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How to keep your camera lenses clean

How to keep your camera lenses clean

It’s inevitable. Shooting in different locations and changing lens will eventually lead to your camera collecting dust on both its external and internal parts.

Dust in your sensor would eventually affect image quality. Fret not. We will give you tips on how to clean inside camera lens. As with any piece of equipment, cameras will get dirty and grimy if you’re not keen on proper maintenance.

Dust In Your Lens

It’s normal to have dust on your camera unless you’re keeping it in an air-tight box. But where’s the fun in that? Exploring subjects, traveling, and composing photos will expose your gadget to elements, no matter how careful you are.

Our point is, don’t be too uptight about this fact. The best thing to do is to learn proper upkeep.

Upon careful inspection, you may notice that dust settles on these areas of your camera lens:

  • Outside the front element glass
  • Between the front elements
  • Outside the back element glass
  • Between the back elements

Here’s an important reminder: Clean the lens only when necessary. Constantly cleaning and mishandling might cause scratches on the glass and its coating.

Cleaning Do’s

How to clean Canon lens inside follows the same basic guidelines as cleaning any other brands of camera.

Below is a list of tips you should follow. Remember, apply these methods only on cleaning the front and back elements of your camera lens.

  • Clear dust using a blower or very fine brushes that are recommended for lens cleaning.
  • Apply lens cleaning solution with a lens cleaning tissue. Make sure that the glass surface is dust-free before doing this.
  • Use lens cleaning products that are recommended by manufacturers.
  • Use microfiber cloth to remove minor smudges. Remove dust first before doing so.
  • Cleaning should be in small circular motions, starting from the center.

You may protect your lens from dust by using a UV filter. If you’re using one, you can clean the filter instead of the lens.

Cleaning Don’ts

Your camera lens, especially its internal parts, is ultra-sensitive. As you know, camera lens is probably the most essential component of your camera. So take responsibility to bring it to authorized service centers if you think that your lens should be cleaned from inside.

We know you came here to know how to clean camera lens from inside. However, our best advice is: Do not do it on your own, or you’ll risk the life of your camera.

As with cleaning its external parts, here are things that you should not do:

  • Do not blow the lens with your mouth.
  • Do not use a regular cloth or any random cleaning solution.
  • Do not clean the lens often. A speck or two of dust should not bother you.
  • Even if there are stubborn smudges, never apply too much pressure when cleaning.
  • Do not clean lens contacts.

Conclusion

If the dust in your camera is visible on your photos, clean the external parts of your lens only, or inspect the viewfinder.

If your cleaning does not make a noticeable change, take your camera to an authorized service center. There, you will see how to clean inside camera lens as done by professionals.

After a proper maintenance check, your camera lens will be good as new. Discover more about camera lenses here!

by Seeing in Macro · Published January 3, 2014 · Updated December 22, 2013

You can have the very best camera equipment in the world, and tons of experience capturing amazing photographs, but if you don’t keep your equipment well maintained, you won’t be able to create the kind of brilliant, clear photographs that impress the folks who view your photos. Part of maintaining your equipment is keeping your camera lenses nice and clean. A spotty, dusty or smeared lens can spell disaster for your next photo shoot. So it’s very important to know the right way to clean a camera lens.

Today’s video post by CamCrunch is dedicated to showing you the exact steps you need to take to keep your lens spotless and ready for action. Pay close attention to the details that are shared in this post, as cleaning your camera lens is quite a bit more involved than simply wiping it off from time to time. If you’ve always wanted to know how to clean your camera lenses like the pros, simply take a look at this tutorial…


Not everyone takes the same approach to cleaning their camera lenses. Some people have their own, unique steps that they take in order to keep their camera lenses clean. The important thing is that you have a basic understanding of the different steps that you should take, and that you make it a priority to clean your lenses on a regular basis. The more frequently you clean your lenses, the better they’ll perform and the better you’ll get at keeping your expensive camera equipment well maintained.

We know that cleaning your gear isn’t the most exciting topic in the world, but it’s important for all photographers to be familiar with the basic steps involved in cleaning a camera lens. We hope that you learned a bit from this post, and that it keeps you inspired to take some time on a regular basis to keep your lenses clean, and all of your photography equipment in good working order. And if you would, please take a minute to click on the Share button to pass this crucial information along to your friends and family.

