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How to filter fry oil for reuse

Unraveling the mysteries of home cooking through science.

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

[Photographs: J. Kenji López-Alt]

I get emails from readers packed with fun stories, family recipes, and interesting tips, techniques, and questions all the time, but it’s rare that I get one with a technique that completely blows my mind. This is one of those occasions.

Here’s the short of it: You can use gelatin to filter cruddy used deep-frying oil until it is crystal clear, and the technique is easier than any other method I know, requiring no wire strainers or coffee filters or extensive clean-up. If you are impatient, you can jump straight down to the directions and get to clarifying, but read on for more details on the testing.

How Gelatin Clarification Works

The email I got suggested, in a nutshell, dissolving some powdered gelatin in boiling water, then stirring that hot water into used deep-frying oil before letting it rest overnight. As the gelatin settles and sets, it should end up trapping impurities in it, leaving clean oil behind.

Wait, what? This sounded way too good to be true.

The idea of using gelatin to clarify stock is relatively new. It first came to my attention around 2009 (I probably first read about it on Dave Arnold’s Cooking Issues blog). Gelatin is a protein that forms an interconnected, weblike matrix when dissolved in water. Not only does the gelatin give the water structure (think: Jell-O), it can also suspend other dissolved and undissolved solids in its matrix.

To gelatin-clarify, you first freeze a gelatin-rich stock, then slowly let it defrost in a strainer or wrapped in cheesecloth. As it defrosts, the network of interconnected gelatin proteins traps impurities, letting a crystal-clear consommé drip out of the bottom, with no need to skim, strain, or simmer.

But using gelatin to clarify oil? Now that was something really new, and frankly, if it worked, far more useful for the average home cook, who probably has no need to make consommé but often ends up wondering, “Can I use this oil again?”

I was skeptical. Stock clarification works because gelatin dissolves readily in hot water. Would mixing gelatin-rich water with oil really filter out impurities, when the gelatin is not even technically dissolving in that oil? Only one way to find out.

The Testing: Fat Clarification Using Gelatin

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

What’s New On Serious Eats

I happened to have a small pot of particularly well-used oil on hand (previously used to fry a few batches of vegetable tempura, as well as some chicken-fried shrimp). I dissolved a teaspoon of gelatin in a half cup of boiling water, then dutifully stirred it vigorously into the dirty oil before transferring it all to an airtight container and setting it in the fridge to encourage the gelatin to solidify.

The next morning, I pulled out the container, poured the oil out into a small pot, and discovered this:

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

Holy cow, this may have really worked! I was left with a solid disk of gelatin, filled with specks of burnt flour and other assorted gunk. Everything was looking great so far. Now for the true test: Could I cook in it?

I heated up the clarified oil on the stovetop and was alarmed, as it started bubbling a little while heating—an indication that there were still at least a few microscopic droplets of water in the fat—but with a little shaking, the bubbles soon completely dissipated, and the oil continued to heat up just like any fresh oil would. Once it hit the desired temperature, I fried a few pieces of green bean tempura in it, followed by a small batch of fried chicken. Both recipes came out perfect, as if they’d been cooked in not-quite-fresh-but-still-super-clean oil (bear in mind, this oil was on its last legs before I filtered it).

Incredible! Not only did the oil come out cleaner and more usable than it would with any other method I’ve ever tried, the process was also far easier. Instead of having to clean out a strainer (not a fun task), all I had to do was pop out that disk of hardened gelatin, complete with all the trapped flotsam and jetsam, and toss it in the compost.

Obviously this technique is going to have to be refined and codified for optimizing the gelatin-to-water ratio, the temperature of the water, how vigorously it’s mixed into the oil, et cetera, but I’m just so darn excited about the prospects that I couldn’t resist sharing it right away.

How to Gelatin-Clarify Oil

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

  1. After deep-frying, allow your cooking fat to cool to room temperature or slightly warmer.
  2. Measure into a small pot half a cup of water for every quart of used oil. Sprinkle it with one teaspoon of powdered gelatin per half cup of water, and let the gelatin hydrate for a few minutes.
  3. Bring the water to a simmer (you can do this on the stovetop or in the microwave), stirring, until the gelatin dissolves. Stirring vigorously and constantly, pour the gelatin/water mixture into the dirty oil. It should look very cloudy and relatively homogeneous at this stage. Cover the pot and place it in the refrigerator (or transfer the mixture to a separate container before refrigerating), then allow it to rest overnight.
  4. The next day, pour the oil from the top of the pot or container into a separate clean, dry pot. Discard the disk of gelatin that remains. The clarified oil is ready to use.

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

N.B.: The first time you use the clarified oil, you’ll find that as it heats up, it will start to bubble a little bit. This is okay. Swirl the pan gently as it bubbles to help release any remaining droplets of water. It will eventually settle down until it’s ready for frying.

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J. Kenji López-Alt is a stay-at-home dad who moonlights as the Chief Culinary Consultant of Serious Eats and the Chef/Partner of Wursthall, a German-inspired California beer hall near his home in San Mateo. His first book, The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science (based on his Serious Eats column of the same name) is a New York Times best-seller, recipient of a James Beard Award, and was named Cookbook of the Year in 2015 by the International Association of Culinary Professionals. Kenji’s next project is a children’s book called Every Night is Pizza Night, to be released in 2020, followed by another big cookbook in 2021.

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How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

Some people shy away from deep frying since it seems like a waste to throw out oil after one batch. The good news is that it’s fine to reuse frying oil multiple times when it’s strained—up to a point.

In search of some guidelines on reusing oil, we fried chicken (thighs dredged in flour and cornstarch) and our Crunchy Kettle Potato Chips. We cooked both foods in identical Dutch ovens filled with 2 quarts of canola oil, strained the leftover oil after each fry, and used a kit to evaluate the oil, which turns it from blue to green in the presence of certain compounds that indicate degradation. The fried-chicken oil got progressively darker and stronger-smelling and turned increasingly green in the test kit vials, but the results were perfectly fine through four uses; only after the fifth batch did the chicken start to taste greasy and have off-flavors. The potato-chip oil remained pale and clean-smelling and barely changed color in the test vials, producing identical chips through eight batches, at which point we stopped testing.

Our recommendation: With breaded and battered foods, reuse oil three or four times. With cleaner-frying items such as potato chips, it’s fine to reuse oil at least eight times—and likely far longer, especially if you’re replenishing it with some fresh oil.

Leave a comment and join the conversation!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It’s the only way I’ll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess – perfect every time. I’ve used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too. I’ve done this using a rimmed sheet pan instead of a skillet and put veggies and potatoes around the chicken for a one-pan meal. Broccoli gets nicely browned and yummy!

Absolutely the best chicken ever, even the breast meat was moist! It’s the only way I’ll cook a whole chicken again. Simple, easy, quick, no mess – perfect every time. I’ve used both stainless steel and cast iron pans. great and easy technique for “roasted” chicken. I will say there were no pan juices, just fat in the skillet. Will add to the recipe rotation. Good for family and company dinners too.

Amazed this recipe works out as well as it does. Would not have thought that the amount of time under the broiler would have produced a very juicy and favorable chicken with a very crispy crust. Used my 12″ Lodge Cast Iron skillet (which can withstand 1000 degree temps to respond to those who wondered if it would work) and it turned out great. A “make again” as my family rates things. This is a great recipe, and I will definitely make it again. My butcher gladly butterflied the chicken for me, therefore I found it to be a fast and easy prep. I used my cast iron skillet- marvellous!

