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How to improve communication skills for workplace success

How to improve communication skills for workplace success

Possessing strong communication skills will help you in every phase of your life. This is especially true in the workplace.

I have personally worked with several leaders who were masters of communication. A few were wonderful speakers who could tell a great story and get everyone in the room engaged. Those of us in attendance would walk away feeling inspired and eager to help with what came next. Others were very skilled at sharing a clear direction and job expectations.

I knew exactly what was expected of me and how to achieve my goals. This was the foundation of an energized and vibrant role I was in. What I have found is strong communication skills are incredibly helpful and sometimes critical in how well we perform at work.

Here we will take a look at how to improve communication skills for workplace success.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. 5 Ways to Improve Communication Skills
  2. How Communication Skills Help You Succeed
  3. Bottom Line
  4. More Tips for Effective Communication

5 Ways to Improve Communication Skills

There are many tips, tricks, and techniques to improve communication skills. I don’t want to overwhelm you with too much information, so let’s focus on the things that will provide the biggest return on your time investment.

Most of these tips will be fairly easy to become aware of but will take time and effort to implement. So let’s go!

1. Listen

Ever heard the saying you have two ears and one mouth for a reason? If you haven’t, then here’s the reason:

Being a good listener is half the equation to being a good communicator.

People who have the ability to really listen to someone can then actually answer questions in a meaningful way. If you don’t make the effort to actively listen, then you are really doing yourself and the other person a disservice in the communication department.

Know that person who is chomping at the bit to open his or her mouth the second you stop talking? Don’t be that person. They haven’t listened to at least 1/2 of what you’ve said. Therefore, the words that spill out of their mouth are going to be about 1/2 relevant to what you just said.

Listen to someone completely and be comfortable with short periods of silence. Work on your listening skills first and foremost: How to Practice Active Listening (A Step-By-Step Guide)

2. Know Your Audience

Knowing your audience is another critical component to having strong communication skills. The way you interact with your manager should be different than how you interact with your kids. This isn’t to say you need to be a different person with everyone you interact with. Far from it.

Here is a good way to think about it:

Imagine using your the same choice of words and body language you use with your spouse while interacting with your boss. That puts things in a graphic light!

You want to ensure you are using the type of communication most relevant to your audience.

3. Minimize

I have lunch with a business associate about 3 times a year. We’ve been talking for several years now about putting a business deal together.

He is one of those people that simply overwhelms others with a lot of words. Sometimes when I ask him a question, I get buried beneath such an avalanche of words that I’m more confused than when I asked the question. Needless to say this is most likely a large portion of why we never put the deal together.

Don’t be like my lunch business associate. The goal of talking to or communicating with someone is to share actual information. The goal is not to confuse someone, it’s to provide clarity in many cases.

State what needs to be stated as succinctly as possible. That doesn’t mean you can’t have some pleasant conversation about the weather though.

The point is to not create such an onslaught of words and information that the other person walks away more confused than when they started.

4. Over Communicate

So this probably sounds completely counter intuitive to what I just wrote about minimizing your communication. It seems like it might be but it’s not.

What I mean by over communicating is ensuring that the other person understands the important parts of what you are sharing with them. This can be done simply yet effectively. Here’s a good example:

Most companies have open enrollment for benefits for the employees in the fall. The company I work for has open enrollment from November 1 to 15. The benefits department will send out a communication to all employees around October 1st, letting them know open enrollment is right around the corner and any major changes that year. There’s also a phone number and email for people to contact them with any questions.

Two weeks later, we all get a follow up email with

How to improve communication skills for workplace success

Possessing strong communication skills will help you in every phase of your life. This is especially true in the workplace.

I have personally worked with several leaders who were masters of communication. A few were wonderful speakers who could tell a great story and get everyone in the room engaged. Those of us in attendance would walk away feeling inspired and eager to help with what came next. Others were very skilled at sharing a clear direction and job expectations.

I knew exactly what was expected of me and how to achieve my goals. This was the foundation of an energized and vibrant role I was in. What I have found is strong communication skills are incredibly helpful and sometimes critical in how well we perform at work.

