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How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

Thank you Edie! Thanks for stopping by. Did you get this trick to work?

Does dropbox handle the symbolic links the same in linux?
I use something like
ln -s /home/username/dropbox/desktop/ /home/username/Desktop/

I will have to try this sometime..

Not really sure Kris… I don’t plan much on Linux.

It’s the other way around

ln -s /home/username/Desktop /home/username/dropbox/desktop/

This definitely looks like something we could use for our shared documents. Our documents are on a NAS. Do you think this will work for our purposes? I read somewhere that Dropbox doesn’t look inside files within the Dropbox file to find recently changed docs. Know anything about that?? The biggest concern would be Dropbox deleting files from our NAS if it detects any kind of disconnect.

You should be fine even if the NAS files are on a mapped drive. Sounds like you are all sharing a single NAS however yes? Multiple users?

will it work if I use d; source path and c; target path ok? I currently am getting syntax incorrect for the following:

mklink /D “D:MikeDropboxlinkeddesktop” “C:UsersMikeDesktop”

For what i understood, you should first delete the “desktop” folder in Dropboxlinked and type

mklink /D “D:MikeDropboxlinked” “C:UsersMikeDesktop”

And Windows atomaticaly will create the “Desktop” folder under the “linked” one. I haven’t tried, but this should work.

Like Marlon said below — make sure you didn’t create a folder at d:mikedropboxlinkeddesktop. That needs to be created automatically using the command.

Thank you so much for taking the time to document the entire algorithm of this process step by step from step one. I had done this a few years back and just found another use to create a symbolic link for a folder and couldn’t remember the exact syntax. All I was missing was the quotes. I rifled through a dozen more posts and was getting frustrated until I found yours. Cheers for documenting it well. The dozen or so posts I went through before I got here were all shit, so thanks.

Killer trick! All 200+ recipes from my PC are symlinked to DropBox, synced automatically, and visible from my new iPad (and all my other devices, for that matter)! No worrying about maintaining multiple copies.

Now if I could only get DropBox to wash the pots and pans for me after I cook a meal…

Brilliant; thank you so much. It worked for me!

Yeah, it’s a little tricky but once you understand the syntax, it works great.

Great site an great article.
I have been looking for some time now for a replacement for Windows Live Mesh as MS decided to kill Mesh as of Live Essentials 2012.
Mesh is (was) great way to sync folders in real time, and to see them scrap it leaves me in a bit of a pickle.
I’m a infrastructure specialist, so I don’t know much about programming and that’s why I felt I was saved when I read your article…., BUT…, there is one problem though.
Dropbox does create the folders and files at the other “end”/second device, but only in the DB folder, it doesn’t sync to the original filestructure, and once the sync’ed folder has been created in the DB folder of the second device, a Sym Link can not be created as the folder already exsist.
I haven’t tried the addon that “Abhijeet Mukherjee” mentioned, but I suspect it will run into the same problem.

The scenario is that I’m often working at the office, updating som files on my notebook, and when I get home and want to work on those exact files, I need them to be “up to date” in the exact same filestructure…

A Sym Link is (as far as my knowledge goes) an open tube, witch means that everything from protocols to attributes goes through, so the only solution I can think of is having a Sym Link at both/all ends.
I have no idea what the conflict, if any might be, as I haven’t tested it yet, but it should be doable if DB is offline and all Sym Links are created identically at both/all ends.

I will test it tomorrow and post back the results.
(haven’t got the energy right now as I’ve been fighting with breakdowns on a bladecenter all day, and It’s 3 am here)

OneDrive is great piece of software but at the time of writing it misses some of the features that competitors (in particular Google Drive) like linking any folder to OneDrive. You can only synchronize data from OneDrive to your user folder (or wherever you define it). But you can’t tell OneDrive to synchronize C:\Support, D:\MyFolder, C:\MySuperHiddenFolder.

How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

Well at least not natively… unless you use the trick below.

Solution

The way to solve is by using neat feature called Symbolic Links. Symbolic links are basically advanced shortcuts. Create a symbolic link to an individual file or folder, and that link will appear to be the same as the file or folder to Windows—even though it’s just a link pointing at the file or folder. Since I wanted to synchronize C:\Support to OneDrive, all I had to do was…

Rename C:\Support to C:\Support-Old

How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

Open CMD as Administrator and use mklink application that’s brought to you by Microsoft as hidden gem

How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

Run following command – where Targetfolder shouldn’t exists (keep in mind REM below means it’s a comment). So just one simple command is necessary

Notice how the folder has special arrow next to it. It means it’s Hard Linked now. How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

Now anything you create in C:\Support (or folder of your choice for that matter) folder or on your OneDrive will get synchronized both ways (technically it’s same file – no synchronization occurs). Isn’t that great?