John, wasn’t it just amazing chicken? So much better than your typical oven baked chicken and on par if not better than gas or even charcoal grilled. It gets that smokey charcoal tasted and overnight koshering definitely helps, something I do when time permits. First-time I’ve pierced a whole chicken minus the times I make jerk chicken on the grill. Yup, the cast iron was not an issue.

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Apart from giving your fried foods a crispy texture and gloriously golden hue, high-quality frying oil (like sustainable palm) can be used over and over again. Just how many times you can use frying oil, however, depends on how you store it between uses. To make sure you get the most out of yours, here are our top tips on how to store frying oil for reuse.

#1 – Cool the oil

After the last order has left the kitchen, it’s time to turn off the deep fat fryer. Given that frying oil usually has a temperature of between 160-180°C when in use, you have to wait until it’s cooled down before filtering it into containers. Most modern commercial deep fat fryers have an in-built thermometer, so check it to make sure you’re not handling hot oil.

#2 – Filter the oil

Once the oil has cooled down, it’s time to filter it into a suitable container. Take a chinois and line it with cheese-cloth. Hold it underneath the fryer tap when you start to drain into the container – it will filter out any bits and pieces of food that have accumulated during the shift. And remember to follow this up after with a regular deep fat frying clean .

#3 – Store the oil

After you’ve drained the oil into an airtight container, make sure to label it with a date (you won’t want to use oil that’s been lying stagnant for a while). Store it in a cool, dark place i.e away from the ovens or the tops of fridges. Storeroom shelves are fine for this, with the added benefit that they help to avoid any kitchen staff tripping over it and slipping in the oil.

Frymax Tip – Frying oil takes on the taste of whatever it’s used to cook. If you stick to a regular menu, don’t worry – it’s fine to re-use the same oil (as long as it’s still in good quality). If you change what you’re cooking, on the other hand, it might be a good idea to replace the oil with a fresh batch – this prevents your foods from taking on unwanted flavours.

If you’re looking for the highest quality sustainable palm oil, check out what Frymax has to offer. As the UK’s leading supplier of deep fat frying oil, we’re dedicated to providing restaurants with the best quality of product at reasonable prices.

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

Sustainable, long lasting and fully refined, Frymax has been the leading vegetable oil in the fish frying trade for over 60 years.

What are some guidelines or rules with regard to filtering and reusing (vegetable/canola/sunflower) oil that has been used for deep frying?

Is it safe and acceptable under some circumstances to filter and keep oil? If so, does it depend on which foods were fried? How long can the filtered oil for be kept for?

Or, is it never appropriate? If not, are the reasons health or flavour related? or both?

12 Answers 12

It is absolutely OK to filter and reuse deep-fry oil.

It’s not uncommon at some short-order restaurants for them to filter the oil daily and only change it once a week. Of course, it does start to taste a little “off” when you reuse it that many times.

There’s also the matter of impurities lowering the smoke point; even when you filter, the result is obviously not “pure” oil; the more you reuse it, the lower the smoke point gets, and eventually it will actually start to smoke at deep-fry temperatures (i.e. become unusable).

For home use, I’d recommend no more than 3 or 4 reuses. Check the oil to see if it needs to be changed sooner than that – if the colour or smell is off, don’t use it again. Best to compare it against a sample of the same “fresh” oil; sometimes it’s hard to just eyeball it without a frame of reference. If it looks totally clear and smells fresh, you could probably go up to 5 or 6 reuses – but definitely not more than that.

P.S. There will be some people who tell you that you should never reuse oil for general health (not safety) reasons. My response to that tends to be that if you’re eating deep-fried food, you’re probably not all that concerned about long-term health risks. Rest assured that if you do a lot of eating out, you’ve eaten plenty of food fried in “leftover” oil.

Your cooking oil breaks down because of particulate that suspends in the oil as you cook in it. The ways that you can tell if the oil is bad is by visibility (at my restaurant we change at two inches but you could pull it sooner than that) and excessive smoking (because as noted above, particulate lowers smoke point and combustion point, and nobody wants to deal with a deep fryer on fire). The way to test visibility is put a shiny disk on the end of a ruler and shine a light through the oil at a depth of two inches, if you can see the light your oil is still good.

For a home cook, flavor transference is the most likely problem when reusing oil. In a restaurant this is less of a concern because you tend to have segregated fryers for different types of foods. To prevent that, you should never use oil between different types, but you can pretty much just keep fish and meat segregated to prevent the worst of it.

Your oil can also break down over time even while stored so you have a hard storage time of about six months after first use as long as you filter between uses. You can filter using coffee filters or cheese cloth and a strainer. If you use coffee filters or similar paper filters you will most likely need to double or triple them up to get as much of the particulate out as possible.

Bottom line. you really shouldn’t throw out your oil after one use, it’s just too expensive for that when a few minutes can save it.

How to Use Coffee Cans As Mini Composters

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

Restaurant workers regularly filter and reuse the oil in the deep fryer, and home cooks can recycle cooking oil, too. After its initial use, cooking oil can be refrigerated or frozen and reused for another six hours of cooking (see References 2). Don’t reuse cooking oil if it smells rancid or you can’t heat it without smoke developing, as this indicates significant deterioration (see References 1 and 4).

Step 1

Allow the oil to cool down to a safe handling temperature. Strain any food particles floating in the oil by raking through it with a slotted spoon and discard them. (See References 3)

Step 2

Place a coffee filter or piece of cheesecloth around the mouth of the jar or original container. Arrange the cloth or filter so that it rests slightly inside the container to prevent the oil from spilling over the side. Slip the rubber band around the coffee filter or cheesecloth to keep it in place.

Step 3

Pour the cooled oil slowly into the jar. You may need to replace the coffee filter or cheesecloth at some point so that the oil continues to flow into the jar.

Step 4

Remove the rubber band and filter or cheesecloth from the jar. Put the lid on it, and store the oil in the refrigerator, or freeze for up to six months (see References 2).

Step 5

Remove the oil from the freezer or refrigerator when you next need to use it. The oil may appear cloudy after being refrigerated, but it should clear up as it warms up (see References 1 and 4). Use the saved oil as directed in your recipe.

I am low on cash and have no access to atv oil filters at this time, i have a 2003 yamaha raptor and it is running kind of bad, and I need to replace the oil filter, and I was wondering if I could just clean and reuse it.

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Answers for The Question

well that would be better than leaving it clogged and dirty. but if you cant afford it dont ride until you can. you have a risk of damage if you dont run clean oil and filter…

That’s just plain bad economics – cash in some returnable bottles and put a new filter on it.

Yes, You can clean and reuse the oil filter. Just make sure that you don’t do this all the time. I do it myself when i dont have the spare cash. It works.. go for it!

Dude… consider the amount of money you have invested in the raptor… Then consider what an oil filter costs..
Don’t ride it until you can afford a filter. They cannot be adequately cleaned and you run a risk of blowing out the filter element if you try.. then you have no filtration.

Don’t do it. Filters are just few dollars. Engines are few thousands of dollars.

Oil filters have valve to limit the oil back flow. Even if you think you got the dirt out, there’s a lot of dirty still in there.

Never re-use a paper type element . park the Raptor till you can get a new filter. there are cleanable racing oil filters out there they have a metal type finish.please dont try to clean it though because it will harm the engine!

There is no cleaning and reusing the old filter. Just wait until you can buy a filter and then do the oil change. If you were to just change the oil, it would be instantly dirtied by that old oil which is in the old filter.

no!, because 1 thing, you wont get all the dirt out of it, besides you can buy them for about 4 or 5 dollars.

i believe u can clean it but u just cant use soap and water u actually need to get an oil filter cleaning kit lol
best bet is to stop riding it and wait until u get some money and buy a whole new oil filter, if not just borrow some money from some one or get a credit card lol

Oil filters are not designed to be backwashed. Nor would you, on a car. The filter only costs $3, so there’s nothing you could clean it with that’s cheaper than the filter itself.