Here we will take a look at how to improve communication skills for workplace success.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. 5 Ways to Improve Communication Skills
  2. How Communication Skills Help You Succeed
  3. Bottom Line
  4. More Tips for Effective Communication

5 Ways to Improve Communication Skills

There are many tips, tricks, and techniques to improve communication skills. I don’t want to overwhelm you with too much information, so let’s focus on the things that will provide the biggest return on your time investment.

Most of these tips will be fairly easy to become aware of but will take time and effort to implement. So let’s go!

1. Listen

Ever heard the saying you have two ears and one mouth for a reason? If you haven’t, then here’s the reason:

Being a good listener is half the equation to being a good communicator.

People who have the ability to really listen to someone can then actually answer questions in a meaningful way. If you don’t make the effort to actively listen, then you are really doing yourself and the other person a disservice in the communication department.

Know that person who is chomping at the bit to open his or her mouth the second you stop talking? Don’t be that person. They haven’t listened to at least 1/2 of what you’ve said. Therefore, the words that spill out of their mouth are going to be about 1/2 relevant to what you just said.

Listen to someone completely and be comfortable with short periods of silence. Work on your listening skills first and foremost: How to Practice Active Listening (A Step-By-Step Guide)

2. Know Your Audience

Knowing your audience is another critical component to having strong communication skills. The way you interact with your manager should be different than how you interact with your kids. This isn’t to say you need to be a different person with everyone you interact with. Far from it.

Here is a good way to think about it:

Imagine using your the same choice of words and body language you use with your spouse while interacting with your boss. That puts things in a graphic light!

You want to ensure you are using the type of communication most relevant to your audience.

3. Minimize

I have lunch with a business associate about 3 times a year. We’ve been talking for several years now about putting a business deal together.

He is one of those people that simply overwhelms others with a lot of words. Sometimes when I ask him a question, I get buried beneath such an avalanche of words that I’m more confused than when I asked the question. Needless to say this is most likely a large portion of why we never put the deal together.

Don’t be like my lunch business associate. The goal of talking to or communicating with someone is to share actual information. The goal is not to confuse someone, it’s to provide clarity in many cases.

State what needs to be stated as succinctly as possible. That doesn’t mean you can’t have some pleasant conversation about the weather though.

The point is to not create such an onslaught of words and information that the other person walks away more confused than when they started.

4. Over Communicate

So this probably sounds completely counter intuitive to what I just wrote about minimizing your communication. It seems like it might be but it’s not.

What I mean by over communicating is ensuring that the other person understands the important parts of what you are sharing with them. This can be done simply yet effectively. Here’s a good example:

Most companies have open enrollment for benefits for the employees in the fall. The company I work for has open enrollment from November 1 to 15. The benefits department will send out a communication to all employees around October 1st, letting them know open enrollment is right around the corner and any major changes that year. There’s also a phone number and email for people to contact them with any questions.

Two weeks later, we all get a follow up email with

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]We all communicate differently, interpret information differently, and understand things differently. So, while we all may speak the same language, often times the message can get misconstrued.

Effective communication is at the core of workplace efficiency, interpersonal success, and, ultimately, an improved bottom line. With our free communication skills webinars, you can learn how to get your point across and embed foundational communication skills at every level of your organization.

Featured Webinars

[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][vc_basic_grid post_type=”ids” initial_loading_animation=”none” grid_id=”vc_gid:1576092592678-24ee7f10-11e7-4″ include=”4896, 5742, 5336″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text]

How to Improve Communication

Self-awareness and interpersonal awareness are at the center of effective communication. To communicate well, you must understand your own communication style, the communication style of the people you are speaking to, and how both of these styles work together.

For example, if your older colleague prefers to talk through edits on the phone while you prefer to email at your convenience, you need to understand these differences and find a way to work around them. You can say, “I know that I prefer to email, but Jeff calls me every time I email him… if I want to be successful on this project, I will call Jeff when I need feedback.” Having this level of awareness helps employees navigate the different personalities, preferences, and styles in the workplace.

So how do you build that awareness? Our webinars are a great place to start!

From the Z anda X Career Success Blog

Articles to help you manage and advance your career

8 Reasons Why Improving Your Communication Skills Will Improve Your Career
A post from our Career Success blog

Having good communication skills can improve every area of life. From picking up the phone to make a simple enquiry, to having a more fulfilling relationship with your partner. But never is the benefit more apparent than in the workplace. It can mean the difference between getting the job, or not, and every opportunity that comes thereafter. So here are a few of the crucial ways in which developing your communication skills can boost your chances of career success.

