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How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

When buying prebuilt Synology Network Attached Storage, you’re also acquiring a license to the manufacturer’s OS, DiskStation Manager. Much like a new installation of Windows 10, there are a number of steps you should take after setting everything up to ensure you’re going to have a great NAS experience. Here are some handy tips to get you started in DiskStation Manager.

Synology QuickConnect

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

Synology has a feature called QuickConnect, which allows you to connect to the NAS at home without using any IP addresses. The servers at Synology will communicate with your NAS through a Synology account, allowing you to maintain a connection even if your ISP refreshes your external IP. It’s also super-easy to locate it on the local network if you need to connect a new device to the NAS.

Setting up QuickConnect is simple too. It’s part of the initial Synology NAS installation process but is an optional step. If you failed to set it up during the installation of your NAS, simply open up the Control Panel and choose “QuickConnect.” You’ll then need to enable the service, create a Synology account and give the NAS a name. The handy wizard will walk you through the few steps.

Ultimate power

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

Like most electronic devices, a Synology NAS allows you to manage power settings, configuring when the NAS will wake up from hibernation, how bright LEDs are, and how aggressive the fan(s) spin to keep the internals cool. Everything can be manipulated on a single screen, which makes doing so an absolute breeze.

Fire up the Control Panel and select “Hardware & Power.” Next, you’ll be greeted by four tabs worth of settings.

General

General contains the following:

  • Power Recovery — Set whether the NAS should auto-start on power failure or LAN activity.
  • Beep Control — Decide when the NAS will perform a system audio sound.
  • Fan Speed — Configure how quiet you wish the fan(s) to operate.
  • LED Brightness — Set just how bright (or dim) the LEDs are for status indicators.

Power Schedule

Power schedules allow you to set just when the NAS will startup or shutdown. This is handy if you use the NAS in an office or at home and only require access at certain parts of the day. For example, you could set power schedules so the NAS would boot up at 7 a.m. and then shut down at 6 p.m. This not only saves on wear and tear but also power.

HDD Hibernation

Hibernating your drives is a great decision if you don’t require drive access all the time, but don’t fancy having the entire system shut down to save power. Not only can you configure internal drives to go to sleep after a certain time of inactivity, but also external HDDs too.

Note that some apps and services you run on the NAS will override these settings and not allow your HDDs to hibernate. Plex is one such service.

Should you have an uninterruptable power supply (UPS), Synology allows you to hook up the NAS to a UPS via USB to have it continue operation or perform a safe shut down should a power loss occur.

Glorious mobile apps

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

Synology has a collection of mobile apps available for Android and iOS. Depending on what you wish to do, you can access files, photos, stream music, check surveillance cameras, and more. One great ability with the NAS and a smartphone is the automatic upload of all your photos — just like you can on OneDrive and Google Drive.

Backup Windows 10

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

Backing up your Windows 10 installation regularly is a good practice. In fact, it’s such a great idea that we highly recommend everyone does it. Even we have those odd times when Windows corrupts itself and requires a fresh install. You’ll run the risk of losing everything if you don’t have a backup at hand.

Synology NAS allows you to configure Windows 10 PCs to send backups to the central device. If you have multiple computers at home or in the office, you have safely store all backups on the single NAS. Sure, you can use discs or external HDDs, but having the process automated with a NAS is much more convenient.

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How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

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How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

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How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

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Microsoft has today announced that the next Windows 10 feature update, officially known as the November 2021 Update, will begin rolling out next month and that the final build is available now for testing in the Windows Insider Release Preview channel and via ISOs.

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

Buy these hard drives for your Synology DiskStation DS920+

Looking for the best hard drives (and SSDs) for your Synology NAS? We’ve got you covered with this comprehensive list of only the best storage media for your DiskStation DS920+.

A hyper specific post today – but handy if, like me, you’ve just wasted a whole evening trying to work out how to get a Synology “package” (ie: app, installed via the built-in “Package Center”) to run when the device boots up.

It all started when I noticed that my DS218+ was no longer on my ZeroTier network. ZeroTier is sort of like a cross between a network router and a VPN – once the ZeroTier software is running on your devices (Macs, PCs, Synology NASes, whatever) those devices will all be accessible to each other, no matter where in the world they are.