HOWEVER- You can keep using your old filter. You can leave the oil filter on for two or 3 oil changes; no problem. They never get full of dirt on the typical duty cycle. If it does get full of dirt (it won’t) there’s even a bypass valve for that.

By trying to clean it you could break down the paper elements and this could plug the filter. Don’t try it.

Sarah Long

Frying a turkey isn’t really the traditional method of cooking a Thanksgiving bird, but it does give it an awesome crispy skin and juiciness through the roof. Still, a lot of us seem to avoid the whole deep-frying situation because of the terrifying tales of Thanksgiving Day explosions — and the fact that the process requires a whole lot of oil. We’re talking 3 to 5 gallons. And oil doesn’t grow on trees. That ish is expensive.

The good news is you can recycle the oil you use to fry your turkey, so you can get at least a little something back on your oil investment — there are just a couple of simple rules of thumb to follow so it’s safe to use.

Choose the right oil

First of all, it’s important to buy your oil with reuse in mind. According to The National Turkey Federation, only oils that have high smoke points should be used — they suggest peanut, refined canola, corn oil, rice oil and sunflower oil. An oil’s smoke point is the temperature at which it begins to break down and create irritating smoke, according to Livestrong.com. Exceeding an oil’s smoke point can cause the oil to be harmful if consumed.

Here’s a tip to make sure you haven’t passed the smoke point threshold: When you’re heating your oil to fry your turkey, monitor the temperature regularly to ensure it doesn’t exceed its smoke point. Safflower and cottonseed oil smoke at 450 degrees F. Canola oil smokes at 437 degrees F. Soybean, peanut and corn oil smoke at 410 degrees F.

Most recipes call for peanut oil because of the flavor it imparts, but you’ll have to make sure none of your guests have a peanut allergy if that’s the route you choose.

Filter your oil after use

After the oil cools overnight in a covered pot, strain the cooled oil through a fine strainer, then filter the oil through a fine cheesecloth or coffee filter. Filtration is especially important if you have used seasonings or breading on the turkey you fried.

Oil storage

Used oil should always be covered and refrigerated to prevent it from going rancid. Though peanut oil is the one most commonly used for frying up a turkey, it’s also the most perishable of the oils and must be kept cold if you plan to keep it longer than a month. You can also freeze it to extend the shelf life even longer.

Used oil will thicken and become cloudy when chilled but return to its original consistency when reheated. The oil will also develop a cloudy appearance that could remain when brought back to room temperature and will only clear up temporarily while heated.

Proceed with caution when using refrigerated oil. One ChowHound user reported a scary situation while reheating cold oil.

“My mom put a saucepan full of oil on the stove straight from the fridge and as it heated it went up like an atomic bomb onto the ceiling,” they wrote. “No one got hurt but soooo dangerous! It must be left out till room temperature when using large quantities that are cold.”

    SHARES 334

Fried chicken. French fries. Doughnuts. These comfort foods all have one thing in common: They’re fried to high heaven.

Now that there are many at-home fryers available, people are deep-frying their favorite treats in the comfort of their own kitchens. But that convenience comes with a cost. If you’re frying often, you can go through oil pretty quickly. Well, we’ve got some fry-tastic news for you.

Yes, it is OK to reuse fry oil.

Here’s how to clean and store it:

Once you’ve finished frying, let the oil cool. When it’s reached a safe temperature, use a utensil to remove any large pieces of batter that might be left over.

Place a fine-mesh strainer or cheesecloth (even better if you use both) over the container you plan to store it in and strain the oil. Be careful when pouring, as there might be larger pieces of debris at the bottom of the fryer. Discard those separately.

Store the oil in a cool, dry place.

There is no official rule as to how many times you can reuse oil; however, it will break down the more you use it, meaning your fried chicken could end up a soggy mess. If it’s cloudy, has a funny odor or has developed a layer of film on top, it’s time to swap it out for a new batch. Hopefully, this makes your frying even easier—and tastier—than before.

Whenever we fry deep fried foods, we wonder what to do with the leftover heated oil. Whether to reuse it or simply throw away the expensive oil. No doubt using fresh oil everytime we cook is the healthiest option. The fact is it’s not a healthy way to use leftover oil coz of the following facts.. On repeated heating of oil, it degrades into fatty acids, triglycerides and..hydroperoxides. The oil turns rancid and toxic in nature. Due to toxicity, it may cause serious health hazards including damaging inner line of the heart, allergic reaction in digestive track, intestinal cancer & so on.. Here are some of the useful tips to increase the life span of the oil.! How can we use the reused oil: · It can be used for shallow frying veggies, paneer, chicken, mutton & fish dishes. · It can be used for seasonings. · For drizzling oil to the sides while making chapatti, adai, dosa. Also can be used for greasing idly plates and paniyaram, appam pans. · Also we can add this leftover oil while kneading dough for chapatis, rotis, puris or naan. Facts about reused oil: · If the used oil has remains of the food, bread bits, bacteria may develop and leads to food poisoning. · Always try to use oils with high smoking point like sunflower oil, safflower oil, corn oil etc. Avoid using groundnut oil, oilive has which has low smoking point for deep frying. · Turn off heat, immediately you are done deep frying. Exposing oil to prolonged heat increases the chances of oil getting spoiled. · If the oil froths or bubbles or smokes comes out of it, discard it immediately. · If the oil colour changes darker and its viscosity is dense, its unfit to use. · Try to avoid iron or copper pans for deep frying. The metal accelerates the process of rancidity. · Don’t mix different types of oils for deep frying. How to store the re-used oil: · Initially, allow the oil to come down to room temperature. · Filter the oil with a coffee filter or a thin muslin cloth and strain the food particles and debris. · Then store the filtered oil in a tightly stealed container and store it in a cool, dark place or inside the fridge. · Try to use this leftover oil quickly. How to dispose the wasted oil: · Don’t discard the reused oil in the sink, as it can clog the pipes. · Pour it in a can / container or in a ziplock cover and dispose. · Also you can give the oil to a recycling centre, if there is one nearby.

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

Oil is a good meal preparation agent to cook with, especially when you are deep frying your food. There are certain health benefits you can derive from cooking oil in a deep fryer that can benefit you and the whole family.

Some oils carry a long shelf life and even after frying your food with them you can reuse that same oil to fry other foods. However, not all cooking oils can be used days later to fry food with.

Some deep frying cookware does not keep the oil clean to use for refrying purposes. However, technology has allowed new manufacturing processes to enter the market. These high tech fryers come with an airtight lid to protect fried oil from dirt particles. This way, the oil is safe for reuse even weeks later.

Store oil in a cool location

Your frying oil can remain in the deep fryer for a long time without spoiling. If you want to keep it usable however, you have to keep your fryer tightly shut and in a location that is dark and cool.

How long to store cooking oil

How long the oil will remain usable depends on a number of things such as what type of food it was fried in, whether you strained the oil after last using it and the type of oil you used.

Oils that cook meat usually take a quicker time to deteriorate than those that prepare vegetable foods. The longer you fry with the same oil, the more its smoke point will break down.

What happens after reuse?

The more food you fry, the more the oil will become darkened. During the first and onward reuse of the oil, if the food you are frying becomes dark too quickly it is an indication that you should change the oil. Frying foods in unhealthy oil can be unsafe for you.

Which oil is best suitable to store in deep fryer?

Many oils have healthy advantages that can help your body. Many experts however go for peanut oil as the most reliable cooking agent that can add the most health benefits to your body and it also has the ability to deep fry foods better than most other oils on the shelf.