How to improve communication skills for workplace success

1. Securing an interview

Getting a foot in the door is the first challenge for any job seeker, and first impressions count for everything. If your communication skills leave something to be desired over telephone, email or—of course—the all-important CV, chances are you won’t have the chance to meet with your prospective employers in person. A few of the key things that employers look for in a candidate, before they request a face-to-face interview, are:

Comfortable confidence
It’s the ‘comfortable’ part of this equation which can be tricky to master without effective communication skills. If a potential candidate comes across as awkward and conversationally stunted on the phone, it’s unlikely an employer will see the assertive qualities that they’re looking for in their ideal recruit. Likewise, someone who’s overly confident might come off as arrogant. Again, not a trait which is high up on the list of ‘wants’ for any potential employer. So hitting the mark with your communication from the get-go is essential.

The ability to listen
Demonstrating that you’ve listened to (and understood) communications from a prospective employer is fundamental. It suggests motivation, attention to detail, willingness, reliability and even trustworthiness. And if you lack the ability to listen, well, that suggests quite the opposite.

Someone who can think for themselves
Passive types lack the self-belief to communicate effectively in the workplace. And if your conversation feels a little paltry and you can’t think of any relevant questions to ask, it could read as a lack of enthusiasm for the role. Again, it’s a balancing act, because no busy recruiter has time to listen to a candidate blab on for hours. But demonstrating a genuine interest, through doing your research and communicating as such, is key to securing a face-to-face meeting.

2. Increasing your chances of interview success

So you’ve secured an interview date, now it’s time to wow them in person. And that’s sometimes easier said than done, especially if your confidence levels aren’t where they could be. Impressing someone in a interview is a fine art. Again, prospective employers want their new team member to be confident but not cocky, agreeable but not passive—and perception is crafted entirely by effective communication. Both in the verbal and non-verbal sense.

3. Doing your job well and avoiding mistakes

In any role, new or established, effective communication is the only means of ensuring that you’re on the same page as your peers and management. Following instructions and delegating tasks requires the ability to listen well and speak directly. Without these attributes, there can’t be clear understanding and this ultimately leads to mistakes, which cost not only your professional reputation but, also, real money. So developing these skills can actually make you more productive and, therefore, much more valuable to your business.

4. Becoming a better listener

This is about learning to listen actively, and you’d be surprised how many people don’t do this in their day-to-day lives. When we listen actively, we develop trust amongst our peer group, we broaden our own perspective on things and develop knowledge; and we become more approachable to those around us. Listening is integral to troubleshooting and, again, saves businesses time and money.

Want to Communicate More Effectively?

We have online courses with full 12-months’ access.
RRP from US$109 – limited time offer just US$12

5. Being seen as motivated

Passive communication can be a real workplace burden. It prevents you from communicating your ideas coherently and, worse still, stops you thinking of new ideas altogether if it isn’t quashed. Effective, assertive, communication not only gives you the tools to think more clearly; it allows you the confidence to directly convey them at every business level. And we all know that colleagues who appear more motivated are more likely to be given opportunities for progression.

6. Giving and receiving feedback

Constructive feedback can be hard to give, and to take—regardless of the role that you are in. It requires careful listening, empathy, and negotiation skills, on both sides. And at one point or another, everybody will be in this situation. So brushing up on these skills can take you from: “my opinion is the only one that matters” to: “I value your opinion and let’s work out where we go from here”.

7. Becoming a better influencer

Being an influential figure in the workplace makes it more likely that you’ll be put forward for promotion. But, according to an article in the Harvard Business Review, it’s harder than it’s ever been to capture the attention of a digitally distracted peer group, and one of the main ways that you can affect influence is through refining your communication skills. Peers are more likely to support a colleague who is likeable—and this is achieved through attentive listening, conveying understanding, empathising, and cultivating connections. It also has a lot to do with body language and its ability to elicit trust, when used effectively.

How to improve communication skills for workplace success

8. Inspiring and motivating others within your team

Leadership happens through a process of building trust and establishing mutually beneficial ways of working. Not just bulldozing your ideas through to completion. Yes, there are plenty of bully-bosses out there, but becoming someone that others actually look up to is about considering the needs of others with as much importance as your own. Otherwise known as assertiveness. For many people, assertiveness doesn’t come easy, so developing this style of communication might require proper training.