It’s magic, but it only works if the ZeroTier client is running on each device. A while ago, I noticed the ZeroTier package wasn’t starting up when my DS218+ rebooted, which meant the device had dropped off my ZeroTier network.

I could restart the ZeroTier package by logging into my DiskStation’s web interface (find.synology.com), opening up the Package Center “app”, and hitting the “Run” button next to ZeroTier. But that was only a temporary fix. Really I needed a way to stop this happening again.

It turns out, if you’ve set up SSH access to your DiskStation, then there’s a synopkg command for interacting with Package Center “apps” from the command line.

You can find out whether a package is running with synopkg is_onoff , eg:

And you can start or stop a package with start and stop , 1 eg:

If you can’t guess what your package is called, you can find it in the list of all packages:

Which will return lines like:

The package name is everything before the dash and the version number.

You could take the /usr/syno/bin/synopkg start zerotier command and chuck it into a script in the /usr/local/etc/rc.d/ directory, so it’ll be run, as root, at startup and shutdown. If you want to do this, you’ll need to follow a few conventions:

  1. The script should end with a .sh extension and have permissions 755 .
  2. It should ideally accept start or stop as a parameter, because the OS effectively runs yourscript.sh start when the system boots, and yourscript.sh stop when the system shuts down.
  3. And if you want your script to run in a particular order during startup, you’ll want its name to begin with a capital “S” followed by two numbers, which define the order relative to other S-named scripts in that directory, eg: /usr/local/etc/rc.d/S99yourscript.sh would run right at the end.

So if all that fiddling floats your boat, then go ahead.

But you bought a Synology device specifically so you didn’t have to go faffing around in unixland, right? Turns out that since DSM 6.0, there’s been a task scheduler built into the DiskStation web admin UI, and it’s called… Task Scheduler.

You can find Task Scheduler in the “System” section of the DSM “Control Panel” app:

In my case, I wanted to run a command at boot, so I picked “Create” > “Triggered Task” > “User defined script”. The default trigger is Boot. So then all I needed to do was paste my command into the “Run command” text box:

Tick the checkbox to enable the task, and click “OK”. Job done! Now the command will be run when the DiskStation starts up.

From what I can tell, this is just a convenience wrapper around each package’s existing start/stop script at /var/packages//scripts/start-stop-status . But I guess it’s nice not having to worry about where the package is physically located, and running synopkg start feels like a closer equivalent to hitting the “Run” button in package Center, than running some start/stop script from inside the package directory itself. ↩

Further reading:

Synology DS214se: Going under the hood

A step-by-step guide to setting up SSH access to your Synology NAS, and installing 3rd-party programs.

24 January 2014

ImageMagick and FFmpeg: manipulate images and videos like a ninja

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Zarino Zappia MSc

Designer, Coder & Internetologist

Zarino makes things that people want to use. He combines his intuition for design with a background in cultural studies and social science, to question, iterate, create and explain.

Jason Fitzpatrick
How to stop and restart applications on your synology nasJason Fitzpatrick
Editor at Large

Jason Fitzpatrick is the Editor in Chief of LifeSavvy, How-To Geek’s sister site focused life hacks, tips, and tricks. He has over a decade of experience in publishing and has authored thousands of articles at Review Geek, How-To Geek, and Lifehacker. Jason served as Lifehacker’s Weekend Editor before he joined How-To Geek. Read more.

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

Keeping the operating system of your Synology NAS up to date is only half of the smooth home server experience: the other half is keeping all your application packages up to date, too. Let’s look at how to manually update your packages as well as how to automate the process.

In our guide to getting started with your Synology NAS, we showed you how to update the core operating system—now it’s time to take a look at keeping your application packages updated too. Because the Synology platform is so much more than simple network-attached-storage, keeping your apps updated is critical in ensuring a smooth and bug free experience.

Manually Updating Your Synology Packages

To get started with the update process, simply navigate to the web-based interface for your Synology NAS. On the default desktop, you’ll see the Package Center shortcut (if there are packages in need of update you’ll see, like in the screenshot below, a red indicator displaying the number of them). If you’ve done a little desktop rearranging, you can always find the shortcut for the Package Center by clicking on the Start Menu-like button in the upper corner to access your full application list.