Oil can deep fry food very well because of the level of high heat temperature that it carries. However, just make sure your deep fryer has a working thermostat to measure the level of heat accurately.

How to store your used oil

If you are not careful, your oil can start becoming rancid, even after the first use. To store your oil so that you can use it to fry other foods, you have to seal it tightly and refrigerate it. It is even better if you freeze it to avoid early spoiling.

Once you refrigerate your used oil in a tightly sealed fryer or container, you can continue using it for months. However, you should practice using caution when cooking with refrigerated oil. After being in the fridge for months and you see signs of deterioration, it is best that you throw away the oil.

Filtering your oil is another way to store whatever is left after your frying session is complete. To filter your leftover oil, you can take a piece of cheese cloth and strainer as well as a coffee filter to remove any impurities left after frying.

The filtering and straining will help remove fried particles still left in the oil. When the particles are removed, the oil will stand a better chance of staying good longer and not going bad too quickly.

Some restaurants use commercial oil cleaner to remove fried particles from the oil after each use so they can use it again. These oil cleaners cost in the thousands of dollars, but if you can afford one for the home you can go ahead and buy the product.

How to know if your used cooking oil is bad

Your used oil can become bad at any time without you knowing it. However, there are a number of ways by which you can prove if the oil you are reusing is good enough for another fry or not.

One way to know if the oil is still usable is for you to note its color. If the color seems darker than usual or the oil is showing any other color rather than its golden look then it is an indication that it cannot be used again.

You may still have doubts about how it should look, so it is best for you to check it against a brand new sample that you have not yet used. When you check against the sample and the oil passes the test, you might be able to still get another 3 to 5 uses from it.

The smell of the oil is another indication whether it is good or bad. If the smell is off it is best to throw it away.

Some people check their oil if it still has reuse purposes by placing a shiny looking disk-like object at a rulers end. They then shine a light at 2 inches depth. If the light appears visible to the eyes then they know the oil is still good enough for a few more frying sessions.

Benefits of reusing deep fry oil

One of the benefits of reusing deep fry oil is that it makes it cheaper on your pocketbook. Instead of going out and buying more oil to deep fry your food, you can use the same oil several times over.

You will save time when you reuse your frying oil because you do not have to waste time going to the shop to purchase a full bottle. Instead of wasting precious time going back and forth to the grocery store, you can save time.

Are there Any Deep Fryers I Can Reuse Oil With?

If you don’t want to worry about knowing whether or not the oil in your fryer is still good, you shouldn’t have to. Would you rather your fryer do the work for you? This deep fryer we found on Amazon has an oil filtration system.

Question: Can I leave oil in my deep fryer?

Answer: Yes! Oil can be left in your deep fryer but you will have to check it each time you are reusing it see if it has become rancid.

If you are going to leave it in your fryer, make sure to place a tight enough lid over it to help keep its purity. It is however better if you store it in the refrigerator.

The more you protect your oil after each reuse the better it will be able to keep its purity and not spoil. Therefore, it is in your best interest that you not compromise the oil after each frying session by leaving it open to dust particles getting into it. This way you can use your oil again.

If you succeed in keeping the oil pure after each reuse, your meals will taste just as good as it would if you fried it the first time using a bottle of brand-new cooking oil.

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How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

Cooking with oil is an excellent way to create delicious dishes with a distinct flavor. After oil has been used, however, it may contain fried breading or pieces of food and require filtering if it is to be reused. Frying oil can be an expensive kitchen commodity if you use it often. There are costly machines which can recycle your used oil, but you can perform the same process for free using a few household items.

Place a coffee filter into your masonry jar, folding the edges of the filter over the mouth of the jar.

Twist the jar’s lid ring around the mouth of the jar. This will keep the filter snugly in place as you filter the oil.

Pour the oil slowly from your frying vat or pan into the masonry jar. This step is more easily performed with warm oil (around 150 degrees Fahrenheit, 65 degrees Centigrade).

Unscrew the lid ring from the mouth of the masonry jar once all of the oil has been filtered. Discard the coffee filter and its contents.

Place the lid cap inside the lid ring and screw it snugly onto the mouth of the jar. Store the oil in your refrigerator for reuse.

Write the date of filtering onto the masonry jar each time you filter oil. This will help you remember which oil to reuse first.

Warning

Pour the warm oil with caution. It will still be hot enough to burn you.

In my life, I have single-highhandedly been responsible for the mass deep-frying of thousands of pounds of potatoes. In fact, if you counted everything I ever

, well, it’s a lot. When you cook as much as I do, the deep-fryer is an asset. The down-side of having an oil- gobbling delicious machine, however, is just that: oil. Oil is expensive and cleaning and extending the life of your oil is a vital necessity and has some knowledge of how to clean deep

So, here are a few tricks for cleaning your used deep-fryer oil:

HOW TO CLEAN DEEP FRYER OIL?

Once your oil is cool (seriously, don’t handle hot oil)

  • Make sure your oil is still re-usable. If it is foaming or very dark or black, it’s done; dispose of it properly. If it smells bad, you don’t want to reuse it. If it passes the sight and smell tests, move on to step.
  • Filter Now, this one is a player’s choice, but it is the fundamental key for cleaning your oil. Commercial restaurants have a big filtering machine, but you can do it at home. You need:
  • An empty container that can hold the amount of oil you want to filter, like a pot or cup.
  • A screen, like a mesh strainer or a colander and/or…
  • A coffee filter, paper towel, or cheesecloth.
  • A ladle or pot to divvy out the oil.
  • Maybe a funnel, depending on the shape of your container (i.e. a bottle).

Preserving For Further Use

So, gather these items, set up in a place where you can spill a little and do

  • First, take the clean container.
  • If you are using a pot, place your strainer on top of the pot, and then line the strainer with a filter of some choice: paper towel, coffee filter, cheesecloth, or anything that will catch the fine particles.
  • If you are using a small-mouthed container, like a cup or bottle, use the funnel and line the funnel with paper towels or a coffee filter.
  • Now that you have got your container topped with a strainer lined with a porous paper product, ladle or slowly pour your ROOM TEMPERATURE oil into the filter-lined strainer. Slowly. If the filters are doing their jobs, it will take a minute.
  • Once all of your oil has passed through, your filtering device should be full of burned tidbits and flavor-killing particles. Remove it and dispose. Not your colander though, keep that.
  • Store your oil with a date and label in an air-tight container-preferable like the container it came in- or fire up the fryer.

You might find below video helpful to get the job done.

Congrats-you did it; you’re one step closer to crispy brown foods. For best results, avoid allowing water or seasonings into the oil, choose a high quality oil that will last longer, and clean as often as you use it. Like all good things, oil can’t last forever, so always start at step 1 and have a happy fry-day.

Last Updated on October 5, 2019 by smartkitchenpicks

Instead of throwing away used deep-fryer oil, you can filter and reuse it. Although you can only use filtered oil three or four additional times, the extra effort will save you money. The oil needs to be filtered because food particles often fall into the oil. If you do not filter the oil immediately, the oil will smell rancid and you will need to throw it out because it will not fry your food properly.

Instructions

1. Allow the oil in the deep fryer to cool to 150 degrees Fahrenheit or lower.

2. Scrape excess oil off the sides of the deep fryer with a slotted spoon.

3. Place a colander inside a deep bowl. Line the colander with cheesecloth. If you do not have cheesecloth, you can use a mesh sieve to filter the deep-fryer oil.

4. Pour the oil into the colander carefully and slowly. The solid pieces in the oil will stay behind.

5. Remove the solids from the colander and discard them. Pour the oil into a large measuring cup and filter back through the cheesecloth again.

