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How to minimize distraction to get things done

Last Updated: March 22, 2021 References Approved

This article was co-authored by Alyssa Chang. Alyssa Chang is a nutrition coach and trainer, based in the San Francisco Bay Area. She uses her extensive background in brain-based neuroscience to work with clients on improving their connections with their brain and body to heal, reach goals, and move pain-free. She holds a BS in Kinesiology and Exercise, Nutrition and Wellness from the California State University, East Bay and is certified in Precision Nutrition, Z-health Performance and is certified by the National Council for Strength and Fitness.

There are 19 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. In this case, 84% of readers who voted found the article helpful, earning it our reader-approved status.

This article has been viewed 116,241 times.

In today’s fast paced, technology-reliant world, it can be tougher than ever to focus on taking care of business without getting distracted. Many of the thoughts, behaviors and devices that play an important role in daily life can become hindrances when trying to focus. In order to stay on task and get things done, it’s essential to create an environment for yourself in which you can work without having your attention pulled in different directions. This includes measures like turning off your phones and other electronics, scheduling specific times to work and meeting a quota of work and other tasks that you set for yourself.

How to minimize distraction to get things done

Learning online can present a few challenges for students, mainly due to how distracting our home lives can be sometimes when we are trying to study. If you are finding it difficult to focus on your work while learning from home, here are a few suggestions to improve your focus and online learning experience.

Removing Electronic Distractions

You are probably tempted to keep your phone at your desk while studying and working on assignments. Keep it out of sight, put away your tablet, and stop checking social media while you are studying. Stay focused on what you have in front of you with as few electronic distractions as possible.

If you still find yourself opening new tabs and checking social media or the news, try downloading browser extensions such as StayFocusd or Work Mode to keep yourself in check.

Get a Still Background

It’s nice to see trees blowing in the wind, people walking their dogs down the street, and our kids playing in the living room; although they tend to distract us from what we are focusing on if they remain in our line of sight.

Take a second and look around the house for an open area against a wall that you can set your computer up against. A blank wall behind your monitor might seem a little boring, but a still background is less likely to take your attention away from your studies.

Noise

A noisy tv and loud cars driving down the street might interrupt your study sessions, but so can a silent home. Noises and sounds stand out even more in a near silent environment, easily stealing your attention away from what you are working on.

So, find yourself a pair of nice headphones and listen to a mellow playlist at a low volume or turn on the tv in another room to make abrupt noises stand out less.

Getting Prepared Ahead of Time

You are going to have a few moments where you get distracted by something outside of your control. You might get hungry, feel cold, or get restless sitting at your desk after a little while. Bring a snack to your desk, put on a hoodie, and try to go for a walk before sitting down to prevent these feelings from pulling you out of your focus.

Stop Creating Distractions

Sometimes we create our own distractions when we don’t feel motivated to study or complete assignments. We might start cleaning, browse social media, or focus on anything not school related. Despite what you might feel, you still need to learn new materials and work on assignments. So be sure to reward yourself with something you would like to do once you’ve finished studying for the day, such as playing games, seeing friends, or watching a movie.

You’ll look forward to getting your homework and studying done so you can get to something else fun or productive without relentless interruptions.

Keeping a Checklist

Take a few minutes to outline the assignments and quizzes you have for the week. Keeping a detailed list of everything will help you track of what to focus on first, and you can start working on assignments as you cover the topics in class. You’ll feel organized and satisfied checking everything off towards the end of the week.

Keeping a Clean Environment

A cluttered work environment sometimes gets the best of us, so be sure to keep your desk clear of empty mugs, scattered papers, and other items. A clean environment will motivate you more and distract you less than if you had to work with a messy desk.

Knowing what Keeps You from Studying

Use these tips to keep you focused while studying at home and remember that you know what takes your attention away from learning the most. Keep track of what distracts you so you can prepare for them the next time you sit down for your classes.

Your ability to stay focused is more than just a worthwhile thing to cultivate–it’s a critical factor in your success or failure. Getting things done is imperative, and focus is the key to getting things done.

Here are 10 tips to help you stay focused at work by managing distraction, drawing healthy boundaries, and eliminating opportunities for procrastination:

1. Check up on yourself.

Distractions can be internal as well as external, so start by looking within. If you’re all over the place, ask yourself what’s really going on. What’s the source of your flightiness or anxiety? What do you need to be working on in your life?

