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How to protect your mac from ransomware

How to protect your mac from ransomwareSome of the most high-profile ransomware cases in recent memory include the WannaCry and Petya outbreaks in 2017, which infected hundreds of thousands of Windows PCs around the world. However, ransomware such as EvilQuest target Mac computers specifically. If you have a Mac, follow the security best practices below to avoid getting infected.

What is Mac ransomware?

Ransomware is a type of malicious software that holds computer systems hostage until a ransom is paid in gift cards, or cryptocurrency like Bitcoin or Ethereum. It’s typically distributed using phishing emails, but it can also spread via unsecured networks.

When Macs are infected by ransomware, users won’t be able to access their data since it’s encrypted. Ransomware messages may also threaten to release the information to the public or destroy sensitive data if victims don’t pay within a certain deadline. Healthcare and finance organizations, in particular, are more likely to pay the ransom because these organizations tend to have a lot of valuable assets, including money, and can’t afford to lose access to their critical data.

Types of Mac ransomware

In 2016, the KeRanger ransomware was distributed through the popular BitTorrent app Transmission. KeRanger was signed with an authorized security certificate, allowing it to evade macOS’s built-in security measures and infect more than 7,000 Mac computers.

Patcher was another strain of Mac ransomware that was discovered in 2017. This type of ransomware disguised itself as a patching app for programs like Microsoft Office. When launched, Patcher would encrypt files in user directories and ask for a ransom paid in Bitcoin. But the ransomware was poorly built, so there was no way to retrieve the decryption key once the ransom was paid.

In 2019, the EvilQuest ransomware encrypted files and tried to trick users into paying a Bitcoin ransom. Much like Patcher, however, there was no feature to decrypt files after paying, leaving those who paid the ransom with nothing.

Ransomware attacks like these can make a resurgence at any time, which is why you need to be prepared in case of an attack.

An ounce of prevention goes a long way

Preventive measures are the best way to keep your Macs safe from ransomware. This involves updating your software regularly to defend against the latest threats and only installing programs from the official App Store.

Since ransomware initially infects computers using phishing emails, make sure to avoid suspicious links and email attachments. Always be on alert even if the email appears to come from a legitimate company or someone you know.

You must also maintain offline backups and have a disaster recovery plan to keep your business running in the off chance that ransomware successfully infiltrates your systems.

Responding to ransomware

If your Mac is infected with ransomware, do not pay the ransom fee, as there’s no guarantee that hackers will provide a decryption key and release your data even if you give in to their demands.

Instead, use an up-to-date anti-malware program to remove ransomware from your computer. Cybersecurity experts may also release free ransomware decryptor tools to remove the infection, so keep an eye out for these on the internet. If these programs and tools don’t work, contain the spread of the ransomware by disconnecting from the network and run data recovery procedures, provided you’ve backed up your data in an external hard drive or the cloud.

Mac ransomware attacks may not be common, but they still pose a great threat to your business. If you need more guidance, contact our team of security experts today. We stay abreast of the latest Mac security threats and know just how to keep your business safe.

Some of the most high-profile ransomware cases in recent memory include the WannaCry and Petya outbreaks in 2017, which infected hundreds of thousands of Windows PCs around the world. However, ransomware such as EvilQuest target Mac computers specifically. If you have a Mac, follow the security best practices below to avoid getting infected.

What is Mac ransomware?

Ransomware is a type of malicious software that holds computer systems hostage until a ransom is paid in gift cards, or cryptocurrency like Bitcoin or Ethereum. It’s typically distributed using phishing emails, but it can also spread via unsecured networks.

When Macs are infected by ransomware, users won’t be able to access their data since it’s encrypted. Ransomware messages may also threaten to release the information to the public or destroy sensitive data if victims don’t pay within a certain deadline. Healthcare and finance organizations, in particular, are more likely to pay the ransom because these organizations tend to have a lot of valuable assets, including money, and can’t afford to lose access to their critical data.

