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How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

You can create a local user account (an offline account) for anyone who will frequently use your PC. The best option in most cases, though, is for everyone who uses your PC to have a Microsoft account. With a Microsoft account, you can access your apps, files, and Microsoft services across your devices.

If needed, the local user account can have administrator permissions; however, it’s better to just create a local user account whenever possible.

Caution: A user with an administrator account can access anything on the system, and any malware they encounter can use the administrator permissions to potentially infect or damage any files on the system. Only grant that level of access when absolutely necessary and to people you trust.

As you create an account, remember that choosing a password and keeping it safe are essential steps. Because we don’t know your password, if you forget it or lose it, we can’t recover it for you.

Create a local user account

Select Start > Settings > Accounts and then select Family & other users. (In some versions of Windows you’ll see Other users.)

Next to Add other user, select Add account.

Select I don’t have this person’s sign-in information, and on the next page, select Add a user without a Microsoft account.

Enter a user name, password, or password hint—or choose security questions—and then select Next.

Change a local user account to an administrator account

Select Start >Settings > Accounts.

Under Family & other users, select the account owner name (you should see “Local account” below the name), then select Change account type.

Note: If you choose an account that shows an email address or doesn’t say “Local account”, then you’re giving administrator permissions to a Microsoft account, not a local account.

Under Account type, select Administrator, and then select OK.

Sign in with the new administrator account.

If you’re using Windows 10, version 1803 and later, you can add security questions as you’ll see in step 4 under Create a local user account. With answers to your security questions, you can reset your Windows 10 local account password. Not sure which version you have? You can check your version.

Create a local user account

Select Start > Settings > Accounts and then select Family & other users. (In some versions of Windows you’ll see Other users.)

Select Add someone else to this PC.

Select I don’t have this person’s sign-in information, and on the next page, select Add a user without a Microsoft account.

Enter a user name, password, or password hint—or choose security questions—and then select Next.

Change a local user account to an administrator account

Select Start >Settings > Accounts .

Under Family & other users, select the account owner name (you should see “Local Account” below the name), then select Change account type.

Note: If you choose an account that shows an email address or doesn’t say “Local account”, then you’re giving administrator permissions to a Microsoft account, not a local account.

Under Account type, select Administrator, and then select OK.

While installing Windows 10 or setting up your computer for the first time, Windows may have persuaded you to log in using a Microsoft Account. Microsoft Account is generally the one you’ve been using to login to your email on Outlook, Hotmail or Live. There was an option to sign in using a local account too, but it usually goes unnoticed. So, now if for some reasons you want to switch to a Local Account from a Microsoft Account, this tutorial will guide you. You can create a separate local account or you can convert your existing account to the local account.

What is the difference

There are several benefits of using a Microsoft Account over a Local Account. A Microsoft Account enables all the cloud services and lets you sync your settings across devices. Also, it lets you access the Windows Store and download/install applications to your computer. You can access some of the other services by only using the Microsoft Account. But a local account is a simple offline account with no synchronization capabilities. You need to separately login to Windows Store to download an application and most of the cloud services are disabled.

It is good to have your settings and files synced over devices but for some reasons, you may not want to do that. Maybe you have a common computer at home and you don’t want to login using your personal Microsoft Account. Or you just simply want to have a local account instead. Follow the steps to convert your existing Microsoft Account to a Local account.

Change Microsoft Account to Local Account

Step 1: Hit ‘Start’ and then go to ‘Settings’.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Step 2: Go to ‘Accounts’ and then go to ‘Your Info’. Verify that you are logged in using a Microsoft Account.

Step 3: Click on “Sign in with a local account instead”. Enter your current Microsoft Account password to authenticate and hit ‘Next’.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Step 4: Select a new username and password for your local account and you are almost done. Click ‘Sign out and finish’ and that is it.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Now you just need to log out and log in with new credentials. None of your files or programs will be affected. The account will remain as it is, only the login procedure changes. You can easily access the files through the library folders as they were before switching your account. Any data associated with the Windows Store applications also remains as it is. But you need to log in again with your original account so that the apps can access that data.

So, this was how you can change your Microsoft Account to a local one. The local account does not synchronize your data and settings. And to download Windows Store apps, you need to log in again. To regain your access to the services, you can log in again with your Microsoft Account. Stuck on anything? Comment down your queries and we will be happy to help.

As I mentioned earlier, the local account does not synchronize your data and settings. And to download Windows Store apps, you need to log in again. To regain your access to the services, you can log in again with your Microsoft Account. Stuck on anything? Comment down your queries and we will be happy to help.

