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How to make your shoes waterproof

How to make your shoes waterproof

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Hikers can come across mud at any time of the year, but spring is the best season for hiking through patches of mud and slush. Some people go straight to waterproof hiking boots for this type of damp terrain, but what if you don’t have waterproof boots?

That doesn’t need to be a problem as you can get similar results with a pair of plastic bags.

Double-Check the Plastic Bags

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Step one is to check for holes in the plastic bags. If there are holes in the plastic bags, they won’t do much to protect your feet. If you need extra confirmation that the bags are watertight, turn them inside out and fill them up. If the water doesn’t leak out, it won’t leak in when you’re wearing the bags.

Once you’ve got two waterproof plastic bags, put on calf-length socks and stick one foot in each bag. You get the tidiest fit by putting your toes in one corner of the bag, then pulling the rest of the bag over you foot with the bottom of the bag beneath your sole.

Hold That Bag Up

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One of the easiest ways to keep the bag in place is covering it with another sock, as you see here in the image. The downside of this is that the sock on the outside is going to end up soaked or muddy. If you’re on a long hike and only wear your plastic bag getup for part of it, that means dealing with an extra pair of messy socks for the remainder of your trek.

One alternate solution is to forgo the outside sock and use large rubber bands to hold the bag in place around your calf. Keep things even tidier by putting a second bag around your ankle. Of course, this adds the extra wrinkle of making sure those bands aren’t too tight. Size them too snugly and you’ll end up reducing your circulation, resulting in cold feet and potential for a whole other world of problems.

Want a more stylish solution? Just put on gaiters over your plastic bags. They’ll hold everything in place, no rubber bands or extra socks necessary.

How to make your shoes waterproof

During the rainy season we bring out our colorful rubber boots and trot stylishly. But there are some days when we are wearing our favorite shoe and a sudden shower greets us on our way making us duck for covers. Even if you have got ample cover for yourself till the rain stops there is a very great chance that you might encounter a puddle in your way ruining your beautiful shoes. To avoid such situations waterproofing becomes our best option. If you live in a place where rain is constant, check out this article and find out how to make your shoes waterproof.

  1. Waterproofing product and shoe material
  2. Patch test before waterproofing
  3. Waterproofing the shoes

Waterproofing product and shoe material

We love to stack up shoes of various designs and material. But the same waterproofing does not go well with every material. If you use the wrong waterproofing product then it might damage the shoes rather than protecting them. Here is a list of waterproofing products you can use for your various shoe materials:

  • Lotion/Cream, Oils and Beeswax are great for waterproofing soft leather.
  • Spray-on water proofers are best for suede, silks and exotic skin like snake skin.

Never waterproof shoes which are made of shiny leather or patent leather as it will ruin the finish. Also do not waterproof the embellishments and hairs.

How to make your shoes waterproof

Patch test before waterproofing

Before applying cosmetics on our body we do a patch test so that we can decide whether the product suit us or not. Similarly before waterproofing your whole shoe, do a patch test on a discreet part of the shoe. This will help you to know whether the waterproofing product brings and visible change in your shoes like color change.

Waterproofing the shoes

Before waterproofing the shoe make sure that it is clean. For new shoes just wipe a clean cloth over it to make sure that there are no dust particles on it. Also cover all the embellishments, trims, hairs or jewels on the shoe as they might get damaged by the waterproofing product.

  • Waterproofing with beeswax: If you are using beeswax to waterproof your shoes then its best to wear a glove as the wax might get on your hand. Now take the wax and rub it all over your shoe. Then take a blow dryer and blow dry over the shoe so that the wax melts and is sealed on the shoe material. Let it cool for five minutes and after that time your waterproof shoes are ready!
  • Waterproofingwith Lotion/Oil: At first read the direction given on the label of the lotion or oil. Open the oil / lotion and take out a generous amount on a clean towel. Then rub it all over your leather shoes. Let it sit for 10 minutes. Then take another clean towel and wipe off the excess waterproofing product left on the shoes. Now just wait for 24 hours before flaunting your beautiful shoes without caring about the puddle.
  • Waterproofing with spray-on: At first shake your spray can. Hold your shoe in the other hand and keep it about 8 inches away from the spray can. Now start spraying on the shoe with even motion. Make sure you cover the whole shoe. Then let it sit for half an hour. After 30 minutes, apply a second coat over the entire shoe. Your shoe is now water and snow proof!