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

Inside the Package Center, you’ll default to the “Installed” view, showing all your installed packages with any packages in need of updates, if applicable, displayed at the top of the list in the “Attention required” section, seen below.

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

There are three ways to approach manually updating your packages. You can hit the “Update All” button to just rip through all the updates without review. You can selectively update by selecting the “Update” button beside each entry in need of updates. Finally, if you wish to review the release notes for a particular update before approving it, you can click on the general entry for an individual application package to see the detailed view. Let’s do so now with the package “Hyper Backup” to see what the update entails.

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

Here in the detailed view, we can see there is an additional “Update” button and, more importantly for our purpose, the “What’s new in version…” release note section that highlights what the update adds/removes/repairs. In this case, it’s just a simple bug fix.

At this point, you can manually approve the update by clicking the green “Update” button, or fall back to the previous menu to review your other updates and click “Update All” to take care of them all at once.

One thing you may notice on this detailed view is the small “Auto-update” check box beneath the “Update” button. Let’s take a look at the automatic update feature now.

Setting Your Packages to (Selectively) Auto Update

While you can check the “Auto-update” checkbox in the detailed view, as we saw in the previous section, there’s a much faster way to turn on bulk (and selective) automatic updates. From either the detailed view we were just in or from the main list of packages, click on the grey button labeled “Settings” along the top edge of the window.

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

Within the Settings menu, select the “Auto Updates” tab along the upper navigation bar.

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

In the Auto Updates menu, you can check “Update packages automatically” as we did below and then set it either as “All packages” or “Only packages below”.

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

If you opt to enable selective automatic updating, simply check off all the packages you wish to keep automatically updated. When you’re done, click “OK” to save your changes. Your Synology NAS will now automatically update your application packages as new updates roll out, no user input required.

Whether you opt to stick to a strict manual method or mix in full (or semi) automated updates, it’s painless to stay on top of package updates thanks to Synology’s streamlined package manager.

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How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas Jason Fitzpatrick
Jason Fitzpatrick is the Editor in Chief of LifeSavvy, How-To Geek’s sister site focused life hacks, tips, and tricks. He has over a decade of experience in publishing and has authored thousands of articles at Review Geek, How-To Geek, and Lifehacker. Jason served as Lifehacker’s Weekend Editor before he joined How-To Geek.
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How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

If you’re like most system administrators who have a mixed Windows, Linux, and Mac environment it probably drives you mad (and your users too) that there are these “.DS_Store” files all over your network shares. These files are used by MacOS to store custom attributes about a folder layout. Such as sort order, position and size of icons, and even a custom background file for this folder. This is fine if your entire network is made up of Macs, but for those with PCs it clutters up your shares everywhere and is super irritating. So in this tutorial I am going to show you how to block .DS_Store files on a Synology NAS permanently, and also show you how to make your Macs be better citizens on the network too. I’ll also show you how to clean up these existing .DS_Store files.

How to Block .DS_Store Files on a Synology NAS

Alright, before we begin, I highly recommend that you do this during a time of low usage by your user community. For several reasons:

  • You don’t want users creating more .DS_Store files as your deleting them, that’s an effort in futility.
  • When we block them, files that get created during this process will become sort of ghost files that will haunt you later on when deleting directories.
  • You will most likely have to restart the SMB service on your Synology NAS which will cause a blip to user access.

You may want to consider disabling all user access to the Synology during this time period and just tell your users you’re going to be doing maintenance for a bit.

Deleting the .DS_Store Files from the Synology NAS

The first thing we need to do is delete all of the existing .DS_Store files from our NAS. This can be done in multiple ways. We’ll cover each of them.

Deleting the .DS_Store Files using a Mac or Linux

If you want to delete these .DS_Store files from MacOS or Linux, you can attach the share and run the following command:

This uses the find command to search the shared folder and actions it with the delete option to remove it. You can also SSH into your Synology NAS and run this command at the command line if you know the location of the share within your volumes and have SSH enabled.

Deleting the .DS_Store Files using a PC

If you want to delete these .DS_Store files from a PC running Windows, you can map the share and run the following commands:

This simply changes to the directory of your mapped share (change D:\ to your drive letter). Del with this switches will force a deletion without asking and search all subfolders for the files.