2. Pinpoint the cause.

Once you have your internal priorities sorted out, look at more external causes. Is it your office setup? An intrusive co-worker? A lack of skill, ideas, or time for something you need to be doing? Burnout? When you can identify the cause, you can fix the effect.

3. Be prepared.

All successful leaders are great planners; they make lists for every major and minor objective. When a task comes your way, spend some time thinking about how you will accomplish it. Write down every step necessary from start to finish, with a timeline (even if it’s a rough one). There is a saying that every 10 minutes you spend on planning saves an hour in execution.

4. Go offline.

Some of the biggest sources of distraction come from email, social media, and cell phones. If you want real focus, take yourself offline until you’ve accomplished what you need to do.

5. Give yourself a break.

One of the keys to doing great work is to know when to take a break. When you start to feel distracted, take a break, and then reassess and refocus yourself. It doesn’t just act as a reward–a short break can help your mind become clearer.

6. Tune it out.

One of the best ways to tune everything out is to tune in to music. When everything around you is distracting, put on your headphones–find something that can serve as background music rather than music that holds your full attention. Music can help you concentrate, and the headphones signal others that you’re not available to chat.

7. Break it down.

Especially when distractions are high, make tasks smaller and break down your large projects into smaller tasks to help you concentrate and give you a sense of accomplishment and progress.

8. Clean it up.

What’s the state of your office or workspace? If it’s dirty, disorganized, or cluttered, invest some time in clearing it out so you can focus.

9. Set a deadline.

If you’re working on a complex task, it takes an average of 90 minutes to accomplish anything worthwhile–and about 30 minutes just to get your mind on the task. Once you are in the flow, set a concentrated period of time–and when the time runs out, stop. It’s easier to stay focused when you have an end in sight.

10. Become an early bird.

This is a simple thing, but the rewards are great if you can pull it off: Start your workday an hour before everyone else. Use that hour to organize your day and to get started before there are any distractions. Similarly, skip the long office lunches most days and instead give yourself a short break to take a walk or clear your head, with something light and nutritious to keep your blood sugar steady. You’re literally giving yourself time and energy.

The distractions that surround us aren’t going anywhere, so learning to overcome them is one of the best things you can do for yourself.

Give some of these ideas a try, and let me know if you’re feeling more effective and less distracted.

Last Updated: February 27, 2021 References Approved

This article was co-authored by Rahti Gorfien, PCC. Rahti Gorfien is a Life Coach and the Founder of Creative Calling Coaching, LLC. Rahti is an International Coach Federation accredited Professional Certified Coach (PCC), ACCG Accredited ADHD Coach by the ADD Coach Academy, and a Career Specialty Services Provider (CSS). She was voted one of the 15 Best Life Coaches in New York City by Expertise in 2018. She is an alumni of the New York University Graduate Acting program and has been a working theater artist for over 30 years.

There are 24 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. In this case, 93% of readers who voted found the article helpful, earning it our reader-approved status.

This article has been viewed 250,581 times.

No one can stay on-task 100% of the time, but being constantly distracted can pose a serious obstacle to getting things done. Distractions eat away at your time and cause unnecessary stress. However, if you’re mindful of how you organize your time and work environment and prepare yourself to accomplish what needs doing, you can significantly limit your distractions. Learn about the habits and strategies you can develop to minimize your distractions at work, enhance your focus on the task at hand, and improve your overall ability to concentrate.

We all start the day with the best of intentions. Although we’re committed to staying focused and on task, and to get as much work done as possible distractions can creep in and sabotage our productivity.

How to minimize distraction to get things done

Unfortunately, social media, smartphones, people and even pets conspire against us, making us less productive than we could be.

The solution to getting more done is simple (in theory): Remove distractions to increase productivity.

However, practically speaking, this isn’t always so easy.

It requires planning and determination, and the willingness to make some simple changes to how, when and where you work.

Following are 10 of these simple changes!

1. Turn Off Notifications on Your Phone

Who can resist the “ping” of a smartphone notification? I know I can’t!

Make sure to turn off social media and email notifications to reduce temptation.

You might also consider putting your phone on silent when you work, and returning phone calls at set times…rather than having to break your concentration every time the phone rings.

