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How to get free building materials

How to Get Free Building Materials

Image by Theresa Chiechi © The Balance 2019

There are numerous ways to find free reclaimed lumber. If you know where to look, you can find salvaged timbers that are free for the taking. Here are a few ways to get the free recycled wood you are looking for.

Old Barns and Buildings

Old barns and mills are a great source for high-quality virgin timber. Many are long past their prime and have begun falling apart or the owners are in the middle of tearing it down. Most barn owners will happily give you their old dilapidated barn just to get it out of the way and cleaned up.

You can post an ad online or with the local newspaper, letting people know you’ll pick up any discarded lumber.

You may be surprised by the volume of calls you receive. Many old barns have been neglected for several years and even decades. Once the roof of a building starts to go, it doesn’t take long for the structure to be in very poor shape. Beams begin to rot, the framing starts to buckle and slip off the foundation and soon you have a very large liability. Insurance companies refuse to insure the barn. The building becomes a huge blight, and it is dangerous to be around it.

This is a helpful situation for both the barn owner and yourself. The service you are providing is worth many times over what the wood in the building is worth to the owner of that structure.

Excavators

Many times the first call a farmer or developer will make when they need to dispose of an old barn or building is to an excavation company. This can be a big opportunity for you to pick up some free reclaimed lumber. Contact some excavators in your area and give them your business card.

Let them know that you recycle wood from old barns and buildings. Try to get them to call you before they start a demolition project. This way you can look at the barn before they begin, and possibly go in and reclaim as much wood as you can before they get started.

This will appeal to excavation contractors because they will have less wood to dispose of. They may even allow you to do a complete reclamation. It’s a bonus for you because you don’t have to dispose of junk material.

Remodeling Contractors

Wouldn’t it be great if all you had to do to get free reclaimed lumber is drop off a trailer wait a few days and pick it up full of reclaimed wood? You really can do just that! Here is what you need to do.

Get in contact with some remodeling contractors in your area. Let them know that you will haul away any wood that they tear out of a house. Contractors will be happy to give the antique building materials to you, it will save them a bunch of money on disposal costs. This works best if you are in an area where there are a lot of old houses.

Make sure to let the contractor know that you are recycling the wood, and you take wood only. No drywall, insulation or other debris–only wood; nails are okay if they are in the wood. If it becomes a problem and you are finding a lot of debris, you can start charging a disposal fee.

You will get some junk wood and possibly some lumber scraps. It is okay if you do. You can sell the scraps in bundles of campfire wood or burn it for heat in a wood stove.

How to Get Free Building Materials

Once you get your full compliment of used and refurbished tools, the search is on for reclaimed and used building materials for your home project. If local resources like your city’s Craigslist don’t help you find what your looking for, log on and have a look at PlanetReuse.

Designed for anyone who needs to buy or sell reclaimed, reused or excess materials and tools, PlanetReuse gives an online home to sellers, who create (free!) listings for their products including pictures, a verbal description, quantity and cost; buyers can browse by a number of categories including location, material and product to find what they are looking for. Designers and architects (or just interested individuals) who have projects trying to qualify for LEED certification can see the travel distance by looking at the more in-depth listing page; a message board is there to help provide answers for questions about a listing. ::PlanetReuse

Difficulty level: Easy

Related Content

How to Get Free Building Materials

How to Get Free Building Materials

How to Get Free Building Materials

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November 28, 2010 by Cathy

Every day I receive emails asking be how to get rid of stuff, especially reclaimed wood, golf balls and quite a few others. Of course local charities, thrift shops, Salvation Army and Goodwill will be happy to take your used household goods and materials to resell. You do have alternatives to not only give your stuff away but to also get free stuff.

Free Giving Away Sites and A Few To Sell.

  1. Craigslist.com
  2. Yingyango– Free giving away site
  3. Giving Away- Free site to post things to giveaway
  4. Freecycle Free to join, ask or give away anything, but mainly household goods.
  5. Free Sharing-Groups that free recycle objects they don’t want
  6. ecycler – Site for giving away your recyclable materials, you can also find recyclable materials as well. You can make money as well as lower trash bills (if you are on the pay to throw program)
  7. Recycle Bank- check with local city, recycle and earn points towards a variety of gifts.
  8. Call2 Recycle- Electronic recycling with over 30,000 drop offs in the USA
  9. Gigoit- Garbage In and Garbage Out- US, Canada and UK. A search box locates reusable items people are giving aways. Can list your own items
  10. Throw Place-Throwplace.com® is a Web site where global users may list goods they wish to give away to others. Charities, Businesses or Individuals registered with Throwplace.com® are able to search the site and make requests for items of interest. Items listed on Throwplace are not for sale—they are to be donated.
  11. Selling Bin– Network of recyclers who might buy back your old stuff.
  12. Take My Mac– Buys back your old mac or apple device
  13. Reuse Market – All sorts of household good, art supplies, office supplies and more.

Building Materials- Used and New, Salvage and Reclaimed

If you have old barns and structures and remodeling materials you want to either sell or give away. The first I would go to is click your state link on this site left sidebar. Each State has a Reclaimed wood/ Salvage listing. Each state also has a Habitat or a Restore listing in which you can find or donate any new and used building materials.

Every construction job has costs for material and labor. The lower a contractor can keep those costs, the more profit each job will generate. Negotiating good materials prices is just as important as having the right tools for the job, and that is why every contractor should focus on ways to get building materials at a discount and put more profit on the bottom line.

There are many ways to get discounts on your construction supplies.

Free Delivery

When you negotiate materials costs with suppliers, always be sure to ask for free delivery. In some cases, you will not get free delivery if you do not ask. Free delivery not only cuts back on your costs for buying materials, but it also frees up your crew and truck to be more productive on the job site.

Always Buy Wholesale

One of the biggest benefits of establishing a strong relationship with a materials supplier is the ability to buy materials at wholesale prices. The discount from retail to wholesale pricing is considerable, and you can establish wholesale relationships with suppliers simply by providing a copy of your business license or your contractor’s license. You should also consider establishing relationships for wholesale pricing with online suppliers as well, just in case your local suppliers cannot get you the materials you need.

Look For Seasonal Bargains

If your company builds decks, then recommend to your clients that they have their decks built in the fall to take advantage of lower materials pricing. Seasonal pricing is common for a wide variety of materials because suppliers have limited space in their warehouses to store certain materials. Pressure-treated wood is usually more expensive during the summer because that is when it is most popular. If you have a warehouse of your own, then you can save money on your summer building by storing seasonal materials at lower prices and using them in your upcoming projects.

Try To Get Payment Terms

It is always a good idea for any business to establish good credit, and you can do that as a contractor when you apply for credit terms with your materials suppliers. Some suppliers offer what are called NET30 terms, which means that you can buy materials today and then pay in 30 days. In some cases, these same suppliers offer discounts for paying your invoices early, which can help you to save money on the materials that you buy.

Put more money on your bottom line by spending less on materials.

Create A Network Of Suppliers

Creating competition is one way to keep prices down for your business, and you can do that by doing business with a network of suppliers instead of just one. In some cases, you might have suppliers constantly trying to give you discounts to win your exclusive business. If you come across that one supplier that constantly offers great pricing, then that is a good way to save money. However, your negotiating power comes from your network of suppliers and you should be very careful not to commit your business to just one materials company.

Paying for supplies is a necessary part of running a contracting business. If you start a course with PDH Contractors, you can learn how to maintain, renew, or upgrade your contracting license in your state. You can also use the library of information on PDH Contractors to learn different ways to get your supplies at discount prices and learn how to negotiate with suppliers as well as customers.