6. Store the oil in an airtight container in the refrigerator. When you place it back into the deep fryer, you may need to add fresh oil so that the oil remains at the level needed to fry food.

Tips & Warnings

Throw the oil away when it appears dark in color or has a foul odor. You can discard the oil by pouring it into an old container. Once the container is full, you can discard it into the trash.

Always wear gloves when handling hot oil to prevent burns.

Avoid pouring oil down the sink because it will clog your pipes.

When deep frying a turkey in a turkey fryer, you definitely need a lot of oil. And using so much oil for just a single fry can prove expensive. Surely the question arises among many

reuse turkey fryer oil or not

Let me clarify the topics.

Research states that in any normal circumstances, oil can

for up to six hours. A deep-fried turkey takes less than an hour of cooking. Thus, it gives you the opportunity to reuse the same batch of oil for around six times.

How long the turkey oil good?

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

How long the turkey fryer oil is good for also depends on the oil used, the temperature at which it heats the oil, and the storage. If you wish to increase the reusability of the oil, use oil that has a high characteristic smoke point because this then allows the oil to

to a higher temperature without breaking down. Once the oil breaks down, it goes foul, and it is unhealthy to consume such oil. Avoid heating the oil to a temperature beyond the smoke point.

Filtering and storing the oil after use is also an important factor in determining the reusability of the oil. The turkey renders fat as it gets deep fried. The fat combines with the oil and causes it to break down slightly earlier than before. Hence, it is necessary to skim off any fat from the oil besides any other matter floating around.

Once the oil cools, filter it through a funnel covered with cheesecloth into the container that originally contains the oil. After filtering the

seal the container tightly and ensure to store it in a cool, dark place.

So, can you

The answer is yes but before reusing the oil; it is always best to check the quality of the oil as using rancid oil can have a negative impact on your health. If the oil appears separated, or it smells bad, discard it immediately. Otherwise, you can reuse it but remember that the total cooking time of the same oil should not exceed six hours.

It might interest you in reading our post on what is the best ​ ​ oil for deep fryer.

Last Updated on October 5, 2019 by smartkitchenpicks

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How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

Was born in a Big City Will die in the Country OK with that!

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

Most places that sell fish fryers also sell large plastic funnels and cone shaped filters.

Old age and treachery will always overcome youth and enthusiasm.

NRA Life Member

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

I bought 6 of the commercial size filter holders off EBay years ago very handy for filtering items.

Was born in a Big City Will die in the Country OK with that!

metal sieve with a fine mesh sold at nearly any grocery store or big box store

most of our frying happens on the grill with a 7 quart dutch oven.so if it is just going to be the next day I just run the sieve around and put the lid on the dutch oven tight.

Most places that sell fish fryers also sell large plastic funnels and cone shaped filters.

This is what I use.

If you look in the kitchen tool section at lot stores. They sell little fine wire stainless steel strainer meant to go in sink drains. They fit nice in bottom of most any size funnel. Can screen out the big chunks from your oil pretty quick with them. If you want it cleaner then go threw coffee type filter after. When I’m doing lots fish fries in spring. I usually just pour the oil threw one of the screens back in jug or into another fry pan. I remember my mother just running a screen sieve around in bottom her old electric fryer. putting a lid on and just setting it aside on counter. Might be days before she used it again. Don’t know if that was better oil in old days? but I don’t recall ever being no rancid tasted. If she thought it was bad she’d dump it start over.

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

HOW MANY TIMES CAN COOKING OIL BE REUSED? HOW SAFE IS REUSING FRYING OIL?

The “smoke point” is when you see smoke on the surface of the oil while you are cooking. It is more important than it may seem, because it means that the oil is already very hot, but also it is a sign that the oil begins to lose properties and even become toxic.

When this happens, the main problem is the formation of fatty polymers, which carries a high long-term risk of cardiovascular accidents. But a used oil is not only dangerous for health, it is also capable of spoiling food (which absorbs the oil) and it finally has strange colors and flavors.

But, as if all that wasn’t enough, reused oil has an additional danger when something fried has little protein and a wide base of sugars. That is why it is so important to fry foods with low sugar levels. And if you do, and you are one of those who like to fry churros on winter and cold Sundays, always try to use clean oil.

The grounds that form at the bottom of the fryer or pan are one of the signs that indicate that we must change the oil. But if we have been filtering and cleaning it, you won’t realize if it is time to change it. A key to know that you must change the oil is the appearance of bubbles while you are cooking.

Obviously, it will always be better and healthier to fry with clean oil. However, if we do not usually fry foods high in sugars, there is a certain margin for reuse, which is quite wide depending on the circumstances. For example, the type of oil we use for frying, the frying temperature or the utensils and pans we use for cooking.

It is convenient to keep in mind that the “smoke point” will be lower if the oil is cleaner. Studies indicate that the most recommended oil for frying is olive oil. Since sunflower oil generates much more toxic aldehydes (and in less time) than olive oil. Now, what really determines whether frying oil can be reused is the temperature. If we have exceeded the “smoke point” in the first use, no matter what type of oil was used, it is not recommended to reuse it for another occasion.

On the other hand, another notable factor is that the fry food. It always needs to be very dry before putting it on the hot oil, therefore, it is advisable to leave the food at room temperature for a long time before introducing it in the oil, since the water favors the decomposition of the oil. After cooking, always filter the oil and store it in a jar without humidity and where the light does not penetrate.

Think twice what to do with the oil you just used for cooking, because throwing it in the sink is not a good option. According to studies, two thirds of the oil used in Spain ends up in the sewers (about 120,000,000 liters), a very ecological gesture that causes serious problems: stuck pipes, more work in treatment plants, pollution (only one liter of oil can contaminate 100,000 liters of water), and so on. The best way to contribute and improve in this aspect is to have an empty water bottle at home and refill it with the reused oil. After this, leave them in specific containers or in clean spots.

1. If you are a person who likes taking care of yourself and the planet, our recommendation is to do not use more than three times the same oil, since the oil disarms its caloric potential in the third frying.

2. Never ever throw oil in the sink, so you won’t help the planet or your city to be clean. It is better to go once every three months to a clean point and deposit the oil there.

3. Having an oil container for each thing is a good technique to save and keep the oil as healthy as possible. So, when you cook french fries have a jar for this oil, another for fish and another for coated food.

A few weeks ago we gave you some simple tips on how to properly store Olive Oil at home. Today, we’re going to some pointers so that you can reuse it correctly after it’s been used for deep-frying, sautéing, etc.

Many people who use Olive Oil tend to throw it away after they’ve fried or cooked with it because they don’t realise it can be reused up to 5 times while it’s still at its best.

What’s more, Olive Oil is the only oil that can withstand high temperatures (up to 200ºC) without breaking down and while retaining all its properties and benefits. That’s something you should bear in mind when choosing an oil for your recipes.

So make a note of these simple tips and follow them to the letter to get the best out of your Olive Oils and reuse them correctly.

10 recommendations for reusing Olive Oil correctly

  1. As a general rule, whenever you cook or fry with Olive Oil at temperatures lower than 200ºC, it can be reused.

How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

  • The food you’re going to fry must be as dry as possible to ensure it doesn’t release water, as water encourages the oil to break down.
  • Avoid covering the pan in order to prevent condensation on the lid which might drip into the oil.
  • To be able to reuse it, it is very important that you filter the Olive Oil after every use. Once it has cooled down, pour it through a 100% cotton or natural fibre sieve, as shown in the following video:

    Your oil should always be stored in tinted glass bottles (to stop light getting in) or stainless steel. Never use copper, iron or plastic receptacles.

