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How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

What largely started in the 1980s and ’90s as a way for Catholic parents to infuse religion into their kids’ education now has more mainstream appeal.

Homeschooled kids have the same access to online learning, friendships, and extracurricular activities as the typical public school student — but without many of the drawbacks, like standardized lesson plans and bullying.

Here are a handful of reasons homeschooling makes sense in 2018.

Personalized learning is a strong method of instruction.

The core idea of homeschooling is the idea that kids need to learn at the speed, and in the style, most appropriate for them. In the education world, enthusiasts call the approach “personalized learning,” and it’s in place in a number of schools already.

Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg are big fans of personalized learning, since it tends to use technology as a way to tailor lesson plans to students. In a recent blog post, Gates pointed to research that personalized learning helps boost scores in reading and math.

Homeschooling parents can take the method a step further. As parents, many are in the best position possible to know, and provide, the right kind of instruction.

Students can learn more about what they really care about.

Without formal curricula to guide their education, homeschoolers get the chance to explore a range of topics that might not be normally offered until high school or college. They can study psychology in fourth grade, or finance in eighth grade.

Some parents are capable enough to pass on this knowledge themselves. But many parents Business Insider has spoken with rely on online learning platforms like Khan Academy or workbooks. Some take their older kids to local community colleges.

While many homeschool families do teach English, math, science, and history, education is by no means limited just to those subjects.

Social media gives kids a way to form lasting friendships.

The most common misconception about homeschoolers is that they lack social skills. Before the internet, there was some truth to the stereotype.

But today’s students have just as much opportunity to see kids their own age as those in private or public schools, and often without as much distraction. Homeschoolers still use apps like Snapchat, Instagram, and Facebook — which may foster unhealthy and even addictive relationships to tech — but also lets them meet up with other homeschoolers or those from traditional schools.

“They’re doing just as well or better,” Brian Ray, a homeschooling researcher at the National Home Education Research Institute, told Business Insider.

Students don’t deal with cliques or bullying.

Homeschoolers don’t deal with all the downsides of being around kids in a toxic school environment.

Plenty of critics argue these downsides are actually good for toughening kids up, but kids who are bullied more often face symptoms of depression and anxiety, do worse in class, and show up to school less frequently.

Homeschooled kids are able to learn in a more harmonious environment.

Schooling isn’t set apart from the “real world.”

Contrary to the name, homeschooling takes place in an actual home only a fraction of the time. A great deal of instruction happens in community colleges, at libraries, or in the halls of local museums.

These experiences have the effect of maturing kids much more quickly and cultivating “a trait of open-mindedness,” as Harvard junior and former homeschooler Claire Dickson told Business Insider.

Since kids spend more time around adults in the “real world,” they rarely come to see school as set apart from other aspects of life.

Students may achieve more in the long run.

Homeschooling makes sense from an achievement point of view.

Research suggests homeschooled children tend to do better on standardized tests , stick around longer in college, and do better once they’re enrolled. A 2009 study showed that the proportion of homeschoolers who graduated from college was about 67%, while among public school students it was 59%.

Students from Catholic and private schools fell even lower in college graduation rates, with 54% and 51% of kids, respectively, completing all four years.

It’s always nice to get a fresh perspective. In this post, Pat Fenner from PatAndCandy.com shares how her perspective about digital learning has shifted throughout her homeschooling experience.

Once upon a time there was a sweet homeschooling family with 2 young children. They had a tentative start to the journey, wondering how this new method of education would play out, and if indeed their children would manage in any way, shape or form to “make it”, let alone thrive!

They spent a few of those early years traveling extensively – living among other cultures provided a whole ‘nother level of education, in addition to creating unique family memories and stories…

Over the years, and back in the States, the form and format of their school morphed. Hands-on learning with KONOS and Unit Studies; Classical methodology; traditional curricula (kinda/sorta); history studies via living books and an emphasis on the arts… All these became relevant as the children’s learning styles and interests became apparent and grew. And gradually, almost imperceptibly, the family developed a lifestyle of learning.

