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How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

Apple’s HomeKit home control and automation system is largely plug, play, and enjoy, but sometimes stubborn devices need a nudge to play nice. Read on as we show you how to reset both devices and the general HomeKit configuration.

In most cases, setting up your HomeKit equipment is pretty easy stuff. But if the company’s companion app crashes, if the HomeKit device gets added to the wrong device in your household, or there is some electronic gremlin you can’t quite pin down, then it’s time to tinker with your HomeKit configuration.

There are two types of resets you can perform with HomeKit devices: you can press the physical reset button on the device itself, if available, or you can reset of the HomeKit configuration on your controlling iOS device. Let’s take a look at both now and highlight when you would use them.

For demonstration purposes, we’ll be using the Philips Hue Bridge 2.0, the HomeKit enabled update to the original Hue Bridge system. (Note: We’re not using the Hue system because it is problem prone, but because it was a popular HomeKit-enabled system we had on hand that had a proper hardware reset button.)

Option One: Reset Your HomeKit Device

The vast majority of home automation and networking products have a physical reset button located somewhere on the device. You’ll need to check the product documentation but generally the reset process is as simple as pressing the small button with a pen or paper clip for 3 to 5 seconds and releasing it. Some products may require that you press the button while the device is unplugged and then plug it in while still pressing the reset button (or some variation like that).

How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

The downside to performing a factory reset on your hardware is that any settings stored on the device itself (and not the companion application)–like Wi-Fi credentials, schedules, configuration files, and so on–will be wiped back to their factory state. In the case of our example product, the Hue Bridge, performing a factory wipe removes all the lights and will require you manually add them to the hub again. As such, factory resets shouldn’t be your first choice unless the device is seriously malfunctioning, like it fails to pair or restarts itself.

The one situation where you will almost always need to perform a factory reset is when you purchase secondhand HomeKit equipment (or move into a home with HomeKit-enabled components) as the devices will likely be still linked the previous owner. Save yourself the troubleshooting headache and just reset them right out of the box.

Option Two: Resett Your HomeKit Configuration

On the other side of things, sometimes it isn’t the device firmware or hardware malfunctioning but some sort of hiccup with your HomeKit system itself. If you find that a factory reset of an individual device doesn’t resolve your issue, you may need to reset your HomeKit configuration on the controlling iOS device.

The release of iOS 10 and the sweeping HomeKit update that came with it completely changed almost everything about how HomeKit is handled on the iOS level–including the location and naming of the reset function. In iOS 9, the reset function was located under Settings > Privacy > HomeKit–while that might not have been the most intuitive location for it, it was at least very clearly labeled as “Reset HomeKit Configuration”

In order to reset your HomeKit home in iOS 10, you need to launch the Home app, the new HomeKit dashboard. Further, this routine only works if you’re on an iOS device logged into the same iCloud account as the person who set up and administrates the HomeKit home. In almost every case that would be your own device, but be forewarned that the first time we had to reset our HomeKit home, we had to do so because we accidentally set up the HomeKit with a child’s iPad and linked the HomeKit system to their iCloud account. As such, we had to use their iPad to reset the system.

How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

Within the Home app, tap on the small arrow icon in the upper left to access the settings menu. If you’re in the relatively unusual position of having multiple HomeKit homes, you’ll be prompted to select which home you want to edit when you click on the settings icon.

How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

Within the settings menu scroll down to the very bottom. There you’ll find the entry “Remove Home”.

How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

Select the entry and then, in the following pop up menu, confirm the removal by selecting “Delete”.

How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

At this point, your HomeKit home will be wiped and you’ll need to repeat the entire setup process including adding the accessories, creating scenes, and inviting family members.

That’s all there is to it. Whether by manual hardware reset or software reset through your iOS device, there are very few issues that can’t be overcome with a little configuration wrangling.

15 steps to take when your Apple smart home goes wonky

How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

When our smart homes work they’re brilliant. But when they break, it can get ugly quickly. While the Apple HomeKit platform is a pretty solid one, when it does crash it tends to go down in flames, and you’ll want to know how to get your HomeKit devices back up and running as fast as possible.

Here, we’ll look at how to reset your HomeKit setup if something goes really wrong, or if you just want to start from scratch.

HomeKit is pretty stable primarily because Apple’s smart home system works locally on your various devices (iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, HomePod or HomePod mini) and doesn’t rely on the cloud.