T he cleanliness of your camera lens affects the quality of your images. It’s as simple as that. But it’s a bit of a double-edged sword because if you clean your lenses too much, or too often, you run the risk of scratching your lens. This post will briefly summarize how to clean camera lenses, with suggestions on where to purchase some of the materials. Let’s jump in.

Best Way to Clean Camera Lens

Step 1: Use a blower to remove dust

If you want to clean your lens, avoid blowing on it. Your saliva or breath could increase condensation. The safest way is to use a blower to get rid of any dust and residue.

They look like this:

Blowers are the safest way to clean your lens

How to Clean Camera Lens

Step 2: Use a lens brush

If a blower isn’t enough, and you still have some specs on the lens, no worries! You can use a lens brush, but we recommend a lens brush with camel hair. Camel hair is thin and will be less harmful to the lens.

Keep in mind brushes can pick up a lot of unnecessary substances. Try not to touch the brush with your hands. It may seem insignificant but if the oils on your hand get to the lens, it could really do some damage.

They sometimes look like actual brushes, other models are made a bit slimmer like a pen.

You can buy these everywhere, including here.

If you want to how to use the brush check out the video below.

Learn more about using a lens brush

Camera Lens Cleaner

Step 3: Use camera lens cleaner

Using camera lens cleaner is a last resort because you really don’t want to risk streaks. Most solutions are alcohol-based and if you just use one or two drops, you probably won’t leave any streaks.

If you’re interested, you can purchase here.

Don’t spray the cleaner directly on the lens, instead use a lens cleaning cloth or tissue. See the next step.

How to Clean Camera Lens

Step 4: Use a cloth or tissue

When you use liquid camera lens cleaner, make sure you wipe it off with either a microfiber lens cloth or specific lens cleaning tissues. Do not use regular tissues as they could scratch your lens.

There are some newer tissues available that work really well.

I recently purchased a new SUV with a backup camera. It constantly gets dirty from melting snow, rain, road grim, etc. How can I keep the lens clean, or clean it without causing damage to the lens?

I don’t expect anything to be able to keep the lens clean while it is actively ugly on the roads, but I want it to be clean and free from grime when it is dry.

How to keep your camera lenses clean

How to keep your camera lenses clean

8 Answers 8

I cut a 3/4″ flat square piece of clear plastic( from vacuum packed purchase of anything),carefully used silicon sealer as a waterproof glue around small trim bezel( mine has flat area around perimeter) ,do not smudge lens view. the flat surface does not trap water/dirt like the convex area of the lens. I found very little intervention is required. I think microscope slide covers 6$ per 100 18mm round would work ,plan on using on all my cars from now on.Can be undone.

My current solution:

Clean the camera lens area well, apply a light coating of Rain-x Original. I made sure I had had not left any streaks or hazing, by buffing well.

This was moderately successful, but grim still tended to collect on the lens.

I purchased a new empty spray bottle and filled it with tap water. I park in a heated garage so I was able to place the spray bottle for easy access when parked. When I get home from a grimy drive, I grab the bottle and give the lens area 3 – 5 squirts. I have not had need to physically touch the lens, decreasing the risk of scratching. The picture remains clear when the lens is dry. I have only been using this techinique for about 3 months so can not speak to the long term reliability of it. I suspect that there is some risk to the camera/lens from being subject to “mini power-wash” on a regular bases, but so far the benefits of clear view have outweighed my anxiety of potentially having to replace the unit.

On the few occasions that I did not spray off the grime immediately on arriving home, I have used a few extra sprays with good results, but spraying clean while still wet has shown the best results.

Edit A couple years later, spraying the lenses when I pull into the garage continues to be a fine solution.

How to keep your camera lenses clean

I’m not sure how well it might work, but you could try NeverWet from Rust-Oleum. It is a super hydrophobic spray on solution which repels water very well. Could keep it clean by keeping it free of deposits. The only thing I am unsure of is how clear it goes on.

How to keep your camera lenses clean

I also have an SUV with backup camera, camera in the forward direction and two downwards cameras on the door mirrors. My experience has been that the forwards camera and the backup camera get most of the dirt, whereas the door mirror cameras get practically no dirt.