We found 147 ‘free building materials’ adverts for you in ‘diy and building materials’, in the UK and Ireland

Free Hardcore

This advert is located in and around Northolt, Middx

How to Get Free Building Materials

Hardcore Rubble

This advert is located in and around Nottingham, Nottinghamshire

Free Hard Core

This advert is located in and around Rochester, Kent

How to Get Free Building Materials

Brick Rubble

This advert is located in and around Nottingham, Nottinghamshire

FREE! Guttering and Pipes – Various

This advert is located in and around Selston, Nottinghamshire

How to Get Free Building Materials

Gothic glass and brass corner shelf reduced

This advert is located in and around Carnforth, Lancashire

How to Get Free Building Materials

Bradstone 450mm x 450mm paving slabs

This advert is located in and around Middleton, Manchester

How to Get Free Building Materials

6 pallets (euro size) – free to collect

This advert is located in and around Rugby, Warwickshire

Rigid white backboard for tall larder unit

This advert is located in and around Paignton, Devon

How to Get Free Building Materials

Under-floor Heating Pipe Staple Gun

This advert is located in and around Shirebrook, Derbyshire

How to Get Free Building Materials

heavy duty paving blocks

This advert is located in and around Crawcrook, [email protected]

How to Get Free Building Materials

WORKTOPS. 2 Brand new Howdens square edged laminate worktops

This advert is located in and around Colchester, Essex

How to Get Free Building Materials

garmin sat-nav

This advert is located in and around Derby, Derbyshire

How to Get Free Building Materials

1 ton of ballast

This advert is located in and around Reading, Berkshire

How to Get Free Building Materials

Wall tiles

This advert is located in and around Lampeter, Ceredigion

How to Get Free Building Materials

Slim Wall Tiles – FREE

This advert is located in and around Bingham, Nottinghamshire

How to Get Free Building Materials

Grey square tiles – FREE – COLLECTION ONLY

This advert is located in and around Bingham, Nottinghamshire

How to Get Free Building Materials

Three Storey House Passenger Lift

This advert is located in and around Ashford, Kent

How to Get Free Building Materials

Rosemary Roof Tiles

This advert is located in and around Morecambe, Lancs

How to Get Free Building Materials

WANTED free pallets – HT marked only, not coloured

This advert is located in and around Milford Haven, Dyfed

How to Get Free Building Materials

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Choosing building materials can be overwhelming when building a custom home. There is a lot to consider throughout the home building process, but if you are looking for some insight on what materials are available and what should be considered, check out this basic guide.

Remember that there are many options for building materials with a custom home—more than we can cover in this guide—but you don’t have to figure everything out yourself. Whitmire Custom Homes is based in Gainesville, Georgia and serves metro Atlanta and the North Georgia area. Whimtmire has a team of architects and home building experts that are happy to help you choose building materials based on your goals and expectations. Contact us to learn more about how we can help you, or schedule a free consultation today to get started!

What Do I Need to Consider?

Upfront Cost and Life Expectancy
If you are interested in building an affordable home, your first reaction may be to choose cheaper materials to build your home. While the more expensive options aren’t always the best fit, the cheaper materials do tend to require more frequent replacements. That’s what it’s important to consider life expectancy in addition to upfront material cost.

If material A costs $5 per unit, but material B costs $7 per unit and are both meet your stylistic expecations, you may be inclined to choose material A. But if material A will need to be replaced in 3 years, while material B will need to be replaced in 6 years, material A will actually be more expensive in the long run. These are important factors to consider if you plan to stay in your custom home for many years!

Energy Efficiency
Cheaper materials are often less energy efficient. Consider how much insulation is provided by the materials you choose for walls, windows, doors and roofing. Sometimes, choosing a more expensive material will offset the costs in future energy savings because you will use less electricity and gas to cool and heat your home.

Aesthetics
Which parts of the home do you want to emphasize? What types of materials are more aesthetically pleasing? Consider the natural and manmade environment surrounding your home. This, of course, is a matter of personal tastes. In selecting building materials, it is up to you to reach a balance between visual appeal, energy efficiency and cost.

Building Materials to Think About

Below is a list of material types you may consider during the building process:

House Framing Materials:

  • Wood framing
  • Concrete block framing
  • Steel framing

Siding Materials:

  • Wood siding
  • Composite siding
  • Fiber cement board siding
  • Brick siding

Stone Veneer

Windows and Glass Doors

Exterior Door Materials & Hardware

Interior Door Materials:

Roofing Materials:

  • Asphalt shingles
  • Wood shingles
  • Metal roofing
  • Cement tiles
  • Rubber roofing

Drywall:

  • Regular drywall
  • Mold resistant drywall
  • Moisture resistant drywall
  • Fire resistant drywall

Floors:

Interior and Exterior Paint

Cabinetry:

  • Ready-to-Assemble cabinets
  • Stock cabinets
  • Semi-Custom cabinets
  • Custom cabinets

Shower Enclosure Materials:

  • Full-framed shower doors
  • Semi-frameless shower doors
  • Frameless shower doors
  • Glass materials

Deck Materials

  • Pressure treated wood decks
  • Composite decks
  • Tropical wood decks

Driveway Materials

This list serves as a starting point for the many options you have when custom building your home. Ready to sit down and talk about building your dream home? Schedule a free consultation with Whitmire today!

Environment

How to Get Free Building Materials

  • 08/13/2010
  • under Eco Textiles, Environment, Recycling

There are tons of serviceable materials discarded from construction and renovation projects every day. Sometimes, a thoughtful or enterprising individual will find a way to reuse a particular material in a new construction project. LEED encourages the reuse of building materials as well, but unless you are well connected — or just very lucky — it can be difficult to find a source for reclaimed and recycled materials. However, websites are beginning to connect interested designers with people who have available materials for sale — or sometimes even for free.

  • How to Get Free Building Materials
  • How to Get Free Building Materials
  • How to Get Free Building Materials
  • How to Get Free Building Materials
  • How to Get Free Building Materials
  • How to Get Free Building Materials

How to Get Free Building Materials

EcoHome pointed out a new network called C&D Material Trader, which focuses on materials for building trades. It is a startup, and there are only networks in New York and North Carolina, but others should be coming along soon. Eventually, the site hopes to be expand down to city or region level, allowing more local selections to be listed.

At JetsonGreen, Preston has pointed out another site called Planet Reuse which has hundreds of items from across the country. Planet Reuse is great fun to browse through and see what materials strike your imagination. It lists everything nationally, however, so an intriguing item might not be that close by. On the other hand, it allows designers to look farther afield.

The LEED radius for locally-sourced materials is 500 miles, and that allows a lot of range to find things. Even if something is farther away, reusing a material that has special character can provide enough of a benefit to be worth considering.

If you know of other sites helping make these connections, please share those with us, too. Hopefully more and more items being listed will help make these networks more useful all-around and keep more useful materials from being landfilled.

How to Get Free Building Materials

Did you know that the National Association of Home Builders estimates that building a 2,000 square foot home creates up to 8,000 pounds of waste? And, despite the fact that about 85 percent of it could be reused or recycled, most of it is ending up in landfills. According to the EPA , it added up to 534 million tons in 2014. It’s a staggering, shameful waste. Fortunately, reclaiming, reusing, and recycling is becoming more common in the construction and renovation industry. Reclaimed building materials like doors, windows, wood flooring, and much more are becoming increasingly easy to find. Not only is reuse much more eco-friendly, it’s also incredibly budget-friendly: reclaimed materials can be 50 percent to 75 percent cheaper than their new counterparts. (Sometimes you can even find free materials! Hello dreamy, inexpensive sustainable home!) Plus, often times your recycled building materials come with a colorful history or weathered appearance that adds a truly unique touch to your project. Ready to find some secondhand solutions for your next project? Here’s how to find reclaimed home building materials.