Types of Mac ransomware

In 2016, the KeRanger ransomware was distributed through the popular BitTorrent app Transmission. KeRanger was signed with an authorized security certificate, allowing it to evade macOS’s built-in security measures and infect more than 7,000 Mac computers.

Patcher was another strain of Mac ransomware that was discovered in 2017. This type of ransomware disguised itself as a patching app for programs like Microsoft Office. When launched, Patcher would encrypt files in user directories and ask for a ransom paid in Bitcoin. But the ransomware was poorly built, so there was no way to retrieve the decryption key once the ransom was paid.

In 2019, the EvilQuest ransomware encrypted files and tried to trick users into paying a Bitcoin ransom. Much like Patcher, however, there was no feature to decrypt files after paying, leaving those who paid the ransom with nothing.

Ransomware attacks like these can make a resurgence at any time, which is why you need to be prepared in case of an attack.

An ounce of prevention goes a long way

Preventive measures are the best way to keep your Macs safe from ransomware. This involves updating your software regularly to defend against the latest threats and only installing programs from the official App Store.

Since ransomware initially infects computers using phishing emails, make sure to avoid suspicious links and email attachments. Always be on alert even if the email appears to come from a legitimate company or someone you know.

You must also maintain offline backups and have a disaster recovery plan to keep your business running in the off chance that ransomware successfully infiltrates your systems.

Responding to ransomware

If your Mac is infected with ransomware, do not pay the ransom fee, as there’s no guarantee that hackers will provide a decryption key and release your data even if you give in to their demands.

Instead, use an up-to-date anti-malware program to remove ransomware from your computer. Cybersecurity experts may also release free ransomware decryptor tools to remove the infection, so keep an eye out for these on the internet. If these programs and tools don’t work, contain the spread of the ransomware by disconnecting from the network and run data recovery procedures, provided you’ve backed up your data in an external hard drive or the cloud.

Mac ransomware attacks may not be common, but they still pose a great threat to your business. If you need more guidance, contact our team of security experts today. We stay abreast of the latest Mac security threats and know just how to keep your business safe.

Some of the most high-profile ransomware cases in recent memory include the WannaCry and Petya outbreaks in 2017, which infected hundreds of thousands of Windows PCs around the world. However, ransomware such as EvilQuest target Mac computers specifically. If you have a Mac, follow the security best practices below to avoid getting infected.

What is Mac ransomware?

Ransomware is a type of malicious software that holds computer systems hostage until a ransom is paid in gift cards, or cryptocurrency like Bitcoin or Ethereum. It’s typically distributed using phishing emails, but it can also spread via unsecured networks.

When Macs are infected by ransomware, users won’t be able to access their data since it’s encrypted. Ransomware messages may also threaten to release the information to the public or destroy sensitive data if victims don’t pay within a certain deadline. Healthcare and finance organizations, in particular, are more likely to pay the ransom because these organizations tend to have a lot of valuable assets, including money, and can’t afford to lose access to their critical data.

Types of Mac ransomware

In 2016, the KeRanger ransomware was distributed through the popular BitTorrent app Transmission. KeRanger was signed with an authorized security certificate, allowing it to evade macOS’s built-in security measures and infect more than 7,000 Mac computers.

Patcher was another strain of Mac ransomware that was discovered in 2017. This type of ransomware disguised itself as a patching app for programs like Microsoft Office. When launched, Patcher would encrypt files in user directories and ask for a ransom paid in Bitcoin. But the ransomware was poorly built, so there was no way to retrieve the decryption key once the ransom was paid.

In 2019, the EvilQuest ransomware encrypted files and tried to trick users into paying a Bitcoin ransom. Much like Patcher, however, there was no feature to decrypt files after paying, leaving those who paid the ransom with nothing.

Ransomware attacks like these can make a resurgence at any time, which is why you need to be prepared in case of an attack.

An ounce of prevention goes a long way

Preventive measures are the best way to keep your Macs safe from ransomware. This involves updating your software regularly to defend against the latest threats and only installing programs from the official App Store.

Since ransomware initially infects computers using phishing emails, make sure to avoid suspicious links and email attachments. Always be on alert even if the email appears to come from a legitimate company or someone you know.