2. Block Unnecessary Apps

10 Methods to Remove Distractions to Increase Your Productivity

While it’s nice to think you can resist the allure of YouTube, Facebook, or email while using your computer, most of us don’t have this level of willpower! If you’re serious about avoiding distractions, consider an app like Cold Turkey. Block apps, websites, browsers…even your entire computer if you like!

3. Have Set Times for Checking Email and Social Media

If you’re not quite ready to go “cold turkey”, at least have set times when you’ll let yourself check email and social media. Obsessively checking throughout the day will seriously hinder your ability to focus, meaning you end up working more while getting far less done!

4. Plan Your Tasks for the Day

10 Methods to Remove Distractions to Increase Your Productivity

Have a plan in place for what you hope to get done for the day. If you’re really determined to increase your productivity, you can even decide on certain times when specific tasks should be done. Use an app like Todoist to plan out your day and track your progress!

5. Tidy Up

A messy desk or workspace can be a major distraction. It can make it harder to find what you need, and can serve as a visual – and even emotional – distraction (“This mess is driving me crazy!”).

At the end of the day, dedicate a few minutes to tidying up so you can start the next day with a clean slate!

6. Use Noise-Cancelling Headphones

10 Methods to Remove Distractions to Increase Your Productivity

A business owner’s best friend! Invest in a good set of noise-cancelling headphones that you can use to drown out the sounds of kids, pets or coffee shop chatter. They may not be cheap, but I guarantee they’ll pay for themselves via increased productivity!

7. Work Outside Your Home

If you work from home, you know how hard it can be to avoid distractions in this work environment. Kids, laundry, dishes, phone calls…each are competing for your time and attention.

Consider working outside your home a few times a week – in a coffee shop or shared workspace – and see if this reduces your distractions and boosts your productivity!

8. Track Your Time

10 Methods to Remove Distractions to Increase Your Productivity

You might be surprised at how much – or how little – time you actually spend on certain tasks. Using a time-tracking app like Toggl lays it all out for you in black and white, meaning you’ll know exactly how much time you’re wasting!

9. Stop All the Multitasking

As small business owners, we’re used to “doing it all”, all the time. And while this is an admirable ability in some ways, it can also seriously hinder your ability to really focus on one task. Rather than trying to get three tasks done at once, your time is probably better spent giving 100% focus to just one task – and once you’re done, you can then give 100% to the next task.

10. Reward Yourself

10 Methods to Remove Distractions to Increase Your Productivity

Staying focused is hard work, so don’t forget to reward yourself! Make sure to build in times during the day when you get some “me” time. This might mean going for a quick walk, having a cup of coffee, or calling up a friend just to chat. Whatever helps you relax and recharge!

There are Many Ways You Can Get Rid of Distractions for Better Productivity

It’s unrealistic to think that you can avoid all distractions. Life and business are unpredictable, and that’s not going to change anytime soon.

However, if you can plan ahead, you can remove many common distractions, thereby improving your focus, increasing your productivity and working more effectively.

Which strategies above are you going to try? Let me know in the comments below!

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I know you want your business to be easier. In order to do that, you need a plan that saves you time and helps your business run smoothly. The problem is that you’re working really hard but no matter what you do you can’t get it all done, which makes you feel stressed.

I believe that it shouldn’t be this hard to have a business that runs easily. I understand because I was working myself sick trying to do it all with little results. One more thing to do and I would have collapsed. Then, I discovered how to focus on what actually matters. Now, I help others do the same saving them time so their business runs smoother.

And I can help you, too. The process is as easy as…

  1. 1. Schedule a Call
  2. 2. Customize Your Plan
  3. 3. Your Business Runs Easier

And in the meantime, get the free workshop Master Your Time: 5 Strategies to Help You Become a Productivity Powerhouse.

Last Updated: March 22, 2021 References Approved

This article was co-authored by Alyssa Chang. Alyssa Chang is a nutrition coach and trainer, based in the San Francisco Bay Area. She uses her extensive background in brain-based neuroscience to work with clients on improving their connections with their brain and body to heal, reach goals, and move pain-free. She holds a BS in Kinesiology and Exercise, Nutrition and Wellness from the California State University, East Bay and is certified in Precision Nutrition, Z-health Performance and is certified by the National Council for Strength and Fitness.

There are 19 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. In this case, 84% of readers who voted found the article helpful, earning it our reader-approved status.

This article has been viewed 116,241 times.

