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How to feed guinea pigs vitamin c

Providing a Good Cavy Diet

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How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is of utmost importance to guinea pigs, as they are unable to manufacture their own (much like humans). Without enough vitamin C in their diets, guinea pigs can become very ill with scurvy.   The amount of vitamin C required varies somewhat depending on the reference source used, but most guinea pigs probably need about 10–30 mg/day. Pregnant, nursing, young, and ill guinea pigs need more.

  • If you feed a good selection of vegetables high in vitamin C along with a good, fresh guinea pig pellet, you can probably meet the vitamin C needs of the average guinea pig.
  • Many guinea pig pellets have vitamin C added but, unfortunately, vitamin C is quite unstable and will degrade over time. Keeping the pellets in a cool dark place helps preserve the vitamin C. You can also get pellets with a stabilized form of vitamin C.
  • The best way to supplement with additional vitamin C is to use vitamin C tablets.   You can buy vitamin C tablets specifically for guinea pigs (e.g. Oxbow’s GTN-50C) or human chewable 100 mg tablets (note: make sure you are getting just vitamin C rather than a multivitamin formula). A quarter of a 100 mg tablet daily is a recommended dose for most adult guinea pigs. The guinea pig tablets are 50 mg, but since vitamin C is a water-soluble vitamin, small excesses over that daily requirement are easily excreted. Many guinea pigs will take the tablets like a treat and eat them, or they can be crushed and sprinkled on vegetables or pellets.
  • Vitamin C can be added to the water, but there are problems with this method. The vitamin C quickly loses its potency in water (a fresh supply must be made at least daily, if not twice). Also, guinea pigs may refuse or reduce their consumption of water with added vitamin C due to the taste, and this may lead to other health problems. It is also very hard to know if your guinea pigs are getting enough vitamin C using this method of supplementation. Feeding a variety of fresh veggies high in vitamin C and/or supplementing directly with tablet forms of vitamin C are better options.

Pellets

Commercial guinea pig pellets should be fed daily. Most guinea pigs will not overeat (usually eat about 1/8 cup per day) but the number of pellets may need to be restricted if a guinea pig becomes obese. Choose a good quality pellet designed for guinea pigs.   Since the vitamin C in pellets also loses its potency over time, look for pellets that use a stabilized form of vitamin C or at least one with a “use before” date ensure freshness, buy in small quantities, and store in a cool dark place.

For growing guinea pigs, alfalfa-based pellets are fine, but for adults, it may be better to search out a Timothy hay-based pellet. A couple of excellent Timothy-based diets include Oxbow Hay’s Cavy Cuisine and KM Hayloft’s Timothy’s Choice.

When choosing a guinea pig diet or pellet, avoid those with nuts or seeds, dried fruits, corn products, animal by-products, beet pulp, or other fillers. Also watch for high sugar content (sucrose, fructose, corn syrup, etc.) and foods with lots of preservative or added chemicals. The Guinea Lynx site has a great article on selecting good quality pellets.

Hay should be a staple in the diet and a fresh supply available at all times.   Grass hays such as Timothy hay or orchard grass are the best for adult guinea pigs. Alfalfa is richer and higher in calcium and is a good supplement for growing guinea pigs as well as pregnant or nursing guinea pigs, but is not a good staple for most adult guinea pigs.

Fresh Vegetables and Fruit

In addition to the hay and pellets, a variety of fresh vegetables (especially leafy greens) and some fruits should be offered daily. Leafy greens should make up the bulk of the vegetable supplementation.   Fruits and other vegetables can be offered in small quantities. Avoid iceberg (head lettuce) as it has very little nutritional value. Good choices include kale, spinach, turnip greens, parsley, romaine lettuce, and dandelion greens. Avoid or limit cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, collards, bok choy, and other cruciferous vegetables as they can lead to gas production in the digestive tract. Also, avoid starchy vegetables such as potatoes. Carrots, carrot tops, green and red bell peppers, apple, apricots, bananas, blueberries, cantaloupe, grapes, oranges, strawberries, and tomatoes can also be fed. If you have a guaranteed pesticide-free source, grass, dandelions, clover, and chickweed can also be offered, especially new growth which is tender and the most nutritious.

Any greens, vegetables, or fruits should be introduced gradually or a digestive upset may result.

1.how often do i feed them the fruit and vegetables??

2.how much do i need to feed them??

3.what is the best things to feed them??

i was only going to give them an orange like 1 or 2 times a week not as an everyday thing

11 Answers

1. You need to feed him each day, or 2-3 times a week. However you want it

2. Veggies- One cup each day

Fruits- About half of an apple, half of any fruit that they can eat. Search the web before feeding him

3. These are safe fruits, I think apples are best

– Orange (caution – sores around lips can develop)

– Tangerine / Mandarin (caution – sores around lips can develop)

– Grapefruit (caution – sores around lips can develop)

– Lemon, Lime (home-grown best, otherwise feed cautiously)

– Currants – yellow, red or black (leaves also edible)

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

2 – Not much. For one pig, fill up about a quarter to a dinner plate.

3 – Keep the hay ready 24/7; they should never be without.

Don’t bother with the pellets. People like them because they’re cheap and easy to feed, but if you do the research, you find out that they’re filling & fattening, but contain very little nutritional value beyond stabilized vitamin C, which you can get from vegetables alone.

Feed them a mix of leafy greens and solid vegetables. A wide variety is best.

Romaine, red leaf, or green leaf lettuce

Kale (surprisingly good amount of vitamin C)

Collard greens (some vitamin C, not much)

Dandelion greens (fair amount of vitamin C)

Some people like to add cilantro and parsley to this list; I prefer to avoid them because of their high calcium content.

Beets (raw, cut them up)

Carrot pieces (sparingly)

Bell peppers (slice them up; fantastic source of vitamin C).

Small tomatoes (slice them up)

Some people add in a bit of broccoli; I avoid this because I’ve had two cavies that got gassy after eating broccoli.

Occassionally, you can give them an ear of corn, husks, silks and all for a large meal. I’ve watched my 4 cavies tear it all up, methodically working together to strip it all down to the cob.

I originally gave them fruits as well, but they seemed to like their veggies more, so I stopped giving them fruit.

1- 2 mugs twice a day, but i just get 4 big broccoli florets, for each or my piggies, then 2 sayoy cabbage leaves each and one carrot each per day. once a week i give them a bit of apple and 1 strawberry each every other day, every now and then they have a grape and sometimes cranberries for a vitamin boost!

2- feed the guinea pig muesli or nuggets, lots of veggies, lots of timothy/meadow hay, constant supply of he stuff.

3- best things to feed them are stuff high in nutrients, vitamins and minerals like lots of veggies and the normal guinea pig diet with treats from pet shops.

i hope i helped

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

1, a little everyday (about 1 tablespoon per guinea pig) but take away what they don’t eat after 24 hours

2, a small handfull of guineapig food per guinea per day (good quality hay must always be available 24/7 for them to eat)

3, guinea pig nuggets is much better than the mix as it will contain pro c and also means the guinea will not be able to only eat the best bits and leave out the other bits. you can also get some pro c or pro biotic powder to add to the water daily to ensure they get sufficiant vitamin c in their diet.

1) Daily. Vit C is water soluble (so it is excreted) so it must be consumed in their diet every day. I prefer to split their veggies into two meals (morning and afternoon).

To clarify – guinea pigs need vegetables every day.

Fruit should be limited to no more than twice per week (because of the high sugar content).

2) Guinea pigs need a variety of fresh veggies daily – at least one cup of veggies per pig per day.

3) There is no “best” type of fruit or veg – they need a variety. Most guinea pigs love leafy stuff like lettuce (Not iceburg), cilantro and parsley. Bell pepper is very good for vit C.

Aside from the fruit and veg – the best dry food for guinea pigs is a quality pellet food (not a mix). The ONLY decent ones are Oxbow and Kleenmama’s. They also do the best hay in my opinion.

