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How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11

Harry Guinness
How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11Harry Guinness
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Harry Guinness is a photography expert and writer with nearly a decade of experience. His work has been published in newspapers like The New York Times and on a variety of other websites, from Lifehacker to Popular Science and Medium’s OneZero. Read more.

How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11

Touch ID and Face ID are convenient, but not as secure as only using a strong passcode (mostly because biometric data doesn’t have the same legal protections). If you want to turn them off, here’s how.

We’re talking here about how to actually turn off Touch ID or Face ID on your iPhone. There’s also a way to temporarily disable these unlock functionalities by rapidly pressing your power button five times (or, on the iPhone 8, 8 Plus, or X, hold down that button while pressing either volume button)—the same shortcut that pulls up the emergency calls screen. When you do this, biometric unlocking is temporarily disabled, and you’ll have to enter your passcode to access your phone.

How to Disable Touch ID or Face ID (But Still Use a Passcode)

Go to Settings > Touch ID & Passcode (on an iPhone X, it’s Face ID & Passcode instead). You’ll be prompted to enter your passcode.

How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11

On the Touch ID & Passcode page (or Face ID & Passcode page on the iPhone X), turn off all the settings in the “Use Touch ID For” section—“iPhone Unlock” and “Apple Pay” and “iTunes & App Store.”

How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11

Now, you will only be able to unlock your iPhone, use Apple Pay, or pay for purchases from iTunes and the App Store by entering your passcode.

The biggest problem with turning Touch ID or Face ID off is that you are more likely to use a weak passcode for convenience; even a six digit numeric passcode isn’t strong enough. With Touch ID and Face ID, you’re able to use a strong passcode without having the hassle of having to enter it too often. If you are going to turn them off, make sure you still use a strong alphanumeric passcode. Here’s how to set one.

How to Disable the Passcode Also (But Seriously, Don’t)

If you really want, you can also disable the passcode. This means you’ll be able to unlock your iOS device just by pressing the Home button. This can be very convenient if you’ve got an iPad that never leaves your home, but is a really terrible thing to do on your iPhone or any device with personal information that is going to leave the security of your home.

If you’re sure you want to disable the passcode, go to Settings > Touch ID & Passcode (on an iPhone X, it’s Face ID & Passcode instead). You’ll be prompted to enter your passcode.

How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11

Tap the “Turn Passcode Off” option, and then tap “Turn Off” to confirm.

How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11

You’ll need to enter your passcode once more, but then it will be turned off until you turn it back on again.

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How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11 Harry Guinness
Harry Guinness is a photography expert and writer with nearly a decade of experience. His work has been published in newspapers like The New York Times and on a variety of other websites, from Lifehacker to Popular Science and Medium’s OneZero.
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How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11

Occasionally, some users may wish to turn off the passcode on iPhone or iPad. Disabling the passcode on iPhone or iPad is easy, but it’s not necessarily recommended due to privacy and security reasons, so therefore it’s only wise to turn off the passcode on an iPad or iPhone for very specific reasons. By disabling the iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch passcode, you essentially are turning off the devices security mechanism, and any data on the device will be become accessible by anyone immediately without any authentication.

This article will show you how to completely disable and turn off the passcode on iPhone or iPad, including the passcode encountered on the locked screens and for authentication in other Settings sections.

Again, turning off the iPhone or iPad passcode lock is generally not a good idea because it exposes any information on the device to anyone who has physical access to the iPhone or iPad, which can pose obvious security and privacy risks. Only disable the passcode on an iPhone or iPad if you are absolutely certain that you are OK with that dramatically diminished security situation, or if the device is intended to be used in public, or some other specific situation where the iPad or iPhone should not have a passcode on it. If you are aiming to turn it off so that you can switch it to something else, remember that you can always change the passcode on iPhone or iPad directly without having to disable it first.

How to Turn Off Passcode on iPhone or iPad

By turning off the passcode lock on the iPhone or iPad you are effectively removing the passcode and its protection from the device. Here is how to do this:

    Open the Settings app on iPhone or iPad

How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11

How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11

How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11

How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11

Once you turn off the passcode, anyone can open and access the iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch simply by turning on the screen, there is no need to authenticate in any fashion at all to iOS or iPadOS. You can turn off the devices screen and wake it up again and it can be immediately unlocked with no passcode.

