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How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

A new “Send Tab to Self” feature in Google Chrome lets you quickly send tabs between all your Chrome devices. This feature, available via a hidden flag in Google Chrome, is available in the stable version of Chrome today.

Update: This is enabled by default in Chrome 77. No hidden flags necessary!

How It Works

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

Sure, you can access open tabs on other devices via the History page without any hidden flags if you use Chrome Sync—but this new feature is slicker and faster.

Once you’ve enabled it, you’ll find a new “Send to Your Devices” option when you right-click on a web page. It’ll list all the Chrome browsers you’re signed into with your Google account—on Windows, Mac, Linux, Chrome OS, Android, and even iPhone and iPad. Select a device to send a Chrome tab to that device.

Remember Google’s old Chrome to Phone browser extension, which let you send tabs from the Chrome browser on your computer to your Android phone? It’s kind of like that—but you can send tabs between your computers, too.

Like all flags, this is a work-in-progress feature. It may change or be removed at any time. Google may soon launch this as a stable feature that doesn’t require a flag. However, it’s available now in the stable version of Google Chrome 76.

How to Enable “Send Tab to Self”

This option is available as a flag. To find it, plug chrome://flags into Chrome’s address bar and press Enter. Search for “Send tab” in the search box.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

You’ll see several different options. You must at least enable the “Send tab to self” and “Send tab to self show sending UI” options—click the boxes to the right of each and select “Enabled.”

You may also want to enable “Send tab to self history” to see sent tabs in your History page and “Send tab to self broadcast,” which lets you broadcast a tab to all devices instead of sending it to an individual one. (The broadcast flag didn’t appear to work when we tested it.)

Finally, if you want to use this feature without enabling Chrome Sync, enable the “Send tab to self: enable use when signed in regardless of sync state” option.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

When you’re done, click “Relaunch Now” to restart your Chrome browser with your flags enabled.

Repeat this process on all the Chrome browsers you use on different devices. If you only enable Send tab to self on a single device, you can’t send tabs to any other devices. Note that Chrome for iPhone and iPad doesn’t have flags, but it can still receive sent tabs.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

How to Send Tabs Between Your Devices

After enabling the flags and restarting your web browser, you’ll have access to the feature in two places.

You can right-click a web page to see the Send to Your Devices menu and click one of the devices to send the tab to it.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

The same option is available on the Omnibox, also known as the address bar. Click once in the bar, and you’ll see a “Send This Page” icon at the right side of the bar, to the left of the bookmark (star) icon. Click it, and you’ll see a list of devices along with when they were last active.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

You’ll see a notification when you send the tab.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

A notification will appear on the other device, too. Click or tap the notification to immediately open the sent tab in Chrome.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

It will work differently on some platforms. For example, on iPhone, you won’t receive a notification—but you will see a “Tab Received” notice at the bottom of Chrome’s New Tab page. Tap “Open” to open the tab you sent.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

If you don’t see one of your devices in the list here, ensure it’s running the latest version of Google Chrome with these flags enabled, and that you’re signed into your same Google account on all your devices.

Other features are available via Chrome flags, too. For example, Google Chrome has a hidden “Reader Mode” that works just like the reading modes available in Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari, and Microsoft Edge.

Cameron Summerson is the Editor in Chief of Review Geek and serves as an Editorial Advisor for How-To Geek and LifeSavvy. He’s been covering technology for nearly a decade and has written over 4,000 articles and hundreds of product reviews in that time. He’s been published in print magazines and quoted as a smartphone expert in the New York Times. Read more.

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

Chrome is a pretty simple browser on the outside, but there are tons of pages built in for advanced settings, tweaks, tests, and more. All of these pages are hidden behind the chrome:// prefix—here’s a look at some of the best.

Before we get into that, however, it’s probably a good idea to explain how these chrome:// pages work. You enter chrome:// into the omnibox, followed by the page you want to access—think of it like a web page, but instead of http:// being the prefix, it’s chrome:// .

So, for example, for the first option we’re going to look at— chrome://about —you’ll just enter exactly that into Chrome’s omnibox like so:

And that’s all there is to it. You can do this for any of Chrome’s internal pages.

Chrome://About: All of Chrome’s Internal Pages in One Place

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

The most useful of all the chrome:// pages is probably chrome://about , because it shows all of Chrome’s other internal pages in an easy to parse (and click!) list.