Hope this helps!

hi, nutrition C is of severe magnitude to guinea pigs, as they’re no longer able to fabricate their very own (very like people). with out adequate nutrition C of their diets, guinea pigs can grow to be very sick with scurvy. the quantity of nutrition C required varies fairly reckoning on the reference source used, yet maximum guinea pigs in all probability choose approximately 10-30 mg/day. Pregnant, nursing, youthful and sick guinea pigs choose extra. in case you feed a stable decision of vegetables severe in nutrition C alongside with a stable, sparkling guinea pig pellet, you could in all probability meet the nutrition C desires of the uncomplicated guinea pig. Many guinea pig pellets have nutrition C added yet regrettably nutrition C is extremely volatile and could degrade over the years. preserving the pellets in a cool dark place facilitates shield the nutrition C.the terrific thank you to complement with added nutrition C is to apply nutrition C pills. you should purchase nutrition C pills particularly for guinea pigs. Ask your vet approximately it, or feed him extremely some vegetables. maximum vegetables incorporate nutrition C, an orange for a fact has the main volume of nutrition C, Emily.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

oranges are definitely a good source of vitamin c, and other fruits.

feed them fruits and veggies once a day, and your guinea pig will grow strong and healthy.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Problems associated with inadequate vitamin C

Since guinea pigs are unable to produce their own vitamin C, it’s important that they get it in their diet! Guinea pigs deficient in vitamin C may have:

  • Poor hair coat
  • Swellings or sores around the mouth/lips
  • Delayed wound healing
  • Poor appetite
  • Lethargy
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty moving or enlarged joints

The average guinea pig needs between 10 and 30 mg/kg daily for good health. A guinea pig who is currently deficient in vitamin C can receive up to 50 mg/kg/day. It is wise to routinely provide extra vitamin C to an ill guinea pig. Excess vitamin C is excreted through the urine and not absorbed by the body. Long-term supplementation of over 100 mg per day should be discussed with your veterinarian.

How should I provide vitamin C?

  • Formulated pellets
  • Fresh veggies and fruit
  • Over-the-counter Vitamin C supplements/chewable tablets

Premium guinea pig pellets, such as those produced by Oxbow, are fortified with good amounts of vitamin C. However, the vitamins degrade with time, which is why you should try to feed an entire bag of guinea pig pellets within 90 days of opening it.

Chewable flavored C tablets are available in 100 mg sizes, which can be quartered into 25 mg pieces and fed directly to your guinea pig. Some people have good luck with liquid vitamin C, which can be found at some health food stores. Avoid multi-vitamin supplements and do not add vitamin C to the water.

Tips for getting your piggy to take a chewable vitamin C tablet:

  • Break the tablet in half to release the aroma. Leave the tablet so your guinea pig gets the idea that it is something he should try or offer to your guinea pig by holding the broken tablet in your hand.
  • Break up the tablet or crush the tablet and roll in a piece of romaine lettuce.
  • Cut a groove in an apple, grape or carrot and slide the tablet through the juice.
  • Add a crushed tablet to 1 tablespoon of water and immediately syringe feed.

Below is a table with vitamin C content of selected fruits and vegetables, which you can use as a guide for selecting appropriate foods for your guinea pig.

Vitamin C content of selected foods and their appropriateness for guinea pig diets

Weight or
Volume of Food

Vitamin C in weight or
volume of food

Amount needed to
provide 25mg/day

Blue = excellent choice for supplementing guinea pig diet
Green = good choice for supplementing guinea pig diet
Orange = fair choice for supplementing guinea pig diet
Maroon = poor choice for supplementing guinea pig diet

Like humans and other mammals, guinea pigs need vitamin C to keep their bodies functioning properly. Also like humans, but unlike other rodents and other animals, guinea pigs are unable to produce their own supplies of vitamin C. This means that they must get 100% of their requirements from the food and supplements you feed them.

Problems Caused by Vitamin C Deficiency

When guinea pigs don’t have enough vitamin C in their diets, it can lead to a number of diseases and ailments:

Scurvy – This can cause your pets to become lethargic and depressed, and also exhibits symptoms including open wounds and loss of teeth.

Bone deformities – Similar to rickets in humans, this makes your guinea pigs’ bones weak and twisted. This can make it difficult for them to move about, and can increase the chances of them breaking a limb.

Immune system problems – Vitamin C deficiency causes a general weakening of the immune system, leaving your cavy exposed to catching other, more common diseases. This also makes it more difficult for your pets to fight off and recover from diseases.

Vitamin C Requirements

Guinea pigs require roughly 10-20mg of vitamin C per kilogram of body weight per day. A typical adult male weighs around 1.2kg, with a female weighing around 1kg, giving average daily requirements of roughly 18mg and 15mg respectively. You should adjust vitamin C amounts for younger, growing guinea pigs according to their weight.

Pregnant sows require roughly double this amount, to take into account the fact that they are also providing nutrients to as many as 6 babies.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin CGuinea pigs cannot produce their own vitamin C, so you need to provide them with plenty of foods which contain it. Image by acrossthesea.

Remember that this is not an exact science, and don’t worry about trying to calculate exactly how much vitamin C you are feeding your guinea pigs. Just give them a varied diet containing plenty of foods rich in vitamin C and you will be meeting their needs perfectly.

Fresh Vegetables and Fruit

These are the best sources of vitamin C, and also contain many other essential nutrients to help keep your cavies fit and healthy. Particular favourites are bell peppers, Romaine (cos) lettuce, and dandelion leaves, but it’s best to include a range of fruit and vegetables in their diet on a daily basis.

Dry Food

Dried foods such as pellets or food mix also contain a certain amount of vitamin C. This is typically much lower than what you’d find in fresh foods, but many guinea pig foods have added vitamin C to make up for this. Together with vegetables and fruit, this will provide your guinea pigs with most, if not all, of their daily vitamin C requirements.

Vitamin C Supplements

If your pets still aren’t getting enough vitamin C, you can top up their intake using supplements. These typically come in 2 forms – tablets, and supplements that you dissolve in their water.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin CVitamin C supplements are available in tablet (left) or water-soluble (right) form. Tablets are superior and should be used wherever possible.

Tablets are considered better because you can make sure they are eaten by the right animal. Where possible, buy the chewy type, as guinea pigs seem to love the taste, and will happily eat them up.

Water-soluble supplements aren’t as effective as tablets because vitamin C quickly degrades in light and water, meaning that your pets will get very little value from them. They can also make the water taste funny, which can put your pets off drinking it, potentially leading to other serious health issues.

Multivitamins

It’s worth quickly mentioning multivitamins for guinea pigs. There are a few of these available on the market, but they can do more harm than good. While your cavies may need a vitamin C supplement, they usually do not have any trouble getting their other vitamins from a healthy diet. Multivitamins can lead to excessive levels of these other vitamins, which can cause health problems.

By taking care with their diet, it is not difficult to meet your guinea pigs’ vitamin C needs. The best advice is to give them a varied diet with plenty of fresh vegetables, and the rest will usually take care of itself.

Guinea pigs were domesticated in 5000 BC by the Incas [source]

Categories: Guinea Pig Health, Tips for a Happy Cavy
Tags: Hammy
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How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

As many guinea pig caretakers already know, there’s much more to caring for your guinea pig than cage cleaning and cuddle time. Along with the cuddles and cleaning, healthy guinea pigs require a regular health-care routine that includes weekly weigh-ins, sight-and-touch “physicals,” ear cleanings, nail trimmings, daily floor times, and, of course, daily doses of Vitamin C.

Like Humans, guinea pigs are not able to produce Vitamin C on their own, and so they must be given a Vitamin C supplement each day.

While your guinea pig can get much of its daily Vitamin C requirement through a diet of high quality hay and pellets, the exact amount of dietary Vitamin C that your guinea pig will absorb cannot be known. Therefore, it never hurts to supplement its diet with a dose of Vitamin C each day.

Like Humans, guinea pigs are not able to produce vitamin C on their own and so they must be given a vitamin C supplement each day.

While your guinea pig can get much of his or her daily vitamin C requirement through a diet of high quality hay and pellets, the exact amount of dietary vitamin C that your guinea pig will absorb cannot be known. Therefore, it never hurts to supplement a your guinea pig’s diet with a dose of vitamin C each day.

The Importance of Vitamin C

In fact, providing daily doses of vitamin C each day is one of the most important things you can do to ensure that your guinea pigs stays happy, healthy, and strong. This is because vitamin C helps guinea pigs maintain and develop healthy bones, blood vessels, and connective tissues while promoting the development and strength of many other vital health functions.

Vitamin C is so important for your guinea pig that a Vitamin C deficiency can result in a myriad of health problems, such as: weakness, lethargy (laziness), diarrhea, and even internal hemorrhage. Yikes!

The Question

OK, so guinea pigs need Vitamin C.

But what’s an easy way to give your guinea pig its daily required dose? And what type of Vitamin C supplement should you use?

An Easy Way to Give Your Guinea Pig Vitamin C

In our opinion, the best way to supplement your guinea pig’s diet is to prepare a daily treat by applying a small amount of Vitamin C powder to a favorite watery snack.

Happy Cavy uses Swanson Brand 100% Pure Vitamin C Powder. A 16oz container of it will last you quite a long time. Jump here for the link!