That vignette probably best describes my family’s early and first foray in homeschooling.

Several years later we found ourselves with a “second family” (long story for another time). After a period of 9 years, we had another set of 3 children. They are currently in middle and high-school. After a much more confident and creative start, however, our homeschool looks vastly different. These kids are being educated for the 21st century.

How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

What does 21st century learning look like?

There are definite characteristics to modern-day homeschools that differ from those of earlier years. While I’m definitely not an advocate for reinventing the wheel, our current culture and most probably the future lends itself to a different type of preparation. At no other time in history has the maxim “Education is not the filling of a bucket but the lighting of a fire” been more applicable.

Students today – our children – need different skill sets than before, or at least need them developed to an even greater degree. They need to possess:

  • Research skills – locate information and instruction about skills and activities as needs arise (available in abundance from the internet),
  • Discernment – filter out and recognize false, misleading or inaccurate information (also available in abundance from the internet),
  • Communication skills – both personal and professional, using the vast array of technological tools that are available today, and be able to adapt to those which are sure to come in the future;
  • Response fluidity – in terms of career choices, employment opportunities, and meeting the needs created as technology inevitable advances.

While there is a definite value and importance to using and learning from real books, there is also a vital need for homeschools today to employ online resources and develop our children’s creativity and skills in managing technology. [Related Post: What Homeschoolers Don’t Know (& what they need) ]

To brush that concept aside is putting them at a distinct disadvantage and preventing them from being valued, contributing participants in the world in which they live.

So let me encourage you today to find tools to help you give them the skills!

And whether you’re like me (a parent from the dinosaur age!) or a young mother just starting out…take the time to learn alongside them. There are many resources out there (and Techie Homeschool Mom is a great start!) that can do the job well. [Related Post: 25 Free Webtools for Creating Homeschool Projects]

Don’t wait any longer – get started on creating a 21st century homeschool today!

What needs do your 21st century homeschoolers have that you didn’t have as a child? Let’s talk about it.

About Jennifer Wolfe

  • Teacher Self-Care: Great Tips PLUS A Hyperdoc To Share! – January 14, 2018
  • 3 Steps to Helping Students Develop College-Ready Writing Skills – November 26, 2017
  • A How To List For Flexible Classroom Seating – September 10, 2017
  • Back To School Hacks: Digitize Your Syllabus and Lesson Plans! – August 20, 2017
  • Want to Be Ready for Middle School? Start With These 4 Skills – August 14, 2017
  • Making STEM Matter in Schools – July 17, 2017
  • The STEM Revolution in Higher Education – June 26, 2017
  • The State of STEM in U.S. Schools – May 30, 2017
  • Teaching Writing With Hyperdocs – May 22, 2017
  • Budget Cuts? Don’t Take It Out On The Teachers – Or The Students – March 20, 2017

In the 21st century, there is a multitude of ways to communicate with parents. I know a large part of the education workforce is comprised of ‘digital immigrants’, but with a little time and motivation, all teachers can (and should) utilize technology to increase communication with parents and students. Here are my eight favorite ways for teachers to communicate with parents (and students) – let me know if I’ve missed one that you use, and which way is your favorite!