11 resources for finding reclaimed home building materials

Craigslist

You might not think of recycled “building materials” when you think of Craigslist, but it’s actually a really great resource for lumber, bricks, cabinetry, flooring, roofing, and more. Most of your options will be materials that are being resold but don’t forget to check the “free” tab. You might also find brand new materials – the extras from other people’s projects that they couldn’t return. Check the site regularly and set up saved searches to get alerts when someone posts the materials you’re looking for.

Planet Reuse

Planet Reuse isn’t just a source for finding materials, they also provide helpful services. The PlanetReuse Marketplace lets visitors browse residential and commercial reused building materials, making the once time-consuming act of tracking down materials quick and easy. Through their Consulting Services , they offer insight and expertise on how to incorporate materials into your design, connect you with the perfect materials, and handle every last exhaustive detail. They even broker a wide variety of reused and recycled building material types to fit every need and budget.

ReuseWood.org

The American Wood Council (AWC) and Canadian Wood Council (CWC) partnered with the Building Materials Reuse Association (BMRA) to develop an online North American directory outlining reuse and recycling options for wood and wood products: ReuseWood.org . You can search the directory based on what’s available in a specific zip code and they offer an extremely wide variety of types of wood products including barn wood, board lumber, millwork, engineered flooring, medium density fiber board, consumer goods, heavy timber, I-joists, pallets, wood windows, wood doors, and more.

Nextdoor

This resource can be accessed online or through an app on your phone. It’s like Craigslist but for specific neighborhoods. There aren’t many ways to customize your search, but you can find some amazing deals. Look through postings or post an ISO with what you’re looking for. Like Craigslist, you’ll be able to find free and for sale items, but you can also try offering your services or unneeded items in exchange for reclaimed materials.

Freecycle

This website is similar to Nextdoor in that it’s organized by neighborhood, but everything listed is free. Not every neighborhood will have a Freecycle, but it’s definitely worth a shot to check and see – they claim to have over 5,000 groups with over 9 million members around the globe.

Residential construction dumpsters

When people do large remodeling projects they need to rent dumpsters to hold their construction waste. While it’s probably illegal to just jump in and hunt through the debris (check to see what the policy is where you live), if you ask politely, most people are open to the idea.

Friends and family

Try reaching out to friends and family for materials they might have. You’d be surprised how many project leftovers people hang on to. Your friends and family are also good resources for borrowing tools if you plan on doing a DIY home build or remodel.

Tear-down sites

These are gold mines for reclaimed and recycled building materials. Just like residential construction dumpsters, contractors doing a complete tear-down or home remodel have to dispose of their construction waste. Not only can you find all sorts of building materials to reclaim, but sinks and toilets can be reused too since most builders purchase new ones for their project. Try calling local contractors and ask if you can browse their latest sites; it might be helpful to specify exactly what you’re looking for. You may run into resistance from some contractors fearing safety and liability issues associated with literal “dumpster diving,” so ask if they will set reusable materials aside instead of burying them in the dumpster. You may find a sympathetic contractor who also hates seeing the waste and would love to see you find a new use for it. Here’s a great example of what a treasure trove a tear-down can be:

Habitat for Humanity Restores

Habitat for Humanity ReStores are nonprofit home improvement stores and donation centers that sell new and gently used furniture, appliances, home accessories, building materials, and more to the public at a fraction of the retail price. Not only are the prices great, you can also feel good knowing that proceeds go towards supporting your community and building affordable housing around the world.

Local salvage stores

Home salvage stores are private businesses that hunt down usable secondhand building materials – kind of like a thrift store for home renovators. Simply Google something like “salvage stores” or “reclaimed building materials” to find options in your area.

Flyers

It may be unconventional in our digital culture, but going the route of the old-fashioned flyer can be incredibly effective. Alyssa from Pure Living for Life describes the great success she and her husband had: “In our flyer, we created a short bio with a photo of our smiling faces. We feel that this shows a little bit of our story and also puts a face to the names which may encourage folks to call. We then included a list of the building materials or tools we were looking for and mentioned that we were interested in trades. Shortly after posting our flyer, a kind gentleman gave us a call. He was a long time contractor and remodeler so naturally, he had lots of leftover building materials laying around from past jobs. We ended up getting tons of fiberglass batt insulation for $50 ($500+ new), 5 double-pane vinyl windows for $200 ($1,000+ new), 2,000 bricks for $75 ($4,700 in value because they are “patina” bricks), 200 sq ft of new-in-box travertine ($450 new), high-density foam insulation ($550 new), work lights, buckets of electrical and plumbing materials, two wood stoves ($520 new), thirty 1x6x10′ cedar boards ($450 new), one sheet of plywood and more. Talk about hitting a gold mine!”

How to Get Free Building Materials

Wondering what material is better to build with?

Do you want to know what materials will work perfectly to build a distribution center? Whether your distribution center will store a considerable cache or toys or requires extreme measures of organization within its walls, there are a few materials from which you can choose to build the best possible building. We’ve tested several alternatives over the years, and finally, the results are in…Steel is the winner!

An Unbiased Look at Building Material Costs…

Steel Keeps Costs Low

In the US, steel happens to be one of the most readily available materials because it’s prime base is made from iron which happens to be the second most abundant mineral on earth. Steel is also easy to repurpose; it is estimated that up to 60% percent of high-quality red-iron I-beams are made from recycled steel, which makes them incredibly strong and affordable. Not to mention the fact that the price of steel is at an all-time low, it is the lowest in 15 years so now is the time to build.

How to Get Free Building Materials

Speed Though Building Construction

Do you need some space to store all those goods ASAP? Then a steel construction may be your only option as it takes the least time to build. Projects can take as little as a few days to complete, which means that you suffer from little to no downtime, and there is no loss of productivity. Plus, you’ll save in the way of labor costs because it only takes a few people to erect a steel structure.

The Least Labor Intensive to Build

In the construction industry, labor costs are a major factor, and that’s where steel wins again. Not only do you need fewer people to complete the warehouse building, but it’s done within a shorter time too. Plus the building is cheaper since the entire structure is designed and built off-site by the supplier and the labor just installs everything onsite. So, they don’t pose the same risk as regular construction, and there is a significant insurance saving too because of lower liabilities.

Easy to Modify

The quickly changing marketplace could mean that you need to add an extension to your warehouse ASAP or even a few years down the line. Here too, steel buildings win because they are easier to modify and expand. You don’t need to demolish the entire structure like you would with brick and wood. Plus the changes are more affordable, costing less than 3x times compared to regular building materials.

Maximize Your Use of the Space

Owing to the fast nature of steel construction projects, they can be completed within inclement weather. So, you have room for various mitigating factors like making up for an oddly shaped piece of land. Not to mention that since most steel buildings don’t require as many pillars, the amount of space that’s usable is much more compared to brick and wood buildings.

Conclusion

If you are in the market for an affordable, durable and low maintenance warehouse building, then you can’t go wrong with prefabricated steel buildings. We can also help you choose the right size, shape, and type of building, depending on your requirements.

Dayton-area residents impacted by the 15 Memorial Day tornadoes can get free building materials thanks to a Cleveland-based company with Gem City ties.

“We have many employees from the Dayton area, and we felt this was a great opportunity to step in and address a critical need,” Sarah Nash, the CEO of Novagard, said in a statement. “Novagard is in a position to help with the recovery and repair of scores of homes. We also appreciate the partnership with Habitat for Humanity, which is coordinating the use of our products directly with contractors.”

The company founded in 1977 shipped two semi truckloads of caulks, sealants and weather stripping valued at $200,000 to the Habitat for Humanity of Greater Dayton, an organization that builds affordable housing.

The donation included 30,000 tubes of caulk.