As you look through the list, you’ll find that a lot of these link to specific pieces of Chrome’s settings menu—like chrome://chrome , which takes you to Chrome’s update page. Or chrome://bookmarks , chrome://apps , and chrome://newtab , all of which open those respective pages.

If you’re just learning about chrome:// pages, this is a good place to start exploring and learning the ins and outs of these hidden internal pages.

Chrome://Flags: Experimental Features and More

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

This is probably the most popular of all the chrome:// pages, because it’s where Google hides experimental features—things that are in the works, but not yet ready for prime time. These let you explore beta features with a simple toggle, so if issues arise you easily can revert back to the stable setting.

There are all sorts of hidden features here, just keep in mind that these are still works in progress. That means they may break other parts of Chrome or cause instability issues. They could also be removed at any point if Google decides to kill the whole idea.

Still, it’s cool to explore.

Chrome://System: Get Detailed Build Information

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

If you’re looking for everything there is to know about your Chromebook, the chrome://system page is where it’s at. You’ll find everything from software and firmware versions to details about all the hardware on the system. There’s a lot of great info here, especially if you like to tinker.

And while it’s more useful on Chromebooks, you can still plug the address into your desktop Chrome browser and get some interesting system details.

Chrome://Net-Internals: Realtime Network Diagnostics

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

There’s a lot going on here, and most of it won’t be useful to average users. But if you’re looking for some advanced details about Chrome’s network usage, this is where you’ll find them.

Chrome://Inspect: DevTools At Your Disposal

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

If you want a little insight of what Chrome is doing behind the scenes, the chrome://inspect page is a neat tool for that. Like the chrome://net-internals page, it’s clearly geared towards developers, but if you want a deeper look at what Chrome has going on in the background, this is a good page to start digging through.

Access All of Chrome’s Hidden Features with a Simple Extension: HiddenChrome

While you can see all of Chrome’s hidden pages on chrome://about , there’s a nicer and more convenient way to do this: with a handy extension called HiddenChrome. It puts all of Chrome’s pages into a nice, tidy, organized list.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

You’ll find developer tools, a quick link to the flags page, internal diagnostics, logs, source code, and all sorts of other goodies here. If you’re a Chrome power user (or have the aspirations), this is a great tool to have installed.

It’s free in the Chrome Web Store, but there’s a $0.99 Pro version if you find it useful.

A new “Send Tab to Self” feature in Google Chrome lets you quickly send tabs between all your Chrome devices. This feature, available via a hidden flag in Google Chrome, is available in the stable version of Chrome today.

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The Google Chrome browser has now made it simpler for its users to quickly send opened tabs between all their devices running Chrome. A new feature called Send tab to self, which is seen as a hidden flag available in the stable version of the browser enables this support.

Using Send Tab to Self feature in Chrome

When Send Tab to Self is enabled, the option becomes visible upon right-clicking a web page. Also, it will show the list all the devices (having Chrome browser installed) you’re signed into via your Google account on Windows 10.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

To enable and configure this Send Tab to Self feature:

1] Launch Google Chrome browser

2] Type chrome://flags into Chrome’s address bar and hit Enter

3] Search for this keyword – Send tab

4] When presented with the list of options, select-

  • Send tab to self
  • Send tab to self show sending UI

5] Enable the above options.

Although Chrome lets you access open tabs on other devices via the History page if you have turned ‘On’ the Chrome Sync feature, this method appears to be a bit quick.

To use this feature Send Tab to Self feature without enabling Chrome Sync, enable the ‘Send tab to self: enable use when signed in regardless of sync state’ option.

When done, exit and restart the browser.

Send Chrome Tabs between your Devices

To send Tabs between your Devices, go to a webpage that you have opened in the browser, right-click it to make ‘Send to…’ menu visible.

When seen, choose a device to send the tab to it.

Also, the same option is seen as an icon in the address bar of the browser. Click it to send the tab to a device.

When done, a notification will appear on both devices. Simply tap the notification to open the sent tab, instantly.

If you don’t see the option appearing for your browser, check if you have updated to the latest version of the Chrome browser.

How do you like using this feature?

Date: September 5, 2019 Tags: Chrome

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A post-graduate in Biotechnology, Hemant switched gears to writing about Microsoft technologies and has been a contributor to TheWindowsClub since then. When he is not working, you can usually find him out traveling to different places or indulging himself in binge-watching.

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How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

A new “Send Tab to Self” feature in Google Chrome lets you quickly send tabs between all your Chrome devices. This feature, available via a hidden flag in Google Chrome, is available in the stable version of Chrome today.

