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How to cope with photography boredom

Many people struggle with chronic boredom. But what exactly is boredom and what are some ways to move beyond it?

According to Wikipedia, “Boredom is an emotional and occasionally psychological state experienced when an individual is left without anything in particular to do, is not interested in their surroundings, or feels that a day or period is dull or tedious.” We all know the feeling. It is part of life. But sometimes it’s a symptom of something deeper that needs tending.

In my psychotherapy practice, I see a few main causes for chronic states of boredom:

  1. Boredom which functions as a protectivedefense against emotional pain. Traumatic and adverse experiences during childhood, like being raised in a chaotic household, make a child feel unsafe. The lack of safety triggers overwhelming and conflicting emotions, like rage and fear. To cope alone, a child’s mind compartmentalizes away “bad” feelings to carry on with life. But disconnecting from emotions, as much as it spares us pain, can also manifest as boredom. Boredom in this case is a byproduct of being out of touch with core emotions like sadness, anger, fear, disgust, joy, excitement, and sexual excitement. When we lose access to our core emotions, we cut off a vital source of energy that makes us feel alive. To heal, we must re-connect safely with our vast emotional world through the body .
  2. Boredom which functions as a signal that we are under-stimulated. In this case, the feeling of boredom tells us about an underlying need to find interests and novelty in our life. To overcome boredom, we must discover any obstacles that get in our way of finding new interests.
  3. Boredom also cuts off access to knowing our true wants and needs. To be in touch with wants and needs, especially when we think they are unattainable, is to feel pain in both the mind and body.
  4. For some people, boredom stems from a combination of all of the above and may also be recognized as procrastination or disengagement.

Rachel grew up in a chaotic household. When I met her as a young adult, she didn’t seem to care much about anything, ending almost every sentence with “whatever” and rolling her eyes. This kind of “I don’t care” defense protected Rachel from emotional discomfort. But it also disconnected her from the energy and vitality that being emotionally alive brings. She was plagued by boredom, a feeling she described as deadness, which was only alleviated when she drank wine.

For Rachel to feel better, we had to understand boredom’s protective purpose. In Accelerated Experiential Dynamic Psychotherapy (AEDP), we invite patients to envision parts of themselves that hold distressing beliefs and emotions so we can help them transform.

I asked, “Rachel, can you imagine the part of you that feels bored sitting on the sofa next to you?”

Rachel could envision the bored part of her. She saw through her adult eyes the image of a 12-year-old girl dressed in goth clothing sitting on the sofa in my office.

By whole-heartedly and without judgement welcoming parts of us that experience boredom, we learn the purpose boredom serves and what we truly need. Almost always, emotions from the past need validating, honoring, and to be felt in the body until they fully move through and out. As a person recovers from past traumas and wounds, defenses like boredom are no longer needed.

Rachel’s vitality and zest for living emerged as she processed the anger at her parents and mourned the pain she experienced in her childhood. She came to understand how “not caring” kept her safe from being hurt and disappointed by life. She learned she was strong enough and supported enough to deal with life’s challenges and the emotions they triggered. And she leaned into more adaptive ways of coping like listening to her emotions and then thinking through how best to get her needs met and solve her problems proactively. Through this work, Rachel ceased to be bored, as she was alive and engaged in all aspects of her life.

A 60-year-old man, Craig, did three years of deep emotional work to heal the trauma from having a mother with narcissistic personality disorder and a contemptuous father. Ready to graduate from therapy, he spent much more time in relaxed states. His mind was quieter. But he also noticed a sense of boredom about life. He told me he was used to being preoccupied by agitation and irritability, which were now gone. “There is so much more room in my head. I guess it used to occupy me, so now I feel weirdly bored,” he told me.

We decided to get very curious about this newfound boredom. As with Rachel, I invited him to get some separation from the bored part so we could talk to it. Craig and I both marveled at the power of talking to discrete parts like they are separate people to figure out what we need.

The trick is when you ask a question to a part of yourself, you must then listen to receive the answer. That part told him he needed to engage more with his hobbies and interests. Craig and I spent fun time discussing the things he enjoyed in life and how he might like to spend his free time. Relief from boredom was immediate as he was excited to discover new interests. After all he had been through, he felt he deserved to care for himself in this new way.

Boredom is a difficult experience. But one doesn’t need to get stuck in that state. With a stance of curiosity and compassion, we can learn the roots of boredom. When boredom tells us we need more interests, we can set a plan for trying out new experiences, practicing patience with ourselves until we find the proper balance of novelty and familiarity. If we are bored because we are defending against deeper emotions and needs, we can absolutely discover those deeper emotions and needs, honor them, and think through how to address them in safe and healthy ways. In this way, we reconnect to our vital and most authentic self.

You too can change your relationship to boredom. Want to experiment with talking to your bored parts? Here are some questions to ask:

  • Is this boredom longstanding or a relatively new experience?
  • When was the first time you remember being bored in such a way that you couldn’t stand it?
  • What does boredom feel like physically ?
  • What’s the hardest part of the experience of boredom: The way it feels physically? The assault to self-esteem? The self-judgment? The impulses to get rid of it? The negative thoughts it causes? Other?
  • What, if any, impulses do the bored parts of you have?
  • Is the sense of boredom always there or does it come and go?
  • What triggers boredom and what makes it go away?
  • Why is boredom a problem for you? Be very specific how boredom affects you.
  • What does your bored part need to feel better?

For extra credit: Work the Change Triangle ! Where is boredom on the Change Triangle? If you moved your bored part to the side, what underlying emotions might you be experiencing? Once you name them, can you validate them without judging yourself?

A+ just for trying!

(Patient details changed to protect confidentiality)

Fosha, D. (2000). The Transforming Power of Affect: A Model for Accelerated Change. New York: Basic Books

Learn to “re-frame” the moment!

Posted May 20, 2010

Samuel Johnson wrote, “It is by studying little things that we attain the great art of having as little misery, and as much happiness as possible.” Little things make us happy, and little things can drag us down.

One “little thing” that can be a source of unhappiness is boredom. Sitting in traffic. Doing laundry. Waiting in a long line at the grocery store.

I’ve found that the more I focus on my boredom or irritation, the more I amplify that feeling. Here are six strategies I use to “re-frame” the moment; even if I can’t escape a situation, by re-framing my emotions about it, I can transform it.

Put the word “meditation” after the activity that’s boring you. (This is my invention.) If you’re standing in a slow line at the drugstore, you’re doing “Waiting in line meditation.” If you’re cleaning up after a party, you’re doing “Cleaning meditation.” Just saying these words makes me feel very spiritual and high-minded and wise.

-– Dig in. Diane Arbus wrote, “The Chinese have a theory that you pass through boredom into fascination and I think it’s true.” If something is boring for two minutes, do it for four minutes. If it’s still boring, do it for eight minutes, then sixteen, and so on. Eventually you discover that it’s not boring at all. In my life, I’ve found that if part of my research isn’t interesting to me — for example, studying the Dardanelles campaign for Forty Ways to Look at Winston Churchill — I read a whole book about it, and then it becomes absorbing. The same principle holds when doing boring or irritating tasks, like washing dishes.

Take the perspective of a journalist or scientist. Really study what’s around you. What are people wearing, what do the interiors of buildings look like, what noises do you hear? If you bring your analytical powers to bear, you can make almost anything interesting.

Find an area of refuge. Have a mental escape route planned. Think about something delightful or uplifting (not your to-do list!). Or maybe review photos of your kids on your phone; studies show that looking at photos of loved ones provides a big mood boost.

