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How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Although Twitter has officially increased the character count per tweet to 280 from the previous limit of 140 characters, it’s still not enough to post long-form contents. That’s why people use Twitter’s threaded tweet feature which allows them to post long-form content by replying to their own tweets. People who spend their life on Twitter know how hard it is to read a big threaded tweet. You have to click on each tweet in a thread individually to expand it, which takes time, and the whole process is really frustrating. Basically, reading a long threaded tweet on Twitter is a nightmare.

But, it doesn’t have to be so. With Thread Reader, a user can easily read long Twitter threads. Thread Reader converts a threaded tweet into a simple blog post where all the tweets are mentioned one-by-one, making it easy for users to read it. In this article, we are going to see, how we can use Thread Reader to easily read threaded tweets:

Use Thread Reader to easily read threaded tweets

As I mentioned above, Thread Reader converts a threaded tweet into a simple blog post giving you an easy and faster reading experience. Thread Reader calls it as unrolling a tweet. There are three methods to unroll a tweet using Thread Reader service, and we are going to look into all of them one by one:

Using Thread Reader Extension on Google Chrome

  1. The easiest way to use Thread Reader is by using its Chrome extension. First, click on the link to install theThread Reader Chrome Extension.

2. Now, open your Twitter account on Chrome and find a threaded tweet. Here, click on the down arrow which expands the menu.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

3. Now, click on the “Unroll in Thread Reader” option.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

4. A new tab will open which will house all the tweets in a blog post, just as shown in the picture below.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

The video also shows how you can use the Chrome extension of Thread Reader to unroll and easily read the threaded tweet.

Using Thread Reader Android App

  1. The first two steps are similar. First, launch the Twitter app and find a threaded tweet.

2. Here, tap on the “down arrow” button and then tap on “Share Tweet via” option.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

3. Now, scroll down to find the Thread Reader option, and tap on it. You will see that a new link will open which will house all the tweets in an easy to read blog post.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Using Thread Reader Bot

The above two methods are simple and easy to use, but what if a user neither uses Chrome or Android. Well, then he/she can utilize the Thread Reader bot to unroll the threaded tweet.

  1. First, open the threaded tweet and then click on the reply box.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

2. Here, type the following reply and post it – @tttthreads unroll, as shown in the picture below.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

3. After a few seconds you will receive a notification on your Twitter account. Click on the link in the notification to open the threaded tweet in a blog post format.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

And this is how it looks when you click on the link in your notification.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

4. Here’s a video explaining the same thing. Watch it, if you were not able to follow the tutorial mentioned above.

Easily Read Threaded Tweets Using Thread Reader

As you can see, Thread Reader makes it really easy to read long threaded tweets. If you are someone who deals a lot with threaded tweets, this can save you a lot of time and effort. Do use this nifty trick and let us know if you like it or not. If you do like it, remember to share this article with your other Twitterati friends.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Thanks to videos, GIFs, photos, and products like Carousel Ads , there are lots of ways to express your message in a Tweet. But what about when you want to use more words and 280 characters aren’t enough? Or you want to update your followers in real-time as a story develops?

This is where our friend the Twitter thread comes in. Here, we’ve got two examples of how to thread Tweets, plus we’ll share some top threads from a few of our own Twitter accounts for inspiration.

How to publish a Tweet thread

1. Click the "Tweet" button to compose a new Tweet.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

2. Write your first Tweet. Click the "Add another Tweet" button and a second Tweet window will pop up.

3. You can publish the entire thread at the same time with the "Tweet all" button. You can also add a thread to a previously published Tweet using the same "Add another Tweet" button.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Publishing one Tweet at a time v publishing a full thread

Publishing a thread one Tweet at a time lets your followers feel the excitement of a developing story — perfect for a live event, product launch, or announcing a competition winner.

