an experiment to make the ultimate tape, combining the bass response of the I and the highs of the II, these were unpopular and are generally rare.
    Type IV: Known as metal tapes, they used a direct metal formulation instead of oxide particles. By far the best sound quality, but are generally more expensive than Type I or II.

    How a deck tells the tape apart for playing is the notches on the top (shown above). Chrome tapes have extra notches next to the write-protect tabs.

    Step 2: Getting the Tools and Materials

    Tools required for this method:
    1. A tape deck

    2. A receiver (for playback) with speakers

    3. A device to record from

    4. RCA audio cables

    5. Power, a strip cord is recommend

    Note: Some receivers, such as mine, have outlets in the back for AC power. These can be used to power your audio equipment, as shown above. I have my tape deck and turntable plugged in, and everything runs fine.

    Step 3: Setup

    Make sure power is being sent to everything you have set up, the deck, receiver, etc. Then, take the RCA cables and connect the “out” or “playback” ports on the tape deck to one of the “in” ports on the receiver. This will make it so the deck send sound through the speakers connected to the receiver. You can test this setup with something like a CD player or iPod with the proper cables. Then, plug your preferred device into the “in” or “record” ports on the tape deck. Some receiver have an “out” jack for recording with tapes decks, and if yours has this then connect this to the tape deck using RCA cables. Make sure speakers are plugged in to the designated ports on your receiver.

    Step 4: Tape Bias

    Tape bias changes how the sound is sent to the tape. With incorrect bias, a tape will sound muddy and poor. Shown is a diagram for tape bias for Onkyo tape decks, like the one I use to record. Depending on your deck, try and find a guide for bias if your deck has a knob for it.
    For Type I tapes, bias does not need to be changed whatsoever and shouldn’t be.
    For Type II tapes, these are called “high bias” and bias should be adjusted so.
    For Type IV, bias should also be set to “high bias” and adjusted from there.

    Step 5: Noise Reduction

    A crucial point in recording is the use of Dolby Noise Reduction (NR). Noise reduction reduces background noise, the hiss of the magnetic tape itself. Most commercial recordings use Dolby type B noise reduction. Newer decks will have a switch for NR with a choice between type B and type C. Older decks that just say “Dolby Noise Reduction” will have type B only. Rarely, some high-end decks will have an option for Dolby S NR which is by far the best, but as said incredibly rare. For recording, I personally recommend Dolby C, as it sounds the best to my ears. Set your desired noise reduction before recording your tape.

    Step 6: Recording

    Now to recording. When you have a tape to record, make sure first that the write-protect tabs are present or the holes are covered, as this allows you to record to a tape. Shown above are three cassettes, a Type I with the tabs pushed in, a Type II with the tabs present, and a Type I with the holes taped over.
    First, turn on your tape deck and receiver and make what you intend to record is plugged in to the deck. If you have the option, such as shown, activate the tape deck channel over the desired channel you want to record. I have mine set to the analog ports for the CD section, which is where I have my iPod plugged in.

    Then, press the record button with a tape in and play your music. Do not press play on your deck. Adjust the volume on your tape deck for the best level of sound if able.
    When everything is set, noise reduction, bias, and volume, reset your music and pause it. Press the record button if the record light isn’t on, and press the play button to start the tape. Wait a second or two for the tape to get on the magnetic portion, and play your music. The music is now being recorded. Do not press anything else on your tape or receiver, and listen to what you’re recording until it reaches the end of the tape. When the end of side one is reached, flip the tape and record more on side two.

    Step 7: Playback

    With your receiver still set to your tape deck, flip your cassette and play it from the beginning. Note the lack of a record light (shown above). You should hear your music coming from the tape!

    You can play your cassette in a hi-fi setup with a tape deck, or listen to it on the go with a player like a Walkman (shown). On mobile players, however, there typically isn’t automatic tape detection, so try to find a switch to set it to the correct tape type (shown). If everything was recorded correctly, your tape is finished.
    Print some small album art to put on the sleeve, write down the track list, put a label on both sides of your tape, push in the write-protect tabs and your cassette is complete!
    Shown above is a cassette I recorded off of two vinyl record, cassettes can record iPods, records, CD’s and more. The sound quality of them, in my experience, is quite good compared to CD’s and records and being able to play them on the go without risking skipping and damage is very convenient.