Take your time. I realize that when information bores me, like trying to understand a change-of-service notice from the cable company, I try to rush through it. This makes things worse, though, not better, because I feel not only bored, but also impatient and confused. Now, when I have to make sense of something that’s both boring and bewildering, I deliberately slow myself down and take all the time I need. My resolution to Put myself in jail is helpful.

— Most important: always have something good to read!

How about you? Have you found strategies to deal with boredom?

* I love the internet! My friend Delia moved to London, but through the wonders of technology, I can read her blog — Real Delia, “finding yourself in adulthood” — and keep up with her from a distance. She just moved, and I got a big kick out of her post about Living with mess: radical acceptance.

* It’s Word-of-Mouth Day, when I gently encourage (or, you might think, pester) you to spread the word about the Happiness Project. You might:
— Forward the link to someone you think would be interested
— Link to a post on Twitter (follow me @gretchenrubin)
— Sign up for my free monthly newsletter (about 43,000 people get it)
— Buy the book
— Join the 2010 Happiness Challenge to make 2010 a happier year
— Put a link to the blog in your Facebook status update
— Watch the one-minute book video
Thanks! I really appreciate any help. Word of mouth is the BEST.

I’m easily bored.

I love being stimulated. I love learning. I love self-development, self-knowledge, and self-growth.

I hate it when I’m sitting and have nothing to do.

In today’s world, we are all slaves to boredom. Boredom is what leads us to checking our email every 5 minutes. Boredom is what causes us to check our social media streams (even when we’re just waiting 30 seconds for the restroom). Boredom is what causes us to take drugs, drink, and seek sexual pleasure.

Personally, I fear boredom. The worst fear I have is to be stuck on a plane for 16 hours (happened to me once on the way to Australia) where I have nothing to do. There is an existential void.

Honestly, I would rather be in physical pain, than feel boredom.

Is boredom good for us?

Of course, there are upsides to boredom. When we are bored, that is what allows us to be creative. When we are bored, we want to stimulate ourselves — so we find creative ways to do so.

If a kid is bored and doesn’t own an iPad— they might create their own toys out of sticks and stones, and cardboard.

If an adult is bored and doesn’t have a smartphone on them (for some weird reason) they might actually go on a walk, look around, and chat to some strangers.

Photography to treat boredom

How to Cope with Photography Boredom

I know a lot of people who were prescribed to go on long walks by their doctors (after surgery, physical therapy, etc). But they found walking to be boring. So they decided to take a camera on their walks, to make it less boring. And funny enough, that is how they discovered “street photography.”

I think photography is a great tool for us to fight boredom in our lives— and become more creative, to self-express ourselves, and to do something “productive” with our leisure time.

I feel boredom is the opposite of feeling focused and “in the zone.” Psychologists call an engaged, creative state— a state of “flow” — where hours run by in minutes, where we lose a sense of self, and when we feel fully-alive.

For me, when I’m shooting on the streets, I feel a sense of flow. I no longer feel boredom. I feel like I’m having an out-of-body experience. I feel totally connected with my camera. I focus on composing, framing, and photographing the beauty around me. I feel more connected with my environment, society, and other people.

How to be less bored in photography

If you want to fight boredom with your photography, here are some practical tips:

1. Don’t photograph what bores you:

This is simple advice— don’t photograph what bores you. Yet how often do we follow these silly “365 day photo challenges” — where you need to take a photograph every day, no matter what?

I have friends who have done these challenges, and their photography ends up feeling like a chore. They photograph random stuff that they feel no natural drive to photograph.

The solution: only photograph what interests you. Only photograph what excites you.

This means, finding your style in photography is knowing what not to photograph. Simply don’t photograph what bores you.

For example, I used to like shooting landscapes, but it soon bored me. I found that photographing people was far more challenging, fun, and interesting. This is how I transitioned from landscape/architecture photography to street photography.

Don’t photograph what bores you.

2. Find beauty in everything:

If you’re hunting to take photos of double-rainbows, people in pink afros, and the extraordinary— you will be disappointed. You will become addicted to traveling to exotic places, just to stimulate your jaded retinas.

Rather, I feel true happiness and joy in photography is to find beauty in everything. To find beauty in a cup of coffee. To find beauty in a flower growing out of the concrete. To find beauty in an old couple holding hands on the street.

Find beauty in ordinary things. This is the only way to prevent being bored of living in the same city and place, and finding joy in everything.

3. Challenge yourself:

To be human is to grow. We’re constantly decaying, and by growing, we are battling our atrophying bodies.

You need to challenge yourself to grow as a photographer. If you keep doing the same old thing over and over again — you might like be Henri Cartier-Bresson, who quit photography. Josef Koudelka, on the other hand, kept innovating with his photography (going from shooting wide-angle 25mm, to 35mm/50mm, to shooting panoramic landscapes).

If you find photographing single-subjects to be boring and unchallenging, try to shoot multi-subjects and layers.

If you find black and white boring, try color.

If you find landscape photography boring, try out street photography.

If you’re bored shooting street photography, try shooting portrait or fashion photography.

Photograph what is outside of your comfort zone, and work hard to take your work to the next level.

Conclusion

We want to embrace boredom in a positive way — knowing that it is a sign from our biological bodies that we need more novelty, excitement, fun, and growth. By knowing what boring things in life to avoid is a good way to live.

I was bored by math and science— and pursued sociology and the humanities instead. I was bored by a 9-5 job, and decided to become an entrepreneur and work for myself. Whenever I am bored in a social situation, I no longer feel guilty for just walking away and excusing myself.

Avoid boredom; seek growth. Challenge yourself, and become the best version of yourself.

Photography is not just about making photos, it is about personal growth. It is about finding beauty in everything in the world, and it is a way to cure yourself of feeling bored or jaded in life.

So let us spend less time consuming, and more time producing. Make photos that brings joy to your soul, and share that joy with others.

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Author

Assistant Professor of Psychology, University of Florida

Disclosure statement

Erin C. Westgate does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

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University of Florida provides funding as a founding partner of The Conversation US.

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More and more of us are staying home in an attempt to slow down the spreading coronavirus. But being stuck at home can lead to boredom.

Boredom is a signal that we’re not meaningfully engaged with the world. It tells us to stop what we’re doing, and do it better – or to do something else.

But, as a social psychologist who studies boredom, I know that people don’t always make the best choices when bored. So if you’re stuck at home, dutifully practicing your social distancing, how do you keep boredom away?

About boredom

We can feel bored even with jobs and activities that appear to be meaningful. For example, researchers have found anesthesiologists and air traffic controllers find themselves bored on the job.

What this research reveals is that just because something is objectively meaningful doesn’t mean it feels that way to us all the time. And even meaningful work can be boring if the person performing it finds it too hard or too easy. Once that happens, individuals might struggle to stay focused.

Reducing boredom requires that individuals solve the problems that produced it – not having sufficient activities that are both meaningful and optimally challenging.

However, sometimes people turn to activities that make them feel better in the moment, but that don’t provide long-term meaning or challenge. For instance, studies have shown that people are willing to self-administer electric shocks when bored.

Other behaviors linked to greater susceptibility to boredom include increased alcohol intake and marijuana use. Boredom is also tied to unhealthy snacking and online pornography.

While these may feel good in the moment, they provide only temporary relief from boredom. To prevent boredom and keep it away, we need to find solutions at home that provide lasting meaning and challenge.

1. Remind yourself why you’re doing this

People generally prefer doing something to doing nothing. As staying home is the most effective way to prevent the further transmission of the coronavirus, it is meaningful to socially isolate. However, it may not always feel that way.

Like all emotions, boredom is about whatever you’re thinking at the moment. That means staying at home will only feel meaningful when we’re actively thinking about the greater good it does. For instance, in studies, when students were prompted to reflect on why their schoolwork mattered to them personally, researchers found that their interest in learning increased.