How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

Gets hardlinked to OneDrive, and at same time synchronized by OneDrive to Cloud!

How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

And best of all it doesn’t take double space on your drive. Enjoy!

PS. To get rid of a symbolic link, you can simply delete it like you would any other file or directory. Just be careful to delete the link itself rather than the file or directory it’s linking to. In my case this would be deleting C:\Support rather then the folder on OneDrive.

As of today, I have a cloud storage account on Amazon Drive, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, iCloud Drive and Dropbox. I mostly use Dropbox overall, but I also use Amazon Drive on my Kindle Fire, OneDrive on Windows 10 and Google Drive for my photos and videos. One issue that I always had is that I want to sync my folders with these services, but I don’t like the fact that I have to copy or move all the files to their special container folders.

Instead, I wanted a way to be able to keep my folders in My Documents or wherever I had them and still have them sync with the cloud services. I learned that the best way to do this is to use symbolic links in Windows. A symbolic link is kind of like creating a shortcut to a folder, but it’s more permanent and acts like a separate folder, even though it’s not.

In this article, I’ll walk you through the steps to create symbolic links so that you can sync any folder on your computer with your cloud service without moving it. Note that Google has a separate program called Backup and Sync that allows you to choose any folder(s) on your computer to backup to Google Drive, which I will explain below.

Sync Folders to Dropbox and OneDrive

Before I get into the steps for OneDrive, I wanted to mention that they now have an option called AutoSave that lets you move the contents of the Desktop, My Documents and Pictures folders to OneDrive without having to do anything on your part. Basically, they point the local folders to the OneDrive folders to make it seamless.

How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

However, it’s only for those three folders. If you have a folder saved somewhere else, you’ll need to either move it to the OneDrive folder or create a symbolic link. To get this done for Dropbox or OneDrive, I have created an example to walk you through the process. As you can see below, I have my OneDrive folder on the left and a folder called OneDrive Test inside C:\Test.

How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

So I want to sync the OneDrive Test folder to my OneDrive account folder without moving it. To do this, you have to open an elevated command prompt and type in the following command:

So let me explain what we are doing here. We are creating a symbolic link (symlink) using the mklink command. It takes two parameters: the first is the location of the symbolic link you want to create and the second is the source directory. As you can see, I don’t need to create the Personal folder in the OneDrive folder, the mklink command will do that for me. Also, you can use any name you want for the folder.

So I am telling Windows to create a symbolic link folder in the OneDrive folder called Personal that is actually just pointing to the C:\Test\OneDrive Test folder. After the link is created, you’ll see the Personal folder inside of OneDrive folder:

How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

If you open that folder, the path will show as if it’s stored in OneDrive\Personal, when it actually is stored in the Test folder. So now you can add files to the folder from either location and both will have the same contents since it’s actually one folder, not two. That’s it!

OneDrive and Dropbox both support symbolic link folders and will sync everything up to the cloud like shown below:

How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

Sync Folders to Google Drive

For Google Drive, start by downloading the Backup and Sync software mentioned above. Once you start the installation, you’ll get the following screen for step 2:

How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

By default, it will select Desktop, Documents and Pictures, but you can click on Choose Folder and pick any folder you want. You can also click the Change link to backup only photos and videos or add file extensions that you do not want to sync.

In step 3, you choose which folders you want to sync down to your local PC. What I normally do is just uncheck Sync My Drive to this computer, since I’m only using it as a backup for my PC.

How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

So there you have it! Now you can sync any folder on your computer with your cloud service. Either you’ll have to create a symbolic link or there may be a feature whereby you can pick the folders you want to sync. If you have any questions or problems, post a comment here and I’ll try to help. Enjoy!

Founder of Online Tech Tips and managing editor. He began blogging in 2007 and quit his job in 2010 to blog full-time. He has over 15 years of industry experience in IT and holds several technical certifications. Read Aseem’s Full Bio

We show you how to create a OneDrive mklink so you can OneDrive folder sync any directory and keep your files safe.