How It Works

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

Sure, you can access open tabs on other devices via the History page without any hidden flags if you use Chrome Sync—but this new feature is slicker and faster.

Once you’ve enabled it, you’ll find a new “Send to Your Devices” option when you right-click on a web page. It’ll list all the Chrome browsers you’re signed into with your Google account—on Windows, Mac, Linux, Chrome OS, Android, and even iPhone and iPad. Select a device to send a Chrome tab to that device.

Remember Google’s old Chrome to Phone browser extension, which let you send tabs from the Chrome browser on your computer to your Android phone? It’s kind of like that—but you can send tabs between your computers, too.

Like all flags, this is a work-in-progress feature. It may change or be removed at any time. Google may soon launch this as a stable feature that doesn’t require a flag. However, it’s available now in the stable version of Google Chrome 76.

How to Enable “Send Tab to Self”

This option is available as a flag. To find it, plug chrome://flags into Chrome’s address bar and press Enter. Search for “Send tab” in the search box.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

You’ll see several different options. You must at least enable the “Send tab to self” and “Send tab to self show sending UI” options—click the boxes to the right of each and select “Enabled.”

You may also want to enable “Send tab to self history” to see sent tabs in your History page and “Send tab to self broadcast,” which lets you broadcast a tab to all devices instead of sending it to an individual one. (The broadcast flag didn’t appear to work when we tested it.)

Finally, if you want to use this feature without enabling Chrome Sync, enable the “Send tab to self: enable use when signed in regardless of sync state” option.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

When you’re done, click “Relaunch Now” to restart your Chrome browser with your flags enabled.

Repeat this process on all the Chrome browsers you use on different devices. If you only enable Send tab to self on a single device, you can’t send tabs to any other devices. Note that Chrome for iPhone and iPad doesn’t have flags, but it can still receive sent tabs.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

How to Send Tabs Between Your Devices

After enabling the flags and restarting your web browser, you’ll have access to the feature in two places.

You can right-click a web page to see the Send to Your Devices menu and click one of the devices to send the tab to it.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

The same option is available on the Omnibox, also known as the address bar. Click once in the bar, and you’ll see a “Send This Page” icon at the right side of the bar, to the left of the bookmark (star) icon. Click it, and you’ll see a list of devices along with when they were last active.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

You’ll see a notification when you send the tab.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

A notification will appear on the other device, too. Click or tap the notification to immediately open the sent tab in Chrome.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

It will work differently on some platforms. For example, on iPhone, you won’t receive a notification—but you will see a “Tab Received” notice at the bottom of Chrome’s New Tab page. Tap “Open” to open the tab you sent.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

If you don’t see one of your devices in the list here, ensure it’s running the latest version of Google Chrome with these flags enabled, and that you’re signed into your same Google account on all your devices.

Other features are available via Chrome flags, too. For example, Google Chrome has a hidden “Reader Mode” that works just like the reading modes available in Mozilla Firefox, Apple Safari, and Microsoft Edge.

If you use Google Chrome on more than one device, you can send links between these devices. For example, you can send a link from your computer to your phone.

In this article, I will show you how to send and receive links between your devices.

What do you need for this to work?

To share URLs, there are two requirements:

  1. You should be signed into Chrome.
  2. You should be signed into Chrome on more than one device using the same Google account.

Now that we have covered the requirements, let us learn how to share URLs.

Send Tab to Self – Computer

Let’s start with your desktop computer. This works the same way on:

  • PC (Windows 10)
  • macOS
  • Chrome OS

To send a website from Chrome:

  1. Visit the website that you want to share on a new tab.
  2. Click within the address bar. This highlights the URL and displays the “send to self” button
  3. Click the “send to self” icon and you will see a list of devices that you have signed into using the same Google account.
  4. Click and choose the device that you want to send the URL to.
  5. You will receive the website as a notification on the receiving device.

Next, let us send a URL from your computer to the phone.

Send to Self – Android

To send a URL from your Android phone to your computer:

  1. Open the website in a new tab and click the share icon on the toolbar. You can also long-press any link and choose the Share link option.
  2. Choose Send to your devices from the share menu.
  3. Chrome will now show you a list of devices that you are signed into using the same Google account. Select the device that you want to send the URL to.

The shared URL will reach your destination computer as a notification. Tap the notification to open the URL using Chrome.