Michael “MK” Kister, Novagard’s marketing and product management vice president, said the company was happy to help.
“We were obviously moved by what was happening in the Dayton area,” said Kister, a Wayne High School graduate. “This is the worst disaster since the Xenia tornado.”

Kister was raised in Huber Heights. His parents, Patricia and Helmut Kister, reside in Oakwood.

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Dayton Executive Director Norman J. Miozzi said the product donation will be put to good use.

“It is available to any and all people (impacted by the tornadoes),” he said. “We are also making it available to all of the organizations that are in the Montgomery County Long Term Recovery group.”

Aside from Habitat, that group assembled by county officials includes The Dayton Foundation, St. Vincent de Paul, the United Way of Greater Dayton and St. Mary’s Development Corporation and several other agencies.

The items are available at Habitat’s ReStore located at 115 W. Riverview Ave. in Dayton. The phone number is 937-222-2296.

Credit: Easterling Studios

Credit: Easterling Studios

Miozzi said donations like the one made by Novagard are critical because about half of those impacted by the tornadoes had no insurance or were under-insured.

“For them to rebuild, it is going to take a lot of community involvement and donations to make people whole again,” he said.

Miozzi said it is going to take years before the community can recover from the disaster that wiped out or damaged more than 2,200 structures in Montgomery County alone, according to a report the county recently released.

“I am just impressed with how the community has come together to serve the people who are involved,” Miozzi said.

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Dayton typically builds about a dozen homes a year. Miozzi hopes to double that amount this year.

“Capacity is going to determine that,” he said.

The nonprofit employs about 20 and is hiring for three positions, including a construction site leader.

Nestle Purina Grants

When it comes to retail organizations that lead where they live, Lowe’s sets the bar high. In the past, they’ve had a strong reputation for being a great organization for applying to when seeking donations of materials for charitable or other community-boosting builds. Unfortunately, after 70 years of having an open application process, times have changed, and Lowe’s donation request program has ended.

TL;DR (Too Long; Didn’t Read)

As of spring 2020, you can’t get a material donation from Lowe’s unless your local store manager has a budget for community donations.

The Way it Was

For decades, Lowe’s Gives Foundation made it a priority to contribute to the community and give back by awarding community grants for $5,000 to $25,000. They favored projects that focused on community improvement and public education with a priority given to K-12 public schools. The grants were only considered for non-product organizations or public agencies that were 501(c) (3) tax-exempt. An eligibility test was also needed to be taken and passed.

Your local store may still be willing to donate gift cards, small amounts of building materials or door prizes, but that will be on a store-by-store basis and you’ll need to speak with the manager to see if your cause may be eligible.

Still Giving, Just Different

With the shifting economic sands of 2020, Lowe’s made changes to their program. The reality is that the opportunity to help and give back was omnipresent, and Lowe’s had no shortage of initiatives they could take. Plus, with 70 years of creating relationships with organizations, Lowe’s has seen what companies have done with the generosity previously provided to them, and Lowe’s is keen to leverage those relationships going forward.

While communities faced unprecedented public health emergencies in 2020, Lowe’s reoriented their community work to support frontline workers. When fatal tornadoes blew threw Tennessee, Lowe’s didn’t wait for Nashville to ask for help, they reached out to be an early responder in the efforts to rebuild. Instead of having people apply for grants, their teams seek for ways big and small to give back in the community around them, from building personal safety shields to making donations to first responders in Louisiana.

For organizations that have worked with Lowe’s in the past, there may be a belief that such help will be automatic in the future, but Lowe’s has a strategic plan for staying involved and says they will communicate with groups they’d like to continue helping.

Home Depot Grant Requests

Another big-box store, Home Depot does, in theory, contribute to smaller projects through its Community Impact Grants Program, but the public health emergency in 2020 saw Home Depot suspending this program as of March 17, 2020, for an indefinite period. Their page explaining the approvals process remains up, and the intention is to bring the program back at a later time, but their priority has been to assist in the public health emergency as long as it continues.

However, their Veteran Housing Grants Program continues operation and allows for grants between $100,000 and $500,000 for qualifying projects that serve large cities with a population of 300,000 or greater. They do have a strict list of requirements and compliances for those who are to be successful in their application, and it’s easily accessible on their website.

Don’t Give Up

Corporations have to go with the flow as the economy grows and shrinks. When adversity is more omnipresent, it makes sense to take the initiative to find projects rather than get deluded by an increasingly struggling public looking for help in all kinds of places.

But tides rise and fall and these charitable programs will change as the economy shifts too, so check back and always visit your local store in case they’ve got a local community budget.

Rebuilding America and crowdsourcing materials

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Share All sharing options for: Death Stranding guide: How to build structures and find materials

How to Get Free Building Materials

Kojima Productions/Sony Interactive Entertainment via Polygon

In Death Stranding, structures that you make can appear in the games of other players. It’s easy to put up ladders, recharge stations, and small shelters on your own, but much larger structures like bridges need hundreds (sometimes thousands) of crafting materials to finish construction. And it’s difficult to find and gather those on your own.

While it is possible to build these all yourself, you can also rely on others to provide materials. But just how do you build these larger structures cooperatively? We’ll show you in this guide.

How to build large structures

One of the first large structures you’ll be able to build is a bridge, but building a bridge is more complicated than just setting down the PCC machine that fabricates structures. For large structures, the PCC will only lay a foundation. From there, it’s up to you (and potentially other players) to pour resources (like metals) into the structure before you can make the full bridge.

To add materials to a structure, walk up to it and hold down the Option button. From the menu that loads, select Complete Structure, where you can add materials and aid in its completion. (If you don’t have any of the available materials to complete a structure — such as ceramics, metals, and special alloys — the option will be unavailable.)

How to Get Free Building Materials

The Complete Structure menu tells us that we need 800 metals to turn the foundation into a bridge. Kojima Productions/Sony Interactive Entertainment via Polygon

In the Complete Structure menu, you’ll see how many resources you need to finish construction (800 metals in the screenshot above). You can add materials to the structure in the same way that you’d store items in private locker. Once you’ve added enough materials to the structure, it will automatically finish building itself.

How to get building materials

When an object needs hundreds or thousands of resources, where do you find them all?

As you play Death Stranding, you’ll likely stumble across resources all over the map. Everything from metals to ceramics, special alloys, and more appear just about anywhere in typically small quantities. This is an easy way to get building resources as you travel, but it’d take days to find the hundreds or thousands of materials that you need this way.

Instead, you can gather mountains of resources anywhere that you can access a delivery terminal. And you can increase the amount of materials available at each terminal in a few ways.

The first is by completing deliveries to that terminal — and eventually increasing your Death Stranding connection level with the person or people near the terminal.

How to Get Free Building Materials

Complete deliveries and orders to increase the amount of materials available to you at a terminal. Kojima Productions/Sony Interactive Entertainment via Polygon

Also, when you and other players recycle materials at a terminal, you not only increase the amount of resources available at that terminal, but you can withdraw what you deposit.

To get materials from a delivery terminal, select the Claim Materials menu and grab as many as you can carry.

Some locations may have literal tons of materials, so it’s best to claim massive amounts of crafting materials for structures after you have access to vehicles. Load up your vehicle, and drive it as close to a structure as you can. Get off the vehicle, access the structure’s menu, and add the materials from the vehicle to it.

For larger structures in the mid- to late-game, you may need to make several trips between terminals, but this is still the fastest way to gain more materials to build the game’s biggest structures.

When facilities don’t have the materials you need, you can always raid MULE camps for materials. Use you odradek to scan a camp and see what’s stored in their hidden lockers before raiding.

Not your everyday building supply stores, Habitat for Humanity ReStores accept and sell a wide variety of new and used building materials. When donated goods are sold, they are kept out of your local landfill and given a second life.