If you’d like to know more about how to develop your communication skills, take a look at our Communication Skills course to see what we can offer.

Want to Communicate More Effectively?

We have online courses with full 12-months’ access.
RRP from US$109 – limited time offer just US$12

How to improve communication skills for workplace success

Perhaps the one personal skill that has the greatest impact on your job satisfaction, promotion potential, and career success is your ability to communicate effectively with others. By improving your communication skills at work you increase your ability to achieve success, have your successes noted, and get yourself those promotions you deserve. Here are things you can do to improve your communication skills at work.

Get Your Point Across

When we’re trying to get a point across to someone else we often think long and hard about what we want to say. That is the wrong way to go about it. Instead of focusing on what you want to say to get your point across, you should focus on what you want the other person to hear.

Listen to What People Are Not Saying

Many times what your employees do not say is as important as what they do say. A manager has to develop the ability to listen to what employees are not saying and dig through that to get to the truth.

Learn to Speak in Public to a Group

Some people are reluctant to speak in public or before a group. Managers can’t be. You will hinder your career if you are unable to speak confidently in front of a group. Like so many other things, public speaking gets easier with practice. You just go out and do it and each time it gets easier.

Get Your Boss to Agree

We all expect our boss to agree with us when we present a request, but too often they say “no.” The problem may not be in what you asked for. Instead, it may be in how you asked for it.

Give Positive Feedback

Don’t ever underestimate the power of positive feedback. We are quick to point out to someone when they make a mistake. Sometimes we forget to acknowledge them when they do something right. Giving positive feedback can be a powerful tool for employee motivation.

Give Negative Feedback Properly

You always want to try positive feedback first, but there are times that isn’t appropriate or effective. When you do need to give negative feedback, there are ways to do it that produce the desired results without creating barriers.

Disagree Without Being Disagreeable

Many managers and companies fail because they rely too heavily on the people like them and screen out those who disagree with them. That’s why many people surround themselves with people who agree with them, think like them, and support them. When your company culture allows people to challenge ideas, suggestions, and plans, you create an organization of thinking, committed people. If your company culture does not allow dissent you produce an environment of fear. Not allowing appropriate dissent will kill your company.

Manage Older Workers Effectively

The workforce is aging as baby boomers move toward retirement. Gen X and millennial managers need to learn how to motivate and manage this talent pool of older workers. It is up to the managers to take the lead and create the climate in which these older workers will remain engaged and productive.

Improve Your Written Communication Too

The purpose of business writing is to convey information to someone else or to request information from them. To be effective in writing for business, you must be complete, concise, and accurate. Your text should be written in such a way that the reader will be able to easily understand what you are telling or asking them. Whether you are writing a sales proposal, an email to your department, or an instruction manual for a software package, here are the steps you need to follow to improve your written communications.​

Write Better Emails

Sloppily written emails waste everyone’s time and money. Write better emails and your boss will love it, your employees will understand you better, and you will spend less time repeating things in another email or over the phone.

Network Better

No matter how you look at it, your success in business depends on your ability to successfully network. Some people consider networking “office politics” and avoid it, but there is much more to it. Successful networking means being able to communicate effectively with your peers and your bosses, but also with your employees. These steps will help you put your improving communication skills to good use to advance in your management career.

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]We all communicate differently, interpret information differently, and understand things differently. So, while we all may speak the same language, often times the message can get misconstrued.

Effective communication is at the core of workplace efficiency, interpersonal success, and, ultimately, an improved bottom line. With our free communication skills webinars, you can learn how to get your point across and embed foundational communication skills at every level of your organization.

Featured Webinars

[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner][vc_basic_grid post_type=”ids” initial_loading_animation=”none” grid_id=”vc_gid:1576092592678-24ee7f10-11e7-4″ include=”4896, 5742, 5336″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_column_text]

How to Improve Communication

Self-awareness and interpersonal awareness are at the center of effective communication. To communicate well, you must understand your own communication style, the communication style of the people you are speaking to, and how both of these styles work together.