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    Store your oil in a cool, dark place.

    You should only reuse oil for further cooking or frying. You should not use it ‘raw’ for marinades or dressings.

    Never mix new and used oils together.

    Reusing oil significantly helps to save resources, making it very sustainable as well as organic.

    When it starts to look darker and thicker, it’s time to change it for new oil.

    By following these simple but important guidelines, you will always be able to enjoy Olive Oils from Spain in the very best condition. As you can see, each tip is simple and easy to remember and, together, are the best way to use and reuse the product properly.

    If you’d like to know more about Olive Oils from Spain, learn how to cook delicious, healthy dishes and keep up to date with all the latest news, and discover everything we have to offer:

    Introduction: Cooking Oil Filter / Strainer – Cheap, Easy and Effective

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    I often use cooking oil in an ordinary pot to deep fry foods like buffalo wings. As long as the oil is not burned it can be reused several times if the fat and food particles are removed.

    The used oil can be filtered through a paper towel or cheese cloth-lined kitchen strainer resting on a clean pot or container. This method quickly clogs the pores of the paper towel with pieces of fried bits so that the oil strains through very slowly and it wastes time.

    Using two strainers worked better but it then became a two person job. My wife would hold the extra strainer over the first while I poured the oil through. It was just awkward and time-consuming. There had to be a better way!

    MY SOLUTION: Using cheap strainers and round food storage containers from the dollar store I made a 3 stage oil strainer that can be used by one person.

    Step 1: Materials You Will Need

    Hand-held kitchen strainers. I used three but two would also work.

    Round food storage containers sized to fit the strainers. These will be used as spacers between the strainers. If you use 2 strainers you need 1 container. 3 strainers requires 2 containers. The container tops are not used.

    * The containers must fit into the strainer frame without slipping all the way through. The frame of the strainer must hold the container, not the mesh. The curve of the bottom part of the container makes all the difference. Make sure to have the strainers with you when you buy the containers to properly size them.

    Sharp knife to cut out the bottoms of the containers.

    Cutting board as a work surface.

    Step 2: Create the Spacers.

    Cut the bottom out of the containers. Plan your cut according to how the container rests inside the frame. Cut just below where the bottom edge of the strainer frame meets the container. To help, you can place the container in the strainer and mark the inside with a marker.

    I briefly heated the tip of the knife to pierce the container and start the cut. This kept the container from cracking.

    Step 3: How to Use the Oil Filter

    * Do not try to filter 200-300 degree oil. Make sure it cools off. Heated oil is thinner and passes through the filter better, but I allow mine to cool to about 100-125 degrees before filtering to avoid burns.

    1) Start with a clean catch basin (pot or container) with enough capacity to hold all the oil you have to strain. Make sure it can withstand the temperature of the oil if it is still warm.

    2) Rest one strainer on top of the catch basin and line it with a paper towel or cheese cloth. I prefer paper towels because I have no idea where to find cheese cloth and I figure it’s trash when I’m done anyway, just like those handy paper towels.

    3) Push the paper towel down to conform to the bowl shape of the strainer and add a container spacer on top.

    4) Repeat: stack strainer, paper towel, spacer, strainer, paper towel.

    The nice thing about buying the same strainers and containers is that they all nest together and don’t take up too much space between uses.

    Make sure to store your used oil in a cool spot away from sunlight or it will turn rancid. Happy frying!

    MMMM. now I ‘m hungry – need to make some more wings.

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    Did you make this project? Share it with us!

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    Did you know, the food you cook, no matter how delicious or expensive it is, can be bad for you when cooked in an unhealthy way?

    Also, no matter how great we are at cooking, there are habits or actions we unintentionally commit while cooking, which can make our food unhealthy.

    Habits are tough to break, especially when you have been used to them for a long time. But when it comes to cooking, you may have to strive hard to break some bad habits because they can be detrimental to your health. I have always said in my health blogs that Nigerian meals are one of the healthiest meals ever. However, if it is not cooked in the proper way, it won’t be beneficial to you.

    Cooking oils are one of the major ingredients used in cooking, however, is reusing cooking oil bad for you? This article discusses the answer to the question.

    Is Reusing Cooking Oil Bad For You?

    This is a habit that many Nigerians are guilty of, heck, even I too. The cost of cooking oils have drastically increased in Nigeria, so a lot of Nigerians have resorted to using used cooking oils when they want to cook or fry.

    Used cooking oils and fats are those that have been used for cooking before. The European Waste Catalogue (EWC) classifies them as Municipal Wastes (household waste and similar commercial, industrial and institutional wastes).

    Used oil is a harbour for bacteria and free radicals. Bacteria usually feed on food particles left in the oil after you use it, and it can lead to food poisoning.

    Reused cooking oils usually contain free radicals, that destroy the body’s cells and increase cancer risk.

    What can you do to repurpose your cooking oil?

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    Although reusing cooking oils can be bad for your health, there are steps you can do to make it better. You need to store it properly so it can safe for reuse. The following tips to reuse your cooking oil are:

    1. As soon as the oil cools off to handle, sieve it through a clean layer of cloth, paper towels or filter paper to remove food particles.

    2. Store it in a clean, transparent jar.

    3. Don’t mix it with unused oil and seal the jar tightly.

    4. Refrigerate the cooking oil.

    5. Don’t reuse your cooking oil if it foamed or changed colour during heating.

    6. Don’t reuse cooking if it has a foul odour or smells like the food you cooked.

    7. Don’t fry your cooking oil above 375°F (or 190°C) because it can lead to the formation of 4-hydroxy-2-trans-nonenal (HNE) in the oil. HNE is a toxic compound that has been linked with an increased risk of various chronic diseases like stroke, atherosclerosis, high cholesterol, and liver diseases.

    8. Buy oils with high smoke point (a smoke point is the temperature at which oil breaks down and begins to smoke), such as vegetable, olive peanut, soybean and safflower oils. You can fry these oils for above 375°F, and they will still be suitable for use.

    As you have learnt, there are so many health effects of reusing cooking oil. However, if you follow these steps you can make your cooking oil safe for reuse.

    Please join us on our social media platforms below. Don’t leave with dropping a comment or sharing this post!

    Whenever we fry deep fried foods, we wonder what to do with the leftover heated oil. Whether to reuse it or simply throw away the expensive oil. No doubt using fresh oil everytime we cook is the healthiest option. The fact is it’s not a healthy way to use leftover oil coz of the following facts.. On repeated heating of oil, it degrades into fatty acids, triglycerides and..hydroperoxides. The oil turns rancid and toxic in nature. Due to toxicity, it may cause serious health hazards including damaging inner line of the heart, allergic reaction in digestive track, intestinal cancer & so on.. Here are some of the useful tips to increase the life span of the oil.! How can we use the reused oil: · It can be used for shallow frying veggies, paneer, chicken, mutton & fish dishes. · It can be used for seasonings. · For drizzling oil to the sides while making chapatti, adai, dosa. Also can be used for greasing idly plates and paniyaram, appam pans. · Also we can add this leftover oil while kneading dough for chapatis, rotis, puris or naan. Facts about reused oil: · If the used oil has remains of the food, bread bits, bacteria may develop and leads to food poisoning. · Always try to use oils with high smoking point like sunflower oil, safflower oil, corn oil etc. Avoid using groundnut oil, oilive has which has low smoking point for deep frying. · Turn off heat, immediately you are done deep frying. Exposing oil to prolonged heat increases the chances of oil getting spoiled. · If the oil froths or bubbles or smokes comes out of it, discard it immediately. · If the oil colour changes darker and its viscosity is dense, its unfit to use. · Try to avoid iron or copper pans for deep frying. The metal accelerates the process of rancidity. · Don’t mix different types of oils for deep frying. How to store the re-used oil: · Initially, allow the oil to come down to room temperature. · Filter the oil with a coffee filter or a thin muslin cloth and strain the food particles and debris. · Then store the filtered oil in a tightly stealed container and store it in a cool, dark place or inside the fridge. · Try to use this leftover oil quickly. How to dispose the wasted oil: · Don’t discard the reused oil in the sink, as it can clog the pipes. · Pour it in a can / container or in a ziplock cover and dispose. · Also you can give the oil to a recycling centre, if there is one nearby.