Using Veto Files to Block .DS_Store on a Synology NAS

Now that we have all of the existing .DS_Store files deleted, it’s time to put in place a mechanism on the Synology to prevent them from returning. Samba supports a mechanism called “Veto Files” and Synology supports this in DSM. It’s a simple way to block or hide files on your shares.

Open the web interface of your Synology NAS and then open the Control Panel application.

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

From there click on File Services.

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

Now click on Advanced Settings under SMB. About half way down on this page you will see an option for “Veto files”. Check this box. Under “Veto criteria” enter “/.DS_Store/”. This will tell the Synology to block the creation of any new .DS_Store files. (Note: If any .DS_Store files are already on the drive they will become hidden. This is the problem we mentioned above and why we don’t want users creating new files when turn this on.)

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

And that’s all there is to that. You’ve learned how to block .DS_Store files on a Synology NAS!

Making your Macs Better Network Citizens

If you’d like to take this a step further, or you’ve got NAS appliances or other SMB files shares on your network that do not support Veto files, you can tell your Macs to behave nicely and treat your network shares better. This option simply forces your Macs to stop creating .DS_Store files in the first place, so there is no need to block them.

The only problem with this method is that this configuration needs to be changed on every single Mac in your environment, and also made to new Macs before they are placed on your network. This might be a problem if you have friends (or contractors in a corporate environment) who bring their own Macs and place them on your network. All it takes is one mis-configured Mac and .DS_Store files are everywhere again. The solution here is to have an MDM tool like Airwatch or Intune that pushes this configuration and enforces it to all devices on your network.

On each Mac, run the following command to disable the creation of .DS_Store files on SMB shared folders:

Reboot your Mac and it will no longer create remote .DS_Store files on SMB shares. This doesn’t affect local files.

How can I restart NAKIVO Backup & Replication without rebooting the server on which it is installed?

Background

Both the Director and Transporter components run as services.

Stopping or starting these services will stop or start NAKIVO Backup & Replication.

Solution

Windows Installation

If NAKIVO Backup & Replication is installed on Windows, follow the steps below:

    the Services snap-in.
    Find the NAKIVO Backup & Replication services:

  • NAKIVO Backup & Replication Director
  • NAKIVO Backup & Replication Transporter
  • Click the Stop action to stop a running service.
  • Click the Start action to start a stopped service.

Virtual Appliance or Linux Installation

Depending on the Linux version, run the command to stop, start, or restart the Director or Transporter services in the system terminal.

Stopping services

Service Ubuntu 16.04 and Ubuntu 18.04 SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Director systemctl stop nkv-dirsvc /etc/init.d/nkv-dirsvc stop stop nkv-dirsvc
Transporter systemctl stop nkv-bhsvc /etc/init.d/nkv-bhsvc stop stop nkv-bhsvc

Starting services

Service Ubuntu 16.04 and Ubuntu 18.04 SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Director systemctl start nkv-dirsvc /etc/init.d/nkv-dirsvc start start nkv-dirsvc
Transporter systemctl start nkv-bhsvc /etc/init.d/nkv-bhsvc start start nkv-bhsvc

Restarting services

Service Ubuntu 16.04 and Ubuntu 18.04 SUSE Linux Enterprise Server Red Hat Enterprise Linux
Director systemctl restart nkv-dirsvc /etc/init.d/nkv-dirsvc restart restart nkv-dirsvc
Transporter systemctl restart nkv-bhsvc /etc/init.d/nkv-bhsvc restart restart nkv-bhsvc

NAS Installation

If NAKIVO Backup & Replication is installed on Synology NAS , follow the steps below:

  1. In the NAS Web GUI, open the Main Menu .
  2. Open the Package Center .
  3. In the Installed tab, find NAKIVO Backup & Replication .
  4. Click the NAKIVO Backup & Replication block.
  5. Under the app icon, click the Action menu.
    • Click the Stop action to stop a running application.
    • Click the Start action to start a stopped application.

If NAKIVO Backup & Replication is installed on Western Digital NAS , follow the steps below:

  1. Open the My Cloud Dashboard and go to Apps.
  2. Find NAKIVO Backup & Replication in the Installed Apps list and click it.
  3. A page containing information about the application opens. Locate the toggle button to the right of the Run App label. Make sure the button is labeled ON, meaning that the NAKIVO Backup & Replication application is running.
  4. Click the toggle button to stop the application.
  5. The button is labeled OFF . Click the button again to start NAKIVO Backup & Replication.