Microsoft OneDrive provides Windows 10 users with enough space to back up their documents in the cloud free of charge. However, you may have also noticed that the OneDrive sync folder is its own entity on your PC.

Anything outside of the directory won’t be stored in the cloud, which can be frustrating if you want to backup pictures, downloads, or game saves as they’re created. Today we’re going to show you how to enable OneDrive folder sync for any directory via mklink. If you are looking for a replacement to the buried OneDrive Fetch Files feature, please check here.

What is a OneDrive mklink?

mklink is a Windows command that lets users create symbolic or hard links between directories and files. You can think of them as a full shortcut, where the link doesn’t just point to a folder – it makes Windows think its contents are actually there.

We can utilize this feature to create a OneDrive mklink junction in our OneDrive sync folder that points to the directory of our choice. For all intents and purposes, OneDrive will now think it has ownership of the files, but the originals will remain. Here’s how to do it:

How to Sync a Local Folder to OneDrive via mklink

This process only takes a minute and doesn’t require any additional setup. The only restriction is the amount of space in your OneDrive account; if you try to sync a large folder you may hit your storage limit. Also bear in mind that uploading files every time they change will use data, which could be a problem if you’re on a metered connection.

    Open Command Prompt

Press the “Windows” button and type “command prompt”, clicking on the first result.

In command prompt, type the following command, being careful to adjust it to suit your preferences using the information below:

mklink /j “%UserProfile%\OneDrive\Documents” “C:\Users\Winbuzzer\Documents”

You should choose folders to sync to OneDrive yourself. The first quotations contain the name you want the folder to appear as after \OneDrive . This can’t be the same as an existing directory. The second should be the source folder you want to link, with Winbuzzer\Documents replaced with your username and the folder or another location entirely, such as “D:\Films” .

If you head to your source folder, you’ll see that it’s still there, unchanged.

You can now head to your OneDrive folder, where you should see the OneDrive mklink with the folder name you specified. In our case, “Documents”.

Next to it will be a ? icon if it’s still syncing, or a ☁ if it’s fully synced.

Use Onedrive to sync a folder on a different location than the default

How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

Jose Gabriel Ortega C

Mar 27, 2020 · 4 min read

Had you ever wanted to synchronize data to one drive that is spread over several drives without duplicating the data?

My name is Jose Ortega, and I’m a Microsoft Certified Professional on Office 365 , Powershell, Messaging (Exchange Online/Exchange On-premises), and Windows Server. I’ve been working with Microsoft Technologies for 12+ years and independently since 2015 using Upwork and reaching the distinction of Top-Rated Plus Freelancer. I used to write scripts for TechNet in my free time, but now I’ve moved to Medium; my goal is to help you solve complicated and straightforward problems with my experience. You can expect an article from one to three weeks. Right now, I’m working and assisting on a Microsoft GIG as a freelancer for Office365 tickets and customers worldwide. Thank you in advance for all the support, follow, clap, comment, and donation. If you would like to ask something or discuss it further, please reach me on social networks (Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, or GitHub as j0rt3g4).

This way, you can add information into the Onedrive Folder within your hard drive with several drives.

Let’s explain this using an example.

  • The Default Folder of the user “jose” is located at
  • Now we want to share a folder called “IMAGES” that are on

Note The drive F: can be a removable drive, but as a matter of fact, if it’s disconnected obviously won’t synchronize, so make sure for mental health that F: drive or whichever disk are internal to avoid issues…

  • Let’s assume that you want to create a folder “with the same name,” in this case, “Images” into the one drive.
  • To create the symbolic link, you have to open the command prompt and run

Wait for the syncronization to occur and do. You can apply this principle to how many folders and different drives you want. It won’t create duplicated items, and it will synchronize as expected.

Personally, I use this option; you need to change the 1st side of the command to:

And that will solve the issue.

The first example is how you can save your Outlook signatures forever in onedrive and create a new symbolic link into your outlook’s signature path; you want to know more, right? go to my article: https://j0rt3g4.medium.com/save-your-outlook-signatures-into-onedrive-and-never-lose-them-again-1337fc1924b6

A second example is that I use programs like Davinci Resolve Studio to color the footage; if you don’t know, I also work with photography and videos, the page is jgocfoto, and it’s on Instagram, Facebook, Instagram, Youtube, 500px, 100asa, youpic, pexels, unsplash, adobe stock, etc. So, to the point, there is logarithmic recording to enhance and maximize the colors that you can grab from the camera. When I started, I’ve collected and brought some Lookup Tables or LUTs to color grade my videos, so Why not use this principle to gather all the LUTs that DaVinci brings by default, plus the One I’ve brought.