    Once you get over the fear of starting an uncontrollable grease fire in your own home, frying your own food can be quite a fun experience for a home cook. Making your own fried chicken or french fries at home is a fun challenge to see if your version stacks up to that of your favorite restaurant. However, since frying requires so much oil (The Kitchn notes that making a batch of fried chicken can require as much as 2 quarts), it makes sense to try and use it more than once.

    But how many times can you use cooking oil before it goes bad? And will using re-used oil change the taste of whatever you’re frying? The most important thing when it comes to reusing oil is to make sure you’re straining it (via Canadian Living). The leftover bits that naturally fall off whatever you’re frying is what causes the oil to degrade and go bad. If you can remove these from your oil, it will stay usable for longer. Just make sure to wait for the oil to cool down before you strain it, because straining while it’s still hot can be extremely dangerous.

    How long is frying oil good?

    The amount of time that you can reuse oil without any adverse effects depends on what you are frying. The rule of thumb is that you should replace oil used to fry animal products more often than replacing the oil to fry plant-based products. If you properly strain your oil, you should be able to use it about four times if you’re frying something like fish or chicken.

    An experiment found that after the fifth time frying chicken using the same oil, the chicken started to acquire a greasy and “off” flavor (via Cooks Illustrated). On the other hand, using the same oil to fry potato chips, the experiment found no difference between the flavor of the first batch and any of the successive batches. The experiment went through eight batches without finding any difference. It’s not to say that you can use it forever if you’re frying vegetable products, but you’ll be able to use it for quite a long while without noticing any differences.

    Oil is frequently used in Indian cooking but can reusing the same oil again lead to health problems? Find out.

    How to Filter Fry Oil for ReuseAlso Read – 10 natural ways to get rid of mosquitoes in your house

    Oil is a very essential part of cooking, especially Indian cooking. Right from the tadka to the saut ing of vegetables, oil comes into play. It is usually the first step of cooking. Place a pan on the gas and pour some oil into it. Since it is so frequently used, often people tend to reuse it several times. But is this practice safe? Can it lead to health problems? Let s find out.

    What happens when you use the same oil for deep frying again and again?

    The problem with reusing oil is that it can create free radicals which cause ailments in the long run. According to diet consultant Naini Setalvad, Free radicals attach themselves to healthy cells and lead to diseases. These free radicals can be carcinogenic i.e. can cause cancer and also atherosclerosis which can lead to increase in bad cholesterol levels, blocking the arteries.

    Some other potential health risks of reusing oil include:

    • Acidity
    • Heart disease
    • Alzheimer s and Parkinson s disease
    • Irritable throat (due to inhalation)

    How many times can one reuse oil?

    Says nutritionist Priya Kathpal, There is no set number to how many times one can reuse the oil as it depends on factors like which oil is used, how long the oil was heated, was it used for deep frying or shallow frying, what type of food was cooked in it etc…

    Though using a fresh batch every time is good, it is not really practical. But if done correctly, one can reduce the risk of negative effects that reused oil may pose. Priya lists a few pointers to help you reuse oil safely.

    • Make sure the leftover oil from cooking or frying is cooled down and then transferred into an airtight container through a strainer/cheesecloth. This will remove any food particles in the oil as they spoil the oil much sooner than expected.
    • Make sure you check the oil each time before reusing for the colour and thickness. If it s dark in colour and is greasy/sticky than usual it is time to change the oil.
    • Also, if the oil is smokey on heating much before than expected, you need to discard this batch as it may have accumulated HNE which is a toxic substance that has been associated with a number of diseases including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, stroke, liver disease, etc.
    • Another thing to remember is that not all oils are same. Some of them have a high smoke point i.e. they can be used for frying, deep frying. Basically they do not break down at high temperatures. Such oils include sunflower, safflower, soybean, rice bran, peanut, sesame, mustard and canola oil. Oils which do not have a high smoke point such as olive oil should only be used for saut ing, nothing which will involve high temperatures. So make sure you do not use the wrong oil for cooking and definitely don’t reuse it for frying, etc.

    You may also like to read:

    For more articles on diet & fitness, visit our diet & fitness section. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for all the latest updates! For daily free health tips, sign up for our newsletter. And to join discussions on health topics of your choice, visit our forum.

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    Obviously I fried mines for too long last night. The inside was fine but the cornmeal was so crispy, it crunched like a thick potato chip! My first experience was better, but I can’t remember how long I cooked it.

    Can you re-use the oil? Are you supposed to filter it if you do. Best answer 10 points by the end of the hour.

    If somebody could break it down in minutes, I’d appreciate it!

    14 Answers

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    You only cook it until it is golden brown. Take it out and let it drain on a paper towel. It will continue to cook even after you take it our for a minute because of the heat. You can reuse the oil for fish. I wouldn’t use it for anything else because it would make other foods have that fish taste. I don’t filter it but you probably should.

    I usually cook for 4-5 minutes depending on the size of the filets.

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    I don’t know where some of these answers are coming from but I deep fry my fish 3 – 5 minutes at about 325 degrees. That’s all the time it takes, otherwise you’re over cooking it. I reuse my oil probably 8 – 10 times before replacing it. The fish always turns out excellent, with no foul tastes or odors. Most people won’t use the oil for anything but fish, but I will use that oil occasionally to for potatoes I’ve cut into fries. Now that’s a tasty fish & chip dinner. 🙂

    Singapore

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    Reusing cooking oil over and over could expose you to harmful chemicals. ST FILE PHOT0

    Reader Kelvin Leong wrote in to ask about reusing oil for cooking.

    He said: “I keep the oil (rice bran oil) after deep-frying meat or seafood, and use it for a few rounds. I keep it clean by straining it.

    “I am aware that the quality will deteriorate with each reuse, but it is such a waste to pour the oil away after one or two times. Please tell me how many times I can safely reuse the oil.” Food writer Eunice Quek finds out.

    According to the Health Promotion Board, one should avoid reusing oil more than twice. Reusing oil too many times can increase exposure to free radicals, which can cause cell damage, says Ms Bibi Chia, who is principal dietitian at the Raffles Diabetes & Endocrine Centre.

    “Heat-sensitive vitamins and antioxidants will be reduced after each use,” she notes.

    Her advice is to check the colour of the oil before reusing – discard it if it has turned dark or black. It should also be discarded if it smells rancid or has turned thick and sticky.

    To remove crumbs from the oil after frying, use a strainer or cheesecloth. Allow the oil to cool before storing in an airtight container, away from exposure to air and light.

    The same storage method applies whether the oil is peanut, corn, sunflower, grapeseed or olive.

    However, whether you should reuse the oil depends on its smoking point. That refers to the temperature at which the oil starts to smoke and break down rapidly. The smoking point is reduced each time the oil is reused.

    Only oils with higher smoking points can be reused, says Ms Chia. Extra virgin olive oil, for example, has a low smoking point, and is not recommended for reuse as there could be exposure to harmful chemicals.