In other words, reframing our activity changes how we feel about it.

How to Cope with Photography BoredomDoing meditation at home while self-isolating. Justin Paget/Digital Vision via Getty Images

Creating simple reminders, such as a note on the fridge, or a morning meditation, can help us keep the big picture in view: Staying home is a sacrifice we’re actively making for the good of others.

2. Find a rhythm

Routines structure our days, and provide a sense of coherence that bolsters our meaning in life. People’s lives feel more meaningful in moments when they’re engaged in daily routines.

We lose those routines when we give up going to the office, or when we are laid off. Even retirees or stay-at-home parents are disrupted by closures to cities, restaurants and schools. This loss of routine can foster feelings of boredom.

By creating new routines, people can restore a sense of meaning that buffers them from boredom.

3. Go with the flow

Figuring out what to do when faced by long days unstructured by work or school can be hard. A recent study of people in quarantine in Italy found that boredom was the second most common issue, after loss of freedom.

One thing that makes such situations hard is that it can be tricky to find activities that are just challenging enough to keep one occupied, without being too demanding. This situation can leave people bored and frustrated.

It helps to keep in mind that what counts as too challenging, or not challenging enough, will shift throughout the day. Don’t force yourself to keep at it if you need a break.

4. Try something new

Boredom urges many of us towards the novel. Embrace that urge, judiciously. If you have the energy, try a new recipe, experiment with home repairs, learn a new dance on TikTok.

Doing new things not only relieves boredom, it helps acquire new skills and knowledge that may relieve boredom in the long run. For instance, we feel a surge of interest when we read an interesting novel or go through complex experiences, but only if we have the capacity to understand them.

Evidence shows that embracing new experiences, can help us lead not only a happy or meaningful life, but a psychologically richer one.

5. Make room for guilty pleasures

It’s okay to binge on television, if that’s all you can handle at the moment.

We sometimes paint ourselves into a box where our most meaningful hobbies are also mentally taxing or effortful. For instance, digging into a classic Russian novel may be meaningful, but it doesn’t necessarily come easily.

Similarly, well-intentioned suggestions for how to cope at home, such as hosting a virtual wine-and-design night, may be simply too exhausting to be pleasurable at a time when many of us are already struggling.

Give yourself permission to enjoy your guilty pleasures. If need be, reframe those moments as much-needed mental refreshment, nourishing and recharging you for a later date.

6. Connect with others

Finding easy meaningful alternatives – bite-sized options that don’t take much effort, but that we find deeply rewarding – can be a challenge.

Luckily one good option is open to us all: connecting with others, whether virtually or for those lucky enough not to be quarantined alone – in-person.

How to Cope with Photography BoredomTalk with friends while working from home. Julie Jammot/AFP via Getty Images

Looking at old photos, or reminiscing with a friend, are simple meaningful actions most of us can take even when we’re not feeling our best. One does not need a reason to call up a friend – our best socializing is the kind that happens casually, in the unstructured time between scheduled activities.

Create room for that virtually as well: Next time you’re pouring a glass of wine or watering the plants, call up a friend while you do it. Make dinner together. We don’t have to be bored, when we’re all in this together.

Boredom itself is neither bad nor good, only our choices about how to counter it make it so.

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How to Cope with Photography Boredom

Are you new to full-time RV life? Maybe you’re an RVer staying long term at a campground. For whatever reasons, some RV campers get bored. If you find yourself getting bored, there are some things that will keep it fun and interesting. Here are a few ideas. If you find you’re just lonely, check out this article on how to overcome loneliness when RVing.

How to Cope with Photography BoredomBelieve it or not, some RVers get bored. Here are things that will help to fight boredom!

Volunteer

Just about any area you decide to stay a while will have some kind of volunteer opportunities. It could be something as easy as volunteering at the campground you’re staying at, volunteering a homeless shelter or at a food kitchen.

There’s even a ministry that helps Churches and other places make repairs to their buildings. It’s called NOMADS. It’s a ministry of the Methodist Church but you don’t have to be a Methodist to join and help out.

I checked their website out here. Looks like they have projects all over the U.S. It looks like they also try and have projects in the South during the Winter months and in the North during Summer. Smart!

Take Classes

If your campground is near an area that has a Community College that offers evening or part-time courses, you could take a course that interests you. I know our local community colleges offer everything from languages, photography to DIY projects.

If DIY projects sound interesting, the big box stores like Lowes, Home Depot and Woodcraft, give easy classes on just about all aspects of DIY home improvement.

Another great place to find local classes is the Library. They often offer all types of classes.

Yet another source is the local groups on Facebook. If there are classes being given in the area, those people will know who and where they’re at!

Start a Business

I’m not talking about starting the next Microsoft or Facebook (although if you’d like to, certainly go ahead!) What I’m talking about is getting out and creating a little side hustle.

I use to do really well on eBay. Even to the point of becoming a Power Seller on there. I would search Thrift Stores and Garage Sales for things I could flip on eBay and make a profit. It was awesome fun. Just be aware that you’ll generally need to ship an item pretty quick after someone purchases it.

If you’ll have problems getting to a post office, this wouldn’t be the side hustle for you.

But I also sold hand made crafts on e B ay and did alright. Some people do very well on Etsy or even selling on Facebook Marketplace!

If flipping other people’s stuff for a profit doesn’t sound like something you’d like, there are tons of other opportunities out there. For example, if making money online sounds like something you’d like, there are websites such as

Not interested in those? Well, how about becoming an RV Inspector? You’d be inspecting RVs for consumers before they bought them. A lot like a home inspector would inspect a home before a home buyer bought it. All you need is some training and a certificate. You can get both of those through the National RV Inspectors Association (NRVIA). You can find out more about becoming an RV inspector here.

Do you like to write? Can you design a website, even a basic one? Or maybe you’re an MS Office guru or an expert at other software. There are sites like UpWork.com and Fiverr.com that you can use to freelance your talents on. People on these sites can command a good fee for their work.

A great source for people who just like to write articles is iWriter.Com. Pay is dependent on the quality of your writing. From those I’ve spoken with, they pay quick and take most any level of experience. So whether you’re just starting out or have written for a long time, chances are there may be a place for you.

Get a Part Time Job

Some people just want to stay busy or make a little spending cash. Part time jobs are great for this!

You can search the local establishments for ‘Help Wanted’ signs. Also, log onto the local Facebook pages and see if anyone is hiring locally. Seems like there’s always someone hiring for something or another in a small town.

You can also look on Craigslist in the ‘Help Wanted’ section to see if there are any jobs in your local area.

Another source of full and part time work for Nomads is Workamper News. If there’s any work at parks or campgrounds in your area, chances are good you’ll find them first at Workamper News.

Many RVers make good part-time income by working for Amazon in their Amazon CamperForce program. Find out more about these opportunities by clicking here.

Some of the benefits of working in Amazons CamperForce program are:

  • 401k benefits
  • Weekly pay schedule
  • Medical and prescription coverage after 90 days
  • Up to $550 a month per campsite
  • Overtime Pay

To get into the program, you’ll need to sign up early. Spots fill months, if not a year, in advance. Yep, that’s how popular it is!

There are also places like FlexJobs.Com. FlexJobs is a job board for remote jobs. They have literally thousands of listings for jobs a person can do remotely. About all you’ll need is a laptop and a good WiFi connection. Also be aware that FlexJobs requires a subscription to view and interact with potential employers. Last I heard it was $49 a year. That’s peanuts though to find a remote job you can do from the comfort of your RV or coffee shop!