Publishing an entire thread at once instantly gives your followers a fully-formed story. This is a good Tweet format for a message you want to control a bit more, like a nuanced company announcement, as done by @TwitterBusiness while launching a test of Professional Profiles.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Why Tweet in a thread?
To tell a story, build intrigue, or create suspense

Tweet threads lend themselves really well to creating intrigue and build-up to the climax of a story, or the nitty-gritty of a conversation.

When publishing one Tweet at a time, we recommend waiting about an hour after publishing your first Tweet to publish your second, and waiting another 15 minutes or so to publish your third.

This staggered format will keep bumping your message up people’s timelines, but not with so much of a time gap that they begin to lose interest.

If you’re publishing a longer-running series or campaign with video or imagery, you can always add your next Tweet days after the first, too. Take @TwitterTogether and their #AlwaysProud series in celebration of Pride, for instance.

Their first Tweet in the thread featured a video about a personal journey and was followed five days later by another video as part of the series. Each video could of course stand on its own, but when threaded, the message was strengthened.

Resurface or follow up a Tweet

Use a thread to add additional Tweets to re-highlight or follow-up on previously published Tweets. @TwitterSpaces did this every couple of days to continuously highlight notable or interesting Spaces.

If you live-Tweeted an event with a thread, you could reply to it the next day to ask people what they thought and if they had any follow-up questions or discussion points for future events. Following up on threads shows your audience that you’re listening and actively driving the conversation with them.

Looking for some extra inspiration now you know how to start your own Twitter thread? Take a look at these five creative ways brands can use Twitter threads.

Justin Pot
How to turn twitter threads into readable blog postsJustin Pot
Writer

Justin Pot has been writing about technology for over a decade, with work appearing in Digital Trends, The Next Web, Lifehacker, MakeUseOf, and the Zapier Blog. He also runs the Hillsboro Signal, a volunteer-driven local news outlet he founded. Read more.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Twitter threads are the worst. Don’t make them.

…is advice I myself don’t listen to. Neither do you. There’s nothing you can say in a Twitter thread that can’t be said better in a blog post, but something about getting feedback for individual sentences is intoxicating, and just too compelling for us to not do it.

This is great for the person creating the tweet storm, but Twitter is a terrible user interface for actually reading long strings of text. Which is where Spooler comes in.

This tool parses any Twitter thread and puts it together into something resembling a blog post. No RT and Like buttons, no replies from randos, no dateline; just the text you want to read, along with any images or videos included in the thread.

Using the tool is simple. First, find a thread you want to turn into a post.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Find the last post in the thread, then copy the URL by right-clicking the date, then clicking “Copy Link” (or whatever specific wording your browser of choice uses.)

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Next, head to Spooler. If it’s your first time using the site, you’ll have to log in using your Twitter account. Once that’s done you can paste your URL.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

The tool will take a while to parse things, particularly for very long threads. This has to do with Twitter’s API limits, but eventually you will see the Tweets turned into a collection of text.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

This is a lot easier to read, and can be a godsend for long threads. It’s particularly useful if you want to quote a long thread in something you’re writing, because it saves you from having to copy-paste from a bunch of different tweets.

Even better: if a given thread includes images, or links to YouTube videos, all of that will be embedded.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

You can even link to the threads you’ve blog-ified, though users need to log into the service in order to see the result. And there are a few downsides, like needing to scroll to the bottom of a thread in order to convert it. You can read the reasons for these and other decision in this blog post about Spooler’s creation, if you’re interested.

If there’s a thread people keep telling you to read, but you can’t be bothered to sort through all the tweets, this is a pretty good tool for the job. It be nice if people would start posting their extended thoughts to blogs again, instead of tweeting them out en masse, this is a decent stopgap solution until that happens (it won’t.)

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How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts Justin Pot
Justin Pot has been writing about technology for over a decade, with work appearing in Digital Trends, The Next Web, Lifehacker, MakeUseOf, and the Zapier Blog. He also runs the Hillsboro Signal, a volunteer-driven local news outlet he founded.
Read Full Bio »

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

For as much as its users love to hate on their platform of choice, Twitter occasionally really comes through with a deep dive on a hot topic that provides actual, meaningful insight. Such an event is almost enough to remind us why we all fritter our lives away on there to begin with.