As the warning dialog tells you, this means that any data on the device is easily available to anyone that can access the iPhone or iPad, including any saved passwords, credit card numbers, emails, messages, address book, contacts, apps, app data, literally anything on the iPhone or iPad can be accessed without any passcode authentication. Therefore this is strongly not recommended for any device with any personal information. However, turning off passcodes for a device that is intended for broad public use and contains no personal data may be reasonable, depending on the individual device scenario.

Turning off the devices passcode lock essentially means you’ll no longer see this screen when picking up an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, and you’ll no longer need to enter a password or passcode to access the device:

How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11

You can enable the passcode on iPhone or iPad again at any time by returning to the same settings section and choosing to turn on the passcode and setting a new one. Users should have a passcode enabled on their device for personal security and privacy.

Additionally, you can change the passcode of the iPhone or iPad at any time as long as you know the current passcode used on the device.

This is probably obvious, but if you turn off the passcode on iPhone or iPad with Face ID or Touch ID, and you also don’t use Face ID or any other biometric authentication, the device will have no authentication method enabled for it at all. Again, this means all data on the device is freely accessible to anyone and by anyone with access to the iPhone or iPad.

If you’re aiming to turn off the passcode because you forgot it, this is likely not the solution you’re looking for. Instead if you find yourself in a situation where you forgot the iPhone passcode, then you can reset the iPhone passcode by using a computer and iTunes, though doing so will require you to completely erase the device and lose any and all data on it.

If you have any thoughts, tips, tricks, information, or other helpful tidbits about disabling the passcode on an iPad or turning off the screen passcode on an iPhone, share it with us in the comments below.

How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11

Source: iMore

Apple makes it fairly simple to temporarily disable its biometric authentication features and force the entry of a password in order to access an iPhone. This is true both for Touch ID and Face ID.

Quickly disabling Face ID or Touch ID can be useful for a number of reasons, but particularly if you’re afraid that someone will try to unlock your phone without your permission. This could include law enforcement, criminals, or even just nosy family members.

Which devices support Face ID?

As of May 2020, there are three generations of iPhone and two generations of iPad Pro that support Face ID.

  • iPhone X
  • iPhone XR
  • iPhone XS
  • iPhone XS Max
  • iPhone 11
  • iPhone 11 Pro
  • iPhone 11 Pro Max
  • iPad 11-inch (2018)
  • iPad 12.9-inch (2018)
  • iPad 11-inch (2020)
  • iPad 12.9-inch (2020)

Which devices support Touch ID?

As of May 2020, these are the following Apple devices that support Touch ID:

  • iPhone 5S
  • iPhone 6
  • iPhone 6 Plus
  • iPhone 6S
  • iPhone 6S Plus
  • iPhone 7
  • iPhone 7 Plus
  • iPhone SE (2016)
  • iPhone 8
  • iPhone 8 Plus
  • iPhone SE (2020)
  • iPad mini 3
  • iPad mini 4
  • iPad mini 5
  • iPad 5
  • iPad 6
  • iPad 7
  • iPad Air 2
  • iPad Air 3
  • iPad Pro (2015)
  • iPad Pro (2016)
  • iPad Pro (2nd Gen)

How to temporarily disable Face ID or Touch ID

  1. Press and hold the Wake button and either one of the volume buttons simultaneously. The Wake button on iPhone is on the landscape side and on the portrait side on iPad Pro.
  2. Tap Cancel if you’re looking to unlock your phone or just tap the Side button to turn off the display.
  3. Enter your password the next time you want to unlock your iPhone or iPad Pro. Face ID should resume its normal function at that time.

You can also rapidly press the Sleep/Wake button five times in succession, but this triggers automatically calling emergency services. You’ll want to make sure you quickly tap the Cancel button within three seconds.

How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11

Source: iMore

Questions

If you have any other questions about disabling Face ID or Touch ID, be sure to let us know in the comments.

In iOS 11, Apple has added an “Emergency SOS” feature that’s designed to give users a quick and easy way to summon emergency services should the need arise. As it turns out, there’s a secondary benefit to Emergency SOS – it’s also a way to quickly and discreetly disable Touch ID.