Happy Cavy uses Swanson Brand 100% Pure Vitamin C Powder. A 16oz container of it will last you quite a long time. Jump here for the link!

The Happy Cavy sisters get their Vitamin C supplement each day during floor time. A Human will thinly slice several pieces of cucumber and apply a small amount of crystallized Vitamin C powder onto the slices. Vitamin C powder can be quite sour, and cutting the cucumber into small, super-thin slices means that there isn’t a lot of time for the pigs to notice the sour – they just get so excited to have a piece of yummy cucumber each day!

By now, we have grown accustomed to our daily sour treat and we scream our little heads off to get it!

Don’t be a silly Human! Avoid using vitamin C water drops to supplement your cavy’s diet!

When using water drops, you are not able to adequately judge the vitamin C dose that each guinea pig receives. Also, vitamin C is not water stable, meaning it will mostly likely break down before your guinea pig has a chance to ingest it.

Almost forget! There’s a How To Video that goes along with Hammy’s Vitamin C post! Enjoy 😀 http://t.co/Jqs6uoRM

How Much Vitamin C Powder Should I Use

Guinea pigs should get 10 to 30 milligrams of Vitamin C each day. This is a relatively small amount, so the Humans aren’t too keen on exactly measuring the powder doses. (Guinea pigs can tolerate a generous amount of vitamin C. But keep the portion very SMALL, as too much vitamin can give your guinea pigs the runs…and we’re not talking about laps around the cage.)

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

When applying Vitamin C onto the cucumber slices, the Humans use a butter knife to portion a small amount of powder, just enough to cover the tip of the knife. The Vitamin C is then spread over the top of each cucumber piece, making sure the power dissolves into the vegetable as thoroughly as possible. Once it is worked into the cucumber pieces, they are promptly fed to a gaggle of wheeking Happy Cavy guinea pigs.

The Humans find that vegetables high in water content work best for administrating Vitamin C in this way. The high water content helps quickly dissolve the powder, plus the Happy Cavies love them cucumber snacks. Other vegetables that work well are tomato, bell pepper, and nearly any type of fruit.

An additional note: Because the powder can taste sour, feed a small snack to your guinea pig after giving the Vitamin C treat. This will help to prevent the powder from irritating your cavy’s mouth.

Share Your Thoughts

How do you give your guinea pigs vitamin C? What kind of vitamin C supplement do you use?

We’d love to hear what you have to say!

About HappyCavy

HappyCavy is the Internet’s only 4-webcam broadcast inside the lives of a female guinea pig herd from Portland, Oregon.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Guinea Pigs loves to eat in fact they live to eat. The daily cycle of a Guinea pig includes Eat, poop, sleep, and repeat. As they are herbivores, their diet should include high-quality plant-like Hay. They need to have food in their digestive system constantly to avoid health problems like Diarrhea.

Now, This task of giving them healthy food can be tough sometimes so here we are to make it simple for all guinea pig owners.

Guinea Pig Diet: Daily Requirement

The basic daily dietary requirements of cavies consist of –

  • Hay (70-75%)
  • Pellets (20-25%)
  • Water

1. Hay

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Hay prevents obesity, dental disease, diarrhea and boredom in guinea pigs that’s why it is a vital part of their diet. It also provides fiber which helps guinea pigs to properly digest.

Types of Hay:

  • Timothy Hay
  • Botanical Hay
  • Oat Hay
  • Orchard Grass Hay
  • Clover and Alfalfa Hays

Dosage

You can give them an unlimited amount and different varieties of grass hay. But, you have to choose high-quality Hay. That means it should be green with pliable stalks and free from foreign particles and fragrant.

Note: Avoid alfalfa hay because it is mainly fed to young guinea pigs who are under the age of 4 months or nursing cavies. Alfalfa has a high amount of calcium that’s why it’s not good for a healthy adult cavy. So opt for timothy or orchard grass hay.

2. Pellets

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Pellets (comprised of hay) contain vitamins A, B-12, C, D & E as well as the minerals phosphorus, Niacin, Selenium, and Biotin.

How to choose the best quality pellets?

  • Avoid pellets that have nuts and seeds in it.
  • Choose those pellets which have been veterinarian-tested and approved.
  • Alfalfa based pellets are best suited for young cavies as they are high in calcium, fat, and sugar.
  • Timothy hay pellets are suitable for all cavies.

Dosage

1/4 – 1/8 cup per day is recommended to prevent obesity. Timothy hay can be given unlimited.

NOTE: Pellets are less important than hay! High-quality grass hay is a must for overall guinea pig health.

3. Water

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Fresh and filtered (not distilled) water must be available in a water bottle for them especially during summers, as guinea pigs are vulnerable to heatstroke. Give them at least 5 ounces of water daily.

Note: Don’t forget to empty, clean and re-fill the water bottle daily to avoid health problems.

Guinea Pig Diet: Vegetables and Fruits

Vegetables and fruits are less important for guinea pigs daily diet.

Veggies

Fresh vegetables can be given once a day. Leafy vegetables like lettuce, spinach, kale, romaine or parsley.

Dosage

1 cup (240ml) max of veggies to each adult per day. Also, you don’t have to necessarily give them a whole cup of veggies. You should limit the intake of veggies as some foods contain a high amount of calcium and can lead to bladder stones.

Fruits

Fruits can be offered occasionally as treats several times a week or fewer than vegetables. Wash all fruits before serving them.

Dosage

Small bite-sized portions daily or big portions once in a week due to the high amount of sugar.

General Tip: Always include new vegetables or fruits gradually in their diet to avoid bowl problems. If your piggy develops loose stool, lower the number of veggies.

Guinea Pig Diet Chart:

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Guinea Pig Diet: Commercial Treats

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

These treats are just extras for your piggy. We won’t recommend them because your cavy would be perfectly happy with the high quality of hay, pellets, veggies & fruits. Treats usually contain artificial sweeteners which makes them not so good options. So offer them treats very occasionally and not instead of basic foods.

Overall Health of Guinea Pigs

Your guinea pig can develop health problems due to nutritional or digestive issues. Visit the vet if you notice these problems in your cavy:

  • Irregular eating & drinking
  • Blood in urine
  • Sitting still or hunched
  • Sore feet
  • Overgrown teeth or drooling
  • Bald patches or excessive hair fall

Always remember prevention is better than cure. So keep your cavies healthy.

Wrapping Up

Always check if your guinea pig has left some food in the bowl or not. If yes, then you need to give them less of it and remove uneaten food. Pellets should be given in adequate quantity so that it doesn’t get wasted as stale pellets have very little vitamin C. And remember to clean their food bowl and water bottle regularly.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

By Natalie Riggs on November 30, 2019
Tagged with: nutrition

Do guinea pigs need vitamin C? Absolutely, yes! One of the main differences between a guinea pig and rabbit’s dietary needs is the addition of vitamin C. Guinea pigs and primates, like us, are unable to make their own vitamin C. Because their bodies can’t synthesize or store it, they need to receive around 10-30 mg per day through their diet. Guinea pigs that don’t get enough vitamin C are at risk for scurvy, even when deprived for as little as two weeks.

Symptoms of Vitamin C Deficiency

Vitamin C deficiency can lead to fragile blood vessels, causing tissues to hemorrhage in the mouth, skin, muscles, and internal organ surfaces. Being deprived of this essential vitamin causes abnormal cartilage and bone formation, enlarged adrenal glands, and painful swelling of limb joints. Guinea pigs may hop like bunnies rather than walking normally, or be hesitant to move at all. Scurvy can also involve tooth problems, leading to difficulty eating. A guinea pig with scurvy will generally look unwell, with poor body condition, a dull and rough coat, and sunken eyes. They may seem listless or depressed, lose weight, and show signs of pain or tenderness when touched.

Complications from Scurvy

You can treat and reverse scurvy if it is caught early enough. The longer a guinea pig is deprived of vitamin C, however, the more likely they are to develop complications. One possibility is permanent arthritis. If the guinea pig still suffers from stiffness and lameness after treatment, a vegan glucosamine supplement can help sooth ongoing arthritis.

Another possible consequence of prolonged deficiency is ongoing tooth problems. Scurvy can impact the anchoring of teeth in their bony sockets. Once a guinea pig needs dental work, you run the risk that trips to the dentist will be come a regular date every few months or even weeks. The relationship between scurvy and dental woes can go both ways. A guinea pig with overgrown molars, elongated roots, or dental abscesses will eat increasingly less, potentially not getting adequate nutrition.