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    Q:”I would like to record audio on my PC. Do you have any recommended software that can do this job well? Thanks.” – Zoe

    Has it ever occurred to you that you can record a meeting chat on your PC? Or have you ever thought to capture what you listen from an online radio? Like Zoe, whether it is system sound or microphone voice, you can easily grab on Windows with the help of a PC audio recorder. This is the reason why we come here to share the following 7 powerful programs.

    How to record the sound coming from your pc (even without stereo mix)

    • 1. Joyoshare VidiKit
    • 2. Audacity
    • 3. GiliSoft Audio Recorder Pro
    • 4. Free Sound Recorder
    • 5. Apowersoft Free Online Audio Recorder
    • 6. Free PC Audio Recorder
    • 7. Voice Recorder

    1. Joyoshare VidiKit

    Specialized in recording audio activities on desktop in high quality, Joyoshare VidiKit – Audio Recorder is the first option shown in this list. It is good at record all kinds of audios on PC and Mac, including Facebook chats, streaming music, broadcasts, online radio, gameplay sound, system voice, voiceover and more.

    By means of this audio recorder for PC, you are allowed to create scheduled task by presetting specific time. Besides, there are 16 output formats for you to choose and related parameters to specify, such as codec, bit rate, channel, sample rate and quality. It’s also available to edit ID3 tag info and trim completed audio.

    Pros:

    16 output audio formats, like MP3, AC3, M4B, AAC, OGG, etc.

    Edit with equalizer, trimming tool and ID3 tag recognizer

    Detect and split the silent automatically

    Schedule recording task for any audio on PC and Mac

    Cons:

    Free version comes with recording time limit

    Movies with true organic sounds, imagined futuristic electronic audio, and even the everyday noises around us, aren’t complete without good sound effects.

    The spacecraft has crashed into a swamp and as Luke and his droid inspect their new environment, a landscape of sounds surrounds them. Strange noises come from everywhere. Unseen creatures from above and below the water each leave their sonic fingerprints on the scene. Unless you’ve been living in a cave for the past 25 years or so, you’ve seen and heard this scene from The Empire Strikes Back. Watching the movie, it’s easy to believe it’s all real, even though the swamp was manufactured on a soundstage and the environmental sounds were gathered from around the globe. The sound effects sell the scene and connect the viewer to the action. And you don’t need a Star Wars budget to spice up your productions with sound effects. All you need is a little effort, creativity and some patience. Let’s get started.

    Think About It

    The term “sound effects” or SFX covers a broad range of noises, including ambience, one-shots, human, electronic and mechanical sounds. With our digital editing tools, we can also repurpose sounds by shifting, reversing and other forms of manipulation. You may be wondering why we should go to the trouble of recording our own sound effects when there are so many good libraries out there. It’s a fair question. When you have a tight deadline or need a sound that lives on the other side of the world, sound effects libraries are the perfect choice. But sometimes, a project needs a specific atmosphere or sound that isn’t in the library. It’s also quicker and easier to record the actual sound during the shoot instead of digging through a set of 250,000 sound effects.

    Depending on the sounds you want to capture, you can use almost any microphone, from the built-in stereo mic on your camera to a fancy shotgun model. The built-in option carries an upside and a downside–you can record in stereo, but you’ll have to live with any mechanical noise produced by the camcorder. If you’re recording busy sounds like traffic or running water, the extra noise won’t be an issue. For quieter settings, you may need another option. One of those options is a portable MiniDisc recorder or other field audio recorder. These small wonders record in stereo or mono at CD quality and will work for hours on a single battery. Just make sure it has a microphone input! If you prefer to use your camera, simply hook it up like you would for a video shoot, grab a pair of headphones and forget about the pictures. When you’re finished recording, capture through FireWire and delete the video part of the media or select capture settings that capture only the audio.