  • Email – This is the easiest way to start communicating with parents. If your school doesn’t collect email info at registration, consider asking for it on a take-home handout, or better yet, create a Google Form (see below) and ask for it. I know teachers who send out weekly updates, communication when they start a new unit, or only email at grade reporting time. I personally like to send out proactive, positive emails at the start of the year to build my relationship with parents before anything challenging happens. Teachers can even keep documents with scripts they use on a regular basis as a template. Email is perfect for beginning digital immigrants!
  • Weekly progress reports – As an AVID teacher, I require my students to utilize a weekly progress report that they take to their teachers for information about their grades and citizenship. They also set goals and track their GPA. This year I’m going to experiment with using Google forms for students to enter their data and then share with their parents. I think a running record of grades, citizenship, GPA and goals would be a great conversation starter for dinner table conversations, and by sharing it with parents, we would ensure they have seen the most current information about their child.
  • School Data Systems – My school uses School Loop for grading and data, and I’ve found that updating the assignment calendar weekly and entering grades bi-weekly really has made grading conversations much more proactive and meaningful. For big assignments, I quickly enter a ‘0’ if not turned in on time; this reminder has really helped increase my turn in rate, and parents appreciate the timely feedback. I do educate my parents at BTSN about my turnaround rate for grading, and let them know that it’s not up to the minute. I remind parents to use School Loop as a conversation starter, and to have their child follow up with me (rather than the parent taking me on) so we can resolve any confusion.
  • Remind – Knowing that teens respond much more readily to texts than email, I began using the Remind.com system to send communicate reminders about assignments, due dates, or just to send encouraging messages or digitally share relevant materials I come across when I’m not teaching. I love that Remind doesn’t require the sharing of phone numbers – it’s a free service that allows subscribers to send/receive text messages. Set up and subscribing are easy – and teachers can set office hours, too!
  • Social Media Facebook/Instagram/Twitter – Since social media is such a part of our society in the 21st century, why not harness its reach and use to communicate what’s happening at school? I know many teachers and counselors who set up Facebook pages (separate from their personal page) to share relevant material for their students. Parents love to see what’s happening in the classroom – why not set up an Instagram account for your class and post snaps of lessons, activities, and field trips? Twitter is a fun way to showcase what’s going on at school, too.
  • Websites – Blogs are a fun and easy way to communicate both informational materials as well as showcase student work. WordPress and Blogspot offer free blog space, as does Google Sites. If your school site doesn’t offer you a website, try using a blog to start one for yourself. Kidblog is another fun tool for student blogging. Digital portfolios are gaining in popularity, and I’ve set them up with both Google Sites and by creating shared folders on Google Drive – quite a few of my teacher friends use Seesaw and love it. I’ve also used YouTube to post and share class videos – you can set your channel to private and just share links with parents, too.
  • Google Calendar – I love all things Google, and Google calendar is an awesome way to communicate with parents. I use it for scheduling conferences by creating a separate calendar and sharing it with families. Google calendar is also great for scheduling and communicating about field trips and special events, as well as for setting up guest speakers.
  • Skype, Google Hangout – Once you’re comfortable with utilizing tech for communicating with parents, you could rely on Skype or Google Hangout for virtual conferences – it’s a perfect (and free) tool that could help you meet with parents who have trouble making it to the classroom during the school day, or could help teachers with their own small children find a more convenient time to meet with parents. There’s nothing better than face-to-face time, even if it’s virtual!

I’d love to hear your ideas for communicating with parents and teachers in the 21st century – please leave your favorite methods in the comments below!

To read more about teaching and mothering in the 21st century, visit Jennifer’s blog at http://jenniferwolfe.net – and grab some free resources while you’re there!

How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

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Dawn says

July 18, 2018 at 9:03 am

I have been using the interactive journal Seesaw. I love that students have a variety of ways to share what they are learning and that up to 10 family members can see the student’s journal and not only comment but add pictures as well.

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How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

Enrolling in a Cyber School like 21CCCS, a Pennsylvania Cyber Charter School, can provide an education that’s built around you.

21CCCS offers individualized instruction to every student and flexibility so that students can find a schedule that works best for them. This approach makes for day-to-day schedules that are unique for each student, so it’s difficult to pin down exactly what a day in the life of a Cyber School student is truly like, but there are many examples out there of 21CCCS enrollees that have developed productive and manageable daily routines with the help of their school counselors, academic advisors, and parents.