You must also maintain offline backups and have a disaster recovery plan to keep your business running in the off chance that ransomware successfully infiltrates your systems.

Responding to ransomware

If your Mac is infected with ransomware, do not pay the ransom fee, as there’s no guarantee that hackers will provide a decryption key and release your data even if you give in to their demands.

Instead, use an up-to-date anti-malware program to remove ransomware from your computer. Cybersecurity experts may also release free ransomware decryptor tools to remove the infection, so keep an eye out for these on the internet. If these programs and tools don’t work, contain the spread of the ransomware by disconnecting from the network and run data recovery procedures, provided you’ve backed up your data in an external hard drive or the cloud.

Mac ransomware attacks may not be common, but they still pose a great threat to your business. If you need more guidance, contact our team of security experts today. We stay abreast of the latest Mac security threats and know just how to keep your business safe.

How to protect your mac from ransomware

Before we start

Having spent some years coding applications for macOS we’ve created a tool that everybody can use. The all-round problem fixer for Mac.

How to protect your mac from ransomware

So here’s a tip for you: Download CleanMyMac to quickly solve some of the issues mentioned in this article. But to help you do it all by yourself, we’ve gathered our best ideas and solutions below.

Features described in this article refer to the MacPaw site version of CleanMyMac X.

Ransomware. The very word sounds ominous. And with good reason. Ransomware attacks are particularly nasty because they prey on users’ fears and are designed to scare them into handing over money. The threats made in order to extort payment can be publishing personal data, exposing online activity, or encrypting data in order to prevent the user from accessing it. Sadly, ransomware on the Mac isn’t unheard of.

How do ransomware attacks work?

Ransomware can infect your Mac in the same way as any other malware. Usually, the user clicks on a link in an email or opens a webpage that contains the malicious code. Often, the code masquerades as an update to, say, Adobe Flash. And, like other malware, it can often present itself as an important security update. So, for example, you might open a webpage that then launches a pop-up page or tab that warns you that your computer is insecure and that you must download an update to fix it. That update contains the malicious code.

Once the code has been downloaded to your computer, it displays a message warning you that something bad will happen if you don’t comply with the hackers request. One well known ransomware attack in 2017, known as WannaCry, targeted Windows computers and encrypted files on infected machines then demanded ransom payments in Bitcoin to unencrypted them.

Another form of ransomware attack involves spamming potential victims with an email message claiming to have proof that they have visited porn websites and even images from their webcam taken during the time they were voting the sites. The email then demands payment in return for deleting the ‘proof.’ In this case, the supposed proof doesn’t exist and no malware has been downloaded to the user’s computer — unless they click a link in the email message.

How can I protect my Mac from ransomware?

The best Mac ransomware protection is to be vigilant and use common sense.

1. Don’t click on any link in an email message unless you’re certain of where the email has come from and where the link will lead

2. Don’t click on links on pop-up windows or tabs that try to scare you into downloading an update or patch

3. Use and ad-blocker in your web browser

4. Install official patches and updates to macOS as soon as they become available

5. Keep your web browser up to date by installing updates as soon as possible

6. Scan your Mac for malware regularly. You can do this using an antivirus tool such as BitDefender or, if you’re using a Mac, by running CleanMyMac X’s malware tool.

How to protect your mac from ransomware

CleanMyMac X has a database of known malware that’s updated frequently. The malware tool scans your Mac and compares what it finds with the database. If there’s a match, it offers to remove the malware for you and all you have to do is press a button.

Mac ransomware removal

Firstly, don’t ever click on a link on the message that tries to extort money from you. Ignore it. Close the window or tab in your web browser or mark the email message as junk.

Next, scan your Mac for malware. You can do this using an antivirus tool. There are several antivirus tools available for Mac that will scan your computer for free. Some will also remove any malware they find for free. Others require you to pay for a full version of the software in order to remove what they find. Alternatively, on a Mac, you can use CleanMyMac X’s malware removal tool. It’s very quick and easy to use.