In today’s fast paced, technology-reliant world, it can be tougher than ever to focus on taking care of business without getting distracted. Many of the thoughts, behaviors and devices that play an important role in daily life can become hindrances when trying to focus. In order to stay on task and get things done, it’s essential to create an environment for yourself in which you can work without having your attention pulled in different directions. This includes measures like turning off your phones and other electronics, scheduling specific times to work and meeting a quota of work and other tasks that you set for yourself.

How to minimize distraction to get things done

It’s incredibly easy to get distracted while trying to focus on what needs to get done in our current digital lives.

Notifications, popups, infinitely available new browser tabs; it can be an endless cycle of one distraction after the other.

When completing quality work, one of the most important aspects is quality of time on task. Often, the more time we’re able to focus on a particular task in sequence, the easier it is to get to a high level of focus.

But getting to that point can be quite a challenge.

1. Create a System

A very popular method for staying focused while working is the Pomodoro system. It’s built around the concept of dedicated work and relax time periods throughout the day. A popular ratio is 45 minutes of work followed by a 15 minute break, then repeating as desired throughout the day. A 25 / 5 minute ratio may work better depending on the day and the task at hand – it’s completely customizable to fit the style that works best.

There are even physical timers that have become popular for use with the Pomodoro system. It’s not necessary, but sometimes the physical setting of the timer can help trigger a focus period. When a timer is not available, use something like Eggtimer which makes it easy to track time right in a browser window.

2. Gamification

Smartphones can be a major distraction when trying to focus on a particular task. A great way to reduce the desire to constantly check the phone is by making a game out of it. Create a small reward to receive for every successful 20 minute period that you don’t look at the phone.

Draw five to ten squares on a piece of paper like a to-do list. Each square represents a length of time that can be customized to fit the total work time needing to be accomplished. If there is two hours of work to do, create six boxes of 20 minutes each and see how many boxes can be crossed off in a row without stopping.

There are apps available that help gamify the removal of distractions as well. ‘Forest‘ for iOS offers a fun way to block usage of an iPhone by planting digital trees during work periods. If the user leaves the app during the set interval of time it kills the young seedling – this leaves a dead tree on the plot of land for the day. If the app is left open for the duration of the work period, making it impossible to check other screens on the iPhone, the tree grows successfully. I’ve found this app to be useful, but it does cost $0.99.

3. Silence Notifications

While this may seem obvious, turning off notifications is one of the best ways to reduce distractions while trying to get things done. Close TweetDeck, put the phone on silent (silent, NOT vibrate – this is just as distracting as ringtones) and try to eliminate anything that may pop up and pull attention away while trying to focus and work. It can be difficult to remove all possible notifications and distractions because well, life happens, but any effort into this area will pay dividends.

Take the time to turn off things that might disrupt your productive work time.

4. Uninstall

If turning off notifications still wasn’t enough to reduce the desire to check social media and see if there are any snapchat messages waiting, just uninstall the app. While apps can be easily reinstalled it can be reassuring to know that there is no possible way a notification is waiting simply because there is no app there to receive it.

Remember: The tide will come in and the tide will go out whether or not we are there to ensure that it does.

5. Make a Bet

Have something to accomplish? Make a friendly wager with a friend or family member to stay accountable to the task. Make sure that the bet is something that would actually sting a bit if lost. Whether it’s money or something else important, make a wager that will help maintain focus for the fear of losing the bet. If this is done correctly, where the person will stay accountable for the wager it can be super effective.

I’ve seen this done at restaurants where everyone at a particular table would put their phone in a pile, directly in the center of the table. The first person to grab their phone from the pile (while the meal is ongoing) has to pay for the entire bill. If that’s not good motivation to be present and leave the phone alone, I don’t know what is.

6. Make Distractions Difficult

The concept of the ‘twitch’ (this site’s namesake) came about when I realized I had established a muscle-memory pattern to open a new tab in Google chrome (cmd – n) type ‘fac’ and hit ‘enter’. As most people will realize, this pattern is what would auto-fill www.facebook.com in a new browser tab and almost immediately open the newsfeed. This pattern would happen whenever I’d reach a difficult point in writing or a pause during a complex problem. I would complete this action without even realizing that I was doing it, then suddenly be staring at Facebook for no reason at all having just checked it a few minutes earlier. If that’s not a twitch, I don’t know what is.