However, what ties all those devices together is your iCloud account, and in our experience it’s here where things can get wonky.

When you change iPhones, set up a new HomeKit Hub or do a software update on an iOS device, things behind the scenes in iCloud can get out of whack, which in rare cases can lead to breaking the whole setup.

We’ve tested out some scenarios where this might happen and have some suggestions to help you get back up and running should they happen to you.

How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

The Home app gets stuck

If you open your Home app one day to find a spinning circle on a screen that says “Loading Accessories and Scenes” you’ve hit a snag.

There’s no way out of this screen other than a very scary option way down at the bottom that says Reset Home Configuration, and the screen just stays that way for hours, days… no matter what you do. This happened to us right after an iPhone update and it wouldn’t go away

We tried other iOS devices in the home and they all showed the same screen, Siri wouldn’t respond to Home requests, and none of the HomeKit Automations were running.

Our HomeKit home was well and truly borked. What exactly caused this to happen remains a mystery, but as we discovered, if this screen appears and doesn’t go away, you are going to have to reset your entire Home from scratch.

Here’s how to do it:

1. If the “Loading Accessories and Scenes” screen appears and doesn’t go away, wait.
2. Then wait some more. Apple tells us this means iCloud is doing some updating in the background and it should hopefully resolve itself and let you continue.
3. While you are waiting check all the iOS devices associated with your HomeKit home and make sure:
a) They are updated to the latest iOS.
b) They have two-factor authentication set up on all the iOS devices.
c) That your Home app is using iCloud (Check on your iPhone / iPad: Settings > User Name > iCloud > scroll down to Home > toggle On).
4. Next, reboot your HomeKit hub (iPad, Apple TV and/or HomePod – follow the instructions here).
5. Finally, relaunch the Home app and cross your fingers that it’s worked.

If it hasn’t, you’re going to need to go a few steps further:

6. Sign out of iCloud (Settings > User Name > scroll down to Sign Out).
7. Press Delete to confirm you don’t want to keep a copy of any data on the phone (make sure it’s all backed up to iCloud).
8. Tap Sign Out.
9. Sign back in again (Settings > Sign In).
10. Make sure you have another iOS or Mac device signed in to your iCloud account handy, so you will receive the verification code you’ll need to sign back in.
11. Open the Home and cross lots of fingers.

If it’s still not fixed you will need to keep going and nuke your HomeKit setup:

12. Open the Home app.
13. Wait for the Loading Devices and Accessories screen to appear.
14. Select Reset Home Configuration.
15. Select it again when the warning dialogue comes up and then wait…

Once the reset process is complete you’ll be presented with a fresh new, empty Home app and you will have to re-add all your HomeKit devices (let’s hope you kept all those HomeKit codes somewhere safe), as well as set up your Scenes and Automations from scratch.

You will find when you go to the Add Accessories screen that many of your devices will show up there and just need to be paired using the HomeKit code. Other devices you will need to manually reset (by following the manufacturer’s instructions) before you can re-pair them to HomeKit.

How to restore your HomeKit Home

Surely if your HomeKit home goes wonky you can just restore all your devices and setting from your iCloud backup? Nope. Apple doesn’t have a way to just restore your HomeKit data, as all of that information is tied up in your securely-encrypted iPhone backup. It’s not possible to go in and retrieve specific data.

However, if you want to try and retrieve your old HomeKit Home you can try doing a complete reset of your iPhone and restore from a backup done before your HomeKit went funny.

With this though you will also lose any other data (messages, pictures etc) you might have added to your phone since that backup date. It’s not ideal and also not guaranteed to work.

How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

How to reset your HomeKit Home

Say you’re bored of your Home setup and just fancy starting from scratch, you can do that too. It’s actually really easy (too easy some might say!).

1. Open the Home app.
2. Tap the Home icon in the top left of the screen.
3. Select Home Settings and scroll down to the bottom and select Remove Home.
4. Select Remove on the next prompt.
5. When you open your Home app again you’ll have a fresh new HomeKit Home to populate. Enjoy!

How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

Apple’s HomeKit home control and automation system is largely plug, play, and enjoy, but sometimes stubborn devices need a nudge to play nice. Read on as we show you how to reset both devices and the general HomeKit configuration.