My solution? I have a microfiber cloth in the open storage area over the glove compartment. Whenever the cameras have a dirty picture, I will use the cloth to clean the cameras. I have done that about dozen times in 3500 km, and absolutely no damage to the lenses is visible. In theory, the scrubbing could damage the lens if it’s dirty, but that probably occurs more slowly than in 3500 km. The microfiber cloth obviously gets dirty, but you can clean the backup camera using an area of the cloth that doesn’t yet have dirt in it. One microfiber cloth will probably last for many years or more. When the entire cloth is dirty, you just replace it with a new one.

So, you need to clean the lenses more often than you fill up the gas tank. I don’t see that as a problem, as it costs less than one minute of my time to clean the forwards and backup cameras.

Some car manufacturers have a camera that is held hidden when driving, and when the camera is active, electric motors move it out from the hidden position. This obviously eliminates the dirt problem, but also costs more, which is why all manufacturers don’t do it.

I recently purchased a new SUV with a backup camera. It constantly gets dirty from melting snow, rain, road grim, etc. How can I keep the lens clean, or clean it without causing damage to the lens?

I don’t expect anything to be able to keep the lens clean while it is actively ugly on the roads, but I want it to be clean and free from grime when it is dry.

How to keep your camera lenses clean

How to keep your camera lenses clean

8 Answers 8

I cut a 3/4″ flat square piece of clear plastic( from vacuum packed purchase of anything),carefully used silicon sealer as a waterproof glue around small trim bezel( mine has flat area around perimeter) ,do not smudge lens view. the flat surface does not trap water/dirt like the convex area of the lens. I found very little intervention is required. I think microscope slide covers 6$ per 100 18mm round would work ,plan on using on all my cars from now on.Can be undone.

My current solution:

Clean the camera lens area well, apply a light coating of Rain-x Original. I made sure I had had not left any streaks or hazing, by buffing well.

This was moderately successful, but grim still tended to collect on the lens.

I purchased a new empty spray bottle and filled it with tap water. I park in a heated garage so I was able to place the spray bottle for easy access when parked. When I get home from a grimy drive, I grab the bottle and give the lens area 3 – 5 squirts. I have not had need to physically touch the lens, decreasing the risk of scratching. The picture remains clear when the lens is dry. I have only been using this techinique for about 3 months so can not speak to the long term reliability of it. I suspect that there is some risk to the camera/lens from being subject to “mini power-wash” on a regular bases, but so far the benefits of clear view have outweighed my anxiety of potentially having to replace the unit.

On the few occasions that I did not spray off the grime immediately on arriving home, I have used a few extra sprays with good results, but spraying clean while still wet has shown the best results.

Edit A couple years later, spraying the lenses when I pull into the garage continues to be a fine solution.

How to keep your camera lenses clean

I’m not sure how well it might work, but you could try NeverWet from Rust-Oleum. It is a super hydrophobic spray on solution which repels water very well. Could keep it clean by keeping it free of deposits. The only thing I am unsure of is how clear it goes on.

How to keep your camera lenses clean

I also have an SUV with backup camera, camera in the forward direction and two downwards cameras on the door mirrors. My experience has been that the forwards camera and the backup camera get most of the dirt, whereas the door mirror cameras get practically no dirt.

My solution? I have a microfiber cloth in the open storage area over the glove compartment. Whenever the cameras have a dirty picture, I will use the cloth to clean the cameras. I have done that about dozen times in 3500 km, and absolutely no damage to the lenses is visible. In theory, the scrubbing could damage the lens if it’s dirty, but that probably occurs more slowly than in 3500 km. The microfiber cloth obviously gets dirty, but you can clean the backup camera using an area of the cloth that doesn’t yet have dirt in it. One microfiber cloth will probably last for many years or more. When the entire cloth is dirty, you just replace it with a new one.

So, you need to clean the lenses more often than you fill up the gas tank. I don’t see that as a problem, as it costs less than one minute of my time to clean the forwards and backup cameras.

Some car manufacturers have a camera that is held hidden when driving, and when the camera is active, electric motors move it out from the hidden position. This obviously eliminates the dirt problem, but also costs more, which is why all manufacturers don’t do it.

Premium Lightroom & ACR Presets, Photoshop Actions, and eBooks For Photography Enthusiasts

If you want to get the best out of your photographic investments, you should know how to properly care for every equipment you have. This is especially true for delicate items like camera lenses.

Camera lenses are big investments because you need to throw some money on them. Most of them do not come cheap. They’re not made of questionable material, either. You use the lenses for various assignments, so if you don’t know how to care for them, they’ll soon become useless. Basic practices like wiping off dust from the lens surface and storing your lenses in durable and protective containers help a lot. But there are other things that you need to take note of.