Supplementing Vitamin C

Most guinea pigs need around 25 mg per day of vitamin C. In normal circumstances, they will get all they need from a high-quality pellet with stabilized vitamin C and a cup of fresh greens every day. Those being treated for scurvy, or recovering from illness, injury, or surgery can benefit from a supplement. Giving at least 25 mg twice daily should resolve most symptoms of vitamin C deficiency in a week or so. Guinea pigs that have suffered from scurvy in the past should have their vitamin C intake monitored closely, adding a supplement if necessary.

Drops for the water aren’t a recommended method for supplementing vitamin C. (And that’s not what our Vita-Drops are. they’re not meant to be an orangy mai-tai with an umbrella treat.) Vitamin C will degrade quickly in the water; the next day it’ll already be less than half as potent. In addition to being an unreliable way to dose, adding anything to the drinking water can change the taste. We don’t recommend adding vita-drops to water. this could cause them not to drink as much as they should. The drops can and should be given via syringe.

A children’s chewable tablet works well, too. If using a human formula, try to find a vegan one without a lot of added sugar or sweeteners like xylitol, artificial colors and flavors, or hard-to-pronounce preservatives. Never give a multivitamin to guinea pigs. Vitamin C in excess will safely exit the body through the urine, but too much of other vitamins and minerals can make your guinea pig sick. Again, 25 mg once daily is enough for most guinea pigs, but those with scurvy will need higher doses more often until they have recovered.

Pseudo-Scurvy

Giving a little bit too much vitamin C isn’t a big deal. What the body can’t use will be flushed out in the urine. But giving large amounts of vitamin C over time has been associated with everything from arthritis to bladder stones. Giving a guinea pig high doses of vitamin C, such as 300 mg daily rather than 30 mg, puts them at risk for developing pseudo-scurvy.

If the guinea pig becomes used to the supplement and then it is no longer given, they can develop symptoms just like scurvy, even if fed a normal, nutritionally complete diet. This happens because the normal mechanism in the guinea pig for absorbing vitamin C has been manipulated. The guinea pig no longer has the ability to absorb enough when it is offered in normal amounts. Luckily, pseudo-scurvy is easily avoided and the condition is usually temporary.

Preventing Vitamin C Deficiency

A proper diet is all that is needed to meet the daily vitamin C requirement for most guinea pigs. Unlimited grass hay is the majority of what they should be eating, but a high-quality pellet with stabilized vitamin C is an easy way to guarantee your guinea pig is getting a balanced diet. Just an 1/8 cup per guinea pig should do the trick, although most won’t overeat as long as hay is always available.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Pellets are a lifesaver for the guinea pig that won’t try veggies. (Side tip: guinea pigs who live with others almost always jump on the veg bandwagon eventually). The addition of vitamin C is the main difference between guinea pig and rabbit pellets. Temperature and humidity can impact the vitamin C in pellets, so proper storage is important. Stabilized C is less likely to break down, meaning these pellets will retain their nutritional value longer.

Fresh veggies are a fun way to add variety to the diet and make sure your guinea pig is getting all the vitamin C she needs. All veggies aren’t created equal. Bell peppers are a great everyday food for guinea pigs. Rotate colors to switch things up. A few slices is all they need. Bell peppers are packed with vitamin C, but still low in calcium, sugar, and acid.

Some fruits and veggies high in vitamin C come with a catch. Parsley, for example, is too high in calcium to feed daily or in large amounts. Luckily, just spring or two packs a big punch for team C. Oranges are juicing their vitamin C reputation for all it’s worth, but are a bit too high in sugar as well as acid to compete with bell peppers. Oranges, like most fruits, are best reserved for treats every now and then.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Vitamin C is necessary for a healthy guinea pig. Growing guinea pigs, weak or recovering guinea pigs, and those that are picky eaters are most at risk for a deficiency. The symptoms can be fully cured if caught early. An easy-to-dose supplement is a recommended addition to every guinea pig first aid kit.

Interested in learning more about guinea pigs? Check out these blogs! ⬇️⬇️⬇️

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Is it possible to feed your guinea pig asparagus? Can Guinea Pigs Eat Asparagus? Surely feeding your guinea pig anything besides their common food is fine. Just as long as it is whole like fruits and vegetables. To be quick about it, feeding your guinea pig asparagus is totally fine.

But I’m sure you’ve heard of the phrase. Never bite off more than one can chew. This means there’s more to just feeding guinea pigs asparagus than you think.

Asparagus contains no toxic compounds that could harm your pet. It is rich in healthy nutrients such as vitamins, potassium, fiber, and minerals. So it’s only healthy that your guinea pig eats asparagus.

But the real question is – how to get read to feed asparagus to guinea pigs?

Table of Contents

Is Asparagus Safe for Guinea Pigs?

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Your guinea pig’s diet contains balanced and nutritious meals. Adding asparagus into the mix is not only safe but favored by many health professionals. It gives your guinea pig a boost of healthy nutrients.

Such as fiber content which a guinea pig needs for digestion. Asparagus is high in water content and it has fewer calories. So it won’t contribute to weight gain, obesity or thyroid dysfunction.

Asparagus also contains vitamin K. Vitamin K leads to stronger bones and muscles for aging guinea pigs. Also perfect for an overenthusiastic and active guinea pig.

The potassium and other minerals in asparagus give a good dose of nutrition. Potassium is good for immunity and overall well-being.

Vitamin A and C which is also abundant in guinea pigs is good. It maintains skin health and prevents blood clotting in guinea pigs. Vitamin C is a common immune-booster compound for guinea pigs. It also aids in the prevention of serious diseases and infections.

If your guinea pig falls sick very often, it may be because of a lack of vitamin C in the body. So it’s better to include more immune-boosting veggies like asparagus once or twice a week.

Now, let’s talk about taste. Asparagus has a crunchy and fleshy texture. Because it’s 94% water, it can be a filling and satisfying veggie choice for your guinea pig. And there’s a slim chance that your pet might not like it.

This begs the following question.

How Much Asparagus Can A Guinea Pig Eat?

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

If you have a guinea pig, you already know that Moderation is Key. Unless it’s lettuce, bell peppers, cucumbers, and zucchini. These veggies a guinea pig can eat more regularly than other veggies. Such as asparagus, green beans, kale, parsley, etc.

A good way to mix all of the veggies together is with the help of a slicer. You can slice the vegetables in different shapes and sizes. It makes a guinea pig’s diet more interesting and versatile. So you know how to maintain a less boring and more exciting diet plan for your pet.

Now, feeding asparagus once or maybe twice a week is more fitting. And each time feed your pet a quarter of a cup of asparagus. Perhaps even less if you’re incorporating other veggies too.

Make sure the asparagus is clean and freshly-cut. Stale or refrigerated asparagus may upset your guinea pig’s stomach or cause nausea. So it’s best to use fresh veggies only.

What Happens with Too Much Asparagus?

There’s nothing to be worried about when it comes to serving asparagus. But feeding too much asparagus to your pet pig may have consequences.

6 Golden Rules of Guinea Pig Care

#1. Too much oxalic acid

Asparagus contains traces of oxalic acid. Excessive consumption of this can cause bladder or kidney stones in pets. Oxalates lead to a production of calcium stones in the kidney or bladder. It’s painful, uncomfortable, and can lead to urinary infections. More severe and untreatable cases may lead to death, even.

Not to alarm you but it’s best to refrain from overfeeding asparagus to your pet. Just stick to the prescribed serving above and your pet will be fine.

#2. Indigestion

If your guinea pig is sensitive to certain types of food, do a test run. Feed only a bite or two of asparagus and wait for 24 hours. If your guinea pig seems uncomfortable, it may be because of an upset tummy.

It’s not uncommon that certain fruits and veggies cause gas in guinea pigs. Because guinea pigs have a unique digestive tract. It’s only natural that human food may cause an unadaptable digestive condition. All the more reason to feed asparagus only once or twice in a week/month.

Cooked asparagus can cause this more than uncooked. Guinea pigs can’t digest cooked food properly. It often leads to constipation, diarrhea, or vomiting.

#3. Pesticides

Even the slightest trace of pesticides on asparagus can cause trouble. So make sure everything is washed including the bowl you serve the food in. To completely eliminate the risk of food poisoning, opt for organically-grown veggies.

Organically-grown vegetables use no harsh chemicals including pesticides. It’s the safest option out there to feed a tiny guinea pig at home.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Final Thoughts – Can Guinea Pigs Eat Asparagus

See this wasn’t so hard, was it? The simple answer to – Can guinea pigs eat asparagus? – is yes! But it’s not a short answer. You have to be careful about how and when you feed your guinea pig asparagus. Also, in what way so that you eliminate an upset stomach or food poisoning.