In most cases, setting up your HomeKit equipment is pretty easy stuff. But if the company’s companion app crashes, if the HomeKit device gets added to the wrong device in your household, or there is some electronic gremlin you can’t quite pin down, then it’s time to tinker with your HomeKit configuration.

There are two types of resets you can perform with HomeKit devices: you can press the physical reset button on the device itself, if available, or you can reset of the HomeKit configuration on your controlling iOS device. Let’s take a look at both now and highlight when you would use them.

For demonstration purposes, we’ll be using the Philips Hue Bridge 2.0, the HomeKit enabled update to the original Hue Bridge system. (Note: We’re not using the Hue system because it is problem prone, but because it was a popular HomeKit-enabled system we had on hand that had a proper hardware reset button.)

Option One: Reset Your HomeKit Device

The vast majority of home automation and networking products have a physical reset button located somewhere on the device. You’ll need to check the product documentation but generally the reset process is as simple as pressing the small button with a pen or paper clip for 3 to 5 seconds and releasing it. Some products may require that you press the button while the device is unplugged and then plug it in while still pressing the reset button (or some variation like that).

The downside to performing a factory reset on your hardware is that any settings stored on the device itself (and not the companion application)–like Wi-Fi credentials, schedules, configuration files, and so on–will be wiped back to their factory state. In the case of our example product, the Hue Bridge, performing a factory wipe removes all the lights and will require you manually add them to the hub again. As such, factory resets shouldn’t be your first choice unless the device is seriously malfunctioning, like it fails to pair or restarts itself.

The one situation where you will almost always need to perform a factory reset is when you purchase secondhand HomeKit equipment (or move into a home with HomeKit-enabled components) as the devices will likely be still linked the previous owner. Save yourself the troubleshooting headache and just reset them right out of the box.

Option Two: Resett Your HomeKit Configuration

On the other side of things, sometimes it isn’t the device firmware or hardware malfunctioning but some sort of hiccup with your HomeKit system itself. If you find that a factory reset of an individual device doesn’t resolve your issue, you may need to reset your HomeKit configuration on the controlling iOS device.

The release of iOS 10 and the sweeping HomeKit update that came with it completely changed almost everything about how HomeKit is handled on the iOS level–including the location and naming of the reset function. In iOS 9, the reset function was located under Settings > Privacy > HomeKit–while that might not have been the most intuitive location for it, it was at least very clearly labeled as “Reset HomeKit Configuration”

In order to reset your HomeKit home in iOS 10, you need to launch the Home app, the new HomeKit dashboard. Further, this routine only works if you’re on an iOS device logged into the same iCloud account as the person who set up and administrates the HomeKit home. In almost every case that would be your own device, but be forewarned that the first time we had to reset our HomeKit home, we had to do so because we accidentally set up the HomeKit with a child’s iPad and linked the HomeKit system to their iCloud account. As such, we had to use their iPad to reset the system.

Within the Home app, tap on the small arrow icon in the upper left to access the settings menu. If you’re in the relatively unusual position of having multiple HomeKit homes, you’ll be prompted to select which home you want to edit when you click on the settings icon.

Within the settings menu scroll down to the very bottom. There you’ll find the entry “Remove Home”.

Select the entry and then, in the following pop up menu, confirm the removal by selecting “Delete”.

At this point, your HomeKit home will be wiped and you’ll need to repeat the entire setup process including adding the accessories, creating scenes, and inviting family members.

That’s all there is to it. Whether by manual hardware reset or software reset through your iOS device, there are very few issues that can’t be overcome with a little configuration wrangling.

HomeKit was announced at WWDC 2014, with devices only now starting to emerge that include this compatibility. As with all technology, it’s a good idea to have a few troubleshooting tips handy Just In Case.

With HomeKit devices, there isn’t really a reboot option like there is with computers or phones. Instead it’s more of a “reset” option. For our example we’ll be using the Caséta Smart Bridge, a hub for controlling (compatible) lights, shades, switches, and thermostats.

If you find that things aren’t working as they should, resetting a hub can be helpful. There generally aren’t a ton of custom settings to have to rebuild in a home automation hub, usually the custom actions and things happen in software. So luckily if you are troubleshooting, it shouldn’t be a huge impact on your setup to reset the hardware. Here’s how:

First, go to Settings > Privacy > HomeKit:

Look at that poor lonely HomeKit compatible device. It still doesn’t have many friends yet.