How to keep your camera lenses clean
photo by Rares Dutu

Tips for Camera Lens Care

  1. Most camera lenses have two lens caps: one for the front and another for the rear. Make sure that the front cap is always on when the lens is not being used. The same goes for the rear cap. Also, as soon as you remove the lens from the camera, immediately put on the caps. This is an essential practice if you want your lenses to help you take good photos. The gold electrical contacts should always be clean.
  2. Some photographers like to protect their lenses by using a Skylight or protective filter (UV). The filter is placed in front of the lenses. This filter will shield your lenses from elements like dust, smudges, dirt and fingerprints. Your lenses will also be protected in case the camera accidentally hits a hard surface (like a table or wall). Protective filters also shield lenses from weather-related elements. Remove only the protective filter when you plan to use a special effects filter.
  3. If you feel that placing a protective filter can affect the quality of your photos, put one on an old camera (if you have one) first and then use it to practice. This will give you an idea of what you need to adjust in order to come up with good quality photos even with a protective filter.
  4. Always have a clean damp cloth in your camera bag. This will be especially useful when you need to change lenses. Use the cloth to wipe off dust from the lens before removing and replacing it. Put on the other lens right away so that dust won’t get to it. Otherwise, put on the camera cap immediately.
  5. It is also a good idea to have a lens care kit. This is actually better than using damp cloth alone. The kit contains a two-sided brush that looks like a paintbrush. One end of the brush is a foam eraser that you can use to remove smudges from the lenses.
  6. Aside from the brush, the kit also contains a cleaning solution, cotton swabs, a special kind of cloth for lenses and bulb blowers (which pushes air over the lens).
  7. Do not use generic cleaning solutions for your filter. There are solutions made especially for camera filters and lenses, such as the ones that are found in lens care kits. Generic cleaners may only harm your filters and lenses with scratches.
  8. If you plan to bring your camera when traveling, especially by car, put everything in a hard case if you can. The case should be placed on the car seat, not on the floor, where it will absorb all the engine vibrations and shocks.
  9. When it comes to proper camera lens storage, there are a number of things you need to consider. As previously mentioned, the camera bag should be hard cased if possible. This offers a lot of protection. Some photographers even place their cameras inside a solid pouch before putting them inside the bag. Others wrap their cameras with a lint-free material to keep away dust and reduce scratches.
  10. Choose a camera bag with partitions so that it will be easy to store your extra lenses and equipment. There are also camera backpacks with long straps and multiple compartments that you can use, especially when traveling.
  11. Place your camera bag or case in an area that is not directly hit by sunlight. It should also be far from heating radiators. Do not store your camera bag in a damp area or room.
  12. Your camera lens filter should also be properly stored. Use a plastic container that’s hard-sided for this purpose. If you do a lot of moving and traveling, though, it is recommended that you use both a hard case and a soft case for your filters. The hard case is for storing the lenses in your hotel room, while the soft case is for carrying the filters wherever you go.
  13. If you live near the sea or if your place is humid, dump or moist, invest in a digital cabinet, as this is the best way to protect your lenses from harmful elements like fungus. Lens fungus develops because of dust, moisture and lack of light. A digital cabinet is temperature-controlled, so your cameras, lenses and filters will be safe inside. If you can’t afford a digital cabinet, make your own “dry box”. Buy an inexpensive, airtight and see-through plastic container, and put some silica gel. The larger the DIY dry box, the more camera equipment you can place.
  14. Finally, take care of your camera and lens. Watch what you’re doing and always have a firm grip on your equipment. As obvious as it may seem — don’t drop the camera or the lenses. You may still be able to use your equipment after dropping it, but chances are some of your stuff may be damaged – and we all know photography gear can be expensive.

How to Clean Your Lenses

Here are three steps for cleaning your lens.

  1. Release the lens gently. Depending on your camera type or brand, there might be a release button you can use for this function.
  2. Use your blower (in the lens care kit) and blow off all the dirt and dust on the lens.
  3. Use a cleaning tissue to apply lens fluid.
  4. Gently wipe the lens. Your direction should go toward the center of the lens.
  5. Slowly re-attach the lens. Put on the lens cap if you are not going to use the camera or lens after cleaning.