For example, if your older colleague prefers to talk through edits on the phone while you prefer to email at your convenience, you need to understand these differences and find a way to work around them. You can say, “I know that I prefer to email, but Jeff calls me every time I email him… if I want to be successful on this project, I will call Jeff when I need feedback.” Having this level of awareness helps employees navigate the different personalities, preferences, and styles in the workplace.

So how do you build that awareness? Our webinars are a great place to start!

From the Z anda X Career Success Blog

Articles to help you manage and advance your career

8 Reasons Why Improving Your Communication Skills Will Improve Your Career
A post from our Career Success blog

Having good communication skills can improve every area of life. From picking up the phone to make a simple enquiry, to having a more fulfilling relationship with your partner. But never is the benefit more apparent than in the workplace. It can mean the difference between getting the job, or not, and every opportunity that comes thereafter. So here are a few of the crucial ways in which developing your communication skills can boost your chances of career success.

How to improve communication skills for workplace success

1. Securing an interview

Getting a foot in the door is the first challenge for any job seeker, and first impressions count for everything. If your communication skills leave something to be desired over telephone, email or—of course—the all-important CV, chances are you won’t have the chance to meet with your prospective employers in person. A few of the key things that employers look for in a candidate, before they request a face-to-face interview, are:

Comfortable confidence
It’s the ‘comfortable’ part of this equation which can be tricky to master without effective communication skills. If a potential candidate comes across as awkward and conversationally stunted on the phone, it’s unlikely an employer will see the assertive qualities that they’re looking for in their ideal recruit. Likewise, someone who’s overly confident might come off as arrogant. Again, not a trait which is high up on the list of ‘wants’ for any potential employer. So hitting the mark with your communication from the get-go is essential.

The ability to listen
Demonstrating that you’ve listened to (and understood) communications from a prospective employer is fundamental. It suggests motivation, attention to detail, willingness, reliability and even trustworthiness. And if you lack the ability to listen, well, that suggests quite the opposite.

Someone who can think for themselves
Passive types lack the self-belief to communicate effectively in the workplace. And if your conversation feels a little paltry and you can’t think of any relevant questions to ask, it could read as a lack of enthusiasm for the role. Again, it’s a balancing act, because no busy recruiter has time to listen to a candidate blab on for hours. But demonstrating a genuine interest, through doing your research and communicating as such, is key to securing a face-to-face meeting.

2. Increasing your chances of interview success

So you’ve secured an interview date, now it’s time to wow them in person. And that’s sometimes easier said than done, especially if your confidence levels aren’t where they could be. Impressing someone in a interview is a fine art. Again, prospective employers want their new team member to be confident but not cocky, agreeable but not passive—and perception is crafted entirely by effective communication. Both in the verbal and non-verbal sense.

3. Doing your job well and avoiding mistakes

In any role, new or established, effective communication is the only means of ensuring that you’re on the same page as your peers and management. Following instructions and delegating tasks requires the ability to listen well and speak directly. Without these attributes, there can’t be clear understanding and this ultimately leads to mistakes, which cost not only your professional reputation but, also, real money. So developing these skills can actually make you more productive and, therefore, much more valuable to your business.

4. Becoming a better listener

This is about learning to listen actively, and you’d be surprised how many people don’t do this in their day-to-day lives. When we listen actively, we develop trust amongst our peer group, we broaden our own perspective on things and develop knowledge; and we become more approachable to those around us. Listening is integral to troubleshooting and, again, saves businesses time and money.

Want to Communicate More Effectively?

We have online courses with full 12-months’ access.
RRP from US$109 – limited time offer just US$12

5. Being seen as motivated

Passive communication can be a real workplace burden. It prevents you from communicating your ideas coherently and, worse still, stops you thinking of new ideas altogether if it isn’t quashed. Effective, assertive, communication not only gives you the tools to think more clearly; it allows you the confidence to directly convey them at every business level. And we all know that colleagues who appear more motivated are more likely to be given opportunities for progression.

6. Giving and receiving feedback

Constructive feedback can be hard to give, and to take—regardless of the role that you are in. It requires careful listening, empathy, and negotiation skills, on both sides. And at one point or another, everybody will be in this situation. So brushing up on these skills can take you from: “my opinion is the only one that matters” to: “I value your opinion and let’s work out where we go from here”.