WorkingNomads.Co is an online newsletter that curates a list of remote jobs directly to your inbox. You choose to receive emails daily or weekly then keep moving to the next city while the telecommuting job search comes to you.

Take Up A Hobby

Has there been something you’ve always wanted to do, like crochet or basket weaving?

What better time to start than now?

In many areas, specialty shops give classes on learning hobbies such as Scrapbooking. If there’s a Hobby Lobby or Michaels close by, they’ll likely have classes as well or at least know where to find them.

And let’s not forget YouTube! YouTube can be an excellent source of knowledge concerning just about any hobby you want to undertake. You’ll just have to make sure you have a good data plan or access to good WiFi.

What Keeps You From Getting Bored On The Road? Let Us Know!

I get it. The scenic tours and touristy things to do in an area give out after a while. And whether they can move or have to stay put, some RVers are going to get bored. And that is okay. Because armed with this list above of things for RVers to do to keep from getting bored, you’ll have so many more things to do you won’t have time to get bored!

Good luck in your new endeavor, and please, drop us a comment below and let us know how it’s going.

Or if you have tips of your own to keep from getting bored while RVing, let us know. We love to hear from our readers!

Boredom, a relatively new idea in Western culture, has infected us mid-pandemic

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Luke Fernandez – Susan J. Matt
August 2, 2020 11:30PM (UTC)

Disaster movies like “Contagion” and “Outbreak” depicted pandemics as dramatic, even action-packed. It turns out the opposite is true: a nascent real-life pandemic problem, it seems, is that Americans are experiencing an uptick in boredom. In June, researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Harvard released “The US National Pandemic Emotional Impact Report,” which found that 53% of Americans surveyed reported being more bored than before the advent of COVID-19.

Perhaps that’s why many are disregarding rules about quarantines and crowds as they go off in search of fun; indeed, a July study just published suggested boredom might be undermining health precautions such as social distancing and self-isolating. Another recent study indicated that Americans were drinking more alcohol during the pandemic; it was seen as a way to cope with boredom. “We are entering a new age of boredom,” Wired magazine opined, adding, “almost none of the sources of fulfillment we relied on . . . [in the past] are easily accessible.”

In the midst of the pandemic, Americans are having to learn how to deal with dullness — something they have been little accustomed to in recent decades. Our culture and our technologies have left us ill-equipped to deal with the monotony of staying home — of skipping parties, movies, amusement parks, and vacations, of cancelling the traditional excitements of summer, and instead accepting the repetitious routines of quarantine life.

Yet our current struggle with boredom would puzzle our ancestors, for boredom was not always a problem feeling. After all, boredom did not even exist as a word until the mid-19th century. (Bore and boring entered English only a little earlier.) While previous generations used words like dull and monotonous to describe tasks, days, and sermons, they did not have a word for the inner emotional state of under-stimulation until the 1850s; tedium and repetition were more expected parts of life, and less surprising. Indeed, they were regarded as the necessary cost of virtuous hard work. Little wonder that books with titles like “Blessed Be Drudgery” were popular reads in 1890.

It was only in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, with the rise of a consumer economy that promised excitement with every purchase, that boredom began to be framed as a problem. Phonographs, movies, radios all promised to solve that problem. “Banishes Boredom” proclaimed ads for Victrola phonographs, while the motion picture industry described its movie theaters as “happy haven[s]” to which “millions may confidently come for freedom from boredom and care.” Even Kellogg’s cereal variety pack vowed to end “breakfast boredom.”

As expectations for constant excitement and stimulation spread, psychologists reinforced the message that entertainment was an entitlement. In the 1930s, psychoanalyst Otto Fenichel claimed individuals had “the right to expect” some diversion from the world at large. By 1957, a Scientific American article was labeling boredom a “pathology.” The article’s author, Woodburn Heron, maintained that “Prolonged exposure to a monotonous environment . . . has definitely deleterious effects,” and endorsed the idea that humans needed variety. The willingness and ability to tolerate dullness and sameness was eroding. Over the course of the 20th century, advertisers, the entertainment and travel industry, and psychologists began to prime Americans to expect constant diversion, and to worry when it was lacking from their lives. By the 1980s, psychologists were developing a “Boredom Proneness Scale,” which would allow them to better identify and treat patients afflicted with the condition.

Boredom had become a problem emotion by the late 20th century. In the last few decades, as our digital technologies have offered us games, apps, music, and social media, our intolerance of monotony and our fear of boredom has only grown. The Onion famously mocked this distinctly modern sentiment in 2014, in a satirical piece titled “Americans Demand New Form of Media to Bridge Entertainment Gap while Looking from Laptop to Phone.” “According to reports from across the country, citizens are loudly calling for a device or program capable of keeping them captivated as they move their eyes from a computer screen to a smartphone screen, arguing that a new source of video and audio stimulation is vital to alleviating the excruciating boredom that currently accompanies this prolonged transition,” the authors wrote.

Or, as a twenty-one- year-old college student told us, “I think having technology at my fingertips makes boredom feel much more dangerous. It’s like if you’re bored, fix it fast.”

None of these changes in American sentiment might seem to matter. Except that they do. Instead of tolerating a little monotony, we’ll gamble more than we should to avoid it. We’ll look at our smartphones while we drive—even though we know for darn sure that we shouldn’t. For the sake of a momentary jolt of dopamine, social media users will tweet away reputations that took years to build. And as the novelty of the first couple months of COVID-19 isolation have worn thin, that risk-taking, and that aversion to boredom, have only grown. Bars are filling up. Pictures of crowded beaches are making the news. Amusement parks have unlocked their gates. Resisting this is a slew of epidemiologists who have been advising us that the coronavirus pandemic is an occasion to spend time apart. But, in our boredom, the pandemic has all too often turned into an occasion to party.

We’re afflicted by a virus of recent origin. But our response to it is shaped by emotions that originate in the 19th century. Until we get a better handle on that past, and learn to cope with boredom, the epidemic is unlikely to go away.

Luke Fernandez

Luke Fernandez and Susan Matt are authors of “Bored, Lonely, Angry, Stupid: Changing Feelings About Technology From The Telegraph to Twitter” and are faculty at Weber State University. Luke Fernandez is Asst. Prof. in the School of Computing at Weber State University. He holds a Ph.D. in Political Theory from Cornell University. He also is a software developer. His writing has appeared in a range of publications, including the Washington Post, Slate, Lapham’s Quarterly, and the Chronicle of Higher Education.

MORE FROM Luke Fernandez

Susan J. Matt

Luke Fernandez and Susan Matt are authors of “Bored, Lonely, Angry, Stupid: Changing Feelings About Technology From The Telegraph to Twitter” and are faculty at Weber State University. Susan J. Matt is an historian of the emotions and Professor of History at Weber State. She is author of “Homesickness: An American History” (Oxford University Press, 2011), and Keeping Up with the Joneses: Envy in American Consumer Society, 1890-1930 (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2003). Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Journal of American History, among other places.

How to Cope with Photography Boredom

Are you new to full-time RV life? Maybe you’re an RVer staying long term at a campground. For whatever reasons, some RV campers get bored. If you find yourself getting bored, there are some things that will keep it fun and interesting. Here are a few ideas. If you find you’re just lonely, check out this article on how to overcome loneliness when RVing.

How to Cope with Photography BoredomBelieve it or not, some RVers get bored. Here are things that will help to fight boredom!

Volunteer

Just about any area you decide to stay a while will have some kind of volunteer opportunities. It could be something as easy as volunteering at the campground you’re staying at, volunteering a homeless shelter or at a food kitchen.

There’s even a ministry that helps Churches and other places make repairs to their buildings. It’s called NOMADS. It’s a ministry of the Methodist Church but you don’t have to be a Methodist to join and help out.