Once there, you’ll see all your HomeKit devices listed. Or, you know, just the one. Tap the “Reset HomeKit Configuration” option, and you’ll get a dialog confirming that you mean it.

Reset the HomeKit Configuration like you mean it!

In this case, the reason we have to reset is because the Smart Bridge decided the iCloud account wasn’t the right iCloud account and we had to have a do-over.

Success! Now to push the button on the unit and get things going again.

Once the software has been reset it’s just a question of hardware reset, usually by pressing some sort of physical reset button on the device itself. Then you can configure things again and get back to living in The Future by telling your virtual assistant to turn on the lights and letting your communicator work it out with your house.

When our smart homes are working, they are brilliant. But when they do break, it can quickly get ugly. While the Apple HomeKit platform is pretty solid, when it crashes it tends to ignite and you’ll want to know how to get your HomeKit gear back up and running as quickly as possible. Here we’ll cover how to reset your HomeKit setup if something is seriously wrong, or if you just want to start from scratch.

HomeKit is pretty stable mainly because Apple’s smart home system works locally on your various devices (iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, and HomePod) and doesn’t rely on the cloud. However, what ties all of these devices together is your iCloud account, and in our experience, this is where things can get wobbly.

Read This: Everything You Need To Know About Living In An Apple Home

When you switch iPhones, add a new HomeKit Hub, or perform a software update on an iOS device, things behind the scenes in iCloud can go wrong, which in rare cases can lead to the entire system going out of business. configuration. We’ve tested some scenarios in which this could happen and have a few suggestions to help you get back on track if this happens to you.

The Home app remains blocked

If you ever open your Home app to find a rotating circle on a screen that says “Loading props and scenes”, you’ve encountered a problem. There is no other way out of this screen than a very spooky option at the bottom that says Reset the home configuration, and the screen stays that way for hours, days… whatever you do. It happened to us right after an iPhone update earlier this year and it wouldn’t go away

More reading: Apple HomePod tips and tricks

We tried other iOS devices at home and they all had the same screen, Siri was not responding to requests from home, and none of the HomeKit automations were working. Our HomeKit house was well and truly blocked. What exactly caused this remains a mystery, but as we’ve discovered, if this screen appears and doesn’t go away, you’re going to have to reset your entire home from scratch.

Here’s how to do it:

1. If the “Loading accessories and scenes” the screen appears and does not disappear, wait.
2. Then wait again. Apple tells us that this means iCloud is performing updates in the background and it should hopefully resolve itself and allow you to continue.
3. While you wait, check all the iOS devices associated with your HomeKit home and make sure that:
a) They are updated to the latest iOS.
b) They have two factor authentication configured on all iOS devices.
c) That your Home app uses iCloud (Settings> Username> iCloud> scroll to Home> to toggle Sure).
4. Next, restart your HomeKit hub (iPad, Apple TV and / or HomePod – follow the instructions here).
5. Finally, relaunch the Home app and cross your fingers to indicate that it is working.

If not, you will need to go further:

6. Sign out of iCloud (Settings> Username> scroll to Logout).
7. Press Wipe off to confirm that you don’t want to keep a copy of the data on the phone (make sure everything is backed up to iCloud).
8. Press Logout.
9. Reconnect (Settings> Connection).
10. Make sure that you have another iOS or Mac device signed in to your iCloud account, so that you receive the verification code that you will need to sign in again.
11. Open Home and cross a lot of fingers.

If this is still not resolved, you will need to go ahead and destroy your HomeKit setup:

12. Open the Home app.
13. Wait for the Charging devices and accessories screen to appear.
14. Select Reset the home configuration.
15. Select it again when the warning dialog appears, then wait …

Once the reset process is complete, you’ll be presented with a new, blank Home app and you’ll need to re-add all of your HomeKit devices (hopefully you’ve kept all those HomeKit codes in a safe place), as well as set up your scenes and automations to start from nothing.

Find more gear: the best Apple HomeKit compatible devices

You will find when you go to Add accessories screen that a lot of your devices will appear up there and just need to be paired using the HomeKit code. You will need to manually reset the other devices (following the manufacturer’s instructions) before you can re-pair them with HomeKit.

If your HomeKit home goes bad, can you just restore all of your devices and settings from your iCloud backup? Nope. Apple has no way to simply restore your HomeKit data, as all of this information is tied to your securely encrypted iPhone backup. It is not possible to enter and retrieve specific data.