7. Becoming a better influencer

Being an influential figure in the workplace makes it more likely that you’ll be put forward for promotion. But, according to an article in the Harvard Business Review, it’s harder than it’s ever been to capture the attention of a digitally distracted peer group, and one of the main ways that you can affect influence is through refining your communication skills. Peers are more likely to support a colleague who is likeable—and this is achieved through attentive listening, conveying understanding, empathising, and cultivating connections. It also has a lot to do with body language and its ability to elicit trust, when used effectively.

How to improve communication skills for workplace success

8. Inspiring and motivating others within your team

Leadership happens through a process of building trust and establishing mutually beneficial ways of working. Not just bulldozing your ideas through to completion. Yes, there are plenty of bully-bosses out there, but becoming someone that others actually look up to is about considering the needs of others with as much importance as your own. Otherwise known as assertiveness. For many people, assertiveness doesn’t come easy, so developing this style of communication might require proper training.

If you’d like to know more about how to develop your communication skills, take a look at our Communication Skills course to see what we can offer.

Want to Communicate More Effectively?

We have online courses with full 12-months’ access.
RRP from US$109 – limited time offer just US$12

From the Z anda X Career Success Blog

Articles to help you manage and advance your career

8 Reasons Why Improving Your Communication Skills Will Improve Your Career
A post from our Career Success blog

Having good communication skills can improve every area of life. From picking up the phone to make a simple enquiry, to having a more fulfilling relationship with your partner. But never is the benefit more apparent than in the workplace. It can mean the difference between getting the job, or not, and every opportunity that comes thereafter. So here are a few of the crucial ways in which developing your communication skills can boost your chances of career success.

How to improve communication skills for workplace success

1. Securing an interview

Getting a foot in the door is the first challenge for any job seeker, and first impressions count for everything. If your communication skills leave something to be desired over telephone, email or—of course—the all-important CV, chances are you won’t have the chance to meet with your prospective employers in person. A few of the key things that employers look for in a candidate, before they request a face-to-face interview, are:

Comfortable confidence
It’s the ‘comfortable’ part of this equation which can be tricky to master without effective communication skills. If a potential candidate comes across as awkward and conversationally stunted on the phone, it’s unlikely an employer will see the assertive qualities that they’re looking for in their ideal recruit. Likewise, someone who’s overly confident might come off as arrogant. Again, not a trait which is high up on the list of ‘wants’ for any potential employer. So hitting the mark with your communication from the get-go is essential.

The ability to listen
Demonstrating that you’ve listened to (and understood) communications from a prospective employer is fundamental. It suggests motivation, attention to detail, willingness, reliability and even trustworthiness. And if you lack the ability to listen, well, that suggests quite the opposite.

Someone who can think for themselves
Passive types lack the self-belief to communicate effectively in the workplace. And if your conversation feels a little paltry and you can’t think of any relevant questions to ask, it could read as a lack of enthusiasm for the role. Again, it’s a balancing act, because no busy recruiter has time to listen to a candidate blab on for hours. But demonstrating a genuine interest, through doing your research and communicating as such, is key to securing a face-to-face meeting.

2. Increasing your chances of interview success

So you’ve secured an interview date, now it’s time to wow them in person. And that’s sometimes easier said than done, especially if your confidence levels aren’t where they could be. Impressing someone in a interview is a fine art. Again, prospective employers want their new team member to be confident but not cocky, agreeable but not passive—and perception is crafted entirely by effective communication. Both in the verbal and non-verbal sense.

3. Doing your job well and avoiding mistakes

In any role, new or established, effective communication is the only means of ensuring that you’re on the same page as your peers and management. Following instructions and delegating tasks requires the ability to listen well and speak directly. Without these attributes, there can’t be clear understanding and this ultimately leads to mistakes, which cost not only your professional reputation but, also, real money. So developing these skills can actually make you more productive and, therefore, much more valuable to your business.

4. Becoming a better listener

This is about learning to listen actively, and you’d be surprised how many people don’t do this in their day-to-day lives. When we listen actively, we develop trust amongst our peer group, we broaden our own perspective on things and develop knowledge; and we become more approachable to those around us. Listening is integral to troubleshooting and, again, saves businesses time and money.

Want to Communicate More Effectively?