Conclusion

Send to self is a quick way to share websites between your own devices. You no longer need to temporarily bookmark or save to a sharing service like Google Keep to do this.

I hope you found this guide useful. If you have any questions related to Google Chrome Send to Self, let me know in the comments section.

About Dinsan Francis

Content Strategist and Digital Minimalist. Loves testing new Chromebook features and writing about them. Favorite Chrome OS Channel is Canary. | Twitter | YouTube.

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[Update: Live in Stable for some] You can directly send tabs to your other devices on Chrome Canary v75

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How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

There’s a reason Google Chrome is the most ubiquitous browser out there. Among other things, it works seamlessly across all of your devices, syncing tabs in the background. But sometimes, it’s just tedious to find that one tab you wanted to share from your phone to your desktop among the myriad open tabs. That’s where a new feature in Chrome’s developer preview Canary version 75 comes in handy: Send tab to self.

Once you enable “send tab to self” in chrome://flags/, you can happily send open tabs from one of your Canary-equipped devices to another. On the desktop, you right-click the tab you want to send and select “Send to My Devices,” while on Android, you need to dive into the share menu and select “Send to my devices” there (Yes, the capitalization is different. It’s not a finished feature). Your device on the receiving end gets a notification through which you can open the shared tab. That’s all there is to it. Magic!

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

Android to Desktop tab sharing workflow

I tested this with MacOS and Android 9 Pie, but it’s safe to assume that it’ll work with other platforms as well. Previously, sharing tabs didn’t function at all, so Google probably flipped a switch somewhere in the backend.

While the feature first surfaced in March, it’s showing up in stable Chrome 76 for more and more people without requiring a flag. There are two ways to check if it’s available to you already: You can either right-click a tab and see if you can find a “Send to Your Devices” entry in the menu, or you can highlight the link in the address bar. That should make a new icon depicting a laptop and a phone appear in the right of the box. When you click it, you can choose where to share the URL to.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

On Android, nothing has changed compared to the workflow in Canary: You still need to head to the share menu to send a tab to other devices.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

Apparently, if you have the send tab to self flag enabled, you have to revert back to the standard state. The option only appeared on one of my devices after I reset it. As our friends over at How-To Geek found out, this might be related to a total of five flags that probably need to work interdependently to make send tab to self function. You can find all of them in one spot if you search for “send tab to self” in chrome://flags. If the feature isn’t available to you yet, activating these might help.

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With Google Chrome, you can share tabs from your phone to your computer, and vice versa.

If you suffer from Too Many Tabs Syndrome (TMTS), you already know how hard it is to manage your tabs. Whether you’re a tab junkie or not, you can now share specific tabs from your PC to your phone (and vice versa) using Chrome.

This way, you can have all your tabs on all your devices, enjoy uninterrupted browsing, and pick up from where you left off, regardless of the device you’re using.

What You Need to Share Tabs Across Devices

To share Chrome tabs across devices, you will need to install Chrome on all your devices. In this case, on your computer and smartphone/tablet. Tab sharing works on Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS, and Android, so you won’t have to worry about compatibility issues.

You will also need Chrome 77 or later to use this feature. Earlier versions required you to visit chrome://flags in your Chrome browser and enable the Send tab to self feature.

Thirdly, you will need to be signed in to your Google account across all the devices you want to send tabs to, and ensure that they are synced.

Related: How to Manage What You Sync in Chrome

How to Send a Tab From Your Computer to Your Phone

There are three simple methods to send Chrome tabs from your computer to your phone. Let’s go over all of them.

Method 1: Use the Laptop Icon in the Address Bar

  1. On a web page open in Chrome, and click inside the address bar.
  2. Click the Send this page laptop icon to the right of the address bar.
  3. Under “Send to your devices,” you should see a list of your synced devices.

Method 2: Right-Click the Web Page’s URL

  1. On an open web page, click inside the address bar to highlight the page’s URL.
  2. Right-click the URL.
  3. Click Send to [device name] to send the tab.

Method 3: Right-Click on a Web Page

  1. While on an open web page in Chrome, right-click on any portion of the page.
  2. From the context menu that appears, click Send to [device name] to send the web page.

How to Send a Chrome Tab From Your Phone to Your Computer

In case you want to send a tab from your mobile device to your computer instead, we’ll show you how to do that as well.

  1. On your mobile device, open the Chrome tab you want to send.
  2. Tap on the triple dots button in the top-right corner of the screen.
  3. Tap on Share >Send to devices.