Emergency SOS is activated by pressing on the sleep/wake button of an iPhone five times in rapid succession. When the requisite number of presses is complete, it brings up a screen that offers buttons to power off the iPhone, bring up your Medical ID (if filled out) and make an emergency 911 call.

alt=”touchiddisabled” width=”800″ height=”709″ />
Along with these options, there’s also a cancel button. If you hit the sleep/wake button five times and then hit cancel, it disables Touch ID and requires a passcode before Touch ID can be re-enabled. Touch ID is also disabled if you actually make an emergency call.

This is a handy hidden feature because it allows Touch ID to be disabled discreetly in situations where someone might be able to force a phone to be unlocked with a fingerprint, such as a robbery or an arrest. With Touch ID disabled in this way, there is no way to physically unlock an iPhone with a finger without the device’s passcode.

It’s also worth noting that there’s no real way to tell that Touch ID has been disabled in this manner. Once you hit the sleep/wake button and then tap cancel, it’s locked in the same way and with the same message that the iPhone uses when it’s been more than 48 hours since a device was last unlocked with a fingerprint.

Apple’s Emergency SOS feature will be available on all iPhones that run iOS 11. Along with disabling Touch ID, SOS can also be used to summon emergency services and alert your emergency contacts when an accident occurs.

iOS 11 is available to developers and public beta testers at the current time and will be released to the public in September alongside new iPhones.

Are you sure? The article specifically says you have to cancel.

vladi

macrumors 6502a
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #78

TouchID was never a security feature but convenience feature. It was implemented so you can skip ridiculous two-step phone unlock procedure.

What modern phones are missing is selected data protection as second layer of protection. This could be achieved by either tagging data such as individual phone call logs, single messages or threads from certain contacts to files or by having separate workspace where all the apps reside in mirror but are populated with unique data. With Iris scanner that could be pushed even further like when IS locks an owner it shows all the data but as soon as someone else looks at the phone available content on screen becomes limited as certain protected content doesn’t show up.

miamialley

macrumors 68040
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #79

miknos

Suspended
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #80

An better option would be to trigger a wipe. Let’s say a secondary password wipes photos, address book, etc.

Girlfriends will get crazy!

ackmondual

macrumors 65816
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #81

FoxMcCloud

macrumors 6502a
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #82

You could always turn your phone off. Or use the wrong finger 3 times. Those two things also disable Touch ID.

This is just a side effect of the SOS.

theotherphil

macrumors 6502a
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #83

gaximus

macrumors 68000
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #84

nicho

macrumors 601
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #85

tennisproha

macrumors 65816
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #86

gwaizai

macrumors regular
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #87

This is all wonderful, but of no practical value for the non-criminal person. You ever deal with law enforcement before?

You fly in from overseas and are exhausted.

Customs asks you to unlock phone, you pull this on them and they stick you in a waiting room for five hours to sweat you. You going to go through the hassle of getting a lawyer yada yada? No you’re not. You’re going to unlock your phone, so you can get to your connecting flight and be the h*ll on your way.

Fzang

macrumors 65816
  • Aug 18, 2017
  • #88

This is all wonderful, but of no practical value for the non-criminal person. You ever deal with law enforcement before?

You fly in from overseas and are exhausted.

Customs asks you to unlock phone, you pull this on them and they stick you in a waiting room for five hours to sweat you. You going to go through the hassle of getting a lawyer yada yada? No you’re not. You’re going to unlock your phone, so you can get to your connecting flight and be the h*ll on your way.

"Cede your legal rights, or you won’t make your flight to Hawaii"

I can almost picture the world tomorrow a better place than yesterday.

nicho

macrumors 601
  • Aug 18, 2017
  • #89

macintoshmac

macrumors 603
  • Aug 18, 2017
  • #90

You are correct.

(s)
But Apple really should have kept it at 3, and maybe Ive could have satisfied his sensibilities by keeping it at 4, in fact Apple should have had a world poll on it for the most convenient number of presses people are willing to make to activate a feature so as to have no-one blame them for the count.
(/s)

Ed217

macrumors 6502
  • Aug 18, 2017
  • #91

shplock

macrumors 6502a
  • Aug 18, 2017
  • #92

Where all these cops that are checking your cell phone when they pull you over? Serious question.

In other words a win for ISIS?

Novus John

macrumors regular
  • Aug 18, 2017
  • #93

shplock

macrumors 6502a
  • Aug 18, 2017
  • #94

mazz0

macrumors 68030
  • Aug 18, 2017
  • #95

Yep, that happened to me too, attracting quite a lot of attention in the office

You have to turn off Auto Call to get this screen (although cancelling the autocall disables Touch ID as well).