Find or donate building materials at your local Habitat ReStore

Looking for new and gently used building supplies? Have some leftover materials from a recent home remodel you’re ready to donate? Whether you are looking to shop or donate building materials, Habitat ReStore can help. Use the search below to find and contact the store closest to you.

What building materials can you find at your local Habitat ReStore?

Make Habitat ReStore your first stop for shopping! You’ll find items and deals you won’t find at other home repair stores.

Most Habitat ReStores have a wide variety of building materials for sale, and selection at each store will vary depending on what donations they have recently received. See the list at the bottom of this article for materials you may find at Habitat ReStore.

In addition to used items, many stores carry new surplus building materials donated by businesses in your community and around the country.

What building materials donations does Habitat ReStore accept?

Your local Habitat ReStore likely accepts a wide variety of new and gently used home building materials. Many donations come from home renovation projects.

The donations accepted by Habitat ReStores will vary by store, but most will accept the following:

  • Kitchen cabinets
  • Doors and windows
  • Flooring
  • Unused lumber
  • Lighting fixtures
  • Fencing
  • Bricks/blocks

Enter you ZIP code in the red box above to find the contact information for a Habitat ReStore near you. Call, email or stop by to see if your store accepts the building and construction materials you have to donate. Many stores even offer donation pickup.

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How to Get Free Building Materials

MJ Scaffolding Service

  • Dublin
  • 54 days
  • 54 days
  • Dublin

in Building Materials

How to Get Free Building Materials

Roofing felt torch on mineral felt

  • Dublin
  • 3 days
  • 3 days
  • Dublin

in Building Materials

How to Get Free Building Materials

Steel stillage for sale 400ono

  • Wexford
  • 13 mins
  • 13 mins
  • Wexford

in Building Materials

How to Get Free Building Materials

Site gauge for an oil tank. 51 cm.

  • Donegal
  • 24 mins
  • 24 mins
  • Donegal

in Building Materials

How to Get Free Building Materials

Manual roller shutters

  • Longford
  • 29 mins
  • 29 mins
  • Longford

in Building Materials

How to Get Free Building Materials

Fall Arrest Bags/Beanbags

  • Fermanagh
  • 30 mins
  • 30 mins
  • Fermanagh

in Building Materials

How to Get Free Building Materials

10 BAY SHELVING 1960X1200X500 Galvanise

  • Dublin
  • 32 mins
  • 32 mins
  • Dublin

in Building Materials

  • Cavan
  • 36 mins
  • 36 mins
  • Cavan

in Building Materials

Commercial extractor fun

  • Dublin
  • 50 mins
  • 50 mins
  • Dublin

in Building Materials

  • Sligo
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Sligo

in Building Materials

  • Galway
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Galway

in Building Materials

  • Roscommon
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Roscommon

in Building Materials

  • Galway
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Galway

in Building Materials

Ford Transit Van Rubber Mat

  • Offaly
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Offaly

in Building Materials

4kWe PV 2.4 Solar Battery storage System Kit Form

  • Limerick
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Limerick

in Building Materials

  • Galway
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Galway

in Building Materials

  • Monaghan
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Monaghan

in Building Materials

  • Monaghan
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Monaghan

in Building Materials

  • Monaghan
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Monaghan

in Building Materials

  • Monaghan
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Monaghan

in Building Materials

  • Monaghan
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Monaghan

in Building Materials

  • Dublin
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Dublin

in Building Materials

  • Cork
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Cork

in Building Materials

Bin Storage System Bench Mounting 15 Bins

  • Kilkenny
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Kilkenny

in Building Materials

  • Longford
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Longford

in Building Materials

  • Westmeath
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Westmeath

in Building Materials

  • Offaly
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Offaly

in Building Materials

  • Waterford
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Waterford

in Building Materials

  • Sligo
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Sligo

in Building Materials

  • Galway
  • 1 hour
  • 1 hour
  • Galway

Dayton-area residents impacted by the 15 Memorial Day tornadoes can get free building materials thanks to a Cleveland-based company with Gem City ties.

“We have many employees from the Dayton area, and we felt this was a great opportunity to step in and address a critical need,” Sarah Nash, the CEO of Novagard, said in a statement. “Novagard is in a position to help with the recovery and repair of scores of homes. We also appreciate the partnership with Habitat for Humanity, which is coordinating the use of our products directly with contractors.”

The company founded in 1977 shipped two semi truckloads of caulks, sealants and weather stripping valued at $200,000 to the Habitat for Humanity of Greater Dayton, an organization that builds affordable housing.

The donation included 30,000 tubes of caulk.

Michael “MK” Kister, Novagard’s marketing and product management vice president, said the company was happy to help.
“We were obviously moved by what was happening in the Dayton area,” said Kister, a Wayne High School graduate. “This is the worst disaster since the Xenia tornado.”

Kister was raised in Huber Heights. His parents, Patricia and Helmut Kister, reside in Oakwood.

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Dayton Executive Director Norman J. Miozzi said the product donation will be put to good use.

“It is available to any and all people (impacted by the tornadoes),” he said. “We are also making it available to all of the organizations that are in the Montgomery County Long Term Recovery group.”

Aside from Habitat, that group assembled by county officials includes The Dayton Foundation, St. Vincent de Paul, the United Way of Greater Dayton and St. Mary’s Development Corporation and several other agencies.

The items are available at Habitat’s ReStore located at 115 W. Riverview Ave. in Dayton. The phone number is 937-222-2296.

Credit: Easterling Studios

Credit: Easterling Studios

Miozzi said donations like the one made by Novagard are critical because about half of those impacted by the tornadoes had no insurance or were under-insured.

“For them to rebuild, it is going to take a lot of community involvement and donations to make people whole again,” he said.

Miozzi said it is going to take years before the community can recover from the disaster that wiped out or damaged more than 2,200 structures in Montgomery County alone, according to a report the county recently released.

“I am just impressed with how the community has come together to serve the people who are involved,” Miozzi said.

Habitat for Humanity of Greater Dayton typically builds about a dozen homes a year. Miozzi hopes to double that amount this year.

“Capacity is going to determine that,” he said.

The nonprofit employs about 20 and is hiring for three positions, including a construction site leader.

Estimating construction materials starts with a basic count of the framing lumber, often called a framing takeoff. A takeoff for a wall frame includes counting the studs (typically 2×4 or 2×6), the headers for door and window openings (using 2x12s is simplest), and horizontal plates for the top and bottom of the wall (plates use the same lumber as the studs). In addition, your framing takeoff may include ​calculating the number of sheets of sheathing required for the exterior side of the wall.

Start With a Plan or Sketch

How to Get Free Building Materials

It’s easiest to do a takeoff when you’re working from a set of construction plans or at least from a rough sketch of the wall frame. If you don’t have construction drawings, start by creating a sketch of the wall to identify the overall length and height of the wall and the size of all door and window openings. Determine the “on-center” spacing of the wall studs: the distance between the centers of neighboring studs. Standard stud spacing is 16 inches on-center. Also, note any corners in the wall or places where the wall intersects with other walls.

Estimate the Plates

How to Get Free Building Materials

Standard frames for load-bearing walls include a single bottom plate and two top plates. To calculate the linear feet needed for the plates, multiply the total length of the wall times 3, then add 5 to 10 percent for waste.

For example, if the wall is 20 feet long, you would need 60 linear feet of plate lumber plus 1 to 2 feet for waste. Depending on the length of the wall, you may decide to use single, full-length pieces for each plate. If the wall will stand on a concrete floor or foundation, the bottom plate must be made of pressure-treated lumber.