If there is a pattern often used to open an app on the phone, change the location of the icon – put it in a weird folder or a completely different place on the homescreen. Use Strict Workflow to block pages that shouldn’t be visited during focus periods. Turn off auto-complete in the web browsers menu options. Make the things that often become ‘twitches’ and more muscle memory than actual intention difficult to access so that you have a moment to pause.

7. Intentional Pause

Whether it’s manufactured by making distractions difficult as described above or by sheer power of discipline: Pause. When the urge to check social media approaches and the mouse moves over to a favorite app, or a new tab to a frequented website; Stop. Take two seconds to pause and ask; “Why am I doing this? Do I really want to do this right now, or am I doing this out of habit? Would doing this help me reach my goal?”

I’m often able to catch myself using this series of questions and taking a simple moment to pause and get back on track.

What are some ways that you help yourself stay focused and on track while working on your important tasks?

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Planning or prep periods are supposed to provide time for teachers to grade papers, plan lessons, and communicate with parents. But the sad reality is that these planning periods often are anything but.

You know how it is. You’ve been having a crazy day. The kids walk out the door & you sit down to finally get something done. You check your email & find a complaint from a parent. By the time you’re done dealing with the issue, your time is half done & you haven’t checked anything off you list yet. So you buckle down & get going when a student comes in to ask you a quick question.

Five minutes later you dive back in, only to be distracted by a funny text from your friend. You really needed a laugh. It’s been a tough day. So you smile, text back, and then get back to your papers. You grade the first one and ***Ding*** the bell rings & kids start pouring in.

You sigh and stand up. You felt like you were working the whole period but you pretty much got nothing done.

There are so many distractions that are just a natural part of teaching, but that doesn’t mean we can’t learn to create focused work times that allow us to actually get blocks of work done at school.

How to minimize distraction to get things done

Not every planning period will be a focused work time, but you should be able to create at least a few of these per week. And before you say that’s impossible, let’s look at some specific ways to reduce the distractions & disruptions.

9 ways to reduce disruptions during planning periods

  1. Make appointments with yourself & guard that time. If you had an appointment to meet with a parent, you would respect that commitment & deny any other requests to meet with you during that time. Well the same thing should be true when you set appointments with yourself.

When you plan a dedicated work period and someone asks to stop by & talk with you, tell them you have a prior obligation. This is not a lie because you’ve made a prior obligation with yourself. You’ll be amazed at how good it feels to guard this time & your colleagues will have no problem stopping by later.

  • Don’t check your email. When you check your email, you’ll be distracted by everyone else’s request for your time. Instead, keep your email closed except for a designated time (or two) each day when you plan to reply to emails.
  • Turn off your notifications. Notifications are crazy distracting, and turning them off is amazingly freeing. I keep notifications only for texts and Voxer. Everything else is off. I’ll check it when I want, but I don’t want it disrupting my day.
  • Use airplane mode. If calls and texts are a big disruption for you, airplane mode allows you to declare yourself unavailable for a few minutes. And don’t worry – those texts will be there when you come back.
  • Use an app like Freedom to block distractions. Apps like Freedom allow you to block different websites during focused work times. Perfect for those who have trouble staying away from social media.
  • Shut your classroom door. And maybe even put up a sign that says something like “Teacher working. Please come back later.” You can’t do this every day, but when you need to get something done, it’s okay to tell people this isn’t a good time.
  • Have designated times students can (and cannot) come ask you questions. If you’re bombarded with student questions during planning periods, you might want to plan this more strategically. Set certain times or days when students can ask you questions and explain that they need to respect your time & stick to these times. Or, teach them that when the sign is outside, they need to come back later. It’s actually healthy to draw these boundaries and be intentional about when you do and don’t answer student questions.
  • Find a secluded spot to work. Sometimes to get something done you have to get out of your room. Is there a part of your building that no one goes to? Maybe camp out there for a bit. And if you have a large block of time, consider getting off campus. You might just be amazed how much you can get done in an hour at the library.
  • Do “errands” at the end of the planning period instead of the beginning. If you need to run copies, stop by the office, or stop by the students, save those tasks for the end of the period, not the beginning. The reality that students are coming back soon will keep that 5 minute task from consuming 10, 15, 20 minutes – like it easily does it you do it at the start of the period.
  • Need more help getting things done and finding some balance? In Take Heart & Teach, you’ll discover more practical tips just like these to help you teach with excellence, balance, and the joy of the Lord – even when things are crazy.