Here’s one example of how a 21CCCS Cyber School student made his schedule flexibility work for him:

“My typical day starts out like any other. I get up before 8 a.m., usually grab a bite to eat for breakfast, grab my computer and log on for school for the day. The best thing about Cyber School is I can do my schoolwork wherever and whenever I want. When I attended a normal brick-and-mortar high school, I noticed I was missing more and more days of school and was just not able to keep up with the workload. I travel to New York a lot because I am pursuing a career in the business world of the fashion industry, so with 21 st Century, I’m able to take my work with me, never miss a day of school, and always be on time or ahead on all of my course work.”

Many might think the independence granted to Cyber School students means they can’t get the help and support they need if they’re struggling with any schoolwork throughout the course of the day. But this is not the case at 21CCCS. Each student enrolled in 21CCCS receives a dedicated Academic Advisor who will be there for him or her whenever they need it.

There are also those who believe enrolling in a Cyber School leads to the loss of social interaction. Once again, this is not true at 21CCCS. Field trips, community days, and yes, even Prom and Graduation, allows 21CCCS students to build long-lasting relationships with their peers and teachers.

The typical day for a 21CCCS student consists of about five to six hours of work a day on average. Each class has weekly online lessons that are about an hour long. They are not mandatory and they are recorded in case a student would like to go back and watch them on their own time.

Students enrolled in 21CCCS also receive any educational equipment they might need to succeed academically.

Another frequently asked questioned by those considering Cyber School is ‘What’s the school year like?’

21CCCS follows a traditional school year calendar. But keep in mind, there are no snow days in Cyber School. But there are also no buses to catch early in the morning! The flexible schedule and online setting of 21CCCS also prevents scheduling conflicts throughout the school year.

Although schedules are individualized and students are encouraged to learn at their own pace, 21CCCS teachers still strive to help their students stay organized so that they can maintain consistent progress throughout their daily routines and the school year.

January 22, 2017 15,393 Views

How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

Summary

When we set out to do something daring, it’s inspiring to know that other admirable people are doing it too and that another hero has done it in the past — and it worked. In the case of Mozart, it’s assuring to know that it did more than just “work.” It floored the world.

This “something” is homeschooling, an endeavor which takes some serious guts to pursue and stick with, day by day, school year by school year. And, thankfully, our God is always ready to give us homeschoolers a “David and Goliath” win when we need it most.

Recently, I spent some time reflecting on the tremendously positive impact that a homeschool education can have on a child and came across this list of famous homeschooled people: Reading down the list, I became astounded!

How incredible to see the fruit of good parenting and homebound education. In addition to Mozart, the list may be quite surprising to many unfamiliar with the value of homeschooling, as it lists most talented and socially accepted individuals such as:

George Washington (b. 1732), first president of the United States.
Thomas Jefferson (b.1743), third president of the United States.
James Madison (b. 1751), fourth president of the United States.
Alexander Hamilton (b.1757), first secretary of the treasury of the United States .
John Quincy Adams (b. 1767), sixth president of the United States.
Daniel Webster (b. 1782), served in both U.S. House of Representatives and Senate, Secretary of State of United States.
Florence Nightingale (b. 1820), founder of modern nursing.
Louisa May Alcott (b. 1832), American novelist.
Alexander Graham Bell (b. 1848), inventor, homeschooled by his mother.
Lewis Carroll (b. 1832), mathematician and author of Alice in Wonderland.
Laura Ingalls Wilder (b. 1867), author of the Little House series of novels.
Edith Claypole and Agnes Claypole (b. 1870), twin sister scientists.
Robert Frost (b. 1874), American poet.
Franklin D. Roosevelt (b. 1882), 32nd President of the United States, homeschooled by parents and private tutors.
Virginia Woolf (b. 1882), English novelist and a central figure in the influential Bloomsbury Group of intellectuals.
Pearl S. Buck (b. 1892), American novelist.
J. R. R. Tolkien (b. 1892), English writer, philologist, and university professor.
Ansel Adams (b. 1902), photographer.
Francis Collins (b. 1950), US physician-geneticist, discovered a number of disease genes and led the Human Genome Project.
Bode Miller (b. 1977), US alpine skier.
Felicia Day, (b. 1979), actress, writer, musician.
Erik Demaine, (b. 1981), mathematician, artist, MacArthur winner.
Reid W. Barton, (b. 1983), one of the most successful performers in the International Science Olympiads.
Tim Tebow (b. 1987), American football player, homeschooled, allowed to play in a local school’s football team.
Joey Logano (b. 1990), NASCAR Sprint Cup Series racer, the youngest driver ever to win a NASCAR race.