I think auto-call is probably the more useful option, although as others have said I think it quite likely I’d forget about this feature in an emergency.

Wanted797

macrumors 65816
  • Aug 18, 2017
  • #96
macrumors 68020
  • Aug 18, 2017
  • #97

Good over-all idea, not sure the process is easy enough to remember or implement, especially if you try to do it unobtrusively so not to draw attention to yourself. Lots of people would need to look at their screen to do this and thus draw attention to themselves and the phone. You would have a hard time explaining to a thief or, **ahem** Person of Authority that you can’t remember or don’t know how to reactivate it. And if the person is threatening you I doubt a court ruling is going to magically appear to protect you from physical harm.

I don’t have a better solution in mind however.

venusboy

macrumors regular
  • Aug 18, 2017
  • #98

rob_saunders

macrumors newbie
  • Aug 18, 2017
  • #99

Chazzle

macrumors 68020
  • Aug 18, 2017
  • #100

Okay, I’ll explain this again.

Once you press the power button 5 times and activate SOS, you have a few options.

1. Power down your phone (disables Touch ID)
2. Call Emergency Services (when call is finished, Touch ID does not work and passcode is needed to unlock phone)
3. Access Medical ID (when pressing Done, passcode is required to access phone)
4. Press Cancel (brings you to passcode screen requiring passcode to unlock phone)
5. Do nothing and leave your phone on the SOS screen (the phone will remain on that screen until one of the above actions is taken which all require a passcode to access the phone)

Since all of these options result in you needing your passscode to get back into the phone, it’s effectively pressing the power button 5 times that disables Touch ID, not just when you tap Cancel.

Touch ID is disabled. Once I wake the phone, I have to enter the passcode to turn Touch ID back on.

Edited to add: The screen turns off after I press cancel. If you don’t hit cancel, the phone does stay lit.

Chazzle

macrumors 68020
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #52

Touch ID is disabled. Once I wake the phone, I have to enter the passcode to turn Touch ID back on.

Edited to add: The screen turns off after I press cancel. If you don’t hit cancel, the phone does stay lit.

Nunyabinez

macrumors 68000
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #53

CarlJ

Contributor
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #54
macrumors 68040
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #55

Solomani

macrumors 601
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #56

JRobinsonJr

macrumors 6502a
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #57
macrumors 68040
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #58

spyguy10709

macrumors 6502a
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #59

Where all these cops that are checking your cell phone when they pull you over? Serious question.

In other words a win for ISIS?

windywalks

macrumors 6502a
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #60

tennisproha

macrumors 65816
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #61

iamshine

macrumors newbie
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #62

coolfactor

macrumors 603
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #63

allenvanhellen

macrumors 6502
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #64

alphaod

Contributor
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #65

applesith

macrumors 68030
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #66

cerote

macrumors 6502a
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #67

iapplelove

Suspended
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #68

Apple blogger

macrumors 6502a
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #69

richard4339

macrumors 6502a
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #70

MrGuder

macrumors 68040
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #71

StandingGoose

macrumors member
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #72

subjonas

macrumors 68040
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #73

StandingGoose

macrumors member
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #74

NZChris

macrumors newbie
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #75

This only works if you switch OFF the auto call option for Emergency SOS.

In a real emergency, you probably want that on. If it is on, you have 5 seconds to cancel the call, while the iPhone is making a loud siren sound.

In iOS 11, Apple has added an “Emergency SOS” feature that’s designed to give users a quick and easy way to summon emergency services should the need arise. As it turns out, there’s a secondary benefit to Emergency SOS – it’s also a way to quickly and discretely disable Touch ID.

Emergency SOS is activated by pressing on the sleep/wake button of an iPhone five times in rapid succession. When the requisite number of presses is complete, it brings up a screen that offers buttons to power off the iPhone, bring up your Medical ID (if filled out) and make an emergency 911 call.

How to temporarily disable touch id and require a passcode in ios 11
Along with these options, there’s also a cancel button. If you hit the sleep/wake button five times and then hit cancel, it disables Touch ID and requires a passcode before Touch ID can be re-enabled. Touch ID is also disabled if you actually make an emergency call.

This is a handy hidden feature because it allows Touch ID to be disabled discretely in situations where someone might be able to force a phone to be unlocked with a fingerprint, such as a robbery or an arrest. With Touch ID disabled in this way, there is no way to physically unlock an iPhone with a finger without the device’s passcode.