If NAKIVO Backup & Replication is installed on QNAP NAS , follow the steps below:

  1. Open the QNAP Desktop and go to Apps Center > My Apps .
  2. Find NAKIVO Backup & Replication in the list of available applications. Alternatively, enter NAKIVO into the filtering box in the upper right corner of the dialog box.
  3. Make sure that the NAKIVO Backup & Replication item is not grayed to make sure that the application is running.
  4. Below the NAKIVO Backup & Replication item, locate the actions menu, open it, and click Stop to stop the application.
  5. The NAKIVO Backup & Replication item becomes grayed meaning that the application has been stopped. Below the item, click the Start button to start the application.

If NAKIVO Backup & Replication is installed on ASUSTOR NAS , follow the steps below:

  1. Open the ASUSTOR Desktop and go to Apps Central > Installed .
  2. Find NAKIVO Backup & Replication in the list of installed applications. Alternatively, enter NAKIVO into the filtering box in the upper right corner of the dialog box.
  3. Below the NAKIVO Backup & Replication item, locate the toggle button and make sure that it is in the 1 state – the NAKIVO Backup & Replication item is not grayed – meaning that the application is running.
  4. Click the button to stop the application.
  5. The toggle button goes to the 0 state – the NAKIVO Backup & Replication item becomes grayed – meaning the application has been stopped. Click the button again to start the application.

If NAKIVO Backup & Replication is installed on NETGEAR ReadyNAS , follow the steps below:

I have had indexing non-stop for about two weeks on both of my Synology units. After submitting a ticket, support said that my debug logs look like it’s being flooded by indexing messages related to files associated with Hyper Backup. They recommend excluding the backup directory–but I cannot find out how. Any suggestions?

The way it happens for me on my Synology DS216+II and DS118 is

From DSM desktop:-

Click ‘Universal Search’ from the dropdown list of apps

Select the ‘Preferences’ cog icon which is to the right of the search box which displays

Click ‘Indexed Folder List’ – set the folders you want to be indexed.

Hopefully it’s the same for your Synology NAS’s

Listing your model and content size would be helpful in assisting you. If you have the bare minimum model to index millions of tiny files, for example, we’ll just tell you you’re gonna have a bad time. If you’ve got a beefy model with only a few gigs of photos, we have a different issue at hand.

What are you indexing? Files? Photos? Some of the default apps require indexing but I know for Drive you can at least make it only do basic indexing.

My bad–I have two that seem to be having this issue–and the directories are both connected to the Hyper Backup application.

Here’s the pertinent exerpt from the trouble ticket:

However, I can see that the indexing logs are flooded with indexing messages related to files that appear to be associated with Hyper Backup tasks in the “Complete Image Mirror” directory on that NAS. One thing that can make the indexing process take a long time to complete or seem to never complete is directories that change a lot or that change on a very regular basis. If you are running regular backups to this particular directory – and if the other device experiencing this behavior also has a similar backup directory that is likewise updated frequently/regularly – then the indexing process may be running but is spending a lot of time on these backup files.

To this end, my recommendation would be to omit the backup directories from the indexing. If you don’t have a specific need to index the backup directories, then the system will be spending a lot of time and resources indexing directories that don’t need this. The fact that the files flooding the indexing logs are not meant to be used directly by end users but are part of Hyper Backup’s processes suggests to me that it isn’t necessary to be indexing these directories.

My issue is that I can see where to explicitly ADD directories to index–but I cannot find any sort of exclude option–unless I need to be comprehensive and do an extensive and comprehensive adding of directories.

The other day I created a little node.js project to keep track of some finances. Synology has a node.js package but that just installs the tools – it has no ‘container’ or any other support to drop files and have it run automagically. Maybe one day.

In the meantime, you can start your project when you SSH into the NAS. My project has a ‘www’ script which bootstraps my project, so to start I simply type ‘ node bin/www ‘ from the project directory. But, it only runs while I’m logged in, and if I log out for any reason, the process dies. That’s hardly useful when I’m away from home, or on a different PC. So I decided to have a look at starting my project as a Linux service.