Taking care of your camera lenses will increase their value and durability. More importantly, it will help you come up with good quality photos that tell the stories you want the world to know.

Learn How to Clean and Avoid Camera Lens Fungus

It’s a safe bet that most of you never heard of lens fungus, but it’s a reality that you have to deal with in humid climates.

Lens fungus will rear its ugly head when moisture gets trapped inside the lens.

What lens fungus does is cause cloudy patterns to form on the lens.

Fungus first starts growing in the lens barrel feeding off all the accumulated dust particles.

The best way to avoid dust and lens fungus is to keep your camera and lenses cleaned and in airtight containers with bags of silica gel, which absorbs moisture.

You’ll want to periodically clean the outside of your lenses – the glass and the lens barrel – to remove any dust deposits and to remove any grease deposits (this is food for the fungi).

Store in a Dry Place

Avoid lens fungus by always storing your photo equipment in a cool, dry place.

If you live in a humid area, then store your equipment in airtight containers with small bags of moisture-absorbing silica gel (those white bags that were packed with your lens when you bought it).

You may need to buy some at your local camera shop.

Remember to periodically change the silica, as it loses effectiveness as it becomes full of moisture over time. Some types of silica gels packs are re-usable after drying in a low oven.

With the camera and lenses packed airtight with moisture-absorbing gel, they should be safe.

Remember that it’s important to let your equipment dry out as much as possible before sealing it all up. Fungus will grow on your lens in less than a week if you expose it to damp, dark, and warm conditions, so please avoid these at all costs.

Keep a Plastic Bag Handy

It’s raining outside, and you want to take advantage of the all the great reflections, so you venture outside and brave the raindrops.

The first thing to remember – before you step out the door – is to wrap your camera in a Ziploc bag to avoid moisture from getting inside the camera.

If you forget to do this, then you must completely and effectively dry your camera and the lens before safely storing them.

One last storage caution – avoid storing your camera in leather bags, where fungi can easily grow and eventually harm the camera.

Removing Lens Fungus

If your camera happens to get infected with fungus, you need to act quickly because some fungi secrete acid that will eat away at your lens’ protective coating; the fungi may even etch the glass and ruin the lens.

Luckily for us, this type of fungus is rare.

There are few mixtures you can make to clear away fungus. A hydrogen peroxide blend with ammonia is a good method, as is a vinegar and water solution to remedy the fungus problem. Make sure you don’t delay, or you’ll need to have the lens professionally dismantled and cleaned, which will be expensive.

If the lens has to be re-coated, then you’re looking at another big charge.

Conclusion

Your camera is an investment – perhaps a significant investment.

The regular and proper maintenance of the camera body, the lenses, and other equipment will ensure that your investment will last for over a decade.

Don’t skimp, because there’s nothing more frustrating than missing that once-in-a-lifetime photo because the camera is not working or is damaged.

Treat your camera and equipment with care and respect, and they should provide you with many years of good service, exciting memories and fantastic pictures.

How to keep your camera lenses clean

I used to clean my lenses religiously. Every time before I left the house with the camera, and again when I got back home. These days, my attitude towards it is a little more relaxed. I don’t worry about dust anywhere near as much as I used to. But I still try to avoid cleaning them the wrong way. And yes, there are some wrong ways.

If you struggle to keep your lenses clean or want to minimise the risk of damaging your lens while cleaning them take some pointers from Joe Edelman. In this video, he shows a couple of ways to absolutely not clean your lenses and talks about why. But he also demonstrates his method for cleaning his own lenses safely and effectively.

To prevent the problem showing up in the first place, Joe states the obvious. Use your lens caps. This is what they’re designed for, to keep dust off your lenses and protect them when not in use. But dust and other bits can get on the surface of your lens while you’re using them, too. So, when Joe needs to clean his lenses, he has a simple three step process.

1. Air

Not canned compressed air. That’s filled with all kinds of chemicals in it that can do your lens more harm than good. Also don’t use air compressors, because they can contain oil particles. And certainly don’t blow on the lens. This will introduce spit and other nasties onto the front of your lens which you’ll then just have to re-clean off.

Joe’s suggestion is the Giottos Rocket Blower. I’ve been using one of these myself for years and they’re fantastic. They’re also good for giving your sensor a quick blast of air, too, if it picks up a little dust. Since Nikon started manufacturing bodies with built in sensor cleaning, I’ve found that a rocket blower takes care of 99% of my dust issues. I used to have to take a swab to the sensor at least once a month with my old D100 bodies.