I checked their website out here. Looks like they have projects all over the U.S. It looks like they also try and have projects in the South during the Winter months and in the North during Summer. Smart!

Take Classes

If your campground is near an area that has a Community College that offers evening or part-time courses, you could take a course that interests you. I know our local community colleges offer everything from languages, photography to DIY projects.

If DIY projects sound interesting, the big box stores like Lowes, Home Depot and Woodcraft, give easy classes on just about all aspects of DIY home improvement.

Another great place to find local classes is the Library. They often offer all types of classes.

Yet another source is the local groups on Facebook. If there are classes being given in the area, those people will know who and where they’re at!

Start a Business

I’m not talking about starting the next Microsoft or Facebook (although if you’d like to, certainly go ahead!) What I’m talking about is getting out and creating a little side hustle.

I use to do really well on eBay. Even to the point of becoming a Power Seller on there. I would search Thrift Stores and Garage Sales for things I could flip on eBay and make a profit. It was awesome fun. Just be aware that you’ll generally need to ship an item pretty quick after someone purchases it.

If you’ll have problems getting to a post office, this wouldn’t be the side hustle for you.

But I also sold hand made crafts on e B ay and did alright. Some people do very well on Etsy or even selling on Facebook Marketplace!

If flipping other people’s stuff for a profit doesn’t sound like something you’d like, there are tons of other opportunities out there. For example, if making money online sounds like something you’d like, there are websites such as

Not interested in those? Well, how about becoming an RV Inspector? You’d be inspecting RVs for consumers before they bought them. A lot like a home inspector would inspect a home before a home buyer bought it. All you need is some training and a certificate. You can get both of those through the National RV Inspectors Association (NRVIA). You can find out more about becoming an RV inspector here.

Do you like to write? Can you design a website, even a basic one? Or maybe you’re an MS Office guru or an expert at other software. There are sites like UpWork.com and Fiverr.com that you can use to freelance your talents on. People on these sites can command a good fee for their work.

A great source for people who just like to write articles is iWriter.Com. Pay is dependent on the quality of your writing. From those I’ve spoken with, they pay quick and take most any level of experience. So whether you’re just starting out or have written for a long time, chances are there may be a place for you.

Get a Part Time Job

Some people just want to stay busy or make a little spending cash. Part time jobs are great for this!

You can search the local establishments for ‘Help Wanted’ signs. Also, log onto the local Facebook pages and see if anyone is hiring locally. Seems like there’s always someone hiring for something or another in a small town.

You can also look on Craigslist in the ‘Help Wanted’ section to see if there are any jobs in your local area.

Another source of full and part time work for Nomads is Workamper News. If there’s any work at parks or campgrounds in your area, chances are good you’ll find them first at Workamper News.

Many RVers make good part-time income by working for Amazon in their Amazon CamperForce program. Find out more about these opportunities by clicking here.

Some of the benefits of working in Amazons CamperForce program are:

  • 401k benefits
  • Weekly pay schedule
  • Medical and prescription coverage after 90 days
  • Up to $550 a month per campsite
  • Overtime Pay

To get into the program, you’ll need to sign up early. Spots fill months, if not a year, in advance. Yep, that’s how popular it is!

There are also places like FlexJobs.Com. FlexJobs is a job board for remote jobs. They have literally thousands of listings for jobs a person can do remotely. About all you’ll need is a laptop and a good WiFi connection. Also be aware that FlexJobs requires a subscription to view and interact with potential employers. Last I heard it was $49 a year. That’s peanuts though to find a remote job you can do from the comfort of your RV or coffee shop!

WorkingNomads.Co is an online newsletter that curates a list of remote jobs directly to your inbox. You choose to receive emails daily or weekly then keep moving to the next city while the telecommuting job search comes to you.

Take Up A Hobby

Has there been something you’ve always wanted to do, like crochet or basket weaving?

What better time to start than now?

In many areas, specialty shops give classes on learning hobbies such as Scrapbooking. If there’s a Hobby Lobby or Michaels close by, they’ll likely have classes as well or at least know where to find them.

And let’s not forget YouTube! YouTube can be an excellent source of knowledge concerning just about any hobby you want to undertake. You’ll just have to make sure you have a good data plan or access to good WiFi.

What Keeps You From Getting Bored On The Road? Let Us Know!

I get it. The scenic tours and touristy things to do in an area give out after a while. And whether they can move or have to stay put, some RVers are going to get bored. And that is okay. Because armed with this list above of things for RVers to do to keep from getting bored, you’ll have so many more things to do you won’t have time to get bored!

Good luck in your new endeavor, and please, drop us a comment below and let us know how it’s going.

Or if you have tips of your own to keep from getting bored while RVing, let us know. We love to hear from our readers!

How to Cope with Photography Boredom

Trading can be an incredibly exciting thing, especially when you are first starting out and everything is brand new to you. Even for experienced traders, it can be an incredibly exciting and thrilling thing to take part in, especially when there is a lot of volatility within the markets. The problem comes when the markets are a little bit slower, in these slower conditions something called trading boredom can set in.

Trading boredom can simply be described as the period when there is nothing going on, the markets aren’t really moving and even if they are, they are not moving in a way that is suitable for your trading strategy, and so you are sat there with nothing to actually trade, not much to analyse and nothing to do at all, this is where trading boredom begins to set in.

While boredom can bring our motivation levels down, it can also lead to other problems. It can make us far more likely to be distracted, those little toys that you have in the room, or the TV in the corner will be turned on a lot more often than it will. This creates a really bad habit when it comes to trading. You want to be getting rid of these distractions, so this trading boredom leads us towards a very slippery slope because if you get into the habit of getting distracted, it will be hard to break out of it.

How to Cope with Photography Boredom

So we briefly mentioned that boredom can actually reduce our motivation levels which in itself is not a good thing. Without motivation, we become more easily distracted and can make us just not want to do it. In fact, a lack of motivation is one of the things that can cause people to quit trading completely, which is of course not a great thing because trading is such a fantastic opportunity and a great hobby to have.

The problem with boredom is that for some it is unbearable and so they decide to try and force some trades, this is never a good idea, neve. All that this will lead to is bad trades and the inevitable losses that come along with them, if you are feeling bored, the last thing that you want to do is force trades, so do not do it, none, not even one, it will lead you down a slippery slope which for many there is no way to return from.

For some it is easy to get through these dull moments in trading, they do not need any added stimulus and can very patiently wait out the slow moments., For many though, it is not quite this easy and these dull moments can be a real killer. We need to find ways to help reduce the feeling of boredom and so we have come up with some ideas that you could try which could help to alleviate that feeling, some may work, some may not, but it is always worth trying as you do not want to be stuck with the feeling of boredom, it will only make you want to put down your trading tools and leave.

When the markets are slow, it is the perfect opportunity to learn a little more, learn something that you do not know much about. This could be a new strategy or just something smaller than can be used to adapt your own strategy. It is also a perfect time to start learning about additional timeframes. These can be used to help you confirm your analysis, as the more timeframes that you understand, the more accurate your analysis can be.

It can also be the perfect time to teach yourself a new skill, patience. Patience is key when trading, these dull moments will always be there, some lasting minutes, others for potentially days. Having an understanding that you have your strategy set, you understand the entry requirements and now are just waiting, do not see this as a time to be bored, think of it as waiting to pounce on the perfect trade. Building up your patience will benefit you in the long run and will potentially help you trade in more strenuous market conditions down the line.

If we are used to the high pace markets, then these slower moments can be even worse, you need to be able to slow yourself down, to calm yourself from all the excitement that you are used to. Take a few minutes before sitting down to trade to relax, take some deep breaths and slow your body and mind, this will allow you to better focus on the issue at hand and to be more in sync with the markets.