Regarding Thomas Edison’s case, Sheley Bedik accounts in his book Thomas Edison: Great American Inventor:

“It has been said that his teacher talked with his parents about Thomas not paying attention in class. The Edisons tried sending Thomas to different schools, but he still had problems learning. Mrs. Edison had been a schoolteacher. She knew that her son was smart. So she took Thomas out of school and from that time on, gave him lessons at home. Thomas Edison loved to read. When he was nine, his mother gave him a science book with experiments in it. Thomas set up his laboratory with chemicals, wires, and other things he needed.”

More recently, the Colfax Family, who wrote up their personal story in Homeschooling for Excellence is a fine example of a family who homeschooled their children at a time when it was not popular. To this day, they continue to witness the fruit of their labors. The Colfaxes homeschooled their four boys, three of whom were adopted (proving it wasn’t just ‘in the genes!’).

They watched three of their sons graduate from Harvard and the fourth, find his niche successfully in computer science. Grant N. Colfax, the oldest of the boys, graduated cum laude from Harvard Medical School as a Fulbright Scholar.

The Colfaxes kept their homeschooling rather simple — it focused on an intense love of learning, with plenty of room to allow their children to develop their talents at their own pace. Some of their children didn’t even learn to read until they were seven or eight years old, and they didn’t shuffle them to all kinds of lessons and activities. Their boys spent plenty of time working outdoors on their farm in creative ways and enjoyed drawing tons of knowledge from their incredibly large home library.

How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

Although many of those mentioned here who were homeschooled may not be from Catholic families, their examples are inspiring from an academic and social standpoint.

As home educators we should feel honored to be following in their footsteps, expecting to be exceptionally successful, because we have the grace of God at our side.

An online school built around you.

21CCCS – PA CYBER CHARTER SCHOOL, PENNSYLVANIA’S TOP PERFORMING ONLINE SCHOOL

Serving Pennsylvania students in grades 6-12, 21st Century Cyber Charter School (21CCCS) provides a unique blend of a rigorous, personalized curriculum, highly qualified instructional staff, and a supportive educational community. Our top performing Pennsylvania cyber charter school students thrive in this environment and have been very successful, according to state standards. It’s no wonder that 21CCCS is known to be one of the best cyber schools in PA.

Through a combination of PSSA scores, Keystone Exam scores, PSAT participation, SAT scores, and other academic performance measures, 21CCCS outperforms other cyber schools in PA. We have been in the top 8% on the College Ready Benchmark among Pennsylvania High Schools. 21CCCS has also been ranked a top-performing cyber charter school throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for our SAT scores.

Upon graduating from 21CCCS, our students who are now moving on from online schooling programs and into the adult world, are fully prepared for their next step. This could mean continuing their education at a two or four-year college or university, perfecting their skills through a vocational certification, or joining the workforce. No matter what they choose, the best performing cyber charter school programs offered by 21CCCS has given them the education that’s needed to succeed in today’s world.

We had some trepidation about pulling our son from the local brick-and-mortar and enrolling him in a cyber school, but we’re very happy we enrolled him with 21st CCCS! He loves it, and he’s doing much better in what is really a more challenging environment!

The Mertsock Family

My daughter benefited from the flexibility to do her classwork at her speed so that she could do musical theatre and also travel. She enjoyed the independence.

The flexibility has been amazing!! As parents with a child living away from home, we are able to monitor all aspects of our daughter’s schooling (assignments, completed work, grades, etc.) through the parent portal, as well as utilize contacting teachers and school administrators. 21CCCS is enabling our daughter to pursue her education and dance dreams.