It’s also worth noting that there’s no real way to tell that Touch ID has been disabled in this manner. Once you hit the sleep/wake button and then tap cancel, it’s locked in the same way and with the same message that the iPhone uses when it’s been more than 48 hours since a device was last unlocked with a fingerprint.

Apple’s Emergency SOS feature will be available on all iPhones that run iOS 11. Along with disabling Touch ID, SOS can also be used to summon emergency services and alert your emergency contacts when an accident occurs.

iOS 11 is available to developers and public beta testers at the current time and will be released to the public in September alongside new iPhones.

When you have a few chicks and one wants you to unlock your phone all the time and you worry about her using your fingerprint while you sleep. trust me, you’ll remember to do it before you go to bed.

Lobitdepth

macrumors newbie
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #29

ActionableMango

macrumors G3
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #30

Soorms

macrumors newbie
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #31

gnasher729

Suspended
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #32

joueboy

macrumors 68000
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #33

Chazzle

macrumors 68020
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #34

JosephAW

macrumors 601
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #35

BWhaler

macrumors 68040
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #36

subjonas

macrumors 68040
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #37

78Bandit

macrumors 6502a
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #38

episodex

macrumors newbie
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #39

WilliamG

macrumors G3
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #40

SeattleMoose

macrumors 68000
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #41

phpmaven

macrumors 68040
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #42

Brian Clifford

macrumors regular
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #43

Apple_Robert

macrumors Penryn
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #44

thisisnotmyname

macrumors 68020
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #45

Apple_Robert

macrumors Penryn
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #46

sinsin07

macrumors 68040
  • Aug 17, 2017
  • #47

OR
1. Enable Magnifier in Settings
Open the Settings app
Tap ‘General’, then the ‘Accessibility’ tab
Tap ‘Magnifier’ and tap the toggle to enable it
Optionally tap the toggle for Auto-Brightness to enable automatic brightness and contrast adjustments based on ambient light while using Magnifier

2. Triple-click home button to activate Magnifier
Once enabled, you can now open the Magnifier from anywhere with a quick triple-click of the home button, including from the lock screen.

There’s an Emergency SOS feature built into iOS 11 that has hidden functionality — it automatically disables Touch ID and makes it so your passcode has to be entered to unlock your iPhone.

Because it essentially shuts down the biometrics on your device, you can’t be compelled by a police officer or malicious person to unlock your iPhone with a fingerprint, nor can your fingerprint be used to get into your device should you be unconscious after an emergency. On iPhone X, this also applies to Face ID.

Emergency SOS is enabled by default, and there’s only one step to activate it: Press on the sleep/wake (Side) button of your iPhone five times in rapid succession. On the iPhone X, iPhone 8, and iPhone 8 Plus, instead of pressing the Side button five times rapidly, you hold down the Side button and one of the volume buttons at the same time. It’s essentially a quick squeeze on either side of the device.

alt=”disabletouchidios11″ width=”800″ height=”708″ />
These gestures initiates a screen that gives you the option to power the iPhone off, make a call to emergency services, or access your Medical ID.

Though not expressly stated, once your iPhone is in this emergency state, Touch ID is disabled. You will, however, have to press the cancel button to get back to the Home screen, so it’s not an entirely secretive process.

If you’re using Emergency SOS to disable the lock screen and don’t want to set the feature up to automatically call 911 when the sleep/wake button is pressed, make sure to disable Auto Call in the Settings app. Here’s how:

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Scroll down to Emergency SOS. alt=”emergencysossettings” width=”800″ height=”707″ />
  3. Disable Auto Call.

With Auto Call disabled, pressing sleep/wake will bring up the aforementioned screen with the option to slide to make the emergency call. With Auto Call enabled, emergency services are called automatically when the sleep/wake button is pressed five times, following a five second countdown timer.

It’s best to leave Auto Call on if you want to be able to get in touch with emergency services immediately should you be in danger.

While this feature was likely built to keep your iPhone secure in a situation where you might be incapacitated, it can also prevent authority figures from forcing you to unlock your device.

This is notable because there have been legal rulings where a defendant has been compelled to provide a fingerprint, but not a passcode. Most people will never need to disable Touch ID, but it’s worth knowing the option is there should there be a situation where it is necessary.