Remember when we used to blog? Like, we issued thoughts in sentences and paragraphs instead of a series of social media convulsions? It used to happen! This is kind of like that.

A Twitter bot called Thread Reader App (@threadreaderapp) can take your barely readable Twitter rant of choice and transform it into normal text served up on a sparse, normal looking page. You might have noticed these “unrolled” threads — they’re popping up all over.

I'm @ThreadReaderApp a Twitter bot here to help you read threads more easily. To trigger me, you just have to reply to (or quote) any tweet of the thread you want to unroll and mention me with the "unroll" keyword and I'll send you a link back on Twitter 😀

— Thread Reader Bot (@threadreaderapp) November 25, 2017

To get your tweetstorm of choice hand-delivered in blog form, you just need to reply to a thread with @threadreaderapp and the keyword “unroll.” While Twitter threads that do the whole 1/347 numbering thing read kind of weirdly, normal chunks of text get sewn together into something very legible indeed.

The creator also offers a Chrome extension that turns this process into a simple series of clicks. (We haven’t tested it so, as with all things, download at your own risk.) Really feeling it? You can donate to the project on Patreon.

Of course, for every good Twitter thread there are 100 of threads of boring dudes mansplaining. Or 200 of barely sentient conspiracy theorists regurgitating the delusion du jour. If the Thread Reader App’s trending page is any indication, the Pizzagate crowd is loving the option to put tweetstorms into a readable, blog-like format too.

While we may not all believe in a clandestine globalist takeover at the hands of the illuminati, I think we can all agree that it’s nice to have more readable Twitter threads!

O ver the past decade, Twitter has become a popular source of breaking news and a means to share information in real-time. This unique ability to give a perspective of “what’s trending” makes it unmatched. In my opinion, Twitter is the most valuable social network out there.

If you’re a regular Twitter user, chances are that you might have come across long Twitter threads that help the message go beyond the 280 character limit. These threads are often used to share a complete news story or provide supporting information. But, how do you follow or share a long thread to make it more readable? There are numerous bots and tools out there that can let you unroll Twitter threads.

Also Read: How To Go For The Lights Out Option On Twitter on iOS

In this article, I’ll be showing you how to use myThreadReader app as a Twitter thread reader. There are two ways to do it and I’ll be sharing both the methods one by one:

Twitter Thread Unroll On myThreadReader Website

1. Open the Twitter thread that you wish to unroll and copy the link. If you’re using the app, you can do so by tapping the Share button and choosing Copy Link To Tweet.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

2. If you’re using Twitter on your desktop or phone browser, simply copy the URL from the browser address bar.

3. Now open myThreadReader.com website and spot the box at the top with Read Thread button. Paste your thread link and click/tap Read Thread.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

4. Your long Twitter thread will unroll into a readable blog post in an instant. Along with a minimal reading experience, this free web app imports pictures and fetches article link previews as well.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

5. You can share this thread with your friends and family directly by copying the URL from the address bar or click on the Tweet this Thread at the bottom.

How To Use Twitter Thread Reader Bot @myThreadReader

1. If you don’t want to do the simple copy-paste charade, you can simply reply to the long thread with @mythreadreader.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

2. Upon doing so, the bot will tweet back a link to a readable post with all the content in one place.

3. Here’s an example of the same:

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Bonus tip: When replying to a thread to make it readable, you don’t need to type the full name of bot each time. I’d recommend you to follow the bot @mythreadreader so that Twitter starts suggesting to you as soon as you start typing.

As I said above, there are numerous apps out there that work as a Twitter thread reader and help you unroll tweets in an instant. Give those tools a try and don’t forget to comment below if you found any other tool with more features.