Both my kids were miserable, stressed, and lacked the excitement for learning they once had. Since starting with 21st Century, my 11th and 12th graders are happy and excited to learn again. They wish to be transferred years ago. Every staff member and teachers are very friendly and so kind. The communication between home and school is absolutely excellent, and very fast responses to every question answered. The support from teachers and staff is amazing.

3 VERY individual students with very different interests, strengths, weaknesses and learning styles. One of them even has additional special needs & challenges. All three love 21st Century Cyber Charter School. It manages to challenge each of them on an individual level.

Seventy years ago, moms were younger and they worked far less.

How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

Though the fundamentals are still the same, parenting has changed quite a bit in the past 70 or so years. Sure, moms and dads today still deal with changing diapers, taming temper tantrums, and getting grape juice stains out of white shirts, but they also have to cope with cyberbullying and the various threats to their children that seem to loom at every corner. In the 1950s, children—if you can believe it—had more freedom, very few mothers worked, and very few dads spent time with their kids. Read on to discover what parenting was like in the 1950s.

Children today might find this hard to believe, but for much of the 20th century, it was relatively common for young children to walk home by themselves. When Slate surveyed some 4,000 readers about their upbringings, they found that the closer to the 21st century someone grew up, the longer they had to wait before their parents let them go out alone.

Among the group that grew up in the 1950s, approximately 40 percent of respondents said that they were able to walk to school alone starting in just 2nd and 3rd grade. For folks who grew up in the ’90s, on the other hand, the majority had to wait until middle school to take those solo ventures.

While people certainly ended their marriages in the 1950s and ’60s, there was a deeply-ingrained social stigma against divorce that has undeniably lessened in the decades since.

According to the Pew Research Center, while 73 percent of U.S. children under the age of 17 were living with their married parents in 1960, only 46 percent of that same demographic was living under the roof of still-wed spouses in 2013. Similarly, while just 9 percent of children were raised by a single parent in 1960, 34 percent were in 2013.

In the first half of the 20th century, having a happy home life—and a few kids—was an integral part of the American Dream. But it turns out that parents were actually spending less time with their kids in those days. A 2016 study published in the Journal of Marriage and Family analyzed data from 11 Western nations and found that moms spent an average of 54 minutes with their kids each day in 1965. As of 2012, that number had nearly doubled—up to 104 minutes. Fathers spent even less time with their children in 1965: just 16 minutes a day. But by 2012, dads were clocking an average of 59 minutes of quality time with their kids.

In the 21st century, moms are able to do it all. Not only do they spend more time with their kids than ever before, they’re able to do so while simultaneously working outside the home. Of course, not every mom is a working woman—and that’s fine!—but there are far more mothers in the workplace than there were some 50 years ago, and they’re spending longer hours working, too. According to data from the Pew Research Center, the average mom in 2016 spent 25 hours a week on paid work, up from 8 hours a week in 1965.

In the 1960s, dads seldom pitched in around the house. In fact, according to the Pew Research Center, men spent an average of just 2.5 hours on child care and 4 hours on housework on a weekly basis back in 1965. But in 2011, the average father spent 7 hours on child care and 10 hours on housework, indicating a much more equal division of responsibilities.

In 1970, the average age of a first-time mom in OECD countries (as defined here) was 24.3 years old. That’s largely because back then, there was a huge amount of societal pressure placed on women to marry and have children, and less expectation that women would return to work after becoming mothers.

According to a 2017 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 1970, just over 40 percent of American women were employed; by 2015, that number was nearing 60 percent. With more women dedicating themselves to their careers during their prime earning years, it makes sense that by the mid-2000s, the average age of a first-time mom in OECD countries was 27.7 years old.