Calculate the Studs

How to Get Free Building Materials

Determine the number of studs needed by starting with a quick calculation for the general studs and adding studs for specific elements:

  1. Multiply the total wall length (in feet) by 0.75 (for 16-inch on-center stud spacing).
  2. Add three studs for each 90-degree corner.
  3. Add four studs for each 45-degree corner.
  4. Add two studs for each wall intersection (where another wall abuts the wall you are estimating).
  5. Add two studs for each opening that is 5 feet wide or less.
  6. Add one stud for each opening over 5 feet wide.
  7. Multiply the total count by 1.15 to add 15 percent for waste.

Determine the Header Material

Headers for standard-size doors and windows often are built with two pieces of 2×12 lumber sandwiched over a piece of 1/2-inch-thick plywood cut to the same size as the header. The total thickness of the header is 3 1/2 inches to match the width, or depth, of a 2×4 wall frame.

To estimate the framing materials for each window and door opening, use the total width of the opening plus 7 inches. For example, for a 36-inch wide door, you need two pieces of 2×12 at 43 inches and one piece of plywood at 11 1/4 inches (the actual width of a 2×12) by 43 inches.

Add Extras

Add extra stud material for fire blocking, structural connections, window sills, temporary bracing, and other additional elements, as needed.

Estimate Sheathing

How to Get Free Building Materials

To calculate the number of 4-by-8-foot sheets of sheathing needed for a wall frame, determine the area of the wall, then convert that value to the ​number of sheets:

  1. Multiply the total height and length of the wall to find the total area.
  2. Multiply the width and height of each opening to find the area.
  3. Subtract the area of the openings from the total area of the wall.
  4. Divide the result by 32.
  5. Round up to the nearest whole number; this is the number of sheets needed to cover one side of the wall.

For example, if the wall is 8 feet tall and 20 feet long, it has a total area of 160 square feet. If there is a 4-by-5-foot window opening, the total area to cover is 160 – 20 = 140. Divide 140 by 32 to get 4.375. Round up to 5. This wall requires five 4-by-8-foot sheets of sheathing.

Things You’ll Need

Always measure and calculate TWICE.

How to Get Free Building Materials

When figuring a job for construction, a few formulas will help you complete a successful project. With a little practice, you will be an ace at building material calculations.

Step 1

Calculate the concrete. Most building projects that begin from the ground up must start with concrete. Multiply the length by width by height of the base, then divide that number by 27. This will tell you the needed concrete in cubic yards.

Step 2

Calculate the 2-by-4 lumber for framing walls. Convert the entire length of the wall being constructed into inches (feet multiplied by 12). Now, divide the length in inches by 16. This will give you the number of 2-by-4s needed for one wall.

Step 3

Calculate wall sheathing. Multiply the length of the wall by height to get the square feet of the wall surface. Since most sheathing (plywood, drywall, paneling) comes in 4-by-8-foot sheets, take the square feet of one sheet (32) and use it to divide the square feet of the wall. This will equal the number of 4-by-8 sheets to cover the wall.

Step 4

Calculate framing and decking for a roof. Divide the entire length of the roof by 2 feet to find out how many rafters you’ll need to frame the roof. For the decking, multiply the length by the width of the roof, convert to inches and divide by 32, the square feet of one sheet of plywood. This will equal the number of plywood sheets you’ll need.

Step 5

Calculate shingles or other roofing material. Three bundles of shingles equal one square of shingles. One square of shingles equals 100 square feet. So multiply the length by the width of the roof and divide that number by 100. This will give you the amount of material in squares needed for roofing. To convert into bundles, multiply that number by three.

I hope you will like this shed materials list/spreadsheet I have put together for you. It is divided into each shed building section for materials needed:

  • foundation
  • floor framing
  • Right, Left, Front, and Rear wall framing
  • Trusses
  • Roof
  • Miscellaneous materials

Then, once you have added or completed the materials needed for each section of your shed, the spreadsheet will automatically move the information from each individual section into a summary materials list.

This allows you to have two materials lists.

  1. One showing materials for each individual building section of your shed, and
  2. A summary list showing all materials needed to build your shed.

This summary materials sheet can then be given to your friendly local lumber supply house where a cost estimate can be done for you.

If you are building and designing your own shed, you can use this spreadsheet to load all your materials from 2″ x 4″ studs to bundles of roof shingles.

You can even fax the worksheet in to your lumber store if you prefer! Now how simple is that? I know that in many cases, Lowes will have a quote back for you in a couple of hours for your shed building materials costs!

I have put together this shed materials estimating spreadsheet to help you in finding out the costs associated with building your storage shed so that you will know up front how much your shed will cost you.

I typically fax this materials list to several lumber supply houses, check on their delivery costs, and go with the cheapest materials estimate.

How To Get The Materials Spreadsheet:

If you would like a copy of the materials spreadsheet, please contact me.

In the question and comment box, please mention that you would like the ‘Shed Materials Spreadsheet’ and submit the form and I will email it to you.

If you would like to see all the materials lists I have for all the shed plans I sell, you can find them here.

Find a materials list for one of my shed plans similar to the one you want to build, take the list to your favorite lumber supply store, and have them look up the costs for you. This way you will have an idea of how much it will cost to build your own unique shed.

Have fun when building your new shed, and as always, be careful when working with and around power tools.

Sustainable and stylish: Moneyless Man says it’s possible to build for free. Photograph: Simon Dale/Lammas

Sustainable and stylish: Moneyless Man says it’s possible to build for free. Photograph: Simon Dale/Lammas

Access to land is one of the key obstacles in our path towards true sustainability, and without a radical shift in land policies, a moneyless society will remain what it is today – a philosophical one.

But if you do want to become communally-sufficient and moneyless, you’ll first need access to a piece of land. While this is not a problem in the Hammersmith of William Morris’s News from Nowhere or Thomas More’s Utopia, within today’s society it usually means the land needs to be bought, even if just as a one-off payment to free a piece of enslaved land from the wage economy. But there are exceptions.

In the 1950s, Vinoba Bhave set up a huge movement called Bhoodan (meaning land-gift) in India, to which ordinary landowners donated 5m acres – an area the size of Wales – to be put back into common ownership so that peasants could live and farm on it. While western culture makes such a movement unlikely, it’s never impossible. For example, Hugh Fearnley Whittingstall’s Landshare project matches those who have land but need help with it with those who can help but have no access to land. And it’s growing rapidly.

So it is obviously difficult, if not impossible, to currently talk about building a home for free. There are huge issues concerning planning permission and council tax. For planning, campaigner Simon Fairlie’s Chapter 7 has tons of great free advice, and eco building organisations such as Lammas are a huge source of inspiration. For council tax, work activists such as John Harris and Lawful Rebellion provide a fascinating resource to draw on. Council tax is effectively a tax on being alive – many countries, such as Ireland, use other more equitable systems.

Next, you can then think about building your own low-impact dwelling. Theoretically, this can be done for free using human labour and local materials – like the old thatch, stone and wood cottages of pre-industrialised times – or by utilising the masses of stuff we’ve already produced. Here is a short selection of the many options open to you, some of which can be built without costing any money:

Earthships: The brainchild of Michael Reynolds, these are a type of passive solar home, made from recycled and natural local materials. Earthships can be self-sufficient in food, water and energy. They incorporate fantastic design – glass bottles are even used to create stunning lighting effects – making them visually beautiful to boot.

Underground houses: Subterranean homes maximise space in small areas, the excavated materials can be used in the building and they are wind-, fire- and earthquake-resistant. One of the greatest benefits of underground homes is their energy efficiency, as the mass of soil or rock (the geothermal mass) surrounding the house stores heat and insulates the house, keeping it warm in winter and cool in the summer.

Roundhouses: Circular houses, with a frame of wooden posts covered by wattle-and-daub or cordwood panels finished with cob. Their conical roofs are usually either thatched or have a reciprocal frame green roof.