For having the best results and keeping your shoes always waterproof, you can repeat the process again after a year or so. This way your shoes will always be waterproof.

If you want to read similar articles to How to Make Your Shoes Waterproof, we recommend you visit our Fashion & Style category.

Make your fabric made shoes waterproof.

How to make your shoes waterproof.

We all have at least one pair of footwear in our closet made from fabric. This could range from Ankara, faux fur, velvet e.t.c

How to make your shoes waterproof

It’s fabric yes but still our footwear isn’t cut out for too much water but as you know, I always bring good news 😁

With just a piece of wax and hairdryer, you will be able to protect your fabric based footwear & rock them with your feet protected from rain, mud e.t.c

Before starting any process, pls ensure your that footwear is clean, dry & free of any dust/debris because waxing a dirty footwear would trap the dirt on the footwear & getting the dirt off after they have been waterproofed would be difficult

Steps

Secondly ensure the beeswax is colorless or off-white. This can be gotten from jumia or any local store near you where natural products are sold

Imagine that you’re coloring with a crayon, Rub the wax vigorously to form a thick layer over any part of the shoe you want to make off-limits to moisture.

As the wax builds up, it will cause visible discoloration. Don’t worry—this will disappear as soon as you apply heat

Switch on the hairdryer to high heat & let it warm up before applying. The more intense the temperature, the faster and more completely the wax will melt.

Hold the nozzle close to the surface of the shoe so that the heat is better concentrated. You should notice the wax beginning to fade into the shoe almost instantly

Because wax is water repellent and non-penetrable, as it liquefies, it becomes integrated into the fabric, sealing the tiny openings and creating a barrier against moisture. It will then re-harden as a clear, protective layer. The finished shoe should look no different than it did before you waxed it

If you do this properly & apply enough layers of wax, all that’s left to do is to see how well your experiment worked. Pour a cup of water over the toe section of the shoe. The water should roll right off.

Congrats! You can now go out fearlessly no matter how soggy it gets outside.

  1. How to Clean Discolored Shoes
  2. How to Dye Suede Boots Dark Grey
  3. How to Clean Dr. Martens Shoes
  4. How to Moisturize Old Leather Boots
  5. How to Redye a Shoe

BÅażej Łyjak/iStock/Getty Images

Sneakers are put through quite a bit of wear and tear, being the common shoe of choice for many daily activities. To prolong their life, it is important to waterproof them, to not only protect the shoes from conditions such as rain and snow but to serve as a barrier against damaging debris and stains. While this applies to all shoes, it is particularly important for sneakers, as they are most often made of canvas. Give your sneakers a second, more durable life with some DIY waterproofing.

Remove the laces from your shoes. For clean, new sneakers, go directly to Step 9.

Set canvas sneakers into a sink, and run hot tap water over them until fully dampened. If the sneakers are made of a more delicate material, like leather or satin, check with the manufacturer before using this method.

Mix 1 tablespoon of baking soda, 1 tablespoon of powder laundry detergent and 1/2 teaspoon of water in a glass. Stir until a paste forms.

Dip a clean toothbrush into the mixture, and use it to scrub the shoes in a circular motion. Clean the entire canvas surface. This removes all debris, making it easier for waterproofing spray to properly adhere to the surface.

Wipe down the shoes with a paper towel, removing all cleaner and debris.

Rinse the shoes with cold water.

Stuff newspaper into the shoes. This will keep the fabric upright, allowing for a shorter drying time.

Allow the shoes to dry overnight. The length of time the shoes take to dry will depend on their material. For instance, fabrics such as polyurethane dry faster than canvas.

Set the dry shoes on a sheet of newspaper, outside or in a well-ventilated area.

Spray the shoes liberally with a waterproofing spray. Hold the can 10 inches away from the shoes, and apply continuously until the fabric is fully coated. Apply two to three coats for full protection.

Let the shoes dry completely overnight. Repeat the process every three months or after the shoes have been exposed to excess rain or debris.