So, get yourself a rocket blower, but don’t try to fly with it. 😉

2. A brush

There are a number of brushes out there to help you wipe the dust off your sensor. Joe uses the Lenspen, a very inexpensive option. Joe does stress that he only uses the brush end of the Lenspen. If the Lenspen feels too cheap for you, then you can always treat yourself to a $75 Static Master Brush.

3. Wiping

You might think the obvious suggestion here is your typical microfibre lens cloth. The problem is that not microfibre lens cloths are created equally. Some are most definitely better than others. But they all have one big problem. They’re absorbant. Any grease on your lens that’s wiped off by a lens cloth is now stuck to the cloth. So, if you need to use it several times, then eventually you’re just transferring grease back to the lens from the cloth.

Joe uses disposable KimWipes with Pancro lens cleaner spray. Once used, you throw it away, so every time you go to clean a lens, you know your cloth is pristine. Personally, I do tend to go for a microfibre lens cloth. But, I change them regularly and I know where I can get good ones. I do also have a couple of packs of the Rosco Lens Tissues. These are disposable, like the KimWipes, and work very well.

Then, go back to the rocket blower to remove any fibres or particles left behind by the wipes.

It seems like a lot of hard work and extra stuff, but you don’t need to carry everything with you always. But even if you don’t, it’s worth having these items so that once you get home, you can give everything a good clean.

How to keep your camera lenses clean

A camera is an extremely useful device and one which helps us capture memories and store them for life. However due to certain issues, it can be difficult to use the camera in its best form. One of these issues is moisture in camera lens. Too much moisture can even damage the lens and this must be avoided. There are many reasons due to which moisture can reach the lens of your camera such as using camera in high humidity conditions or using it during rains etc.

Moisture tends to make pictures blurry and may not allow you to capture images properly. Moisture can reduce the battery life as well as the overall life span of the camera as well. Thus it is important to learn how to remove moisture in camera lens. To find this out, you can go through the following given information.

1. Use silica gel

One of the most common solutions and also the most effective to remove moisture in camera lens is to make use of silica gel. Silica gel helps to pull moisture out of electronics and even camera lenses. It is easily available at departmental stores, art and craft stores and other similar places. You can also buy it online. Follow the given procedure to use this gel to remove moisture from your lens:

  • All you need to do is to place some near the camera lens to help the moisture be absorbed by the gel.
  • You will first have to place the silica gel in a plastic bag, remove the battery or film of the camera and place the camera in the plastic bag as well.
  • You may have to leave the bag in a warm place for a few days to help the gel absorb the moisture from the camera completely.

How to keep your camera lenses clean

Image Credits: Pixabay

2. Put it in an airtight bag containing uncooked rice

  • Another fabulous way to remove moisture from your camera lens is to put it in an airtight bag which contains uncooked rice.
  • The uncooked rice will absorb the moisture from the camera lens and hence put it back in working condition again.

How to keep your camera lenses clean

Image Credits: notchbad.com

3. Put it in sunlight

  • This may sound like an obvious solution but if nothing works, then it is a good idea to put your camera lens in the sunlight for sometime.
  • The sun will soak the moisture and dry the interior parts of the lens.

Alternatively, you can invest in Lens Heater Warmer Dew Heater with Temperature Regulator Strip and avoid putting your Camera in open Sun.

How to keep your camera lenses clean

Prevent moisture

To avoid moisture or water from entering your camera or its lens again, it is important to keep certain points and preventive tips in mind. They are given as follows:

  • For starters, avoid using the camera in extremely humid conditions as moisture tends to enter the lens in such cases.
  • Also, keep your camera in a bag when not being used rather than out in the open for a long time. You can also place silica gel packets in the camera bag when the camera is not being used so as to keep moisture away.
  • Avoid using camera in rainy conditions, near beaches or other water bodies. But in case you are using it in such surroundings, remember to use protective camera gear to avoid moisture from seeping in.

How to keep your camera lenses clean

Cameras are expensive devices which must be used with care and caution. Water or moisture can damage your device completely and as soon as you observe moisture in the camera lens, try following the tips given above. A little delay can prove to be an expensive mistake. However if you are unable to solve the issue of moisture in camera lens, you can always contact a professional. Reach out to Mr Right for all your camera and general home appliances repair needs.