Straw bale homes: Houses built using straw bales to form the walls of the building. In the UK, the bales can be made of wheat, rye or oat straw. They are also naturally well insulated.

Of course, doing all this completely for free is fairly unrealistic today. But even if you choose the relatively upmarket Earthship on a few acres, it at least means you will only have to spend a fraction of your time in the money economy paying the bank back money.

Ultimately, I believe it is a fundamental human right for every person to have the opportunity to live without money if that is their belief, as stated under Article 9: Freedom of Thought, Conscience and Religion of The European Convention on Human Rights. That’s why I will soon be campaigning with the Freeconomy Community for the right to live moneyless, allowing people to choose to pay their taxes and National insurance contributions from tithes and labour, or whatever alternative legal tender the government decides to offer. Watch this space.

• Mark Boyle is the founder of the Freeconomy Community and has lived moneyless for the last 19 months. His book, The Moneyless Man, is out now, published by Oneworld – sales from the book will go to a charitable trust for the Freeconomy Community. This is the last in the Guardian’s Moneyless Man series

WilsonPro

Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes

These days, most of us own a cell phone. With a wealth of mobile possibilities literally at our fingertips, it’s hard not to expect strong cell reception all the time, whether we’re at home, in the car, or in the office. Yet, we’ve all experienced the occasional dropped phone call or lost signal. While this can be frustrating, it’s not always the cell phone carrier’s fault. Often, there’s just something between the cell tower and you.

Obstructions to a good signal

Cellular signals emanate from cell towers. Although there are countless towers in most developed areas of the country, there are several reasons that their signals may not be reaching your device.

  • Distance: If you’re in a remote region with few cell towers, you may just be too far away for a strong signal to reach you.
  • Terrain: Mountains, hills, and bluffs can all stand in the way of the tower and your device, absorbing the signals before they reach you.
  • Vehicles: The metal and glass materials of a vehicle provide protection for passengers, but also can prevent cell signals from getting in.
  • Vegetation: Thick forests, tall trees, and other vegetation can form natural barriers to cell signal waves.
  • Atmospheric conditions: Turbulent storms, thick fog, and other weather conditions can easily disrupt cell signals.
  • Man-made obstructions: Brick, concrete, and steel materials in bridges, buildings, and other man-made objects are notorious cell signal obstructors.

All these things can obstruct a cell signal and prevent it from reaching your phone or device, resulting in poor reception. Man-made building materials are especially good at blocking out signals.

How building materials block signals

Almost any large object built by humans can interfere with cell phone connectivity. Since humans spend a good deal of time inside, we depend on strong reception indoors. Yet, radio frequency (RF) signals cannot filter through materials like metal or concrete. Instead, large buildings or even the walls of your office can deflect or distort signal waves. That’s why driving into a parking garage will almost always disrupt your cell reception—because suddenly the signal has to deal with numerous thick concrete walls. You may wonder if there’s a way to boost signal in a metal building.

How to Get Free Building Materials

Other building materials like wood, brick, stone, shingles, and drywall can have a similar effect, weakening and often blocking signals completely. Even glass—especially energy-efficient windows coated in metal-oxide—can cause signals to bounce right off the surface.

See this chart below for how much signal is lost (dB) for each type of building material. This is why you might experience slow data and dropped calls while indoors.

Generally speaking, reception will almost always be better outside a building than inside. So how can indoor cell reception be improved?

Cell signal boosters bring the outside signal inside

Cell signal boosters—also called bidirectional amplifiers—can make a big difference when it comes to bringing a cell signal from outside to indoors. These devices use antennas to detect any existing signal outside the building—even a very weak one—and bring it indoors. Then, the booster amplifies the signal and broadcasts it inside the building, bringing a better signal within range of your cell phones and devices. When you make a call, it works in the opposite direction by transmitting an amplified signal from your phone back outside to the cell tower.

Depending on the size of the interior space, the man-made materials involved, and the layout of the building itself, you may need several antennas and amplifiers to provide the needed coverage improvement. That’s where a professional installer can help optimize your booster system for the best results.

Contact us to learn more about how a cell signal booster can improve your building’s reception, or download our case study to learn how WilsonPro achieved total cellular connectivity for a high end condominium, and can do the same for your business.

How to Get Free Building Materials

It’s pretty telling that there’s a lot of interest these days in the tiny house movement, both as a way to save money and live with a smaller footprint, and also as a method of embracing the concept of living more simply. There is no shortage of plans on the market for building your own tiny house, and for those who want to live in a tiny house but don’t want to (or can’t) build their own, readymade micro-houses are available to purchase from builders, so there are plenty of options for those wanting to make the move to living more minimally.

However, building a tiny house out of all new materials (or purchasing one) can still be rather expensive, relative to many people’s income, and it requires the same kinds of building materials and resources that go into building any other modern house, so it isn’t necessarily the cheapest or most eco-friendly housing option. But there are already a huge number of houses and structures already built, but that aren’t usable in their current state, either because of years of neglect or being located in an area that isn’t desirable to live in, that could be “mined” for their building materials, which could be repurposed into a tiny house.

While we’ve previously covered Brad Kittel’s Tiny Texas Houses, with some of the back story of how this tiny house business grew out of Kittel’s architectural salvage business, there’s a couple of upcoming workshops, as well a DVD set and on-demand videos, that can take you from a wannabe tiny house builder to a bonafide “salvage miner” and micro-house constructor.

Beginning on February 28th, and running through March 2nd, Kittel’s Pure Salvage Living is offering a hands-on workshop, titled “The Ugly Duckling Salvage Mining Bootcamp,” where participants can learn the ins and outs of salvage mining while actively working to harvest used building materials from an old ranch house near Luling Texas. Attendees will learn a variety of helpful tactics for salvaging materials for repurposing into a tiny house (or two), including:

  • How to identify materials and value them
  • The Salvage Mining Process (from “Cherrypicking” to Transporting & Storing)
  • How to remove doors and windows safely from other structures
  • How to use your tools effectively to not damage materials
  • How to De-nail wood safely and efficiently (And using a modern pneumatic “Nail Kicker”)
  • Safety Precautions and Salvage Mining Tips

Following immediately on the heels of the salvage mining bootcamp is a building workshop (March 3rd through March 9th) which will take participants through the process of designing and building a tiny house using the repurposed building materials from that deconstructed house. This tiny house bootcamp will work on building a 15′ by 12′ home with two floors (which is said to be “big enough to live in full time but small enough to get around building code in urban areas”), from start to finish, and give attendees the skills and the confidence to go back home and start building their very own mini house using salvaged building materials.

For those that can’t get down to Texas for the salvage mining workshop, Kittel also offers five hours of videos on salvage mining either as a set of DVDs, or for rent via video-on-demand, which include a number of key skills, such as how to obtain the rights to salvaging a building and how to efficiently and safely deconstruct it, as well as “live” examples of the salvage process.

And if you’re not interested in the bootcamps or the videos, but just have some questions you need answered, Kittel, who has 20 years of salvage experience and 7 years of tiny house building experience, also offers phone consultations about building tiny houses or salvaging building materials.

[Update: It looks like the salvage mining bootcamp is now sold out, but there are still spots available for the tiny house salvage building bootcamp.]

Determining a building’s construction type is dependent on quite a number of different factors and requires a keen eye for detail. If you would like to be able to identify a building’s construction type, start with Step 1 below for an overview of how it’s done. You will also find specific information on all six building types.