There are also a lot of trading forums and communities out there, do not be afraid to join a few. Some people often think that they are a waste of time or that they will not be able to learn anything from it or that they are simply full of people wanting info but not willing to give them. This is certainly not the case, there is a wealth of information out there, you will always find answers to questions and a lot of information that could be beneficial for you, not only this, but it will give you something to do while the markets are quiet, taking away some of that boredom.

So remember, there will be some dull moments, no matter what your strategy is or how long you have been trading, there is always the opportunity for the markets to be slow and for you to struggle to find trades, it is important that you know what to do with yourself in those situations. If you have a lot of patience then it won’t be an issue, but for those that find it hard, keep looking for something for you to do, different forums, new analysis, new strategies, anything that isn’t forcing trades. So have some things planned to do for those quiet moments, that way you won’t be tempted to make those bad boredom trades.

A downloadable game for Windows and Linux

How To Cope With Boredom and Loneliness – A Guide For The Isolated
A Documentary Filmmaker Simulator – Ludum Dare Version

You play as Nigel Wimble, award winning filmmaker, as he completes his final episode of ‘A Guide For The Isolated’ series. His previous episodes include deathrow inmates, lighthouse keepers and the tribe of Mantitteewahwah.

Tonight his focus is on 43 year old, Harold Fletcher, who has been grounded to his room for the past 30 years.

You are tasked with choosing the relevant scenes to shoot for the show. Examine the objects in Harold’s room and pick the ones that hold the most potential for hard hitting television! Every item holds a story but not every story is relevant. Use your filmmaker intuition to pick the best scenes to make television gold!

Pick your scenes then sit back and watch the show. Viewers will rate the show at the end. Try to get a perfect score of 30!

Our game is less of a game and more of a create your own documentary type of thing. It’s really silly and we had a lot of fun making it. We hope you enjoy playing!

Be sure to have your audio turned on!

This game was made in 72 hours for Ludum Dare 37 – Theme – One Room

Tools used:
* Unity
* Sprite Something
* Reaper

Steam Version Available – Link

Alexis Boni – Coding and Music

David Day – Art, Writing, Voices and Music

Plastic Race Car Bed Song:

Making Of Timelapse

If you want to support us please consider donating a small amount, every little penny helps!

Last Updated On February 2, 2016 by amit

How to Cope with Photography Boredom

boredom is part of your emotional cycle. everybody gets bored. but no one wants to be bored. we all like to be entertained. 21st century is for entertainment, entertainment and entertainment. but still despite having so many interesting options we get bored.

getting bored once in a while is natural. but how you deal with boredom and use it creatively for your transformation depends upon you. your response to boredom depends upon your intelligence.

boredom simply means that you don’t want to do what you are doing. you want a change, a fresh perspective towards things or a break from your routine. boredom always carries a message for you but most people fail to see it.

there are two types of boredom:

1. one is natural boredom which is part of your emotional cycle. it comes to everybody. no matter who you are, what you do or what you don’t do. it does not matter how many interesting options you have to spend time. some amount of boredom will always come in your life every few days. just as anger, love, excitement, hope, frustration, irritation are part of your moods. so is boredom. if you don’t accept it then you are missing something. remember, you are a human being and you have a heart. boredom is one of the emotion of your heart. don’t run away from it as it may have a purpose in your life.

2. boredom created by your lifestyle – this happens when you are not creative in your life. when you don’t have any hobby or you are not listening to your inner voice and doing something which is against your natural flow of energies. it can also happen when you are giving more importance to earning money and fame than in doing what you like doing. boredom also comes when your work is more about efficiency than creativity. your work is regular, monotonous or repetitive and does not have much scope of creativity.

in this post, we will be dealing with second type of boredom which happens because of your lifestyle. you can definitely do something about this boredom as you are indirectly creating it.

how to deal with boredom:

1. don’t run away from it – most people don’t want to face boredom. they try to run away from it by watching cinema, reading books, going out with friends or any other distraction. it does not help. because what it does is that you simply suppress or ignore the boredom. this way you miss learning the insights which boredom brings with it.

2. accept boredom and learn from it – when you accept any issue then the whole quality of your energy changes. because now you don’t waste energy in fighting with the issue. so you have extra energy and you can have a fresh look at the issue. so acceptance helps a lot. you become at ease and are ready to learn.

when you face boredom with acceptance of it, then in that inner calm state you can listen to signals which your soul is sending to you. you become open to the voice of your soul. you may get courage to change your lifestyle. many things are possible. give it a try.

3. when bored then spend time with yourself – most people ‘go out‘ when bored. i suggest ‘go in‘. its a good time to be with yourself. when i am bored then i like to go out for a walk or spend time in a garden or doing meditation. it helps and many times i get lot of insights. spending time in nature is also a wonderful idea. remember, every emotion has a certain amount of energy. so when you are bored then you have to use the energy of boredom meaningfully. most people dissipate this energy in cinema or in friends or in shopping. but it does not add any meaning in your life. according to me, when you are bored then either be with yourself or with nature. you can spend time in gardening, going for a walk in a beach or in a park, looking at the birds or at the play of nature.

4. analyze your lifestyle – when you are bored then look at your life and see where you are going in life. are you living a meaningful life? do you need to get more creative and meditative in life. do you need a change in your lifestyle. boredom will indicate some pointers towards your faulty lifestyle. it will indicate some changes which you should make in your life. but it can only happen when you accept boredom and ready to learn from it. so be ready to face your boredom with a deep acceptance. boredom will point out where you are going wrong and what steps you should take.

How to Cope with Photography Boredom

How to Cope with Photography Boredom

The two enemies of human happiness are pain and boredom. – Arthur Schopenhauer Understand Why You are Bored Before you can actually start working on overcoming your boredom you must understand why you are bored. – Are you feeling tired or lazy? – Are you unmotivated to do things you want to do? – Do you feel you are not able to do things that you want to do? – Do you feel you don’t know what to do?

The two enemies of human happiness are pain and boredom. – Arthur Schopenhauer

Understand Why You are Bored

Before you can actually start working on overcoming your boredom you must understand why you are bored.

  • Are you feeling tired or lazy?
  • Are you unmotivated to do things you want to do?
  • Do you feel you are not able to do things that you want to do?
  • Do you feel you don’t know what to do?
  • Etc.

Ways to Overcome Boredom :

1. Get Enough Rest

Boredom and exhaustion are interrelated. By simply being tired you are paving a direct route towards boredom. The reasoning behind this is that when you are tired your brain struggles to focus on one particular situation and therefore wanders between many different situations.

This lack of concentration leaves you stuck between the gap between focused and unfocused. This gap is the literal definition of boredom.

2. Create Goals

Once again it’s all about finding a destination. When your mind begins to wander excessively you feel bored. This is why making goals is so important. Goals help to give you direction while at the same time help you become more focused.

3. Focus

All boredom is, is a misdirection of mental energy. So if you are able to give direction to this energy and focus it, you can overcome your boredom.

4. Change Your Thoughts

Life is only a reflection of your thoughts; if you can control your thoughts you can control your life. Try to put a positive spin on everything you do and make your thoughts constructive. This will help you change your overall attitude and will help you develop an active perspective.

5. Get Motivated

Get inspired to keep going.

Think about the future, your plans, your long term goals and where you would like to be in say 10 years. Try to give yourself a fresh thought process and build upon it. Go from future plans and slowly work back to your current situation.

This future to present way of thinking is very effective for overcoming boredom.

6. Change your Surroundings

This for me is the most effective way to deal with boredom. Whenever you feel bored get up, change your surroundings and relocate yourself.