Celeigh O’Neil has been writing professionally since 2008. She has a Bachelor of fine arts from the University of Ottawa, as well as degrees in fashion illustration/design, digital arts and certification in hair and makeup artistry. O’Neil was a frequent contributor to Toronto’s “Dialog” newspaper and has worked as an instructional writer, creating lessons in fashion, art and English for students of all ages.

How to make your shoes waterproof

Make your fabric made shoes waterproof.

How to make your shoes waterproof.

We all have at least one pair of footwear in our closet made from fabric. This could range from Ankara, faux fur, velvet e.t.c

How to make your shoes waterproof

It’s fabric yes but still our footwear isn’t cut out for too much water but as you know, I always bring good news 😁

With just a piece of wax and hairdryer, you will be able to protect your fabric based footwear & rock them with your feet protected from rain, mud e.t.c

Before starting any process, pls ensure your that footwear is clean, dry & free of any dust/debris because waxing a dirty footwear would trap the dirt on the footwear & getting the dirt off after they have been waterproofed would be difficult

Steps

Secondly ensure the beeswax is colorless or off-white. This can be gotten from jumia or any local store near you where natural products are sold

Imagine that you’re coloring with a crayon, Rub the wax vigorously to form a thick layer over any part of the shoe you want to make off-limits to moisture.

As the wax builds up, it will cause visible discoloration. Don’t worry—this will disappear as soon as you apply heat

Switch on the hairdryer to high heat & let it warm up before applying. The more intense the temperature, the faster and more completely the wax will melt.

Hold the nozzle close to the surface of the shoe so that the heat is better concentrated. You should notice the wax beginning to fade into the shoe almost instantly

Because wax is water repellent and non-penetrable, as it liquefies, it becomes integrated into the fabric, sealing the tiny openings and creating a barrier against moisture. It will then re-harden as a clear, protective layer. The finished shoe should look no different than it did before you waxed it

If you do this properly & apply enough layers of wax, all that’s left to do is to see how well your experiment worked. Pour a cup of water over the toe section of the shoe. The water should roll right off.

Congrats! You can now go out fearlessly no matter how soggy it gets outside.

Rain or snow (or any kind of precipitation, really), is like the kiss of death to a beloved pair of leather shoes. It’s why nearly all shoe care instructions insist on hosing them down with a waterproof spray before stepping foot outdoors. As it turns out, that one preventative measure can have the opposite effect, shortening your shoes’ lifespan. David Mesquita, the vice president of Leather Spa and shoe care connoisseur, would be the first to recommend not using waterproof sprays—his shop doesn’t even stock the stuff. So what should you do to protect your shoes from the elements? Keep reading to find out how to waterproof your shoes without completely ruining them.

Avoid Waterproof Sprays

“To really ‘waterproof’ leather, it means creating a barrier where water or moisture can’t get through from either direction, so the leather is no longer breathing,” Mesquita says. “When the leather is no longer breathing, it affects the temperature and perspiration from inside, causing sweat and odor. Picture your foot sitting in a sauna.”

Pick a Water-Resistant Spray Instead

Water-stain repellents are your best bet—they’re light enough so that even if you accidentally oversaturate the material, you won’t damage it, Mesquita says. Another perk? Cleaning, dyeing, and conditioning your shoes (aka everything you need to do to preserve the life of your shoes) are actually doable if you use a water-resistant spray. “Waterproof sprays are too strong; they act as a sealant, and because of that, it won’t absorb polish or leather conditioner,” Mesquita explains.

Test a Patch First

“I recommend doing a spot check before applying anything over an item,” Mesquita cautions. “Always test-spot first.”

Mist Lightly

“Hold the spray eight to 12 inches away from the article and mist one very light application. Let it dry. Then, apply a second layer, and if you want, you can do a third,” Mesquita says. His pick: Leather Spa water and stain protector ($17; leatherspa.com).

Avoid One Certain Finish

“Do not spray patent leather. Think of it as plastic—it may not necessarily ruin the material, but it will just sit on top and look messy or wet,” Mesquita says. “You can use the water-resistant spray for all other materials, like leather, suede, nubuck, and fabric.”

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How to make your shoes waterproof

The sad but harsh truth is, those brand-new trainers you’ve been longing for, for so long, are just not cut-out for wet weather. But before you trade them in for rainproof shoes such as boots or wellies, why not invest in a dependable waterproof shoe spray to help safeguard them? Protecting any textile-based footwear from drips and drizzles to the occasional dunk in a puddle – you’ll be rocking your favourite kicks in next to no time, without the worry of British weather! Find our guide on how to waterproof your shoes below.