If you’ve used and antivirus tool and are still having problems, google the symptoms, including the text of the warning message. You won’t be the only computer user to have been attacked in this way and others may have found and share a solution. Make sure, however, that you only follow suggestions from websites you trust, such as well known tech sites.

What if I’m locked out of my Mac completely

Some ransomware attacks lock you out of your Mac. They will force your Mac to restart and, when it does, present you with a screen demanding an unlock code before you can proceed. The hackers will tell you the only way to get that code is to meet their demands. Don’t. Instead, do this.

1. Take your Mac and proof of purchase to an Apple Authorised Service provider. They should be able to unlock it from Lost mode, once you’ve proved it’s yours

2. Change your iCloud password. If the hackers have accessed your Mac, it’s possible they have your iCloud password

3. Turn on two-factor authentication if you haven’t already done so. It will protect other devices connected to your iCloud account.

What if I can’t access my files?

If you’ve been the victim of a ransomware attack that has encrypted files on your computer (no Mac ransomware has done this yet, but the WannaCry Windows attack did it), you should try and restore them from a backup. First, though, follow the steps above to remove the ransomware. Then delete the encrypted files.

Once you’ve done that, if you use Time Machine you can simply launch Time Machine from the menu bar on your Mac, navigate to a point in time before you were attacked and find the files then hit Restore. If you use another backup tool or service, follow its instructions to restore your files.

If you don’t currently backup your data on a regular basis, now is the time to start. It won’t stop ransomware attacks, but it will mean you can replace encrypted files with copies if you need to. Ideally, you should have a regular backup schedule that backs up to two locations, one local and one remote.

What if I have already clicked a link or paid money?

You should still follow the steps above to remove the ransomware. Sadly, scammers are greedy and prey on those they consider to be ‘easy’ targets. If you’ve already paid up, or even clicked a link, you will, unfortunately, now be in that category and will be targeted. It’s even more important to scan your computer regularly (we advise using CleanMyMac X) and be vigilant in the future.

You should also consider reporting the attack to the authorities. While you may be embarrassed to have fallen victim to a scam, or the details of the scam itself may be embarrassing, extortion is a serious crime in most countries. Many countries now have dedicated units to deal with fraud and within those are cybercrime units, specialists in dealing with this kind of crime.

Ransomware is a particularly nasty type of malware because it preys on fear. It’s designed to scare you into paying money, either to prevent something happening or restore access to your data or computer. Whatever you do, never pay the ransom, it will only make you a target for another attack. Take the steps outlined here to protect yourself, or if you’ve been hit by ransomware, to remove it. And make sure you backup your data regularly to you can restore files if you need to.

How to protect your mac from ransomware

Q: Do Mac users need to be worried about ransomware or is it just a Windows problem?

A: Ransomware continues to be one of the most lucrative attacks that cyber-thieves have in their bag of tricks. In 2019, there was a 41% increase in attacks with the associated costs estimated to be in the $7.5 billion range.

While Windows-based computers have always been a much bigger target because there are more potential victims, ransomware specifically targeting MacOS has been around since 2016.

The Newest Threat

A recently discovered threat specifically targeting MacOS users named ‘EvilQuest’ has significantly stepped up the damage it does to victims.

Not only does it encrypt data files and holds them hostage, it also installs a keylogger, tries to steal crypto-currency wallet info and provides the hacker with full remote control of the computer, even if the ransom is paid.

It seems to randomly select files to encrypt that can include critical system files, such as the login keychain. The damage done by this particular malware is so insidious, that the only known way to completely remove the infection to format your entire storage disk and then reload everything from scratch or a clean backup.

Distribution Method

This particular ransomware program was first found hiding inside of another program, allowing it to sneak in when the host program gets installed, kind of like a Trojan Horse.

Although it’s been associated with pirated software downloads so far, there’s nothing to keep the bad guys from exploring other options. Hiding it inside another program makes it much more difficult for traditional signature based anti-virus programs to detect the malware.

You can go to this page on VirusTotal to see which security programs have updated their signatures to specifically detect this code.

As always, it’s best to stick to reputable sites or the Apple App Store for installing any new software program.