Guinea pigs have a sensitive tummy. So they require a consistent diet of fresh fruits and veggies. Asparagus is one of them as it contains vitamins, fiber, and potassium. But too much of anything is bad for anyone, let alone a guinea pig.

Get to the bottom of the essential asparagus feeding guide for guinea pigs. Understand the right method and time for feeding. And how to avoid any regrettable mistakes that may cause your guinea pig pain or discomfort.

Feed a Guinea Pig

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Avoid Overfeeding Your Guinea Pig

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Make Guinea Pig Treats

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Make Guinea Pig Food

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Get Your Guinea Pig to Eat a Treat Out of Your Hand

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Make Emergency Guinea Pig Food

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Change a Guinea Pig’s Diet

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Give Your Guinea Pig Treats

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Separate a Guinea Pig for Feeding

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Make Guinea Pig Granola Bars

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Feed a Guinea Pig a Well Balanced Meal

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Choose Guinea Pig Food

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Make a Guinea Pig Circle for Its Food

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Give Your Guinea Pig a Good, Healthy Diet

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How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

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How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

By Natalie Riggs on November 30, 2019
Tagged with: nutrition

Do guinea pigs need vitamin C? Absolutely, yes! One of the main differences between a guinea pig and rabbit’s dietary needs is the addition of vitamin C. Guinea pigs and primates, like us, are unable to make their own vitamin C. Because their bodies can’t synthesize or store it, they need to receive around 10-30 mg per day through their diet. Guinea pigs that don’t get enough vitamin C are at risk for scurvy, even when deprived for as little as two weeks.

Symptoms of Vitamin C Deficiency

Vitamin C deficiency can lead to fragile blood vessels, causing tissues to hemorrhage in the mouth, skin, muscles, and internal organ surfaces. Being deprived of this essential vitamin causes abnormal cartilage and bone formation, enlarged adrenal glands, and painful swelling of limb joints. Guinea pigs may hop like bunnies rather than walking normally, or be hesitant to move at all. Scurvy can also involve tooth problems, leading to difficulty eating. A guinea pig with scurvy will generally look unwell, with poor body condition, a dull and rough coat, and sunken eyes. They may seem listless or depressed, lose weight, and show signs of pain or tenderness when touched.

Complications from Scurvy

You can treat and reverse scurvy if it is caught early enough. The longer a guinea pig is deprived of vitamin C, however, the more likely they are to develop complications. One possibility is permanent arthritis. If the guinea pig still suffers from stiffness and lameness after treatment, a vegan glucosamine supplement can help sooth ongoing arthritis.

Another possible consequence of prolonged deficiency is ongoing tooth problems. Scurvy can impact the anchoring of teeth in their bony sockets. Once a guinea pig needs dental work, you run the risk that trips to the dentist will be come a regular date every few months or even weeks. The relationship between scurvy and dental woes can go both ways. A guinea pig with overgrown molars, elongated roots, or dental abscesses will eat increasingly less, potentially not getting adequate nutrition.

Supplementing Vitamin C

Most guinea pigs need around 25 mg per day of vitamin C. In normal circumstances, they will get all they need from a high-quality pellet with stabilized vitamin C and a cup of fresh greens every day. Those being treated for scurvy, or recovering from illness, injury, or surgery can benefit from a supplement. Giving at least 25 mg twice daily should resolve most symptoms of vitamin C deficiency in a week or so. Guinea pigs that have suffered from scurvy in the past should have their vitamin C intake monitored closely, adding a supplement if necessary.

Drops for the water aren’t a recommended method for supplementing vitamin C. (And that’s not what our Vita-Drops are. they’re not meant to be an orangy mai-tai with an umbrella treat.) Vitamin C will degrade quickly in the water; the next day it’ll already be less than half as potent. In addition to being an unreliable way to dose, adding anything to the drinking water can change the taste. We don’t recommend adding vita-drops to water. this could cause them not to drink as much as they should. The drops can and should be given via syringe.

A children’s chewable tablet works well, too. If using a human formula, try to find a vegan one without a lot of added sugar or sweeteners like xylitol, artificial colors and flavors, or hard-to-pronounce preservatives. Never give a multivitamin to guinea pigs. Vitamin C in excess will safely exit the body through the urine, but too much of other vitamins and minerals can make your guinea pig sick. Again, 25 mg once daily is enough for most guinea pigs, but those with scurvy will need higher doses more often until they have recovered.

Pseudo-Scurvy

Giving a little bit too much vitamin C isn’t a big deal. What the body can’t use will be flushed out in the urine. But giving large amounts of vitamin C over time has been associated with everything from arthritis to bladder stones. Giving a guinea pig high doses of vitamin C, such as 300 mg daily rather than 30 mg, puts them at risk for developing pseudo-scurvy.

If the guinea pig becomes used to the supplement and then it is no longer given, they can develop symptoms just like scurvy, even if fed a normal, nutritionally complete diet. This happens because the normal mechanism in the guinea pig for absorbing vitamin C has been manipulated. The guinea pig no longer has the ability to absorb enough when it is offered in normal amounts. Luckily, pseudo-scurvy is easily avoided and the condition is usually temporary.

Preventing Vitamin C Deficiency

A proper diet is all that is needed to meet the daily vitamin C requirement for most guinea pigs. Unlimited grass hay is the majority of what they should be eating, but a high-quality pellet with stabilized vitamin C is an easy way to guarantee your guinea pig is getting a balanced diet. Just an 1/8 cup per guinea pig should do the trick, although most won’t overeat as long as hay is always available.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Pellets are a lifesaver for the guinea pig that won’t try veggies. (Side tip: guinea pigs who live with others almost always jump on the veg bandwagon eventually). The addition of vitamin C is the main difference between guinea pig and rabbit pellets. Temperature and humidity can impact the vitamin C in pellets, so proper storage is important. Stabilized C is less likely to break down, meaning these pellets will retain their nutritional value longer.

Fresh veggies are a fun way to add variety to the diet and make sure your guinea pig is getting all the vitamin C she needs. All veggies aren’t created equal. Bell peppers are a great everyday food for guinea pigs. Rotate colors to switch things up. A few slices is all they need. Bell peppers are packed with vitamin C, but still low in calcium, sugar, and acid.

Some fruits and veggies high in vitamin C come with a catch. Parsley, for example, is too high in calcium to feed daily or in large amounts. Luckily, just spring or two packs a big punch for team C. Oranges are juicing their vitamin C reputation for all it’s worth, but are a bit too high in sugar as well as acid to compete with bell peppers. Oranges, like most fruits, are best reserved for treats every now and then.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Vitamin C is necessary for a healthy guinea pig. Growing guinea pigs, weak or recovering guinea pigs, and those that are picky eaters are most at risk for a deficiency. The symptoms can be fully cured if caught early. An easy-to-dose supplement is a recommended addition to every guinea pig first aid kit.

Interested in learning more about guinea pigs? Check out these blogs! ⬇️⬇️⬇️

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Last Updated: August 24, 2020

As far as food trends go, kale has been at the top of the vegetable hierarchy for a while now. And what’s not the love? It’s packed with nutrients and it’s darn good too! But what about for our beloved guinea pigs? Can they reap the benefits of this superfood?

Yes, guinea pigs can eat kale. It is totally safe in moderation and can even confer significant health benefits to your fluffy buddies!

Read on for an in-depth consideration of kale’s health benefits, how to feed kale to a guinea pig, and the possible dangers you should be aware of.

Kale Nutrition and Fun Facts

The tough, leafy green known as kale belongs to the cabbage family, or brassicas. Kale originated in Asia Minor and the Mediterranean and has been cultivated for food as far back as 2000 B.C. It varies in color from green to purple, and guinea pigs can eat both!

Here are some of the most pertinent parts of the USDA assessment of nutrients present in 100g of raw kale:

    Vitamin A: 3.23g Vitamin C: 93.4mg Vitamin K: 389mg Calcium: 254mg Potassium: 348mg Fiber: 4.1g

Health Benefits of Kale for Guinea Pigs

As a part of a well-balanced diet of hay, vegetables, greens, and fruits, kale is a powerhouse of good vitamins and minerals for guinea pigs!

However, you shouldn’t be feeding kale, kale, and only kale to your piggy. Variety and moderation are the key to a healthy diet for your furry little friends.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin CImage Credit: enriquelopezgarre, Pixabay

Vitamin A

Kale is a leafy green that is rich in vitamin A. This versatile vitamin benefits your guinea pig in many ways! It supports their organ functioning, especially the kidney and liver. Good eyesight, a robust immune system, and skin hydration are also supported by vitamin A.