So, what reliable waterproof spray for shoes do I invest in, you ask. Introducing the trusted WD-40® lubricant and rust-remover. No, really. You don’t need to break the bank and purchase a fancy waterproof spray – that infamous blue and red can that’s been hiding in your cupboard is the ultimate protector that you need.

WD-40 can protect your footwear from water thanks to its unique, specialist formula. Whether you want to shield your trainers from the rain or give your winter boots extra protection from snow, WD-40 will provide an extra barrier so that water does not penetrate the material, and simply beads off. Read our guide below on waterproofing shoes.

How To Waterproof Your Shoes:

What you will need:

The process:

Step 1: Clean and dry your shoes thoroughly

Step 2: Spray WD-40 Smart Straw with the precision applicator to ensure accurate and complete coverage

Step 3: Leave the formula to dry

Pro Tip: Did you know that WD-40 can actually clean your shoes? Now that you have clean trainers, you can find out how to clean white trainers in our how-to guide.

So, now you know one of the many cool uses of WD-40, it’s time to discover what else the famous blue and red can do! From removing crayon from walls, how to stop a squeaky door, or a guide to cleaning coffee stains – find more tips and tricks here.

How to make your shoes waterproof

Disclaimer

The uses shown and described for WD-40 Multi-Use Product were provided to WD-40 Company by the users themselves. These uses haven’t been tested by WD-40 Company and do not constitute a recommendation of suggestion for use by WD-40 Company. Common sense should be exercised whenever using WD-40 Company products. Always follow the instructions and take heed of any warnings printed on the packaging.

This post may contain affiliate links.

How to make your shoes waterproof

How to make your shoes waterproof

They say that April showers bring May flowers, but they don’t tell you that your shoes will get wet planting those flowers! I have several pairs that I cycle between, but when it rains every day for a week, it’s hard to keep them dry. I finally figured out how to waterproof shoes and boots naturally!

How to Waterproof Shoes or Boots Naturally

Step 1: Clean Shoes

While starting with brand new shoes would be ideal, in most cases that may not be practical.

If your shoes aren’t new, make sure they are at least clean and dry. To dry them quickly, wrinkle some newspaper into loose balls and stuff your shoes with them overnight. This should dry them out, but they may need another day. Brush off any dirt or mud, then you’re ready to start.

Step 2: Wax on

Next, you’ll need some wax. You can use beeswax, soy wax, carnauba wax, bayberry wax, candelilla wax, or whatever type of wax you can find. Next, rub the wax on the shoe or boot, scraping the wax against the surface of the foot ware. Be sure to cover the entire surface, not missing any spots.

Most wax will turn clear when melted (in the next step), but for some fun effects you can try colored crayons on white shoes. You can draw any designs or shapes that suit you. Be aware that any designs you draw on the shoes will likely become blurred and distorted after melting.

Step 3: Wax off

Set your shoes or boots on a few layers of newspaper. Using a hair dryer aimed at the shoe surface, begin heating up the wax. The wax will melt as you making sweeping motions over it with the hair dryer.

Go slowly, melting the wax as you move around on top. Work around from the top to the bottom.

When you are finished, let them cool and them put the shoes on. Flex the toes to see if the wax will crack. The layer should be thin enough that it doesn’t crack. But if it does, remelt the same area again.

Wax Reapplication

If you wear your shoes a lot, you may need to rewax them from time to time. A single application should last six months to a year with average use. Don’t be afraid to wax your shoes again at any time if they start to leak.

Do you know how to waterproof shoes or boots in a unique way? If so, tell us about it!

About Debra Maslowski

Debra is a master gardener, a certified herbalist, a natural living instructor and more. She taught Matt and Betsy how to make soap so they decided to bring her on as a staff writer! Debra recently started an organic herb farm in the mountains of Western North Carolina. You can even purchase her handmade products on Amazon! Connect with Debra Maslowski on G+.

PAID ENDORSEMENT DISCLOSURE: In order for us to support our website activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this website.