Check for Torrent Programs

We know that this is currently being spread through pirated versions of very popular or expensive software programs available on various ‘torrent’ sites, which is a shady part of the Internet.

Specific programs are needed in order to download programs for free from these torrent sites, so it’s a good idea to check your Mac for them, especially if you have kids.

Some of the more popular programs include Folx, qBittorrent, uTorrent, Transmission, Xtorrent, BitTorrent, Vuze, BitLord and FrostWire. You can manually search the Applications folder or use the Spotlight search (the magnifying glass icon in the upper right corner) to see if they exist.

If you find one of these programs on your Mac, it would be advisable to do a thorough security scan of your entire computer and have a discussion about the dangers of torrent downloads with the family member that is using it.

The Best Protection

No matter which ransomware strain hits you, your choices are either to pay the ransom or lose the files forever, unless you have a detached or off-site backup.

Anything attached to your computer such as an external hard drive or USB drive will be locked down by the malware, which is why online backups are very effective against this growing threat.

The recent WannaCry ransomware attacks on Windows have some Mac users wondering if they are safe. Is macOS secure from ransomware attacks?

The recent WannaCry ransomware attacks on Windows systems have generated worldwide headlines and caused quite a lot of fear among users of all operating systems. Even some Mac users have been wondering if their computers are safe from such attacks.

So are Mac users safe from ransomware attacks?

A writer at 9to5Mac recently considered the question and warned Mac users not to become complacent despite the fact that Windows is still the #1 target for ransomware attacks.

Ben Lovejoy reports for 9to5Mac:

For consumers and businesses, it needs to be a reminder of the importance of keeping operating systems updated – and all data backed-up more than once. Windows may be the primary target, but Mac malware is growing – which includes ransomware.

McAfee said recently that Mac malware grew 744% last year. Most of it was adware, which is an irritation rather than a threat to data, but not all of it.

In January, we saw an attack which hijacks Safari and the Apple Mail app to cause Macs to crash and a separate attack that captures screenshots from them. In February, a Word macro specifically aimed at Macs allowed arbitrary code execution capable of anything from keylogging to webcam captures. In April, a fake macOS update allowed an attacker to spy on all Internet usage, including secure websites. In May, malware disguised as a Flash updater made its way from Windows to Mac, and a Handbrake mirror got hacked to allow a malicious version to be installed.

In case you thought I’d forgotten to include something from March, that was a doozy. That was when we learned from Wikileaks that the CIA has a hacking unit devoted to iOS malware and has lost control of most of it. Indeed, governments are probably the biggest customer for zero-day exploits, and have the biggest teams working on discovering new ones. The WannaCry attack itself uses an exploit developed by the NSA.

As you can tell from Ben’s post, the answer is clearly no. macOS users are not completely safe from ransomware attacks. One can say that we are somewhat safer than those using Windows, but that’s just reducing the question to a matter of degree.

All operating systems have security vulnerabilities

Ben’s post just underscores the fact that all computer operating systems have vulnerabilities of one kind or another. No operating system is totally immune from such problems.

Windows, of course, remains one of the most widely used operating systems in the world. And older versions of Windows often aren’t patched regularly and thus provide an extremely attractive target for hackers.

But even macOS can be successfully attacked, and Mac users should never become complacent about security. Like any other computer user it is incumbent on us to make sure that our systems are kept strictly up to date and that we adhere to the best security practices possible.

macOS: How to avoid or remove ransomware

So how can you avoid having your Mac become infected by ransomware? A writer at Macworld has some very helpful tips, and he also has some advice for what to do if you do become infected.

Keir Thomas reports for Macworld:

With the outbreak of WannaCry crippling the world’s computers, Mac users might be wondering what they can do to protect themselves from ransomware, and how to fix things if they get hit. Here’s everything you need to know about detecting, avoiding and removing ransomware on Macs.

This is one of several in-depth Macworld articles dealing with Mac security. If you’re looking for AV buying advice, read our roundup of the Best Mac antivirus and Do Macs get viruses?; general advice can be found in our Mac security tips; and those who have been hit by a virus should try How to remove Mac viruses.