Harry Guinness
How to turn twitter threads into readable blog postsHarry Guinness
Writer

Harry Guinness is a photography expert and writer with nearly a decade of experience. His work has been published in newspapers like The New York Times and on a variety of other websites, from Lifehacker to Popular Science and Medium’s OneZero. Read more.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog postsJustin Pot
Writer

Justin Pot has been writing about technology for over a decade, with work appearing in Digital Trends, The Next Web, Lifehacker, MakeUseOf, and the Zapier Blog. He also runs the Hillsboro Signal, a volunteer-driven local news outlet he founded. Read more.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Twitter threads (aka tweetstorms), where someone posts a series of related Tweets one after the other, sit in a weird place: everyone claims to hate them, but lots of people post them anyway. Twitter has recently embraced the feature, integrating them into the platform and making them easier to do right. Here’s how to use them.

Note: As I write this, the feature is only available through Twitter’s web app. It will be rolling out on Android and iOS in the near feature and should work almost identically.

Creating a New Tweetstorm

Head to Twitter and start a new Tweet. Type out what you want the first message to say and then, when you’re ready to add a second tweet, click the little plus icon.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Now you’ve got a second Tweet window to use, so just type in what you want to say, and then click the plus button again if you need more tweets.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Keep going this way to add however many Tweets you want in your thread. You can add images, Gifs, and videos, as normal.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

When you’re ready, click the “Tweet All” to send the thread.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Your followers will see the first Tweet from the thread (and maybe up to two more). To see the full thing, they need to click the “Show this Thread” link.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

This stops Twitter threads from totally overtaking people’s feeds.

Adding Another Tweet to the Thread

If at some later point you want to add another Tweet to your thread, open it and then at the bottom tap the “Add Another Tweet” option.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Type whatever you want to say and then click the “Tweet” button.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

You new tweet is added to the end of the thread.

With 280 character Tweets and official support for Tweetstoms, Twitter is definitely changing. Rather than a place for 140 character thoughts, it’s now possible to have much longer discussions. Whether this is a good thing or not remains to be seen.

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How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts Harry Guinness
Harry Guinness is a photography expert and writer with nearly a decade of experience. His work has been published in newspapers like The New York Times and on a variety of other websites, from Lifehacker to Popular Science and Medium’s OneZero.
Read Full Bio »
How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts Justin Pot
Justin Pot has been writing about technology for over a decade, with work appearing in Digital Trends, The Next Web, Lifehacker, MakeUseOf, and the Zapier Blog. He also runs the Hillsboro Signal, a volunteer-driven local news outlet he founded.
Read Full Bio »

Conversations are happening all the time on Twitter—and it all starts with just one reply to a Tweet.

Popular conversations are easy to find and join. We show you the most interesting content first, and when you join in, you will have the full character limit to craft your reply with. Below we’ve outlined some basics about conversations on Twitter, and how best to participate in them.

Replies in conversations

A reply is a response to another Tweet, and is one of the easiest ways to join in a conversation as it’s happening on Twitter.

When you reply to a Tweet, you can see the full list of participant usernames in the conversation by clicking or tapping the prompt above the Tweet. Usernames will not automatically be added to the beginning of the reply, giving you all available characters to use in your response.

  1. Find the Tweet you want to reply to.
  2. Click or tap the reply icon

When you start a new Tweet, you can choose who will be able to reply to it. You’ll see a default setting of Everyone can reply next to a globe icon in the compose Tweet box. Clicking or tapping this prior to posting your Tweet allows you to choose who can reply to you.

To help minimize unwanted replies and improve meaningful conversations, you’ll also be able to change who can reply to your Tweet midway through a conversation.