Vitamin C

Guinea pigs are one of the few mammals that cannot produce their own vitamin C, so including multiple sources in their diet is important. Vitamin C supports healthy hair and skin, a strong immune system, and prevents diseases like scurvy.

Signs of a vitamin C deficiency in your guinea pigs include:

    Lethargy Dry, brittle fur Poor appetite Diarrhea Sores or swelling on the lips and mouth Swollen joints Delayed healing of cuts and injuries

Kale has a moderate amount of vitamin C and makes an excellent supplement to your guinea pig’s vegetable variety.

Vitamin K

Vitamin K plays a critical role in the formation of blood clots. A healthy vitamin K level means that if your guinea pig gets a cut, their body will quickly scab the wound over and heal more efficiently. The high amounts of vitamin K in kale can also help improve digestion and reduce inflammation.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin CImage Credit: Pezibear, Pixabay

Potassium

Kale has lots of potassium too. This essential mineral contributes to a guinea pig’s regulation of fluids in the body, nerve functioning, and maintenance of cholesterol levels.

Potassium has also been found to help reduce the risk of bladder stones, a painful condition which guinea pigs are prone to. Yay for potassium!

Can Kale Be Bad for Guinea Pigs?

In moderation, no!

However, moderation is the key to that consideration. Anything a creature eats in excess can eventually become bad for it. It’s all about the amount present in your guinea pig’s diet.

A leaf of kale amongst their veggie spread a few times a week is perfectly acceptable, and likely beneficial to your guinea pig.

But feeding your little piggy kale, and only kale, as their green veggie regularly and in large amounts could lead to some of the distressing health concerns listed below.

Bladder Stones

Being quite high in calcium, kale also poses the problem of increasing your guinea pig’s risk of bladder stones. Calcium crystalizes in the bladder into hard stones which are incredibly painful to pass.

In moderate amounts, and as part of a balanced diet of greens and veggies, it shouldn’t be a problem. But guinea pigs are particularly susceptible to bladder stones already, so we advise extra caution when adding kale to their diet.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin CImage Credit: Andy Miccone, Flickr

Vitamin Toxicity

Excessive levels of vitamin A can potentially become toxic to our small, furry friends. Younger guinea pigs are especially susceptible, so it may be wise to be sparing with kale for babies and juvenile piggies.

If you are feeding your guinea pig kale regularly and notice their skin becoming dry and scaly, remove the leafy green from their diet for a time. Monitor their skin and hair health, as well as energy levels for a time, and see if the change has had any effect.

Vitamin toxicity, or hypervitaminosis, is a rare thing and requires truly large amounts to do damage. However, better safe than sorry we always say. Especially when it comes to our pets!

Pesticides

It’s pretty common knowledge these days that pesticides are not good to ingest. These harsh, bug-killing chemicals can be bad for humans, so just imagine how tough they might be for your tiny, sensitive herbivores like guinea pigs.

Don’t worry though, this one is an easy fix!

Buying organic kale from the grocery store or growing it yourself are great ways to avoid having to worry about nasty pesticides altogether. Just remember to wash all their veggies before serving to remove dirt and insects, and your piggies will be happy and safe!

How to Feed Kale to Your Guinea Pigs

Guinea pigs should always have their kale served to them raw. These little critters are the original raw vegans, and their bodies are not equipped to digest cooked or seasoned foods.

As with all produce, you plan to feed to your guinea pig, we recommend washing kale first. A quick wash will clean it of any stray dirt or pesky little insects that may have hitched a ride.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin CImage Credit: Pexels, Pixabay

How Much Kale Should I Feed My Guinea Pigs?

A leaf or two of kale, depending on the size of the fronds, is just the right amount for a guinea pig. Feel free to include it as part of their veggie medley several times a week, though more is inadvisable.

Final Thoughts on Feeding Kale to Your Guinea Pig

Kale is a healthy, delicious leafy green to include in your guinea pig’s diet for a bit of variety. When provided in moderation your guinea pigs will not only love to chomp on kale, they may even receive health benefits.

Featured Image: WikimediaImages, Pixabay

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

An avid animal lover, Roland started this blog to help all varieties of pets and their owners on their journey to living their best lives.

With their innocent face and small size, Guinea Pigs are amongst the most likeable pets that you will ever come across. Though many people are fond of keeping guinea pigs at home, it is seldom that they know how to exactly feed these cute little creatures. So, let’s look at what you need to know to go about feeding the guinea pigs.

Importance of Vitamin C

Vitamin C is one of those ingredients that is very important for the guinea pigs, because unlike human beings these pigs can’t produce vitamin C themselves in their body. Deficiency of Vitamin C can make the guinea pigs extremely weak with scurvy. Generally, guinea pigs require about 10-30 mg/day of vitamin C in their diet. Mentioned below are some ways in which you can feed the guinea pigs with vitamin C:

* Try feeding these pigs with a good quantity of vegetables and fresh guinea pig pellet.
* Keep the pellets in a dark and cool place to make them last fresh for a longer time.
* Feed the guinea pigs with vitamin C tablets like Oxbow’s GTN-50C or chewable human 100mg vitamin C tablets.
* Feed the pigs with water in which Vitamin C has been added. However, adding vitamin C in water changes the taste of water and pigs drink less water, so it can also create another issue. Giving them vitamin C in the form of vegetables is the most ideal way.

Feeding with Pellets

Commercial Guinea food pellets should form an essential part of the diet for the guinea pigs. Generally, these pigs consume 1/8 cup of pellets per day. Avoid feeding these pigs with pellets having nuts, dried fruits, corn, seeds and animal by-products. As mentioned before, pellets are a rich source of vitamin C for the pigs, however, be sure to feed the guinea pigs only with fresh pellets. While choosing a pellet for these pigs, remember to check the high sugar content and added preservatives, which can cause harm to them.

Feeding with Hay
Guinea Pigs also need to be given a good supply of hay in their diet. Remember, to feed them with fresh hay and not stale hay. Guinea pigs like the hay from grass like timothy and orchard grass. These pigs also like eating alfalfa hay that is rich in calcium and is also a good supplement for pregnant and nursing guinea pigs. Also note, that hay is not a good supplement for adult guinea pigs, which can have problem in digesting it.

Feeding with Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
Apart from hay, guinea pigs should be given fresh fruits and vegetables daily. Green leafy vegetables supply them with all kinds of vitamins and minerals. Vegetables like parsley, spinach, turnip greens, romaine lettuce and dandelion greens are good for feeding guinea pigs. While in fruits, apricots, apples, blueberries, oranges, strawberries, grapes and bananas are good source of energy for guinea pigs. On the other hand, avoid feeding these pigs with starchy food like potatoes and foods like broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage that are difficult to digest.

It’s not at all unusual to want to spoil your guinea pig with a treat every now and again.

And while there are plenty of commercial options available to pick and choose from, it’s tough to beat giving your furry little pig a sweet piece of fruit – especially something as tasty as a strawberry.

You may have heard that it is completely safe to give guinea pigs fruit, especially strawberries, so long as you make sure to avoid overfeeding them.

Other people, though, may have told you that the sugar and the streets can wreck their digestive health faster than you ever believe possible – turning those furry little family members into diabetics and shaving their lifespan significantly.

What’s the truth?

Guinea Pigs can eat strawberries in small portions. Only feed strawberries to your Guinea pig once or twice a week as part of a balanced diet. Strawberries contain 5% sugar by weight – and that’s a lot of sugar to pump into your tiny little guinea pigs. Strawberries should be given as a treat.

Will giving strawberries to your guinea pig too often really harm their health and wellness?

Table of Contents

Can Guinea Pigs Eat Strawberries?

Strawberries are a summertime favorite for millions of people, but your guinea pigs will like a snack of strawberry just as much – as long as you keep the amount of strawberry you give them limited to only a few small pieces every week.

Strawberries themselves are absolutely loaded in Vitamin C, a vitamin that your guinea pigs need for optimum health and one that they don’t often get enough of in their normal food.

At the same time, though, strawberries are also 5% sugar by weight – and that’s a lot of sugar to pump into your tiny little guinea pigs.

What we are trying to say is that you can give your guinea pig strawberry confidently, but you have to make sure that you aren’t overloading their health systems with too much sugar. It really is possible to push their blood sugar levels to unsafe heights pretty quickly with too much fruit, causing them to turn into diabetics and ending their lives prematurely because of it.