There are several things you can do to protect your Mac against ransomware:

2. Basic phishing protection

3. Don’t use dodgy software

4. Always ensure your system and apps are updated

5. Install only from official websites

6. Back up frequently

Did you miss a post? Check the Eye On Apple home page to get caught up with the latest news, discussions and rumors about Apple.

Next read this:

Jim Lynch is a technology analyst and online community manager who has also written for many leading industry publications over the years, including ITworld, InfoWorld, CIO, PCMag, ExtremeTech, and numerous others.

The opinions expressed in this blog are those of Jim Lynch and do not necessarily represent those of IDG Communications, Inc., its parent, subsidiary or affiliated companies.

Some of the most high-profile ransomware cases in recent memory include the WannaCry and Petya outbreaks in 2017, which infected hundreds of thousands of Windows PCs around the world. However, ransomware such as EvilQuest target Mac computers specifically. If you have a Mac, follow the security best practices below to avoid getting infected.

What is Mac ransomware?

Ransomware is a type of malicious software that holds computer systems hostage until a ransom is paid in gift cards, or cryptocurrency like Bitcoin or Ethereum. It’s typically distributed using phishing emails, but it can also spread via unsecured networks.

When Macs are infected by ransomware, users won’t be able to access their data since it’s encrypted. Ransomware messages may also threaten to release the information to the public or destroy sensitive data if victims don’t pay within a certain deadline. Healthcare and finance organizations, in particular, are more likely to pay the ransom because these organizations tend to have a lot of valuable assets, including money, and can’t afford to lose access to their critical data.

Types of Mac ransomware

In 2016, the KeRanger ransomware was distributed through the popular BitTorrent app Transmission. KeRanger was signed with an authorized security certificate, allowing it to evade macOS’s built-in security measures and infect more than 7,000 Mac computers.

Patcher was another strain of Mac ransomware that was discovered in 2017. This type of ransomware disguised itself as a patching app for programs like Microsoft Office. When launched, Patcher would encrypt files in user directories and ask for a ransom paid in Bitcoin. But the ransomware was poorly built, so there was no way to retrieve the decryption key once the ransom was paid.

In 2019, the EvilQuest ransomware encrypted files and tried to trick users into paying a Bitcoin ransom. Much like Patcher, however, there was no feature to decrypt files after paying, leaving those who paid the ransom with nothing.

Ransomware attacks like these can make a resurgence at any time, which is why you need to be prepared in case of an attack.

An ounce of prevention goes a long way

Preventive measures are the best way to keep your Macs safe from ransomware. This involves updating your software regularly to defend against the latest threats and only installing programs from the official App Store.

Since ransomware initially infects computers using phishing emails, make sure to avoid suspicious links and email attachments. Always be on alert even if the email appears to come from a legitimate company or someone you know.

You must also maintain offline backups and have a disaster recovery plan to keep your business running in the off chance that ransomware successfully infiltrates your systems.

Responding to ransomware

If your Mac is infected with ransomware, do not pay the ransom fee, as there’s no guarantee that hackers will provide a decryption key and release your data even if you give in to their demands.

Instead, use an up-to-date anti-malware program to remove ransomware from your computer. Cybersecurity experts may also release free ransomware decryptor tools to remove the infection, so keep an eye out for these on the internet. If these programs and tools don’t work, contain the spread of the ransomware by disconnecting from the network and run data recovery procedures, provided you’ve backed up your data in an external hard drive or the cloud.

Mac ransomware attacks may not be common, but they still pose a great threat to your business. If you need more guidance, contact our team of security experts today. We stay abreast of the latest Mac security threats and know just how to keep your business safe.

It is more important than ever to safeguard your digital assets from increasing risks and threats. Have you heard already of Ransomware and Shadow IT? Today, I would like to talk about these two serious risks and give you some tips to protect yourself from them.

Let`s start with ransomeware which is one of the darkest threats today.

What exactly is Ransomware?