To do this, you need to copy and paste the default folders into Onedrive, in this case, is C:\ProgramData\Blackmagic Design\DaVinci Resolve\Support\LUT” was copied into D:\Cloud\Onedrive\LUTs, and once the folder is copied, I could create the symbolic links like this:

And a final example is that I use Capture One 17 (the latest version always), so I’d like to save my customizations on the software and not lose them if I’m working from home or the office or just doing a quick review or any picture,

On this last one, we need to copy both.

“C:\Users\jorte\AppData\Local\Capture_One” into “D:\Cloud\OneDrive\Capture One Pro All included\CaptureOne”

”C:\Users\jorte\AppData\Local\CaptureOne” to “D:\Cloud\OneDrive\Capture One Pro All included\Capture_One”

And finally, from a DOS console as admin (or even a Powershell one) run, so the solution for this case is:

So there’s no way to go:

C:\Users\Public –> (SyncTool) –> OneDrive.com cloud?

Arnav Sharma | http://arnavsharma.net/ Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.

  • Marked as answer by Charlie Spencer Wednesday, December 9, 2015 11:20 AM

Symbolic links, otherwise known as symlinks, are basically advanced shortcuts. You can create symbolic links to individual files or folders, and then these will appear like they are stored in the folder with the symbolic link even though the symbolic link only points to their real location.

I also talked with a colleague who work at OneDrive for business, and seems like the symbolic link is the best way to do that. But users from OneDrive for business forum might give more effective suggestion since we are not experts on this product.

Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact [email protected]

That’s great, but as I told Arnav earlier, I don’t want the data residing only on OneDrive.com with at link back to it. I want the data residing locally, with OneDrive.com as backup storage. As I understood the instructions he linked to at howtogeek.com, with symbolic links, the data resides only on the could. That’s not what I want.

Thanks anyway. Please let me know if I’m completely mistaken about this.

Here is how I have resolved this need to sync the Public Folders to One Drive. This is somewhat ugly but it works. The added benefit is that when you set up a new computer, all the Public files can be there on the new computer as well. In my house each user logs in with their own standard account without Admin rights (there are 2 local admin accounts that are used for installing software and making system changes so everything in the personal folders is kept private), and the visitors log in with a local Visitor standard account. Everyone can access the public files. If you want to be more restrictive, you can change the permissions on the OneDrive files.

  1. Copy the Public folder to your OneDrive folder. (Move doesn’t work, that would be too easy)
  2. Set Permissions on the OneDrive Public Folder
    1. Right click on the Public folder in your OneDrive folder. Select Properties.
    2. Click the Sharing Tab.
    3. Click Advanced Sharing
    4. Select ‘Share this folder’ and click Permissions
    5. Select the group Everyone and make the permissions Change and Read. Leave the other options blank and definitely don’t check Deny for anything or everyone will be denied access to the folder including you)
    6. C lick OK 3 times to close the windows and set the permissions

    3. Open the Public folder in your OneDrive folder and the original Public folder in the Users folder in separate
    windows.

    4. Right click and drag each of the OneDrive\Public subfolders to the corresponding Users\Public folder and
    select Create Shortcut. I do this for Documents, Downloads, Music, Pictures, Recorded TV (yes I have some)
    and Videos. There is no real point in doing that for any of the others because users wouldn’t be adding to
    them. If you have created other Public folders, create shortcuts for them as well.

    5. Open each of the Users\Public subfolders and verify that the shortcuts are there and that they work.

    6. Delete the files in each of the Users\Public subfolders except for the shortcut.

    7. You will now save your files to the folder pointed to by the shortcut and they will automatically be saved
    to OneDrive

    8. If at any time in the future you find files in the Users\Public subfolder that you want to back up just drag
    them to the shortcut in the subfolder.

    As I said – it is ugly but it works and only needs to be set up one time for each computer.