If you’re going to give your guinea pig strawberries it’s not a bad idea to give them small pieces attached to the green leafy tops. This balances out the sugar, give them something sweet to chew on and helps you with portion control as well.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin COnly give your Guinea Pig Strawberries as a treat once or twice a week maximum

Are There Other Fruits Guinea Pigs Can Safely Eat?

You can give your guinea pigs a couple of other fruits as well, including:

  • Apples
  • Banana
  • Blackberries
  • Blueberries
  • Cranberries
  • Grapefruit
  • Mango
  • Mellon
  • Oranges
  • Peaches
  • Pears
  • Pineapple
  • Tangerines

You might also want to think about sneaking your guinea pig a bit of sweet pepper every now and again.

They will love the sweet treat but you won’t have to worry about the sugar content in peppers the way you do with foods like strawberries.

How to Feed Your Guinea Pigs Strawberries

Feeding your guinea pig strawberries (or any other fruit, for that matter) is pretty simple and straightforward.

Only ever get your fruit from a reputable source, too, making sure that it is ripe and not rotten. Scrub all of those pesticides, toxins, and potential chemical agents of the fruit before you begin to slice it up and you’ll be good to go.

The next step is to cut those strawberries up into tiny little pieces, even smaller than what you might consider bite-size for a child. You want to be sure that your guinea pig can manage them without any trouble.

It’s also not a bad idea to let those strawberries warm up to temperature. Cold fruit – especially cold strawberries – can cause stomachaches for your guinea pigs.

Make sure that your only ever giving them a bit of strawberry a handful of times each week (maybe two or three times max) and you should be good to go!

Final Thoughts

Like all things in life, too much of a good thing can cause you harm. It’s the same for your cute little guinea pig. You may think you’re doing them a favor or giving them the best possible fresh fruit diet.

But in the long run, you could be seriously harming their health. You should speak to your local vet and get their advice on the perfect diet for your guinea pig.

Guinea pigs are greedy little things and will often eat and eat until they are sick ( Similar to us ) but you are in control of their diet, life and longterm health. So, be responsible and give them a healthy balanced diet with the odd strawberry piece as a treat.

Guinea pigs are natural herbivores and would spend their time foraging and grazing in small herds in the wild. They need to be fed the types of food they have adapted to eat. Their teeth are continuously growing, which is one of the reasons why they need plenty of roughage to chew; this wears down their teeth and helps prevent serious dental problems. Providing sufficient fibre in their diet is also very important for both their gastrointestinal system and general health.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

For your guinea pigs to be happy and healthy, you should:

Providing the opportunity for your guinea pig to graze on grass is also important to their wellbeing. If they do not have an areas where they can graze safely (for example, free roaming in a safe enclosure), then offering cut grass is another alternative (however, they should not be fed lawn trimmings, as these can cause digestive upsets). When you harvest grass to feed to your guinea pigs you need to make sure it is safe. Ensure that the grass has NOT been sprayed with any herbicides or pesticides, don’t harvest grass from the roadside as it may be contaminated with exhaust fume toxins or from areas where it might have been soiled by other animals (e.g. livestock or dogs), the grass should be fresh and green and not have any mould, mildew or fungus on it. Just as with hay, Lucerne (alfalfa) should not be given fresh and clover should be avoided where possible and not given in large quantities).

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

It is important that guinea pigs are introduced to a variety of different and healthy foods from a young age, as they may not try or accept new foods later in life.

Please note that it is normal for guinea pigs to eat their soft, nitrogen-rich faeces that are derived from their caecum after they pass them (coprophagy). This does not indicate any kind of dietary deficiency or abnormality and guinea pigs should be allowed to do this.

I know guinea pigs have to have vitamin C everyday. I was wondering how much C they have to have? They sell C tablets and water droplets BUT are these necessary if I give my guinea pig some orange slices everyday? Plus my guinea pigs food is enriched with Vitamin C (that’s what the food bag says. ) If I can just give my guinea pig oranges for their daily C source, how many orange slices do I give them? THANK YOU 🙂 Please list your source (like how many years you’ve owned guinea pigs) so i know your info is accurate!

4 Answers

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

All you really need is their feed. Oranges are a really poor choice for 3 reasons. 1) they don’t really have all that much vitamin C. 2) they are acidic and can cause mouth ulcers. 3) they have lots of sugars and are fattening. Kale is a much better source of vitamin C and other nutrients and is not fattening. Other good choices are dark leaf lettuce, bell peppers and parsley

Do not give supplemental C from tablets. You can actually provide too much C if you do. They do excrete excess in the urine but high levels cause the excretion mechanism to have a higher set point. As a result, if you stop mega dosing, they still excrete the same amount and wind up being deficient. (info from Joe Wagner, DVM, editor of the Biology of the Guinea Pig)

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

You can never give your guinea pig too much Vitamin C, but you can give too little.

I don’t recommen adding any vitamin C to their water, unless they are ill.

I also only recommend 1 food brand- Oxbow. Oxbow Timothy Pellets.

The substitute for Vitamin C is salads. I make my guinea pigs salads every morning and afternoon.

Morning Salads (for two pigs)-

-1 Romane Leaf (Doesn’t have to be romane, just make sure its NOT Iceberg lettuce!)

-Some cilantro or parsley

-1/8 Green Bell Pepper

-1/8 Red bell pepper

-slice of tomatoe

Afternoon salad (2 pigs)-

-Some cilantro or parsley

-1/4 green bell pepper

-1/4 red bell pepper

-slice of tomatoe or two

**Keep in mind that you don’t have to feed them just this. There are plenty others. Just check on the internet if it’s okay for them or not.**

I know that guinea pigs need vitamin C daily from their diet because they can’t produce it or store it on their own, but I have read that their natural diet in the wild is just grasses. Where do wild guinea pigs get their vitamin C?

5 Answers

Most animals produce vitamin C in their cells from its component parts. This means that they do not need vitamin C in their diet, because they will produce it from the food they eat.

Guinea pigs, primates and humans do NOT produce vitamin C in their bodies, so they MUST get it from their diet. If they do not consume adequate amounts of vitamin C they will suffer from a deficiency called scurvy.

Signs of scurvy include lethargy, diarrhoea, weight loss, and internal skeletal-muscular haemorrhage.

Vitamin C is also a water-soluble vitamin, so it can not be stored in the body. These animals therefore need to get vit C in their diet every day.

Wild guinea pigs eat a variety of plant matter – and plants contain high levels of vitamin C.

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In the wild guinea pigs are grazers – they eat all the time. Their diet is low in calories, so they must eat a large quantity to get enough energy. It is easy to get enough vit C when you eat such a large amount of fresh food! Many pet guinea pigs are fed a complete diet, with very little fresh food. As a result you need to get all the requierd vit C in a much smaller quantity of food.

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How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

You’ve got nothing to worry about 🙂 Citrus fruits are actually pretty low in vitamin C compared with other fruits and veggies! The best one to feed that contains the highest level of C is bell peppers. The yellow ones have the most C, followed by red, followed by green. You can also feed the orange ones. Roughly 1/8th of a bell pepper contains all the vitamin C a guinea pig needs daily! They can be fed as often as daily, but make sure you add other veggies to keep his diet varied and interesting. And don’t worry too much about him not eating the red ones, some piggies are just fussy eaters. Chum Chum will also get some vitamin C from good quality unlimited hay, and his pellets. I just looked up the name of the pellets and found a list of ingredients which featured alfalfa, corn and oats, seeds and dried fruit? I’m not sure if it was the same brand or not but if this is the food you are feeding then I would suggest switching onto a different food. It should be pellets, not a muesli mix, and it should contain no alfalfa, nuts, seeds, honey, dairy products, animal by-products or any fake colours and flavours. Switch onto a new food gradually to avoid upsetting him tum. Grass contains vitamin C. Fruit has some vitamin C but all fruit is high in sugar so should be fed in small amounts and only once a week. And citrus fruits are acidic which can lead to tooth rot and mouth sores so citrus fruits aren’t the best for pigs anyway. I hope this helps you! 🙂

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How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Bonsy is incorrect , they do need more due to the fast rate they metabolize vitamin c. Try feeding your pig plain rabbit food with no veggies added for a while. When it passes away,,this will be the reason.

The answer is same as the first person. The grasses and greens they eat provides them with the vitamin c they need.

How to Feed Guinea Pigs Vitamin C

Even though the bulk of your guinea pig’s diet should be comprised of a pelleted food and timothy hay, it is also important to offer your pet fresh fruits and vegetables from time to time. This will not only keep your guinea pig mentally stimulated and help prevent him from becoming bored with his food, but it will also help ensure he doesn’t suffer from any nutritional deficiencies.