7. Take a Break

Sometimes all you need is a break from life. Find some fun things you can do to kill some time and let your brain work at minimum energy.

This should help you cool down and allow you start up refreshed and ready to go.

8. Embrace Boredom

Sometimes the only way to defeat boredom is to embrace it. Let your body become fully engrossed in the process and try to relax. Meditate and let it just fall over you. If you don’t fight it, it won’t fight back.

How to Cope with Photography Boredom

Highlights

  • Reducing boredom requires that individuals solve the problems that produced it – not having sufficient activities that are both meaningful and optimally challenging.
  • Other behaviors linked to greater susceptibility to boredom include increased alcohol intake and marijuana use. Boredom is also tied to unhealthy snacking and online pornography.
  • One thing that makes such situations hard is that it can be tricky to find activities that are just challenging enough to keep one occupied, without being too demanding. This situation can leave people bored and frustrated.

6 things you can do to cope with boredom at a time of social distancing

May 27, 2020

8.13am EDT

Origin Source

More and more of us are staying home in an attempt to slow down the spreading coronavirus. But being stuck at home can lead to boredom.

Boredom is a signal that we’re not meaningfully engaged with the world. It tells us to stop what we’re doing, and do it better – or to do something else.

But, as a social psychologist who studies boredom, I know that people don’t always make the best choices when bored. So if you’re stuck at home, dutifully practicing your social distancing, how do you keep boredom away?

About boredom

We can feel bored even with jobs and activities that appear to be meaningful. For example, researchers have found anesthesiologists and air traffic controllers find themselves bored on the job.

What this research reveals is that just because something is objectively meaningful doesn’t mean it feels that way to us all the time. And even meaningful work can be boring if the person performing it finds it too hard or too easy. Once that happens, individuals might struggle to stay focused.

Reducing boredom requires that individuals solve the problems that produced it – not having sufficient activities that are both meaningful and optimally challenging.

However, sometimes people turn to activities that make them feel better in the moment, but that don’t provide long-term meaning or challenge. For instance, studies have shown that people are willing to self-administer electric shocks when bored.

Other behaviors linked to greater susceptibility to boredom include increased alcohol intake and marijuana use. Boredom is also tied to unhealthy snacking and online pornography.

While these may feel good in the moment, they provide only temporary relief from boredom. To prevent boredom and keep it away, we need to find solutions at home that provide lasting meaning and challenge.

1. Remind yourself why you’re doing this

People generally prefer doing something to doing nothing. As staying home is the most effective way to prevent the further transmission of the coronavirus, it is meaningful to socially isolate. However, it may not always feel that way.

Like all emotions, boredom is about whatever you’re thinking at the moment. That means staying at home will only feel meaningful when we’re actively thinking about the greater good it does. For instance, in studies, when students were prompted to reflect on why their schoolwork mattered to them personally, researchers found that their interest in learning increased.

In other words, reframing our activity changes how we feel about it.

How to Cope with Photography Boredom

How to Cope With Boredom and Loneliness is a hilarious little documentary film simulator in which you interview Harold Fletcher, a 43 year old man who has been grounded in his bedroom for over 30 years!

Based on a game jam build created for Ludum Dare, How to Cope With Boredom and Loneliness sees you taking on the role of Nigel Wimble, an award winning journalist who is about to film the final episode in his documentarry series, “How to Cope with Boredom and Loneliness: A Guide for the Isolated”. The subject of this final documentary is Harold Fletcher, a 42 year old man who hasn’t left his bedroom for over thirty years after his mom grounded him for being naughty.

The gameplay in How to Cope With Boredom and Loneliness is fairly simple, you just select different objects in the room to for Harold (and his mother) to talk about, shedding light on how he’s managed to cope with over thirty years of isolation. The scenes you shoot will then be sent to a focus group that will decide how well you did.

The gameplay isn’t why you’ll fall in love with How to Cope With Boredom and Loneliness though – it’s Harold and his wonderfully odd anecdotes about all the meaningful connections he’s formed with the objects in his bedroom. His fully voiced dialogue is absolutely hilarious and his “Race Car Bed” song is a delight. Highly recommended.

Available On: Windows & Linux (Steam)

Note: If you like How to Cope With Boredom and Loneliness, be sure to check out the devs other game, The Mind of Marlow.

Boredom and restlessness are like opposite poles of an energy scale and are common complaints when attempting mindfulness. Boredom is associated with a lack of enthusiasm and connection, whereas restlessness implies energy that’s pumping through the body, itching to burst out. Mindfulness is designed to observe both of these states and find a balance between the two.

Combat boredom for mindfulness

Meditation can sound like the ultimate boring activity. Sit there and do nothing. What could be more boring? Even watching paint dry may sound a more exciting prospect. Society seems geared up to help you avoid boredom.

Television adverts are short and snappy to grab your attention, and mobile phones help to distract you at any moment that a hint of boredom arises. These continual forms of distraction make you bored more quickly and more easily. Meditation is a courageous step against the tide.

If you feel bored during meditation, you’re not really being mindful. Boredom generally implies a lack of connection, or that you’re thinking about the past or future instead of the present. If you’re finding attending to your breathing boring, imagine if your head was plunged into water – you’d suddenly become very interested in breathing!

Noticing feelings of boredom and moving your focus back to your breathing is all part of the process of mindfulness and quite natural.

The following techniques can help you work with the feelings of boredom during meditation:

Acknowledge the feeling of boredom. Boredom is the feeling that has arisen, so accept it in this moment.

Notice the thoughts running through your mind. Perhaps, ‘Ohhhh, I can’t be bothered!’ or ‘What is the point of doing this?’

Get interested in boredom. Allow yourself to become curious. Where did the boredom come from? Where’s it going? Can you feel boredom in certain parts of your body? Notice the desire to sleep or do something else other than continuing to practice.

Connect your attention to the sensations of breathing and see what happens to boredom.

Take a step back from the emotion of boredom. If you’re aware of the boredom, you’re not the boredom itself. Observe the boredom from this stance of a decentered, detached awareness, as if the boredom is separate from you.

Observing boredom can be very interesting. When boredom arises you get to see the thoughts and feelings that run through you every time you get bored. These feelings can rule your life without you noticing. By becoming aware of them, they begin to loosen and let go. Your mental programs are shadows and through the light of mindfulness the programs lose their apparent reality and disappear.

Combat restlessness for mindfulness

Restlessness is similar to boredom, but is associated with excessive levels of energy and a common mental state. You run around all day doing a million and one things and then when you sit down to meditate, your mind is still racing.

Try these two ways of coping with restlessness:

Begin your meditation practice with some mindful movements. You may choose to go mindful walking or perhaps do some mindful yoga. This helps to slowly calm your mind so that you’re able to practice some sitting or lying down meditations.

Observe your restlessness without reacting to it. Feel the restlessness in your body. What is your mind telling you to do? Continue to sit despite what the mind says. This is a powerful meditation, a discipline that trains the mind to do what you tell it to do rather than the other way round.

You’re in control. Just because your mind is restless you don’t have to run around like a headless chicken doing what it tells you. The mind can say things like, ‘Oh, I can’t stand this. I need to get up and do something.’ You can watch this show going on in the mind, breathe into it, and guide your attention back to the inhalation and exhalation.

8 tips for coping with boredom during self-isolation: York U Expert

It’s not easy being a student, parent, or caregiver under normal circumstances, let alone during a pandemic. Torontonians have been here before. During the SARS outbreak of 2003, upwards of 23,000 people in the GTA were quarantined. Housebound, they were not allowed visitors or excursions into the community – even asked to restrict dog walks to their backyard.

For many, the combo of isolation and monotony is a hotbed for numerous psychological challenges, including the menace of boredom.