    Ms Chia says: “When choosing oil, think of the temperature needed to prepare the food, and the flavour you want the food to have. Use only one or two types of oil at a time, to keep them fresh. Heat, light and exposure to air can cause oils to turn rancid or taste bad.”

    Obviously I fried mines for too long last night. The inside was fine but the cornmeal was so crispy, it crunched like a thick potato chip! My first experience was better, but I can’t remember how long I cooked it.

    Can you re-use the oil? Are you supposed to filter it if you do. Best answer 10 points by the end of the hour.

    4 Answers

    You only cook it until it is golden brown. Take it out and let it drain on a paper towel. It will continue to cook even after you take it our for a minute because of the heat. You can reuse the oil for fish. I wouldn’t use it for anything else because it would make other foods have that fish taste. I don’t filter it but you probably should.

    I usually cook for 4-5 minutes depending on the size of the filets.

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    after frying fish, fry at least one potato cut into slices, wedges or fries! This will clean the oil of the fish flavor. You can leave it in the kettle or strain it back into the bottle.

    2-3 minutes per side, depending on thickness. I filter and refuse the oil but only for frying more fish. The oil it tends to taste like fish.

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    i leave it in for about 10 minutes. it depends on the type of fish.

    you can re-use oil! you do need to filter it. there could be nasty gunk in it.

    This post may contain affiliate links.
    If you buy something from one of the linked sites you won’t pay anything more, but I might make a commission.

    I love deep frying food. When the weather gets cold the ice cream maker goes away and the deep fryer comes out. French fries, donuts, battered Oreos, everything tempura. It’s all amazing.

    But what isn’t amazing is how expensive peanut oil is. The more food particles I can filter out of it, the longer I can keep a batch of oil in use.

    I’ve tried every different technique for filtering the oil I could think of. Cheesecloth only worked if I layered four or five pieces together, and it was really difficult to keep little pieces of cheesecloth fabric out of the oil. And it was in no way reusable. A mesh strainer was easier, but a lot of tiny particles still got through.

    I have finally hit on a method that keeps basically every single visible particle out: straining through a nut milk bag.

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    What the heck is a nut milk bag? It’s supposed to be used for making nut milk (duh). It’s made of a very tightly-woven material for keeping all of the non-milk nut bits in the bag, which makes it perfect for straining cooking oil!

    What you need:

    • Used cooking oil
    • Nut milk bag
    • Funnel
    • Oil storage container
    • Another person

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    Take the nut milk bag and put it inside of the funnel, draping it over the top of the funnel. If your bag has a drawstring, pull it tight to help keep it secure on the funnel.

    Put the funnel in the storage container (I just use the plastic bottle the oil came in). While one person holds the funnel, the other person pours the oil in slowly. That’s it!!

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    You can hand wash the nut milk bag with water and dish detergent, let it air dry, and use it over and over again. Put the oil in the refrigerator to use again!

    Not only will your oil last longer, but it will help keep your foods from tasting like each other (although nothing will help fishy smells – you might want to use a separate batch of oil just for fish).

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    • University of Toronto

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    star5112 / Flickr / CC BY 2.0

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    Here are some suggestions that will, hopefully, prevent the formation of future fatbergs.

    One can’t help but feel terribly sorry for the eight employees of Thames Water in London who are working non-stop to clear away the enormous ‘fatberg’ currently clogging pipes beneath Whitechapel. While pipe blockages are a regular occurrence, this is the biggest yet – a whopping 145-ton mass the size of 11 double-decker buses (or a blue whale!), made from a strange combination of solidified cooking oil and wet wipes. “Yuck” is a serious understatement.

    This problem, however, goes to show that London residents – and, doubtless, many others around the world – persist in their cluelessness about how to dispose of these everyday products. We’ve written many times on TreeHugger about the perils of so-called disposable wipes; one could say we’re flush with posts on the topic. But cooking oil is one that has not been discussed in as much detail, so here we go with tips on how to use, reuse, and discard old oil.

    Cooking oil should never be flushed down the toilet or poured into a sink, no matter how much hot water or soap chases it down.

    Cook Wisely

    Cooking oil takes on the flavor of whatever it has cooked, so try to cook like with like. Think, too, about the order in which you fry foods. Breaded items tend to leave a lot of residue, whereas vegetables (with or without batters) are much cleaner; cook in order of cleanest to messiest. If you’re frying meat like chicken, the fat will render during the frying process and mingle with the cooking oil, which can shorten its lifespan.

    Use Solid Oils

    I make this statement from a disposal point of view. Cook with oils that solidify once they cool, such as coconut oil, lard, vegetable shortening, or bacon fat. These are easiest to dispose of, since you can scrape them into the garbage directly. (Read further about the environmental and ethical effects of different cooking oils here.) Of course, it’s harder to use these solid oils in the large quantities required for deep-frying, which leads to the next point .

    Use Less Oil

    The main reason I don’t own a deep fryer is because I don’t want to deal with old cooking oil. It’s too much hassle, and strikes me as wasteful, not to mention unhealthy. When a recipe requires frying (like latkes or falafel), then I use much less oil than it calls for. Sure, the texture may not be perfect, but then I don’t have surplus kicking around and can look forward to the real thing at a restaurant sometime.

    Reuse

    You should reuse old oil as much as possible. Cool the oil, strain through cheesecloth to get rid of food bits, and store in a glass jar (or the original container) in a dark cupboard.

    There is no limit to the number of times you can reuse old cooking oil, but you should watch for signs of degradation, such as a murky appearance, foam, or an odor that’s off.

    Mix With New

    Food52 says it’s possible to mix small quantities of old oil with new for better frying.

    “As oil breaks down, the molecules become less hydrophobic, which means they can come in closer contact with the food; thus, frying can happen more efficiently! (We learned this, too, from Kenji at Serious Eats.) This is why you’ll hear that some people reserve old oil for mixing with new oil. At some point, however, used oil becomes so much less hydrophobic than in its original state that it enters the food too quickly, which leads to sog and grease.”

    Discard Wisely

    There are a few recommendations for disposing of old oil. You should see if your city or municipality accepts cooking oil for recycling. (This is what fast-food venues typically do, as old oil now has value as biofuel.)

    If you cannot recycle or reuse, you can pour the old oil into a non-recyclable sealable container and dump in the trash. This is the official recommendation from Thames Water.

    Personally, I dislike the idea of tossing oil in the trash. I prefer to dig a hole in a corner of the yard near the compost bin and pour it in. It’s cleaner, simpler, and really no different than sending it to a landfill.

    Obviously I fried mines for too long last night. The inside was fine but the cornmeal was so crispy, it crunched like a thick potato chip! My first experience was better, but I can’t remember how long I cooked it.

    Can you re-use the oil? Are you supposed to filter it if you do. Best answer 10 points by the end of the hour.

    If somebody could break it down in minutes, I’d appreciate it!

    14 Answers

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    You only cook it until it is golden brown. Take it out and let it drain on a paper towel. It will continue to cook even after you take it our for a minute because of the heat. You can reuse the oil for fish. I wouldn’t use it for anything else because it would make other foods have that fish taste. I don’t filter it but you probably should.

    I usually cook for 4-5 minutes depending on the size of the filets.

    How to Filter Fry Oil for Reuse

    I don’t know where some of these answers are coming from but I deep fry my fish 3 – 5 minutes at about 325 degrees. That’s all the time it takes, otherwise you’re over cooking it. I reuse my oil probably 8 – 10 times before replacing it. The fish always turns out excellent, with no foul tastes or odors. Most people won’t use the oil for anything but fish, but I will use that oil occasionally to for potatoes I’ve cut into fries. Now that’s a tasty fish & chip dinner. 🙂