  1. From twitter.com or the Twitter for iOS or Android app, tap on the compose Tweet button.
  2. Click or tap Everyone can reply next to the globe icon to choose who can reply to your Tweet.
    • Everyone — this is the current default option. For public accounts, it means that everyone will continue to be able to reply. If your Tweets are protected, it means only people who follow you will continue to be able to reply.
    • People you follow — only people who you follow, as well as anyone you mention in the Tweet, will be able to reply.
    • Only people you mention — only people who you mention in the Tweet will be able to reply.
  3. When you’re ready, click or tap Tweet to send.
  4. After you Tweet, you can change who replies by navigating to the top right of the Tweet and tapping the More
  • When your Tweet is live, people will see that you’ve limited who can reply to your Tweet.
  • When you’ve invited certain people to reply, they will see a line of context right below the Tweet from their Home timeline letting them know that they (and anyone else selected) can reply and join the conversation. They will also receive a mention push notification if they have that setting on.
  • Restrictions you place on your Tweets will only apply to the ability for others to reply to your Tweet. Others can still engage with your Tweet by, for example, liking or Retweeting it, or voting on a poll you include in your Tweet.
  • Once you’ve published a Tweet, you can manage your conversations by changing who replies to your Tweet or deleting the original Tweet. Replies and Retweets of your Tweet will inherit the restrictions you placed on the root Tweet, but Quote Tweets will not inherit your restrictions.
  • If a Tweet is deleted, Retweets will also be deleted and replies will lose any previous restrictions.
  • If you deactivate your account, any reply restrictions your Tweets currently have will lift, and if you reactivate your account during the reactivation window, all previous reply restrictions will be reapplied. However, during the window when your reply restrictions were lifted, it’s possible that replies that would have otherwise been restricted could have been added to your conversation.

Who am I replying to?

From the compose screen, you can see the people in the conversation you will reply to. Click or tap Replying to… to bring up an editing screen with a list of everyone who is a part of the conversation.

Reply editing screen basics:

  • Up to 50 people who are in the conversation will be displayed.
  • Adding people: To add additional people to a conversation, swipe down to close the editing screen, and then simply type their username into your Tweet. A manually-typed username in the text box will count towards your character limit.
  • Removing people: The people listed on the editing screen can be removed (except for the author of the original Tweet to whom you are directly replying). To remove people from the conversation in the editing screen, simply click or tap on the checkmark icon

  • Note: If an account you have blocked visits your profile, they will see a message alerting them of the block.

Note: If your Tweets are not protected, then all replies are public, but only relevant people, such as those who follow you and someone who is part of the conversation, will see your reply in their Home timeline, even if you begin your reply with “.@”. If you would like all of your followers to see your reply, the best way to do so is by Retweeting or Quote Tweet.

Read more about replies and mentions and types of Tweets for more information.

Notifications for conversations

When you receive a notification for a conversation, it will indicate whether it is a reply or a mention:

  • If your username appears within the body of a Tweet, you will receive a mention notification.
  • When someone replies to you, you will receive a reply notification.
  • When you receive a notification, click or tap on it to view the conversation and who else is participating in it.

Who is a part of the conversation?

You can also view participants of a conversation from Tweets you see in your Home timeline, profile page, notifications, or from a Tweet detail. To view participants’ names, bio, and @usernames:

  1. Click or tap Replying to.
  2. From here you can see everyone who is included in this reply. You can also follow or unfollow people in this list.

Note: An account that you have blocked will still be visible to you in the list of people in the conversation, indicating they are blocked, but without their profile information displayed. You may choose to unblock them from this list by tapping on the blocked icon

Conversation ranking

You may notice that some replies in a conversation are not shown in chronological order. Replies are grouped by sub-conversations because we strive to show you the content that we think you’d be most interested in and contributes to the conversation in a meaningful way, such as content that is relevant, credible, and safe. For example, when ranking a reply higher, we consider factors such as if the original Tweet author has replied, or if a reply is from someone you follow.

Direct reply count

Just like you can see the total number of likes and Retweets for any Tweet, you can also see how many people are participating in the conversation by the reply count. You’ll see a number next to the reply icon

indicating how many direct replies the original Tweet has received. This number is not the total number of replies in the entire conversation.