    How to minimize distraction to get things done

    How to minimize distraction to get things done

    Welcome to the Smarter Living newsletter! Every Monday, S.L. editor Tim Herrera emails readers with tips and advice for living a better, more fulfilling life. Sign up here to get it in your inbox.

    This year we learned that the key to doing the things we want to accomplish isn’t time management, but rather attention management. Instead of rigorously scheduling every minute of your day around tasks and to-do lists, approach work more from the perspective of: What are the things I care about, and what are the things I want to devote my attention to?

    It seems like a small, arbitrary word-swap, but when you’re truthful with yourself about the things that take up your attention — and whether those are the things you’re truly content with giving your attention to — you might realize that solely thinking about work in terms of time spent isn’t the best approach.

    Take control of your procrastination

    Etymologically, “procrastination” is derived from the Latin verb procrastinare — to put off until tomorrow. But it’s more than just voluntarily delaying. Procrastination is also derived from the ancient Greek word akrasia — doing something against our better judgment.

    “It’s self-harm,” said Dr. Piers Steel, a professor of motivational psychology at the University of Calgary and the author of “The Procrastination Equation: How to Stop Putting Things Off and Start Getting Stuff Done .”

    That self-awareness is a key part of why procrastinating makes us feel so rotten. When we procrastinate, we’re not only aware that we’re avoiding the task in question, but also that doing so is probably a bad idea. And yet, we do it anyway.

    “This is why we say that procrastination is essentially irrational,” said Dr. Fuschia Sirois, professor of psychology at the University of Sheffield. “It doesn’t make sense to do something you know is going to have negative consequences.” Read more >>

    Wait to do things until you’re truly ready

    Don’t fall for prescrastination, or tackling things before the time is right.

    What’s so hard about not jumping the gun?

    One explanation is evolution. If you don’t grab the low-hanging fruit now, it might not be there later. You could run out of time to complete a task, or forget about it altogether. Carpe diem, right?

    “I actually interrupt people a lot because otherwise I’m afraid I won’t remember what I was going to say,” said Lisa Fournier, a professor of psychology at Washington State University. Read more >>

    [Like what you’re reading? Sign up here for the Smarter Living newsletter to get stories like this (and much more!) delivered straight to your inbox every Monday morning.]

    Forget time management. Embrace attention management

    Attention management is the art of focusing on getting things done for the right reasons, in the right places and at the right moments. Prioritize the people and projects that matter, and it won’t matter how long anything takes. Read more >>

    Learn how to do Deep Work

    ‘Deep work’ is a term for focusing without distraction on a cognitively demanding task. It describes, in other words, when you’re really locked into doing something hard with your mind. In order for a session to count as deep work there must be zero distractions. Even a quick glance at your phone or email inbox can significantly reduce your performance due to the cost of context switching.

    The idea here is that if you want to successfully integrate more deep work into your professional life, you cannot just wait until you find yourself with lots of free time and in the mood to concentrate. You have to actively fight to incorporate this into your schedule. It helps, for example, to include deep work blocks on a calendar like meetings or appointments, and then protect them as you would a meeting or appointment. Read more >>

    Don’t let modern distractions steal your attention

    Making ourselves inaccessible from time to time is essential to boosting our focus. A 2017 survey from the American Psychological Association found that being constantly and permanently reachable on an electronic device — checking work emails on your day off; continuously cycling through social media feeds; responding to text messages at all hours — is associated with higher stress levels.

    Half-paying attention to everything means you’re not able to fully pay attention to anything. And that kind of task switching comes with a cost. Read more >>

    Just get it done already

    “At some point, we must remind ourselves, any changes we make to a creation no longer make it better but just different (and sometimes worse),” Dr. Alex Lickerman wrote in Psychology Today on the topic of just getting things done. “Recognizing that inflection point — the point at which our continuing to rework our work reaches a law of diminishing returns — is one of the hardest skills to learn, but also one of the most necessary.”

    The M.F.D. is the minimum outcome you’re willing to accept as a consequence of a decision. It’s what you’d be perfectly fine with, rather than the outcome that would be perfect. The root of the M.F.D. lies in the difference between maximizers and satisficers. Maximizers relentlessly research all possible options in a scenario for fear of missing the “best” one, while satisficers make quick decisions based on less research. Read more >>

    What your tips to tackle 2020? Tell me on Twiter @timherrera.