Read it: Apple HomePod Guide – Your Missing Smart Speaker Manual

However, if you want to try and get your old HomeKit Home back, you can try to completely reset your iPhone and restore from a backup you made before your HomeKit got funny. Along with this, you will also lose any other data (messages, pictures, etc.) that you might have added to your phone since that backup date. This is not ideal and does not work either.

Say you’re bored with your home setup and feel like starting from scratch, you can do that too. It’s actually very easy (too easy, some might say!).

1. Open the Home app.
2. Tap the Home icon at the top left of the screen.
3. Scroll down and select Delete the house.
4. Select Remove at the next prompt.
5. When you open your Home app again, you will have a new HomeKit Home to fill out. Enjoy!

Add accessories to the Home app, then organize them by room or zone to easily control different areas of your home—all with just a tap or by asking Siri.

Create rooms and zones

Add accessories

To add an accessory to the Home app, use your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch. You can’t add accessories to the Home app on Mac. Before you set up your accessory, check these things:

  • Make sure that it’s powered on and nearby.
  • Check your accessory’s manual to see if it needs additional hardware to work with HomeKit.

Then follow these steps:

How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

  1. Open the Home app and tap Add Accessory or .
  2. Use the camera on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch to scan the eight-digit HomeKit code, or QR code on the accessory or accessory documentation. If you have an iPhone 7 or later and see on your accessory, hold your iPhone near the accessory to add it.
  3. When your accessory appears, tap it. If asked to Add Accessory to Network, tap Allow.
  4. Name your accessory and assign it to a room to help you identify it in the Home app and control it with Siri.
  5. Tap Next, then tap Done.

Learn how to set up your HomePod, HomePod mini, Apple TV, or iPad as a home hub so that you can control your accessories while you’re away from your home.

Some accessories, speakers, and smart TVs might require software updates or additional setup with the manufacturer’s app.

Samsung AirPlay 2-compatible smart TVs don’t support HomeKit and can’t be added to the Home app.

How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

When I updated to iOS 9.2 on my iPhone this week, I ran into a terrifying bug: Upon restart, my HomeKit house vanished.

First, the good news. The data still showed up on my other devices, including on a device I’d given guest access to, so it thankfully hadn’t vanished into the ether and I didn’t have to consider resetting my whole HomeKit house. (I’ve done that for troubleshooting articles before. It’s not fun.)

But no matter what I did, I just couldn’t see HomeKit on my iPhone. The HomeKit scren appeared in the Settings app, but instead of “The Palace,” I saw a mournful “You currently do not have any homes or invitations to homes.” No bueno.

After some consultation and experimentation, it turns out that a strange app bug had glitched my iCloud syncing. As a result, myHomeKit data in iCloud stopped syncing with my physical device, presenting as a device with no data. (I’ve also seen a bug where your accessories show up, but you can’t interact with any of them.) Your data is fine—as evidenced by perfectly-functioning HomeKit apps on other iOS accessories logged into your account—but it just can’t communicate with your iPhone any longer.

If you’ve run into something similar yourself, here are a few troubleshooting steps you can take to try and fix it.

Step 1: Reboot your device.

Sometimes a simple device reboot is all your iPhone needs to right itself back with the iCloud sync repository.

Step 2: Turn iCloud Keychain off.

If a reboot doesn’t work, try rebooting the next best thing: iCloud Keychain. Your HomeKit data syncs via iCloud’s encrypted storage locker, and turning it off and on again forces a re-sync between your device and the keychain.

NOTE: Before you turn off iCloud Keychain, make sure you either know your security code or have another device of yours logged in to iCloud nearby so you can reauthenticate your iPhone.

  1. Go to Settings > iCloud.
  2. Tap on Keychain.
  3. Turn iCloud Keychain off.

How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

  • Reboot your device.
  • Go to Settings > iCloud > Keychain and turn iCloud Keychain back on.
  • Approve iCloud Keychain from another device or enter your security code.
  • Wait a few minutes to see if your Home data reappears; if it doesn’t, try rebooting your device again.
  • Step 3: Reset your iCloud account on your device

    If rebooting iCloud Keychain didn’t do the trick, it’s time to consider the nuclear option: Logging out of iCloud on your device. This can be a pain for a number of different reasons, but the biggest annoyance is that it resets all credit and loyalty cards you have in Apple Pay. Still, if you haven’t had luck with any of the above steps, it might be time to give this a try.