DISCLAIMER: Information on DIY Natural™ is not reviewed or endorsed by the FDA and is NOT intended to be substituted for the advice of your health care professional. If you rely solely upon this advice you do so at your own risk. Read full Disclaimer & Disclosure statements here.

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Comments

How to make your shoes waterproofKerry Lowe says

Great idea! I love simple solutions.

How to make your shoes waterproofAdeniyi Samuel says

I need the drawing steps guild

How to make your shoes waterproofAngi says

easier to melt wax in a dish over a pan of water then paint it on shoes with a brush – like they did in olden days then you can make candles with leftovers or let it cools and save it for net time x x

About Matt & Betsy

How to make your shoes waterproof

Matt and Betsy are passionate about living naturally and building a like-minded community focused on the sustainable lifestyle.

DIY Natural is about rediscovering the traditional value of doing things yourself, doing them naturally, and enjoying the benefits. Welcome to the movement! (read more)

Now that sweater weather is in full force, boots of all styles will soon make their way out of the dark depths of your closet. If your shoes aren’t quite winter ready, hacks to make boots slip-proof will make your commute through the snow a lot easier — not to mention injury free.

Whether you’re facing fresh, powdery snow or trudging through layers of ice, having the appropriate cold weather shoes is a must. But investing in quality pairs of non-slip boots can get costly and stylish options aren’t always readily available. Besides, you’re probably already committed to a trusty pair that you’ve broken in just right. Luckily, there are always DIY methods to make your boots equipped to handle snow and ice, whether you’re glued to a favorite pair or you’re eyeing new shoes that don’t exactly have the best traction.

If you want to avoid fearing for your life every time you take a step, follow any of these seven strategies for giving your boots the grip they need to survive the slush.

1. Scuff The Soles

Adding traction to your boots can be as as easy as intentionally scuffing the bottoms. Give your shoes a better grip by scraping the soles against abrasive surfaces like rough concrete or gravel. New shoes especially are more slippery due to their perfectly smooth soles, so wearing them down will make a noticeable difference.

2. Use Traction Spray

Believe it or not, you can actually spray on the grip you need to winter-proof your boots. Spray-on traction adhesives coat your shoes with enough protection to brave icy surfaces, so be sure to keep a bottle in your stash all season long.

This traction spray from Bare Ground does a good job of adding grip in a hurry, though several applications may be necessary.

3. Add A Salt And Rubber Glue Mixture

Adding a grainy texture to your soles may also help prevent you from sliding all over place. Try combining salt and rubber glue to coat onto your shoes. The mixture should add a non-slip component to your boot of choice.

If you have rubber soled shoes, try this plastic fusion epoxy adhesive as your “glue” base. Sprinkle salt on top, and you’ll have grippy treads that aren’t going anywhere.

4. Spray Soles With Hairspray

Although hairspray is a super temporary solution, it is an alternative to spray-on traction adhesives that will make shoes with smooth soles a little more slip-proof. This quick fix will require reapplication on a daily basis, however. Before stepping outside, be sure the hairspray has dried completely.

L’Oreal Paris’ Elnett Satin hairspray has a quick-dry formula and sprays in ultra fine mist. Plus, this spray is super multifunctional: It can also be used to remove lip stick stains and stop tights from running.

5. Score The Bottoms

You may be weary of taking a knife or razor to your favorite pair of boots, but you definitely won’t regret it later. Scoring your soles can give them more traction as water will be able to pass through the treads.

6. Adhere Sand To Your Soles

A cost effective way to get your shoes snow ready is to adhere sand to your soles. Using spray adhesive, like this one from Loctite, and dry sand, coat the bottoms with the gritty material. Coarse sand will surely give your boots more traction.

7. Try Ice Grips

If you’re not too keen on the DIY-ing, you can always slip ice grips onto your existing boots. They’re a surefire way to add tread without compromising the integrity of your shoes. These traction grips from Due North come in colored options as well as basic black. You can take them on and off with ease and add them to any style of boot.

All you need is a little DIY magic to give your boots a non-slip grip. Now you can enjoy the snowier, icier months free of fear.

Bustle may receive a portion of sales from products purchased from this article, which was created independently from Bustle’s editorial and sales departments.

This post was originally published on 1/9/2017. It was updated on 6/25/2019 and 4/3/2020. Additional reporting by Kate Miller.

This article was originally published on November 14, 2016