Version 80 of Google Chrome improves protection against third-party cookies

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How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge

Google’s Chrome is, by most measures, the most popular browser in use. That being said, it also has a perception problem as far as security is concerned, causing privacy-concerned users to shake the Chrome habit. If you don’t have any intention of moving away from Chrome anytime soon, here are some tips to help you maximize your privacy.

Chrome has tools for blocking first-party cookies (which are used to store your preferences for a particular site) as well as third-party tracking cookies (which follow your online activity across sites). Some of these tools need to be enabled manually, and we’ve included instructions on how to do that, along with steps on how to delete cookies already stored by your browser. We also address how Google plans to prevent fingerprinting — a form of tracking that uses data about your system configuration to identify you.

There are also plenty of extensions available in the Chrome Web Store if you’d like to protect your privacy beyond Chrome’s built-in tools.

Deal with trackers

Version 79 of Chrome, which came out last December, concentrated mostly on enhancing password security. In Chrome 80, which began rolling out on February 4th, Google is gradually implementing a new system for sorting and blocking cookies. It will allow all first-party cookies, but third-party cookies will have to include a specific same-site setting that ensures they are being accessed from secure connections. (You can update to the Chrome 80 manually by going to Help -> About Google Chrome. However, be aware that this feature may take a while to be fully implemented.)

Google also says that Chrome will phase out third-party cookies in two years in favor of an alternative system to cookies using new technologies Google is developing.

Adjust your tracking settings

Meanwhile, you can still manually block cookies in Chrome:

  • Go to “Settings” (by clicking the three dots in the upper-right corner next to the URL bar). Scroll down and click on “Advanced” at the bottom of the screen or in the menu bar on the left.
  • Find the “Privacy and security” section, and then click on “Site settings” -> “Cookies and site data.”
  • To block only third-party cookies, toggle “Block third-party cookies” on. To block all cookies, toggle the “Allow sites to save and read cookie data” to off.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

Once you’ve blocked third-party cookies in your settings, a cookie icon will pop up on the right side of your address bar when Chrome is blocking cookies. You can click on that icon to see what cookies are allowed and blocked by each site and choose to block or allow individual cookies. Here’s how:

  • Click on the icon, and a small window will open
  • You can, at this point, allow cookies from this site or continue to block cookies. Click on “Done” to save your settings.
  • To view which cookies are being blocked, click “Show cookies and other site data” at the bottom of that window. You can toggle between seeing the “Allowed” and “Blocked” cookies.
  • Click on the site name; you’ll see either “Block” or “Allow” at the bottom of the window, allowing you to block or permit cookies from that site. If you click on the arrows next to the site names, you can see the individual cookies and can block or allow them as well.
  • When you click on an individual cookie’s name, you’ll also see its domain, when it was created, and when it expires.

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

Clean up your cookies

Chrome does allow you to automatically clear out your cookies and other data when you exit the browser.

  • Go to the “Cookies and site data” page as described above
  • Toggle on “Clear cookies and site data when you quit Chrome”

Want to see a list of all the cookies currently stored by your browser?

  • In the “Cookies and site data” page, click on “See all cookies and site data.” You can delete cookies by site by clicking on the trash icon next to each site name, or you can delete them all by clicking “Remove all.”
  • If you click on the site name, you’ll be able to see the individual cookies left by that site. Click on the arrow for more information about the cookie, and click on the “X” to delete it.

If you want to clear a range of your data from the browser:

  • Go to “Settings” -> “Privacy and Security” -> “Clear browsing data”
  • A window will open up with two viewing options: “Basic” and “Advanced.” The former allows you to clear out your cookies, browsing history and caches; the latter gives you the chance to delete all of those items along with other types of data, such as your download history, passwords, and autofill form data.
  • At the top of the box, select an option from the drop-down menu next to “Time range.” You can clear anything from the last hour’s worth to all of the data that’s been collected.
  • In either view, make sure the categories of data you want to delete are selected, and then click “Clear data”

How to use chrome’s hidden “send tab to self” feature

Fingerprinting and ad-blocking

Google has proposed a number of fingerprinting protections, which it says it plans to implement later this year. Among the proposed steps is a strategy, which involves restricting the number of requests that can be made for user information so as not to allow for the collection of enough data to identify individual users.

Chrome, by default, does filter out some ads using the rules set by the Coalition for Better Ads and EasyList, but you can always download ad-blocking extensions to increase your protection.

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