    NOTE: I recommend that you just leave the group Everyone with Change and Read access, but if you
    only want some users to access the backed up Public files, uncheck all of the boxes for Everyone
    at step 2, substep 5 above. Be careful.
    D on’t check Deny for anything or everyone will be denied access to the folder including you)

    You can then add others
    1. Click the Add button
    2. Click the Advanced button at the bottom
    3. Click the Find Now button on the right
    4. Select Administrators from the list, then hold down the control key and select each of the users
    you want to give access, then click OK above the list 5. Click OK again to create the access list
    6. Scroll up and select Administrators and select full control
    7. For each or the others select the name and select only Allow Change and Read so they can add items
    to the folders
    8. Click OK 3 times to close the windows and set the permissions

    So you use OpenEmu for classic game emulation on your Mac, but you have more than one mac. You’re always wishing that you’re 2 (or more) Macs could just sync up, but they don’t… Here’s the solution.

    The save files for OpenEmu are totally accessible, but OpenEmu doesn’t have any native functionality for syncing your games with any of the popular Cloud Drive services. I should mention that because this is sort of a hack, this could possibly mess up your game saves, and I’m not responsible if this goes badly for you. That said… I haven’t had a problem with this in all the time that I’ve had this setup (about a year). So the solution is for us to put your saved games on the cloud drive of your choice, and then trick OpenEmu into thinking that the game saves folder is still in the same place, but in reality, it will be using what’s called a symbolic link.

    Symbolic links are a way to create a reference to another folder that looks as if it really is that folder. They are different to traditional shortcuts because they share the same iNode as the actual folder you’ve attached it to. If you want to find out more about how that works, watch this video. The important thing is that your computer will think that a folder reference is really that folder, thus allowing us to relocate local files onto the cloud without your computer knowing it.

    Locate your local game saves

    You’re going to click on the “Go” menu in Finder and hold down the option key. You should now see a folder called “Library” that you can go to. Click on that.

    Next, go into the folder called “Application Support”. This is the folder where the “OpenEmu” folder is located. So find OpenEmu and go into that folder. Next you should see a folder called “Saved Games”. Typically, the full path to that end folder would be:

    Move the Saved Games Folder to the Cloud

    Now you’re going to move that saved games folder over into wherever you want on your cloud drive. I use Google Drive myself, because that’s been the most reliable for me, but you can use whichever one you prefer. You do need to have that cloud service installed on your computer though (meaning that you can access it just like any other folder on your Mac). I’d also recommend copying that folder to somewhere else, like your desktop, in case something goes wrong and you need to restore that folder.

    Make the Symbolic Link

    The next step is to put the symbolic link into your OpenEmu Folder. You just need to replace the folder you took out, with a symbolic link of the same name. I’m going to go over the general ways that you can make a symbolic link here.

    To make a symbolic link, you need to…

    First put your folder wherever you want it actually be (usually on some sort of cloud folder or external drive).

    Next, type in the following command:

    Alternatively, you can navigate to the folder where you want the shortcut and just include the full path to the actual folder you’re linking to, like so:

    So in our case, the terminal command should look a lot like this (if you were using Google Drive as the cloud storage):

    When it Syncs and What to Avoid

    Now, when you go and place one of your games in OpenEmu, only the quick saves will be synced to the cloud. So that automate state save that occurs when you exit a game is just saved locally on your computer. If you want to use the cloud saves, then you need to use the quick load feature, which you can assign to any button on your controller.

    It’s also important to note that the this will only work if you have constant internet access when you’re playing your games, and you could definitely mess up your game saves if you try to do a quick save while offline.

    That’s All Folks!

    That’s it, let me know if you had issues in the comments, and I’ll try to help you out. Thanks

    As of today, I have a cloud storage account with Amazon Drive, Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, iCloud Drive, and Dropbox. I mainly use Dropbox, but I also use Amazon Drive on my Kindle Fire, OneDrive on Windows 10, and Google Drive for my photos and videos. I’ve always had one problem: I want to sync my folders with these services, but I don’t like the fact that I have to copy or move all files to their special container folders.

    Instead, I wanted to be able to store my folders in My Documents or elsewhere, and still sync them up with the cloud. I found out that the best way to do this is using symbolic links on Windows. A symbolic link is similar to creating a shortcut to a folder, but it is more permanent and acts like a separate folder, although it is not.

    In this article, I’ll walk you through how to create symbolic links so that you can sync any folder on your computer with the cloud service without moving it. Please note that Google has a separate program called Backup & Sync which allows you to select any folder (s) on your computer to back up to Google Drive, which I will explain below.