Date: May 5, 2019 Tags: User Account

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Lavish loves to follow up on the latest happenings in technology. He loves to try out new Windows-based software and gadgets and is currently learning JAVA. He loves to develop new software for Windows. Creating a System Restore Point first before installing a new software is always recommended, he feels.

If you’re using a Windows 11 device, you may have signed in without using your Microsoft account. When you follow the steps below, you’ll be able to see which account you’re currently using. To sync your settings and Microsoft Store purchases across all your devices, you’ll need to sign in with your Microsoft account.

Select Start > Settings > Accounts > Your info.

Select Sign in with a Microsoft account instead. You’ll see this link only if you’re using a local account. Note that if you see Sign in with a local account instead, you’re already using your Microsoft account.

Follow the prompts to switch to your Microsoft account.

If you’re using a Windows 10 device, you may have signed in without using your Microsoft account. When you follow the steps below, you’ll be able to see which account you’re currently using. To sync your settings and Microsoft Store purchases across all your devices, you’ll need to sign in with your Microsoft account.

Select the Start button, then select Settings > Accounts > Your info (in some versions, it may be under Email & accounts instead).

Select Sign in with a Microsoft account instead. You’ll see this link only if you’re using a local account. Note that if you see Sign in with a local account instead, you’re already using your Microsoft account.

Chris Hoffman
How to switch to a local user account on windows 10Chris Hoffman
Editor-in-Chief

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Windows 10’s setup process now forces you to sign in with a Microsoft account. If you’d rather use a local user account, Microsoft says you should switch from Microsoft to a local user account afterward. Here’s how.

What You Need to Know

There is a way to set up Windows 10 without using a Microsoft account. If you disconnect your system from the internet, you’ll be able to sign in with a local user account. This works whether you’re going through the setup process on a new PC or installing Windows 10 from scratch.

But, if you’ve already set up. Windows 10 and created or used an existing Microsoft account, this won’t be much help.

This process will keep all your installed files and programs. You won’t lose anything. However, Windows 10 will no longer synchronize your settings between your PCs and use other Microsoft account-linked features. You can still sign into some individual apps with a Microsoft account without signing into your PC with that Microsoft account.

We’re not saying everyone needs to use a local account. The choice is up to you! We’re providing these instructions because Microsoft is making using a local account much more confusing.

Switch to a Local Account From a Microsoft Account

You’ll do this from Windows 10’s settings app. To open it, click the Start button and click the “Settings” gear icon on the left or press Windows+i (that’s a lower-case “i”).

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Click the “Accounts” icon in the Settings window.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Click “Sign in with a local account instead.” This option is on the “Your info” tab, which will be selected by default. Your Microsoft account details are displayed here.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Windows 10 will ask if you’re sure you want to continue, warning you that you’ll lose Microsoft account features like the ability to synchronize your Windows 10 settings between your PCs. To continue, click “Next.”

When Windows 10 asks, enter your PIN or password to verify your identity.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

You’ll be prompted to enter a username, password, and password hint for your local user account. The hint will be shown when someone tries to sign in with an incorrect password.

Enter the details you want to use and click “Next.”

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

You’re almost done. Click “Sign out and finish.” The next time you sign in, you’ll have to provide your new password.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

If you want to use a Microsoft account in the future, return to the Settings > Accounts > Your Info screen. You’ll be able to link your local account to a Microsoft account by providing a Microsoft account’s username and password.

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How to switch to a local user account on windows 10 Chris Hoffman
Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek.
Read Full Bio »

You can create a local user account (an offline account) for anyone who will frequently use your PC. The best option in most cases, though, is for everyone who uses your PC to have a Microsoft account. With a Microsoft account, you can access your apps, files, and Microsoft services across your devices.

If needed, the local user account can have administrator permissions; however, it’s better to just create a local user account whenever possible.

Caution: A user with an administrator account can access anything on the system, and any malware they encounter can use the administrator permissions to potentially infect or damage any files on the system. Only grant that level of access when absolutely necessary and to people you trust.

As you create an account, remember that choosing a password and keeping it safe are essential steps. Because we don’t know your password, if you forget it or lose it, we can’t recover it for you.

Create a local user account

Select Start > Settings > Accounts and then select Family & other users. (In some versions of Windows you’ll see Other users.)

Next to Add other user, select Add account.

Select I don’t have this person’s sign-in information, and on the next page, select Add a user without a Microsoft account.

Enter a user name, password, or password hint—or choose security questions—and then select Next.

Change a local user account to an administrator account

Select Start >Settings > Accounts.

Under Family & other users, select the account owner name (you should see “Local account” below the name), then select Change account type.