After doing a lot of research into how Synology does services, and a few failed attempts at init scripts, I found that Synology DSM (since version 5 perhaps) bundles Upstart, which is a neat little tool to deal with services on Linux. It’s most prevalent on Debian and derivatives (notably Ubuntu). So, here’s how I got my node.js application running on startup by using Upstart.

Step 1. Create an Upstart script.

Upstart scripts live in /etc/init by default, and that’s also the place they live on your Synology NAS. You name the script ‘ servicename.conf ‘, where ‘ servicename ‘ is whatever you want it to be called. I called mine ‘ foobar ‘ because I’m inventive like that, so the file is /etc/init/foobar.conf .

You can be as simple or as comprehensive as you like. I started by using a very simple script, like the one below.

Step 2. Start the service manually

The best part about keeping it simple is that you are more likely to get it running. If there is an error in your script, it won’t start and it won’t tell you why. It will just say the service could not be found.

To start the script, just type start foobar from the terminal. If it’s happy, you’ll see the process start and the PID displayed on the console. To stop it again, type ‘stop foobar’.

Unlike other Linux based systems, “crontab -e” won’t work on the Synology NAS.

Modifying crontab and enabling the deamon

  1. Become root

synoservice -restart crond

Note: After a shutdown or reboot, you’ll need to restart the cron deamon to enable it again.

Running tasks using a different user account

If you want to run a task under a different user than root you can do the following:

#min hour mday month wday who command 30 0,6,12,18 * * * root /bin/su -c “/var/services/homes/myuser/apps/flexget.sh” myuser

The task above will run a flexget script under the username myuser ever 4 hours.

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Hi, I’m interested about running a cronjob with a different user than root. I was wondering if my code below needs any “escape” characters?

I know have have many double quotes, so maybe that’s why it is not running.

*/15 * * * * root /bin/su -c “filebot -rename -r -extract /volume1/download/tmp/ –output “/volume1/Video/TV Shows” –format “/Season / ” –db TheTVDB -non-strict” user1

Here’s my issue:
I have a cronjob to move completed files to a different directory, but when it moves them it creates a directory under the “owner 0” (aka root). This is not good, cuz I cannot see the files in my media player on my TV :(. They must be under a user I have.

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

Use a cron job with the chown command to change the ownership of the produced files. Alternately use chmod to allow you to read those files (chmod 644)

What can cron do that tte Synology Task Scheduler can’t? The Synology Task Scheduler also handles some other task, like mailing errors.

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How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

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How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

Source: Windows Central

After plugging in your Synology network-attached storage (NAS) enclosure, it’s actually relatively easy to connect to the unit through your web browser. Synology not only makes some of the best NAS for home, but also offers an external connection service that makes the whole process painless, and there’s even software you can download and use if everything else fails.

How to set up your Synology NAS

In order to start using your NAS, you need to set everything up, including the DSM OS. Here’s how:

  1. Turn on the NAS.
  2. Wait for the unit to complete its boot sequence.
  3. Fire up your web browser and enter find.synology.com or the IP of the enclosure. (There’s also the Synology Assistant you can download.)

You should now be greeted by the DSM install wizard.

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

Source: Windows Central

How to connect to your Synology NAS

Once you’re up and running and just need to access the web port, simply follow these steps:

  1. Fire up your web browser and enter find.synology.com or the IP of the enclosure. (There’s also the Synology Assistant you can download.)
  2. Enter your account credentials and hit Log in.

How to troubleshoot connecting to your Synology NAS

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

Source: Windows Central

Should the above not work through your web browser, there are a few steps you can take to connect to the NAS. I would recommend double-checking to see whether your NAS is turned on and connected to the network using a cable. You can also log into your router or network switch admin panel to see whether it has been assigned an IP address.

Lastly, Synology offers the Synology Assistant, which can help you connect to and manage various company NAS units on the network.

  1. Head to the Synology website.
  2. Choose your NAS model.
  3. Download Synology Assistant.
  4. Install the software.
  5. Run Synology Assistant.
  6. Allow the suite to search your network.
  7. Right-click your NAS and choose Connect.

How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

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How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

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How to stop and restart applications on your synology nas

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