    Audio Safari

    Scene #27 in our movie has the main characters, Bob and Rhonda, discussing recent events at the edge of the woods. After a heated argument, Rhonda storms off with the car, leaving poor Bob stranded. You’ve got your gear together and a list of sounds to record, and there’s a perfect place just outside of town. Scout the location with your ears, listening for good and bad sounds. Is there traffic in the background? Depending on the area, aircraft is a possibility too. This location is clean, so we’ll set up our equipment. Since this is ambience for our video, stereo recording is the way to go. There’s plenty of wildlife and water sound, so we’ll use the built-in stereo mic on the camera. For a completely natural feel, position the camera just as you would to shoot video. Slate the recording with a short description of the setting or scene number and let the tape roll for a few minutes.

    Next on the list is a car door slam and tires throwing gravel as the car speeds away. For this setup, we’ll use a handheld or shotgun microphone to isolate the sounds. We’ll also record each element separately so we can get the timing just right in post. The door slam is easy — just point the mic at the door and slam it a few times, we can pick the best one later. Don’t forget to record the opening sound too. For the drive-off, we’ll set the microphone near the car, pointed in the direction it will drive. With safety in mind, we should locate the camera and people to the side of any flying gravel. A long mic cable and some safety glasses wouldn’t hurt either. We’ll record several takes of this one too, for more flexibility later.

    Finally, we need to record a sound that can substitute for feet crunching through the leaves in the woods. Let’s set up with the handheld or shotgun this time too. Lay a large towel on the floor and dump a bag of potato chips or corn flakes in the middle. Feel free to crunch with your hands or feet — whichever makes the most convincing sound. Don’t worry about matching the pace of the video; we’ll record a variety of left and right footfalls to drop on the timeline. I guess we’ll have to clean up the mess at some point.

    Post It

    Once you’ve recorded your sound effects and dumped them into the computer, you need to mold them on your timeline. First, we find the perfect version of each sound. Next, let’s drop the stereo ambience on the timeline to establish the feel of the scene. The recording of the woods should enhance the feel without overpowering the dialog. Adjust the volume with track sliders or rubber bands to create the right balance. Now we’ll add the car noises. Scrub the timeline to the point where Rhonda opens the car door. Add that sound effect on its own track and then do the same for the car door slam, nudging each sound until it matches the action perfectly. For the drive off, we’ll do the same thing, but add a keyframed pan to the mix. The car drives from right to left, so set a keyframe at the beginning of the clip and adjust the pan 50% right. Now, go to the end of the clip, set another keyframe and adjust the pan for 50% left. Tweak for maximum effect.

    We’ve saved the footsteps for last since they’re the most difficult. Play the scene and count how many footsteps you’ll need. If the feet aren’t in the shot, watch for body movement to determine their locations. Drop a variety of left footfall sound effects on one audio track and then add the right footfalls on another. Slide the sound effects around until you’ve created a convincing walking sound. If necessary, mute the other audio tracks to improve clarity as you’re editing. To help with timing, it may be possible to reference the dialog track for actual footfalls. Once you’re happy with the edit, play it a few times, listening for balance and realism. The sound effects should enhance the scene rather than call attention to themselves.

    Lock That Mix

    Now, it’s up to you to experiment with these techniques on your own projects. Adding your own sound effects to a video is a creatively rewarding process. It’s extra work, but you’ll gain valuable experience and a newfound respect for the SFX wizards who share their creativity on the big screen.

    Contributing Editor Hal Robertson is a digital media
    producer and technology consultant.

    Side Bar

    Grab It Today

    I recently worked on an independent movie called Breaking Ten. As the sole tech guy, I was responsible for shooting, lighting and audio. Working on tight schedules barely got some scenes shot, so I had to return later to record sound effects. Unfortunately, it was many months later and now the restaurant was out of business, the field with all the crickets had been mowed, and the creek was much lower than the day of the shoot. I know better. Lesson learned: save yourself time, gas and stress by recording sound effects while on location.