Note: If you choose an account that shows an email address or doesn’t say “Local account”, then you’re giving administrator permissions to a Microsoft account, not a local account.

Under Account type, select Administrator, and then select OK.

Sign in with the new administrator account.

If you’re using Windows 10, version 1803 and later, you can add security questions as you’ll see in step 4 under Create a local user account. With answers to your security questions, you can reset your Windows 10 local account password. Not sure which version you have? You can check your version.

Create a local user account

Select Start > Settings > Accounts and then select Family & other users. (In some versions of Windows you’ll see Other users.)

Select Add someone else to this PC.

Select I don’t have this person’s sign-in information, and on the next page, select Add a user without a Microsoft account.

Enter a user name, password, or password hint—or choose security questions—and then select Next.

Change a local user account to an administrator account

Select Start >Settings > Accounts .

Under Family & other users, select the account owner name (you should see “Local Account” below the name), then select Change account type.

Note: If you choose an account that shows an email address or doesn’t say “Local account”, then you’re giving administrator permissions to a Microsoft account, not a local account.

Under Account type, select Administrator, and then select OK.

Jason Fitzpatrick
How to switch to a local user account on windows 10Jason Fitzpatrick
Editor at Large

Jason Fitzpatrick is the Editor in Chief of LifeSavvy, How-To Geek’s sister site focused life hacks, tips, and tricks. He has over a decade of experience in publishing and has authored thousands of articles at Review Geek, How-To Geek, and Lifehacker. Jason served as Lifehacker’s Weekend Editor before he joined How-To Geek. Read more.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

If your Windows 10 user account is currently a Microsoft account (by your choice or because you got, one way or another, roped into it) it’s easy to revert it back to a local account if you know where to look. Read on as we show you how.

Update: Windows 10’s interface has changed a bit, and Windows 10’s installer is pushing Microsoft accounts harder than ever. Follow these instructions to switch to a local user account on the latest version of Windows 10.

Why Do I Want To Do This?

While there are benefits to using a Microsoft account as your login (synchronization of files and browser history, for example) many people prefer to have their Windows login as a totally separate experience and entity from any online accounts they might have (Microsoft accounts included).

For the most part it’s easy to prevent yourself from ending up with one account or another as you can easily choose which one you want when you initially install Windows or set Windows up for the first time after purchasing your PC.

Recently, however, we discovered a super annoying way that your local user account is automatically and without your permission converted into a Microsoft account: when you first log into the Windows Store on your new Windows 10 PC your local user account (say “Bill”) gets switched over seamlessly to whatever email address you use for the Windows Store (say “[email protected]”).

Not only is this an annoyance but if you end up in some comedy-of-errors situation where someone who isn’t you logs into the Windows Store then it converts your local user account to a Microsoft account with their login credentials. Further compounding the problem you need their password to undo the mess (and, should you lock your computer or log out before you fix the problem you’ll need their password just to access your computer). It’s all rather bizarre and a very poor and underhanded bid to get people using the Microsoft-style login instead of the local-user login.

Converting Your Microsoft Account Back to a Local User

Whether you’ve had a Microsoft account for a while and you just want to switch it back to a local user or you had a similar experience to ours wherein the Windows Store hijacked your entire user account, the process for reversing everything is pretty simple if you know where to look.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

On the Windows 10 PC in question, navigate to the Accounts menu. You can do so in a variety of ways (such as taking a winding trip through the Control Panel), but the fastest way is to simply type “accounts” in the search box on the Windows 10 start menu and select “Change your account picture or profile settings” as seen in the screenshot above.

When the Account Settings menu opens you’ll see, as indicated by the top arrow in the screenshot below, the email address of the now active Microsoft Account.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Below that you’ll find a link, indicated by the second arrow, labeled “Sign in with a local account instead”. Click on that link.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

You’ll confirm the account again and be required to plug in the password (not so bad if it’s your account, more than a tad annoying if your nephew or the like logged into the Windows Store on your machine and triggered this whole sequence of events). Click “Next”.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Enter a new local username and password (and if you’re in the same situation we found ourselves in then new means the old username and password you were very happy with before things got all muddled up). Click “Next”.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

The last page is a confirmation of the process and a reminder that this only changes the local login and not your Microsoft account. Click “Sign out and finish”. Strangely, signing out and converting the Microsoft account to a local account didn’t change anything with the Windows Store app and we remained logged in under our Microsoft user account. Seems to us like they could have simply allowed us to login to the Windows Store in the first place without all this nonsense and saved us a bunch of steps in the process!

Have a pressing question about Windows 10? Shoot us an email at [email protected] and we’ll do our best to answer it.