Overview for Assessing Construction Type

How to Get Free Building Materials

  • Building elements: The building materials used in the construction of the following elements are the foundation for classification, be they wood, steel, or masonry.
    • Structural frame
    • Exterior bearing walls
    • Interior bearing walls
    • Exterior nonbearing walls and partitions
    • Interior non-bearing walls and partitions
    • Floor construction, including supporting beams and joists
    • Roof construction, including supporting beams and joists, are comprised of
  • Fire-resistance rating: This is the other factor in determining construction class. The building materials used in the construction of the building elements above will have a fire-resistance rating. Fire-resistance rating typically means the duration for which a passive fire protection system can withstand a standard fire resistance test. This can be quantified simply as a measure of time (ex. 0 hours, 1 hour, or 2 hours), or it may entail a host of other criteria involving other evidence of functionality or fitness for purpose.
    • “Minimum” rule: It is important to remember when selecting the construction class that the building is only as strong as its weakest element. For example, a masonry building may have an unprotected wood roof. The wood roof is the weakest member such that it has no fire-resistance. Thus, the construction class would be Joisted Masonry (see below). Now imagine this same building with a metal deck roof. So long as the supporting members of the building do not contain wood then this building would be Masonry Noncombustible (see below).

How to Get Free Building Materials

  • Structural frame
  • Bearing walls (interior and exterior)
  • Floor construction
  • Roof construction
  • What the fire rating of the materials

How to Get Free Building Materials

  • Frame Construction (ISO Class I, IBC Type V)
  • Joisted Masonry (ISO Class 2, IBC Type III, IBC Type IV)
  • Light Noncombustible (ISO Class 3, IBC Type IIB)
  • Masonry Noncombustible (ISO Class 4, IBC Type IIA)
  • Modified Fire Resistive (ISO Class 5, IBC Type IB)
  • Fire Resistive (ISO Class 6, IBC Type IA)

How to Get Free Building Materials

  • International Building Code (IBC): This is a model building code developed by the International Code Council (ICC). It has been adopted throughout most of the United States. A large portion of the International Building Code deals with fire prevention. It differs from the related International Fire Code in that the IBC handles fire prevention in regards to construction and design and the fire code handles fire prevention in an ongoing basis. Parts of the code reference other codes including the International Plumbing Code, the International Mechanical Code, the National Electric Code, and various National Fire Protection Association Standards. IBC is more descriptive and also includes A or B types of construction for each class.
    • A is protected, meaning that all structural members of a building or structure have an additional fire rated coating or cover by means of sheetrock, spray on, or other approved method. The additional fire rated coating or cover extends the fire resistance of the structural members by at least 1 hour.
    • B is unprotected, meaning that all structural members of a building or structure have no additional fire rated coating or cover. Exposed members are only fire resistant according to their natural ability, characteristics, and fire rating.
  • Insurance Services Office (ISO): This is a provider of data, underwriting, risk management, and legal/regulatory services to property-casualty insurers and other clients.

Don’t throw it away – donate good-quality used and surplus building materials to the nonprofit Reuse Center at Boston Building Resources. Prevent needless waste, help a neighbor, and receive a tax deduction. Pick-up service available.

Please note that we are accepting fewer donations than usual so that our staff can follow safety protocols. Any materials we pick up must be set out in a garage or at curbside.

If you are dropping off your donation, please make an appointment.

Donating high-quality building materials, new or used, helps people repair and improve their homes while also sparing the environment from needless waste. Because the Reuse Center at Boston Building Resources is a 501(c)(3) charity, both material and financial gifts are tax-deductible to the extent allowed by law.

What we do and don’t take

The list of materials below is meant to provide general guidance, and is subject to a conversation with BBR’s donations department about the specific materials you are offering. In some cases, we cannot accept materials because of low demand from our customers for certain items, even if the materials are new or in excellent condition.

For the kitchen

Countertops: stone or solid surface, minimum 6′ long and 25″ deep, with no cutouts or turns

Sinks: new or like new

Appliances (in showroom condition, less than seven years old): “Appliance411” will help you determine age if you’re not sure.

Cabinet doors without their cabinets

For the bath

Drop-in or undermount sinks: new in box only

Tubs: new or like new

Freestanding shower units

Low-flow toilets: made in 2005 or later

Accessories (towel racks, etc.)

Some shower doors

Windows

Vinyl and wood replacement or new construction windows

Insulated with double-pane glass

Window treatments: shades and blinds

Any sash without a frame

Picture windows (non-opening)

Screens without their windows

Doors

Interior: prefer widths of 28″–32″ & 36″ and heights of 78″–80″

Storm doors: with frame, hardware, storm, and screen; prefer 32″ x 80″ or 36″ x 80″

Hardware (locks, knobs, hinges)

Doors with lead content

Any door unit over 6′ wide

Metal patio doors

Used bi-fold doors

Lumber, plywood, drywall, woodwork, trim

Dimensional lumber (6′ minimum length, no scraps, denailed)

Moldings (6′ minimum length, denailed)

Mantels and fireplace surrounds

Stair parts: newel posts, balusters, treads

Plywood (half sheets or larger)

Drywall (half sheets or larger)

Exterior house shutters

Materials with lead content

Heating and cooling

Air conditioners: working with a SEER rating of 10 or more

Boilers or furnaces: gas-fired in excellent condition

Domestic hot water heaters: 5 years old or less

Fireplace inserts and wood stoves

Any oil-fired appliances

Unvented gas fireplace inserts

Freestanding steam or hot water radiators (consider contacting the MassArt Iron Corps)

Tile

New, whole ceramic and stone tiles

Prefer a quantity of 30 sq. ft. or more for field tile

Accent tile: any quantity

Flooring

Carpeting, rugs, and carpet tiles (new or like new)

Sheet vinyl or vinyl tile (new)

Wood and bamboo (new or used/denailed)

Prefer a quantity of 30 sq. ft. or more

Electrical

Working and complete

Residential surface-mounted light fixtures

Paddle fans with mounting bracket

Fluorescent or incandescent bulbs

Commercial electrical equipment

Commercial light fixtures that don’t have residential application

Paint

Latex paint, full containers

Cans must be clean and paint in good condition

Boston residents can consider giving other containers of paint to the city’s paint swap shops

Other

Siding: wood or fiber-cement (no scraps)

Asphalt roof shingles (new in package)

Fencing: wood or metal, new or like new

Bricks and pavers, free of mortar

Small hardware, plumbing, and electrical items

Tools (working and complete)

Used pipes (iron or PVC already glued)

Most furniture (consider donating residential furniture to Boomerangs, Household Goods, or the Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless, and office furniture to the Boston ReStore or The Furniture Trust.)

Recreational and exercise equipment

Guidelines for Donating

Donors, including many from Andover’s 2014 Zero Waste Day, tell about their experience donating building materials to BBR’s Reuse Center and why it’s important.

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While we do our best to assess the appropriateness of a donation before pick-up, there is no substitute for actually seeing it. Therefore, the BBR staff member has the authority to refuse items that s/he determines to be inappropriate for the homeowners and nonprofits we serve. We are a small nonprofit and must be careful not to accept items that we will need to pay to dispose of later on.

In most cases, our two-person pickup crew can handle the collection of your materials. If we are picking up your donated items and they are extraordinarily heavy or large, like a six burner Wolf Range or large Sub-Zero refrigerator, for instance, it may require an able-bodied person at the pickup location to help load it onto our truck—but we will let you know ahead of time if we think it requires extra labor. If it is extra-large, and you have told us that such a person will be available, and that person is not there, we will be unable to pick up the donation.

If you plan to deduct the fair market value of the materials from your taxes, we suggest taking photos of the materials before they are donated. Keep the photos with the Boston Building Resources receipt to document your donation.

Materials being picked up by our truck must be at street level and in close proximity to the street or driveway. Materials in basements or several floors up will not be picked up unless specific arrangements have been made.

Because Boston Building Resources cannot test or warranty appliances, we accept only appliances that are in like-new condition and not more than a few years old. As with all donations, our staff member has the last word on appliances.