How to Cope with Photography Boredom

Assistant Professor, John Eastwood
Photo by Paola Scattolon Photography

But John Eastwood, an assistant professor in the department of psychology in York University’s Faculty of Health, says there are ways to avoid the scourge of boredom or how to respond well when it strikes.

Here are eight tips to get you started:

1. Don’t panic
Boredom is such an unpleasant feeling, that in laboratory settings, some resort to shocking themselves with electrical current! In real life, overeating is a frequent response as we reach for yet another potato chip. We don’t like feeling bored! But, disagreeable feelings, like boredom, are normal and serve a purpose. Feelings help us meet our needs and keep us oriented towards what matters. For example, anger may signal that we are being taken advantage of, and fear tells us when we are in danger. Boredom tells us when we are at risk of stagnation. So despite being an uncomfortable feeling, we are the better for it. The challenge is to respond wisely.

The big bore, what is it good for? Boredom expert prof. John Eastwood @YorkUHealth @BoredomLab explains the impact boredom can have on our ability to work in a special radio program on Boredom on @BBCSounds https://t.co/qKHF3CY3Cu

2. Accept what you cannot change
You, your children, and other family members in self-isolation or quarantine are likely to experience boredom. Accept it. Don’t get worked up. Boredom doesn’t indicate a character flaw or poor planning – it’s just a part of life, especially life under quarantine. Let yourself feel bored long enough to listen and learn from it.

3. Find another gear
Typically, we’re propped up by routines. We rush to the 6:44 train, marching orders wait in our stuffed inbox, the kids have hockey tonight. All of a sudden, when in quarantine, all that changes. Quite simply, we are used to outsourcing the control of our attention and time. In quarantine, we may come to realize that we’re actually not that good at directing the focus of our attention – perhaps to the point of paralysis. ‘TV now and then laundry, or, tackle the laundry first?’ becomes a momentous decision. Quarantine pushes you out of a reactive gear and invites you to discover a self-determination gear.

4. Understand why you’re feeling bored
Boredom is not an absence of things to do. The bored person knows there’s stuff to do – that’s not the problem. Our smartphone is a virtual portal to the infinite; oh and there’s a lot to do in real life too. The problem is that the bored person desperately wants to be doing something but doesn’t want to do anything that is doable. When bored you can’t muster up an actionable desire or find any value in the available options. So boredom is born of disordered wanting and valuing, not an absence of possibility.

5. Take time to find clarity
Finding clarity about your desires and discovering value in possible activities might require a moment of self-reflection. Take that time. Many people report that some of the most transformative and fulfilling changes in their lives were sparked by a period of change that allowed them to reflect on their goals and values. Try journaling. Reflecting on the value of quarantine itself might help. Research shows that having a good reason for doing something makes it less boring no matter how monotonous. What’s your reason for going into isolation? Find the answer to why – why quarantine or why any activity – and you’ll be less bored.

Bored yet? That could be a good thing: Psychology prof. John Eastwood at #YorkU’s @BoredomLab @YorkUHealth explains why boredom doesn’t have to lead to a productive activity: https://t.co/8QJu6Fwtqn via @CNN

6. Avoid passive entertainment
Early in quarantine, binge-watching Netflix can seem like a great plan. But eventually, you will become restless for something more. In fact, passively consuming entertainment – treating yourself like an empty vessel in need of filling – likely makes you ripe for future boredom. What you most need when bored is the ability to reclaim authorship of your life. Tragically, we often do the precise opposite; again outsourcing a solution. Resist the urge to find the quickest anaesthetic offering remedy without cure – or worst, blunting of the motivation to address the root issue. When bored, the key is to find activities that flow from and give expression to, your passions, creativity and curiosity. And while wrestling with these big questions, you could pause to have a cup of coffee and go for a vigorous walk in nature – simple generic strategies that reduce boredom.

7. Get by with a little help from your friends
An absence of human contact makes isolation and monotony even more unbearable. Research has shown that people are more likely to be bored when alone, compared to when with others. In quarantine direct human contact might be curtailed, and in such circumstances, online connection can help beat back boredom. It’s not all bad on the Internet. But maybe you should give up the Kardashians (they are not actually your friends anyway) and Skype with a real friend you haven’t seen for years. Play an online game with others. If stuck at home with your family, gather around the dining room table for a rousing board game. Social distancing does not have to mean an absence of social connection.

8. Look for the silver lining
Potentially boring situations – that we learn to navigate without becoming bored – are rewarding. Constantly scaffolded by external forces, kept busy by the demands of life, filled up by compelling experiences, it’s possible to become disoriented and lost. Moments of pause create a space to explore who we are and what we value. What’s more, figuring out the answers to such questions can point you towards important – boredom busting – life projects.

What Professor Eastwood’s tips below

We can’t travel these days, but we have the Internet, right? And that means we can embark on a few virtual tours and visit some of the most awesome places in the world and have fun while staying on our couch, at home. Well, it is not the same “fun” you’d have if you actually visited those places, but it will do, for the time being, right?

So, take a break from your remote work tasks and check out these awesome virtual tours from around the world; they will help you cope with the boredom of staying indoors. Are you ready? Let’s see where you can go to these days!

1. You can try the virtual tours of the Cambodian Angkor Wat temple

You can do that at Virtual Angkor website. You will find a couple of virtual tours of the Cambodian historical landmark of Angkor Wat and the surroundings, as well as get a taste of the Cambodian everyday life. You can either go deep into the history of the site, or explore the climate and atmosphere of a typical Khmer village. It will feel like a breath of fresh air after all this #stayathome experience.

2. Don’t forget about NASA virtual museums

Want to learn a little about space and the universe? Then you should check out the NASA virtual tours and museums. For example, the NASA Glenn Research Center lets you select one of the 10 virtual tours which will take you to the Zero-G Facility, the Supersonic Wind Tunnel, the Simulated Lunar Operations Laboratory and so much more. You can check out the 360 videos, images and even see some testing in action.

How to Cope with Photography Boredompixabay

3. Visit the tomb of Queen Meresankh III in Egypt

Queen Meresankh III was the granddaughter of the ancient Egyptian monarch Keops who is known to have commissioned the construction of the Great Pyramid of Giza. Her tomb is 5,000-year-old and can be visited through an immersive virtual tour implemented by Harvard University.

How to Cope with Photography Boredom Wikipedia

4. You shouldn’t miss the Louvre virtual tour also!

This is quite good news, especially if you’ve ever wanted to go to the Louvre, but never got the chance to visit Paris. Now you can learn about Egypt, see the remains of Louvre’s Moat, gaze at the famous Mona Lisa and many more through their virtual tour. You can navigate through the Louvre virtual museum using a quite intuitive mini-map.

How to Cope with Photography Boredom Pixabay

5. Visit Amsterdam, ride a Formula 1, swim with the dolphins and many more!

I have just discovered VIEMIR and I’m sure there are many other such Youtube Channels with immersive 360 videos of experiences worthy of anyone’s bucket list. If you are a thrillseeker, then this might be one of the best solutions for you, so far.

6. Tune in to Georgia Aquarium’s live webcam!

The Georgia Aquarium in Atlanta is famous for the cute little puffins and they made sure you can still follow the adorable puffins with the help of an underwater webcam. And you should because it’s cuteness overload!

How to Cope with Photography Boredom Ray Hennessy/Unsplash

7. The National Museum of Computing has opened his virtual doors

The National Museum of Computing in the United Kingdom is home to the largest collection of working historic computers in the world. They have opened their “virtual doors” for a virtual tour through the history of computers. So, what an experience to watch old, big, chunky computers from your sleek, modern device!