We have online courses with full 12-months’ access.
RRP from US$109 – limited time offer just US$12

5. Being seen as motivated

Passive communication can be a real workplace burden. It prevents you from communicating your ideas coherently and, worse still, stops you thinking of new ideas altogether if it isn’t quashed. Effective, assertive, communication not only gives you the tools to think more clearly; it allows you the confidence to directly convey them at every business level. And we all know that colleagues who appear more motivated are more likely to be given opportunities for progression.

6. Giving and receiving feedback

Constructive feedback can be hard to give, and to take—regardless of the role that you are in. It requires careful listening, empathy, and negotiation skills, on both sides. And at one point or another, everybody will be in this situation. So brushing up on these skills can take you from: “my opinion is the only one that matters” to: “I value your opinion and let’s work out where we go from here”.

7. Becoming a better influencer

Being an influential figure in the workplace makes it more likely that you’ll be put forward for promotion. But, according to an article in the Harvard Business Review, it’s harder than it’s ever been to capture the attention of a digitally distracted peer group, and one of the main ways that you can affect influence is through refining your communication skills. Peers are more likely to support a colleague who is likeable—and this is achieved through attentive listening, conveying understanding, empathising, and cultivating connections. It also has a lot to do with body language and its ability to elicit trust, when used effectively.

How to improve communication skills for workplace success

8. Inspiring and motivating others within your team

Leadership happens through a process of building trust and establishing mutually beneficial ways of working. Not just bulldozing your ideas through to completion. Yes, there are plenty of bully-bosses out there, but becoming someone that others actually look up to is about considering the needs of others with as much importance as your own. Otherwise known as assertiveness. For many people, assertiveness doesn’t come easy, so developing this style of communication might require proper training.

If you’d like to know more about how to develop your communication skills, take a look at our Communication Skills course to see what we can offer.

Want to Communicate More Effectively?

We have online courses with full 12-months’ access.
RRP from US$109 – limited time offer just US$12

Improving your communication skills can gradually lead you to new heights of success. In today’s world of growing connections and information networks, it is necessary to know how to improve communication skills so that you stay ahead of the pack.

Communicating effectively with others means you have the ability to receive and relay information, a central asset that has leapfrogged and transcended today.

Improve your communication by applying following ways

1. Listen Carefully

Effective communication depends on your ability to listen carefully. A listener allows you to focus on all aspects of the conversation. An attentive listener allows you to focus on what is being said and to ensure that you understand your point without misunderstanding it. It can make someone feel confident; make them feel like they are being listened to, and make the other party feel that they are looking to you for advice or guidance.

Improving your communication skills can gradually lead you to new heights of success.

2. Understand the conversation

Learning to engage in conversation is a great way to improve your understanding. The key is to understand how to ask questions whenever you feel you are missing out on a particular point. It shows that you are busy and eager to know what is going on. Try to use your other senses during ongoing conversations. The more you engage your other senses, the more closely you will understand the conversation.

3. Try to Answer

During the conversation, try to answer instead of trying to answer. Responding involves using your brain, usually answering makes you feel better. Responding allows you to control your emotions as you carefully monitor what you say. On the other hand, the reaction gets things out of hand and the point of the conversation is lost. It is not intended to be effective.

4. Practice makes a man perfect

The most important tip to improve communication skills is practice. Discuss and socialize as much as you can. Practice listening carefully and contribute to the conversation. A great way to work on someone’s communication skills is to talk to friends and family, but this does not require serious discussion.

5. Separate Negativity

A toxic workplace often has passive-aggressive leadership, destructive gossip, politics, and negativity to insult others. This can really benefit you when you are around this every day. It is essential to learn to separate the negativity that we are experiencing every day by moving away from the reality of who we really are.

If the means of communication in the organization are gossip, it is not a healthy practice and it cooperates from above that no one can trust. The widespread lack of communication is a feature of most toxic workplaces. If one gets no feedback on work whether it may be positive or negative, that can create hurdles in productivity.

It’s not about problems; it’s all about not getting the solutions. As a problem occurs there must be a solution for it. One should discuss finding solutions and not on who created the problem.

Good communication in the workplace creates a happier environment. All of us know that the Happier workplace is the most productive one!

Maturity is not when we start speaking big things. It is when we start understanding small things.