But not all fruits and vegetables are safe for guinea pigs, and some provide more nutrition than others. Today, we’ll focus on cabbage – a vegetable that guinea pig owners often consider including in their pet’s diet.

Can You Feed Your Guinea Pig Cabbage?

Generally speaking, cabbage is an acceptable food to offer your guinea pig. However, there are several different types of cabbage, and they all have different nutritional profiles. Simply put, some types of cabbage are safer for guinea pigs to eat than others.

We’ll discuss four of the most common types of cabbage below, so you can learn more about feeding them to your pet.

Is Green Cabbage Good for Guinea Pigs?

Green cabbage is not an ideal vegetable for your guinea pig, but you can feed it to your pet in minimal to moderate quantities. Green cabbage does contain quite a bit of Vitamin C, which is important for your pet’s health (guinea pigs cannot create their own Vitamin C the way some animals, such as dogs, do).

However, it also contains quite a bit of calcium. Excessive amounts of calcium can cause guinea pigs to suffer from bladder and kidney stones.

Is Red Cabbage Good for Guinea Pigs?

Because it has more Vitamin C than most other types of cabbage, red cabbage is probably the best variety to feed your pet. The large amounts of Vitamin C contained in the food will help prevent your pet from developing scurvy – a potentially fatal disease that afflicts guinea pigs who don’t obtain enough of the vitamin.

Unfortunately, red cabbage also contains quite a bit of calcium. This means that you can’t feed it to your pet too often, as it may trigger the formation of urinary tract stones.

Is Chinese Cabbage Good for Guinea Pigs?

Chinese cabbage is likely the least appropriate cabbage to feed guinea pigs. It does contain quite a bit of Vitamin C, which will help ensure your pet gets enough of this essential vitamin. However, it is also full of calcium. In fact, it has more than three times as much calcium as some other types of cabbage.

Accordingly, if you decide to feed your pet Chinese cabbage, you must do so very sparingly.

Is Savoy Cabbage Good for Guinea Pigs?

Savoy cabbage is not an ideal cabbage to feed to your pet. It doesn’t have as much Vitamin C as the other types of cabbage discussed here, which means it won’t help your pet stave off scurvy.

Savoy cabbage actually has less calcium than most other types of cabbage, so it may, however, be useful for guinea pigs who’ve suffered from urinary tract stones in the past. Just understand that you’ll still likely need to provide your pet with a few vegetables that are high in Vitamin C to help keep him healthy.

Bloating and Gas: A Common Problem Cabbages Cause Guinea Pigs

Whenever you are trying to determine whether you should feed a given fruit or vegetable to your pet, you’ll want to be sure to consider all aspects of the food – not just its nutritional content.

For example, you must consider whether your pet will like the food, as well as any digestive difficulties it may cause him. Some guinea pigs do appear uninterested in cabbage, but the majority will munch on it readily, so you don’t have to worry about whether or not your pet will like it. Even if your pet doesn’t want to eat the cabbage you provide, he won’t be missing out on much, as cabbage isn’t one of the most nutritious foods you can offer. He’ll either like it, or he won’t, but this won’t cause any problems either way.

On the other hand, cabbage can be tough on your guinea pig’s digestive system. Specifically, it can often cause gas and bloating. This should only cause temporary discomfort if you feed your pet small amounts of cabbage, but if you feed him large quantities of the food, it can lead to long-term problems and disrupt the bacterial flora of his intestines.

How Often Can You Feed Your Guinea Pig Cabbage?

Because cabbage isn’t especially nutritious, contains a large amount of calcium, and may cause digestive problems for your pet, you’ll only want to feed it to your pet sparingly. This will typically mean giving your pet a leaf or two of cabbage once or twice per week. It may even be wise to feed it to your pet only once every other week.

Note that guinea pigs who have suffered from bladder or kidney stones in the past should probably not be offered high-calcium vegetables like Chinese cabbage at all.

Nutritional Information for Cabbage

Below, we’ve put together a chart that details the different nutritional values of various types of cabbage. Use this information to help determine how often you should feed your pet cabbage and which type you should select.

Type of Cabbage Calcium Per Ounce Vitamin C Per Ounce
Green Cabbage 11.2 milligrams 10.2 milligrams
Red Cabbage 12.6 milligrams 16.0 milligrams
Chinese Cabbage 29.4 milligrams 12.6 milligrams
Savoy Cabbage 9.8 milligrams 8.7 milligrams

All values were taken from SELF Nutrition Data.

Preparing and Serving Cabbage to Your Guinea Pig

Cabbage is fairly easy to prepare for your guinea pig. You’ll want to start by washing it thoroughly to remove any pesticides, herbicides or bacteria that may have contaminated it.

Then, you’ll want to remove the core (stem). It’s often easiest to do so by slamming the cabbage (stem side down) on to a kitchen counter. This will break many of the fibers free, making it easier to cut out the remaining portions of the stem.

At this point, you’ll want to cut the cabbage into 2- or 3-inch pieces to make it easier for your guinea pig to eat them.

Wrapping Up: Cabbage and Your Guinea Pig

Cabbage isn’t the best vegetable to provide your guinea pig on a regular basis, but it is certainly safe to offer in small amounts. Just do your best to select the best type of cabbage (likely red cabbage) for your pet, and only offer it about once per week or so. Additionally, consult your vet before offering it to any guinea pigs who’ve suffered from kidney or bladder stones.

Guinea Pigs & Vitamin C

Unlike many other species, guinea pigs do not possess the ability to store the essential nutrient vitamin C (ascorbic acid), essential for bone and tooth growth amongst other things. That’s the biggest thing they have in common with us humans!

Vital for Health

A deficiency of vitamin C can lead to scurvy which gives rise to a variety of serious health issues. Vitamin C is involved in the making of collagen within the body, essential for blood vessels, bone and healing. Too little vitamin C can cause bleeding, joint swelling, teeth issues and much pain, amongst many other serious symptoms. Its’ effects can be permanent, though with early diagnosis by a vet, along with the appropriate treatment, many symptoms can be reversed. Prevention, however, is way better (and less painful) than cure.

How Much?

An average guinea pig will need around 10-15mg per day, with the young, ill and pregnant sows needing more. Fortunately vitamin C is readily available from fresh veg (such as leafy greens and others), and it can also be present as an additive in good guinea pig feeds. A well-balanced diet should provide all the required vitamin C, but there are supplements available, such as the Natural Science Vitamin C supplement from Oxbow, which is a hay-based, high-fiber supplement containing essential stabilized vitamin C.

A deficiency of vitamin C can lead to scurvy which gives rise to a variety of serious health issues. Its’ effects can be permanent, though with early diagnosis by a vet, along with the appropriate treatment, many symptoms can be reversed.

Stabilised Source

When feeding a supplement, it is important to ensure the source of vitamin C is stabilised. Vitamin C can quickly degrade in in water and some foods, so do check it’s content is stabilised.

Human grade vitamin C should not be used as dosage can be difficult – use a product designed for guinea pigs. If you have any queries on the best supplement source, speak with your vet.

It is worth noting that if you feed a vitamin C supplement, mention this to your vet if your guinea pig is unwell. This will help your vet with diagnosis.

A Natural Source

Many natural foods contain a good source of vitamin C – red pepper, parsley, spinach, kale and green peppers are all very high in vitamin C, as are kiwi and papaya; fruit, of course should be fed as a treat only.

Dosage

Ensuring s correct daily dosage is vital to ensure conditions such as scurvy can be avoided, and to ensure an overdose is also avoided. It is a little unclear as to whether an overdose of vitamin C is dangerous, as excess vitamin C is excreted in the urine, but it is always sensible to ensure correct dosing if you feel additinal vitamin C is required. It should be noted that a correctly balanced diet should provide all the required vitamin C for a healthy guinea pig.

It is not appropriate to supplement vitamin C through the water for a number of reasons:

  • Vitamin C degrades very quickly – so a supplemented water bowl in the morning may have the correct dose, but later in the day the vitamin C will have degraded.
  • Dosage is difficult to monitor and relate back to how much water has been drunk – particulalry if there is more than one guinea pig drinking from the bowl.
  • Some guinea pigs can be put off from drinking if the water has a slightly unusual taste or smell (we may not be able to detect it, but they may!). Hydration is critical to their wellbeing, so don’t do anything that may reduce consumption.

Check With Your Vet

If you have any concerns or queries on the need for vitamin C, or are concerned your guinea pig may be suffering from a lack of vitamin C (or is showing any signs of ill-health) it is important to seek advice from your guinea pig savvy vet.

Further Reading

Check out our other info pages for more information on diet and care