    For this step, you’ll also need a second Apple ID—to help reset iCloud sync. If you don’t have one (or live with a significant other who has one), you can create one for free at the sign in screen.

    1. Go to Settings > iCloud.
    2. Tap Sign Out, and confirm.
    3. You’ll be prompted that all iCloud-stored notes and images will be deleted from your device. Press Delete to confirm.

    How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

  • Press Keep on My [device] when iCloud prompts you about locally-stored calendars, News data, Safari data, and more (to reduce sync time).
  • Enter your Apple ID password and press Turn Off.
  • After your account is disabled, go back to the iCloud settings screen.
  • Log in with your other iCloud account (or create a new iCloud account at this time).
  • Tap Don’t Merge when asked about your data.

    How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

  • Log out of the secondary iCloud account (follow steps 2-5).
  • Log back into your primary iCloud account.
  • Tap Merge when asked about your data.
  • Go to the Keychain screen and turn iCloud Keychain back on.
  • Approve iCloud Keychain from another device or enter your security code.
  • Wait a few minutes to see if your Home data reappears in your HomeKit app of choice; if it doesn’t, try rebooting your device.
  • Questions?

    Let us know in the comments. Step 3 was the step that finally worked for me, though it did come at the cost of having to set up my Apple Pay cards once more. With luck, you’ll be able to reset your HomeKit data with one of the earlier steps.

    How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

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    How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

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    Now that HomeKit-enabled accessories are hitting the market, you may be wondering what you can do with your new connected devices. Whether you are controlling the temperature, turning off lights, or locking the front door, you will be able to use your iPhone to take care of various activities around the house.

    If you are away from home, you’ll even be able to use Apple TV (third-generation or newer running Apple TV OS 7.0 or later) to control some functions while away from home. We’ve got a tutorial for getting your HomeKit-enabled accessories ready for use.

    How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

    Download the App

    HomeKit is compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch running iOS 8.1 or later. When you get your device, be sure to download the compatible app from the App Store and pair your device using the special code that comes with your new HomeKit accessory.

    Setup

    Once paired, use Siri to take control of your electronics. You can tell the virtual assistant to set the temperature or turn off the lights in the kitchen. There are some commands that will require you to unlock your iPhone before Siri will comply. For example, you won’t be able to unlock your door until you unlock your iPhone.

    How to reset your homekit devices and configuration
    Some apps allow you to group multiple accessories together, letting them be controlled with a single Siri command. Groupings need to be set up in third-party accessory apps, and the settings may be called “homes, rooms, or scenes.” Third-party apps that offer HomeKit groupings can often incorporate HomeKit devices they’re not even designed to control. Lutron’s app, for example, can also control a Nest thermostat.

    How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

    If you want to reset the system and begin anew, open the Settings app on your iPhone and select Privacy. Then, select HomeKit and tap “Reset HomeKit Configuration.”

    Shared Connections

    Multiple iOS users within the same household will be able to use the connected devices. However, one person will be designated the administrator. Add new users from the settings section of the company’s app for the system you use.

    Using Apple TV

    If you are away from home, you will be able to set up your Apple TV to do the work while you are gone. All you have to do is make sure your iPhone and Apple TV are signed in with the same Apple ID account. Then, you can use Siri commands to remotely control your accessories, like turning on the lights while you are away. With iOS 9 later this year, remote access to HomeKit devices will get even easier via iCloud.

    Lost or Stolen iPhone

    If, against your desires, you no longer have your iOS device in your possession, use Find My iPhone to turn on Lost Mode so no one can use it to remotely activate your HomeKit accessories. You can also erase the contents of the device (only use this feature if you are sure you won’t be getting the device back).

    You can use another iOS device that is signed into the same Apple ID to control your HomeKit-enabled accessories. Just download the compatible app and follow the steps above.

    How to reset your homekit devices and configuration
    If you don’t have another iOS device, you will have to manually reset your accessories by following the manufacturers’ instructions. When you replace your device, you will be able to pair it with your HomeKit-enabled accessories again.

    Each system’s app will have a slightly different user interface. However, HomeKit supported devices will all be able to work with Siri so you can control your home from your iPhone by activating the virtual personal assistant. When iOS 9 and watchOS 2 launch in the fall, you will be able to use Apple Watch to control HomeKit-enabled devices and you’ll be able to access them remotely without an Apple TV.