    Sync folders with Dropbox and OneDrive

    Before I move on to the steps for OneDrive, I would like to mention that they now have an autosave option that allows you to move the contents of your Desktop, My Documents, and Pictures folders to OneDrive without any action on your part. Basically, they point local folders to OneDrive folders to keep things running smoothly.

    How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

    However, this is only for these three folders. If you have a folder saved elsewhere, you will need to either move it to the OneDrive folder or create a symbolic link. To do this for Dropbox or OneDrive, I’ve created an example that walks you through the process. As you can see below, my OneDrive folder is on the left and a folder called OneDrive Test is inside C: Test.

    How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

    So I want to sync my test OneDrive folder with my OneDrive account folder without moving it. To do this, you need to open an elevated command prompt and enter the following command:

    mklink / J “C: Users Aseem OneDrive Personal” “C: Test OneDrive Test”

    How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

    So let me explain what we are doing here. We create a symbolic link (symbolic link) using the mklink command. It takes two parameters, the first is the location of the symbolic link you want to create and the second is the source directory. As you can see, I don’t need to create a personal folder in the OneDrive folder, the mklink command will do it for me. Alternatively, you can use any name for the folder.

    So I tell Windows to create a symlink folder in the OneDrive folder called Personal, which actually just points to the C: Test OneDrive Test folder. After creating the link, you will see the personal folder inside the OneDrive folder:

    How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

    If you open this folder, the path appears as if it is stored in OneDrive Personal, although it is actually stored in the Test folder. So now you can add files to a folder from anywhere, and both will have the same content, since it is actually one folder, not two. That’s all!

    OneDrive and Dropbox support symlink folders and sync everything in the cloud as shown below:

    How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

    Sync folders to Google Drive

    For Google Drive, start by downloading the above mentioned backup and sync software. After starting the installation, you will see the following screen for step 2:

    How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

    By default it will select Desktop, Documents and Pictures, but you can click Select Folder and choose any folder you want. You can also click the Edit link to back up only your photos and videos, or add file extensions that you don’t want to sync.

    In step 3, you choose which folders you want to sync with your local PC. I usually just uncheck the “Sync my drive with this computer” checkbox as I only use it as a backup for my PC.

    How to sync any folder to the cloud with symbolic links

    That’s all! Now you can sync any folder on your computer with the cloud service. Either you will need to create a symbolic link, or there may be a function with which you can select the folders you want to sync. If you have questions or concerns, please leave a comment here and I’ll try to help. Enjoy!

    Hi everyone. First off, let me share my excitement when I started playing BotW. It's such an amazing game, with so much to explore and do. It's my first Zelda game, and also my first CEMU game. I suggest you try the game out, if you haven't done so. It's highly recommended.

    Right off the bat, I noticed there wasn't any cloud syncing feature built into CEMU, unlike Steam, which offers Steam Cloud. In this guide, I'll show you how you can create symbolic links to sync (and backup) your precious save game files, which you have no doubt invested lots of time and effort into.

    A symbolic link acts as a pointer, that "points" to a different directory in your computer. Programs (such as CEMU), see this symbolic link as a directory, not as a file. In contrast, regular links are files with an .lnk extension, and thus, may not work with CEMU.

    In this guide, I will show how to sync BotW save game files to OneDrive (it should also work on Google Cloud and Dropbox). For this to work, the save game directory has to be moved to the cloud directory, and a symbolic link needs to be created in the . \CEMU\mlc01\usr\save directory.

    Create a new directory in OneDrive, and name it "CEMU saved games".

    2. Move your save game directory ". \CEMU\mlc01\usr\save\00050000\101c9500\user\80000001" to "%userprofile%\OneDrive\CEMU saved games" (cut and paste it there)

    3. Open command prompt as administrator and type the following: (be sure to replace . with the full path of your CEMU directory)

    mklink /d "C. \CEMU\mlc01\usr\save\00050000\101c9500\user\80000001" "%userprofile%\OneDrive\CEMU saved games\80000001"

    Now check to see if your symbolic link works. Open file explorer, and go to your save game directory in \mlc01\usr\save\00050000\101c9500\user. 80000001 will now be shown as a link. Double click it, and it looks just like your regular directory. Check to see if your OneDrive directory is the same.

    From now on, any new saves for this game (including manual and auto-saves) will be automatically synced to cloud as long as you have internet access. I set up symbolic links for other computers running CEMU, and they synced flawlessly. The above method also works for other CEMU games as well. Just change the save game directory. Go ahead and give it a try.