A tweetstorm is a series of related tweets posted in succession on Twitter by a user. Recently, WordPress has rolled out a new feature that allows the users to convert their existing blog posts into a tweetstorm without any difficulty.

Some time back, WordPress had introduced the functionality that allows users to post their Twitter threads or tweetstorms in their blogs on the WordPress platform, with the ‘unroll’ option for Twitter embeds. So, this new feature is basically the opposite of the previous functionality.

With the new feature, you can post your blogs, word by word, and with all the embedded images and videos on Twitter, as per WordPress. This is slightly different from the functionality through which a link of your blog post can be posted on your Twitter account in the form of a new tweet.

Now, to use this feature, first of all, you need to connect your Twitter account with your WordPress blog/site. On WordPress, at the top-right corner, you will see the Jetpack icon, and through this icon, you can connect your WordPress site with your Twitter accounts. This option lets the users connect their multiple Twitter accounts with their blog/site to let you post your tweetstorms in different places if you wish to do so. This is a good way to improve the reach of your blog post.

Once you choose the account or accounts on which you want to post your blog, you will see the two options that WordPress gives. One is to post the link of your blog on Twitter, and the second, newly added option is to share the post as a Twitter thread.

How to publish a blog post as a Twitter thread pic.twitter.com/kbQtQglNxh

— WordPress.com (@wordpressdotcom) October 13, 2020

With your tweetstorm, WordPress allows you to add an introductory message and several other things to make it look as if the post was directly made on Twitter. If your post is long, you do not have to worry much about breaking the sentences at appropriate places, because WordPress can also do that for you. However, you can make these editions, choose where one tweet ends, and the subsequent tweet follows yourself by previewing your post before publishing it on Twitter as a tweetstorm. At the end of your published tweetstorm, a click-able link for your original post on WordPress will also be given so that your followers can check it out there too.

This new feature has been launched as a part of the new Jetpack 9.0 updated version of WordPress and it is already rolling out for the masses.

Twitter has a 140 character limit. It’s always had this limit though, in recent months it has relaxed on a few things. For example, user handles and links no longer count towards the characters you’re tweeting. This lets you fit more in the 140 characters but it’s not enough. Another neat change Twitter made is how it shows replies to a tweet. The UI enables users to create what has been dubbed a ‘Twitter Thread’. It’s basically a long tweet broken down into smaller tweets. It’s kept ‘together’ by the user adding the next tweet as a reply to the first one. Chirr App is a free web app that lets you create a Twitter thread from a long tweet. It breaks it down into smaller tweets and tweets them out for you in the correct format. All you need to do is compose your thoughts.

Create A Twitter Thread

Compose the tweet you want to break down into a thread. You can compose it in simple text app like Notepad. There’s no limit to how long your tweet can be when you create a Twitter thread. The only thing you need to be mindful of is where you add the paragraph breaks. Chirr App breaks a tweets down by paragraph breaks when it can. If there are no paragraph breaks in your tweet, it’s not a problem but be careful where you add them just the same.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

Once you’ve composed the tweet, paste it in Chirr App. Click Publish. The first time you click the publish button, you will have to authorize the app to connect with your Twitter account. Once you’ve done that, the app will create a Twitter thread from your original tweet and post it. Chirr App will tell you how long a tweet it and how many tweets it will break the longer one down to.

How to turn twitter threads into readable blog posts

An Essential Twitter Tool

You don’t necessarily need an app to create a Twitter thread but there are benefits to using one. You can compose whatever message it is you want to send without stopping to Tweet out a thought every time you hit the 140 character limit. You aren’t bothered about the character count while you compose your message. More importantly, your message is sent out in one go. There isn’t a long break between the first and second, and subsequent tweets. This prevents replies from other people throwing the thread format off. You can send out a message without worrying about the replies that are coming in.

Someone needs to turn this into a proper iOS and Android app. You can alternatively create a Twitter moment but it really isn’t the same thing.

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