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How to switch to a local user account on windows 10 Jason Fitzpatrick
Jason Fitzpatrick is the Editor in Chief of LifeSavvy, How-To Geek’s sister site focused life hacks, tips, and tricks. He has over a decade of experience in publishing and has authored thousands of articles at Review Geek, How-To Geek, and Lifehacker. Jason served as Lifehacker’s Weekend Editor before he joined How-To Geek.
Read Full Bio »

As is known, both local account and Microsoft account can be created or added for Windows 10 logon. But it doesn’t mean you can use one of them just at will. For example, suppose you are logining into computer with local account, but want to login with Microsoft account instead, you would need to follow some steps to change the login user account. No matter what you are using is Windows PC, laptop or tablet, it is necessary to learn to switch login account between local account and Microsoft account.

Section 1: Switch to login with local account in Windows 10

When you sign in Windows 10 with Microsoft account, how to switch to log in with local account?

Step 1: Go to Start > Settings > Accounts > Your account in Windows 10.

Step 2: Click the link “Sign in with a local account instead” under login account, Microsoft account.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Step 3: On pop-up dialog “Switch to a local account“, enter current login account password. And click Next button.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Step 4: Then enter the local account information that you will want to sign in Windows 10. Click Next.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Step 5: Click Sign out and finish button to close the dialog.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

And you would successfully log in Windows 10 with local account you just set.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Section 2: Sign in with Microsoft account instead of local account in Windows 10

While you access Windows 10 computer with local account, how can you switch login user from local account to Microsoft account?

Step 1: Similarly, navigate to Your account tab in Settings > Accounts.

Step 2: Click the link “Sign in with a Microsoft account instead” under login user.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Step 3: Enter the Microsoft account and password you want to sign in Windows 10 with. Click Sign in button.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Instantly, you would successfully change the login account from local account to Microsoft account in Windows 10. In fact, the process is similar to the process of adding Microsoft account for Windows 10 logon.

When you have a computer at your home, there might be other individuals like your siblings, grandparents who too would wish to experience the new world of technology. But due to their insufficient knowledge of handling digital equipments they might cause serious damage to your system especially children. Thus it would be very much important to create multiple user accounts, other than the one you are using currently to ensure safety of your files and documents.

But creating multiple user accounts give way to the trouble of switching between them every now and then while handling apparently with someone else in your presence. Thus, this article would depict the ways and tricks which are simple enough to let you know how to switch between different user accounts swiftly without going to the main user account screen via rebooting.

Method 1: Switch over Accounts from Sign-in Screen on Windows 10

When you just start your Windows 10 PC the first thing that you come up with is your sign-in screen. Here you can switch between accounts. In case you have already started the system and want to get back to the accounts list in the sign-in screen to change the user account, follow the instructions shown below:

Step 1. If you are already signed-in via a particular user account, press “Windows logo key + L” shortcut combination to lock your Windows 10. If you forgot your Windows 10 login password, follow this tutorial to unlock your Windows 10 password.

Step 2. Click on the “Lock Screen” button and your sign-in screen would appear instantly.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

NOTE: Although, by default Windows 10 loads the most recent account that was signed-in yet you will get the entire accounts list in the bottom left corner of the screen.

Step 3. In the list, select the account that you wish to switch to and then enter the login details. Windows 10 asks for the details that you had used the last time, like picture password, PIN, etc.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Step 4. If you wish to alter the method of logging, tap on the “Sign-in” options and select the method that you would like to prefer for the next time.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Method 2: Switch between Accounts using Start Menu on Windows 10

If you are already signed-in then instead of going back to the sign-in page, you can switch the user account from the main interface screen of windows 10 as well. Follow the guidelines given below to switch between accounts:

Step 1. Click on “Start” button with a Windows logo on it to turn on the start menu.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Step 2. Now; tap the picture or symbol of your currently signed-in account, and you will see a menu with the other user accounts listed below.

Step 3. Select the “user account” that you would like to switch to and click on it.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Step 4. You will be directed to the login screen where you have to enter your login details for the newly chosen account which is loaded.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

NOTE: You can choose the sign-in options by tapping the “Sign-in” button. See this reset guide if you forgot your sign-in password.

Method 3: Switch between Accounts Using CTRL + ALT + DELETE

There are many shortcuts or rather to short keys that can be employed in order to switch over user accounts. One such method is discussed here in this section. The only pre-requisite is that you need to be logged-in with any user account in order to initiate the switching process. So this is what you have got to do:

Step 1. From the main interface or the home screen press the key combination ‘Ctrl + Alt + Delete’ from your keyboard.