Throughout the majority of the 20th century, mental health issues like depression and OCD were largely swept under the rug entirely. Thankfully, though, medical advances and reduced social stigma surrounding mental health issues allowed for treatment to become both more focused and more widespread. For example, the creation of antipsychotic drugs and advancements in health care caused the number of mentally ill patients institutionalized at public hospitals to decrease by 92 percent from 1955 to 1994, according to a report from Out of the Shadows: Confronting America’s Mental Illness Crisis.

And, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of teens and tweens diagnosed with anxiety or depression rose recently, from 5.4 percent in 2003 to 8.4 percent in 2012; and more than 78 percent of those diagnosed with depression were able to receive treatment. And if you’re not sure whether your child is depressed, then listen to what they’re saying; People Who Use These Words May Suffer From Depression.

To discover more amazing secrets about living your best life, click here to follow us on Instagram!

An online school built around you.

21CCCS – PA CYBER CHARTER SCHOOL, PENNSYLVANIA’S TOP PERFORMING ONLINE SCHOOL

Serving Pennsylvania students in grades 6-12, 21st Century Cyber Charter School (21CCCS) provides a unique blend of a rigorous, personalized curriculum, highly qualified instructional staff, and a supportive educational community. Our top performing Pennsylvania cyber charter school students thrive in this environment and have been very successful, according to state standards. It’s no wonder that 21CCCS is known to be one of the best cyber schools in PA.

Through a combination of PSSA scores, Keystone Exam scores, PSAT participation, SAT scores, and other academic performance measures, 21CCCS outperforms other cyber schools in PA. We have been in the top 8% on the College Ready Benchmark among Pennsylvania High Schools. 21CCCS has also been ranked a top-performing cyber charter school throughout the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for our SAT scores.

Upon graduating from 21CCCS, our students who are now moving on from online schooling programs and into the adult world, are fully prepared for their next step. This could mean continuing their education at a two or four-year college or university, perfecting their skills through a vocational certification, or joining the workforce. No matter what they choose, the best performing cyber charter school programs offered by 21CCCS has given them the education that’s needed to succeed in today’s world.

We had some trepidation about pulling our son from the local brick-and-mortar and enrolling him in a cyber school, but we’re very happy we enrolled him with 21st CCCS! He loves it, and he’s doing much better in what is really a more challenging environment!

The Mertsock Family

My daughter benefited from the flexibility to do her classwork at her speed so that she could do musical theatre and also travel. She enjoyed the independence.

The flexibility has been amazing!! As parents with a child living away from home, we are able to monitor all aspects of our daughter’s schooling (assignments, completed work, grades, etc.) through the parent portal, as well as utilize contacting teachers and school administrators. 21CCCS is enabling our daughter to pursue her education and dance dreams.

Both my kids were miserable, stressed, and lacked the excitement for learning they once had. Since starting with 21st Century, my 11th and 12th graders are happy and excited to learn again. They wish to be transferred years ago. Every staff member and teachers are very friendly and so kind. The communication between home and school is absolutely excellent, and very fast responses to every question answered. The support from teachers and staff is amazing.

3 VERY individual students with very different interests, strengths, weaknesses and learning styles. One of them even has additional special needs & challenges. All three love 21st Century Cyber Charter School. It manages to challenge each of them on an individual level.

How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

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Our sister organization, HSLDA Action, is a 501(c)(4) organization and is permitted to endorse political candidates and engage in lobbying that is germane to its purposes. HSLDA Action’s Political Action Committee endorses candidates who support homeschool freedom and lobbies on behalf of homeschool freedom.

Learn more about HSLDA Action here.

Yes. HSLDA’s leaders, directors, and employees are Christians who seek to honor God by providing the very highest levels of service in defending homeschool freedom and equipping homeschoolers. And because of our beliefs, we want every family to have the freedom to direct their children’s education, no matter their background or religious affiliation. Therefore, we do not make religious beliefs a condition of membership or any other service we offer. You can learn more about HSLDA here.

HSLDA is the trusted movement leader that makes homeschooling possible by caring for member families and protecting and securing the future of homeschooling.

Get in Touch

We’re available by phone (540-338-5600) M–F 8:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m. ET.

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