    How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

    For those who follow my blog know that I have been working with ESP HomeKit for a while. To make new accessories I have to regularly re-flash my ESP modules. Especially when debugging the code, it often happens that I have to re-flash the firmware again. But here lies some troubles, When you didn’t removed the device when it was online you cant add it again and you have to Reset your HomeKit Device.

    Reset Homekit Device

    When device knows it was removed from HomeKit (that means that device was online and accessible from Home.app when it was removed), then there is no problem of reconnecting it back, since when Home.app removes accessory, it connects to it and sends command to remove pairing. When last admin pairing is removed, accessory switches back to discovery and pairing mode.

    If you removed the accessory offline, then you need to factory reset your accessory. Various accessories have different ways to do that. E.g. with Sonoff Basic users usually implement reset on long button press. Some light bulbs (e.g. LIFX) require you to turn it on and off for 1 second 5 times in a row. So certified hardware also has this reset problem if you do it offline. My suggestion: just don’t unpair offline or be prepared to do factory reset/flash erase.

    Button Library

    At first you need to download two files so called libraries ( Button.c and Button.h ) We need to call the libraries in our main code later. Open the Terminal app. Click the Finder icon in your dock. Click Go. Click Utilities. Double-click Terminal.

    Make a new folder called e.g reset. Where Your_Username is you Mac Username, Run this command:

    Change into the directory by typing:

    Now you can download the two files below within this directory

    File name: Button.c
    Version: 1.4.2

    How to reset your homekit devices and configuration

    File name: Button.h
    Version: 1.4.2

    How to reset your homekit devices and configuration
    The Code

    Now that we have downloaded the perquisite library’s we can make our new main.c file. You can use Apple Xcode or in my case Atom to code.

    Atom is a free and open-source text and source code editor for macOS, Linux, and Microsoft Windows with support for plug-ins written in Node.js, and embedded Git Control, developed by GitHub. Atom is a desktop application built using web technologies. Most of the extending packages have free software licenses and are community-built and maintained. You can download your free copy here.

    At firts we need to include the downloaded button library by adding this line:

    Then we place after the last #define line this part of code. On the second line you see the definition of the GPIO pin on your ESP. As you can see this is the same button that is used to put your ESP device in program mode. Why you may ask, because I already have a button connected to this GPIO and can give it more than one function with the button library.

    Right here after you place this part of code. Here we create the task it self. We start with blinking the led so you know that the reset function is starting. Hereafter is will reset the WIFI Configuration followed by the HomeKit reset and at last it will restart your ESP module by executing sdk system restart procedure. In the last three line we make a xTask for executing the whole thing.

    Right here after you place this part of code. Here we define the button press options. In this case I only will use a long press, as the single press is preserved to program your ESP module. under the line: case button_event_long_press we call the previous made function reset_configuration(); .

    Example Code

    So now that we know what we have to do it’s time to implement it into a excising code. In this example I use the HomeKit LED example to demonstrate how to implement it.

    Led.c Example

    When you have uploaded your .bin files to your esp hold the program button for 4 seconds and it will preform the reset! You can download all files here.

    How to reset your homekit devices and configuration
    DO YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS? LEAVE A COMMENT DOWN HERE.

    Note: To produce and sell HomeKit compatible accessories, your company need to be certified for that (https://developer.apple.com/homekit/, If you’re interested in developing or manufacturing a HomeKit accessory that will be distributed or sold, your company must enroll in the MFi Program.) Espressif have their implementation of HomeKit framework, but it will give you it only if you have MFi certification (notice this text at the bottom of page you mentioned: Please note that the Espressif HomeKit SDK is available to MFi licensees only, and you need to provide the Account Number for verification purposes when requesting the SDK.).This project is a non-commercial implementation of HAP protocol, not meant for commercial use.

    REFERENCE

    Maxim Kulkin, esp-wifi-config (2019), Library to bootstrap WiFi-enabled accessories WiFi config, https://github.com/maximkulkin/esp-wifi-config Paul Sokolovsky, esp-open-sdk (2019), Free and open (as much as possible) integrated SDK for ESP8266/ESP8285 chips, https://github.com/pfalcon/esp-open-sdk Espressif Systems, esptool (2019), ESP8266 and ESP32 serial bootloader utility, https://github.com/espressif/esptool

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