Step 2. You will be directed to a new screen, with few options in the center of the screen.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Step 3. Choose the option “Switch users” and you will be taken to the login screen.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Step 4. Once you are moved to the login screen, select the user account that you wish to switch over to, enter the required details and hit ‘Enter’.

There you go, you are now in the new user account profile!

Method #4: Switch Accounts with ALT + F4 on Windows 10

This is the easiest method of all the aforementioned methods. The only condition is that the user is signed-in in to a certain account before switching over to some other user account. Go through the steps mentioned below to pull off the task:

Step 1. First of all, go to your home screen or desktop, close all the apps or make sure the apps and programs are minimized.

Step 2. Now press “Alt+F4” short key combination from the keyboard.

Step 3. Now; the “Shut Down” prompt would turn up. Click on the “Shut Down” option and a list of other options would open up.

How to switch to a local user account on windows 10

Step 4. Select the “Switch user” option and tap “Ok”.

Step 5. You will again be directed to the login screen where you can input your login details to enter the newly chosen user account.

Conclusion:

Multiple accounts in a system are quite beneficial when the users are outnumbered for a single system. But at the time it creates the hassle of switching from one account to another from moment to moment. If you don’t know the shortcuts to switch between accounts on Windows 10, it will automatically reduce the work rate and will affect the productivity of the user.

If you want to know more on windows 10 and its relevant issues, don’t forget to subscribe to our website for more information.

Windows supports multiple users so that one can use the account from anywhere. It can be in an Office or a Cafe or at Home where the Windows PC is common, and many use it. Due to this, people are often required to switch users in their Windows OS. In this article, you will learn different methods to switch between users in Windows quickly.

How to Switch Users in Windows 11/10 (Multiple Ways)

Here are several methods you can follow to change users in Windows

  1. From the Sign-in screen
  2. From the Start menu
  3. Using Command Prompt or PowerShell
  4. CTRL + ALT + DELETE method
  5. ALT + F4 method

The method works on all versions of Windows and all types of accounts.

1] From the Sign-in screen

The first thing you’ll see after starting a Windows 11/10 PC is the sign-in screen. If you are already logged in, you can lock Windows by pressing Windows + L.

  1. Once in the Sign-in screen, click on the screen to open up the sign-in option.
  2. Windows displays the login screen for the most recent user.
  3. Locate to the bottom left corner of the screen and select any user you want to sign in with.
  4. Enter the login info for that user, and you are now logged in from that user.

2] From the Start Menu

  1. Click on the Windows icon to open the Start menu.
  2. On the extreme left column, locate the top icon and click on the account option.
  3. From here, select any account you wish to sign in from.
  4. The Windows lock screen page will load with your preferred user, fill in the correct login information and log in.

3] Using Command Prompt or PowerShell

If you are more of a command prompt person, this method is for you; follow the steps mentioned below:

  1. Press Windows Key + X and click on PowerShell (Admin)
  2. Enter the following command:
  3. It will ask you for the password in the command prompt itself, type your password, and hit enter to switch users.

In place of \, you can either enter the username of the user you want to log in to or the computer name of that user.

4] Using CTRL + ALT + DELETE method

This method will only work if you are already logged in from a user in Windows.

  1. Press CTRL + ALT + DELETE
  2. This will open a window with several options, one of which will be the switch users one.
  3. Click on Switch users and select the user you want to log in with.

5] ALT + F4 method

To follow this method, close all your apps as if you don’t do it now; later, they all will be forced to close, and you will lose all unsaved data. Once all the apps are closed, follow the steps given below:

  1. Press ALT + F4 together
  2. A shutdown window will appear.
  3. From the dropdown list, select Switch User and click OK.
  4. You will be logged out to the login screen, and you can select any user you want to login in with.

What Happens to All Running Processes When Switching Users in Windows?

The second user will reuse system processes.

User processes from the first user will remain in memory. New methods, even for the same applications, will be duplicated. For example, if the second user also opens Chrome, it is already opened by the first user. Each will have its process running.

Can Multiple Users Login Simultaneously to Windows?

One person may use an operating system at a time on a PC. Although multiple users may have accounts, only one can be active at once.

Server versions allow multiple users to log in from remote text or graphical terminals and use the server’s facilities.

Any Way to Create a One-Click User Switching Shortcut?

No such shortcut apps are available in Windows to switch users, but you can use the Windows Key + L combination to take you to the login screen to change users directly.

Do Different Windows Profiles Run at the Same Time?

Task Manager shows you other users and their resources, and you can see how much they use by going to the Users tab. You can leave something running even when switching users. Consider having a Professional or Enterprise edition of Windows (or at least until they stopped simultaneous logins). Therefore, you could use the computing device as both your “console” and remote desktop simultaneously.