Ramsomware is malware that encrypts files on other computers. The blackmailers who encrypt these files then threaten not to give the data back to you unless you pay them a large amount of money. One-third of British companies have already been affected by ransomware according to an article at infosecurity-magazine.com.

How can the risk of ransomware infection be reduced?

There is a possibility to reduce the risk of infection by malware like ransomware through comprehensive patch management. Most computers are particularly vulnerable to attack because they are not on the current patch level, or the default configuration allows the user to open unsafe applications. On Mac, a system can be secured quite quickly by regularly installing the latest security updates and by setting security settings to run programs. This can be accomplished with a client management tool like Parallels Mac Management for Microsoft SCCM. Parallels Mac Management extends your existing Microsoft SCCM to manage Macs like you manage PCs. It allows centralized rollout of the current patches for the operating system and applications and ensures a secure client.

Another dark risk is shadow IT.

What exactly is Shadow IT?

Shadow IT is the use of software, hardware, and IT systems that are not officially released and supported by the IT department. This includes the use of cloud services such as Dropbox or OneDrive that employees use for work without permission from the IT Admin. Shadow IT results in insecure data, as sensitive information can end up in unsafe channels and can also be attacked by Trojans such as ransomware. A client management tool like Parallels Mac Management can detect unlicensed software on end devices to reduce its use.

I hope this article gave you a better understanding of two big risks we have to face nowadays and how to protect yourself from them.

What is your experience with malware or shadow IT? Let us know in a comment below, or on Twitter or Facebook.

If you have any questions regarding Parallels Mac Management, feel free to contact us:

How to protect your mac from ransomware

Ransomware is a malware attack where attackers threaten to publish your data online, encrypt files, deny access to your files, or even expose your online activity unless you pay a ransom. Despite Apple’s uptight inbuilt security features, ransomware is rapidly growing and increasingly becoming a common threat.

Anybody can be a victim of ransomware, and that is why you need the best ransomware protection to guard your Mac and ensure the best security. Below are a few tips to help you safeguard your Mac from ransomware.

Update your macOS Regularly

To protect your device from malware, keeping your software and OS updated is crucial. When you run an update, you are able to get the latest security patches making it harder for cybercriminals to exploit vulnerabilities in your software, hence maximizing ransomware prevention. It would help if you implemented a device management strategy, perhaps in a way that updates are done automatically. You can do this by opening system preferences and further clicking the app store icon. Go ahead and tick “automatically check for updates”, and your machine will be set to download updates automatically.

Install Anti Malware Software

Some third-party apps are essential tools that give protection to your machine since they scan for potential threats and fixes them. You can download tools such as mac cleaner that offers all-round protection. The app gives protection against data miners, trojans, and recent browser hijackers. The app also helps you delete tracking cookies and erases sensitive details like browser history to ascertain your privacy. By running a diagnosis check on your Mac regularly, your chances of catching up with ransomware before it does damage are better. You can also install and antivirus software that will keep your Mac protected.

Back Up Your Data

It is also smart to play safe. Well, there are plenty of ways to back up your data besides your computer. It is recommendable to maintain duplicate backups for your data such as one cloud-based drive such as Dropbox or Google Drive and the likes. Cloud storage allows you to return to the previous version of files making it possible to return to an unencrypted version. Your data will always remain safe when backed up in a case where you experience a ransomware attack. Therefore, it is crucial to keep everything copied on an external hard drive. Be sure not to leave it connected to your computer when not in use. Otherwise, if left plugged in, your data can also be encrypted.

Download from Official and Trusted sites

Downloading media files or software from an unknown website increases the risks of threats. It is vital to visit verified and trusted sites if you want to download something. Most reputable websites have markers you can recognize to show they have been verified. For example, secure sites use “https,” which is symbolized by a green padlock icon in the address bar instead of “http,” denoted by a red padlock icon to show the site is not secured. It is crucial to avoid clicking up on pop-up windows since hackers use such pop-ups and fake websites to spread malware.

Wrap Up

macOS has the hardware and software security implementations that make them quite secure. However, it is necessary to protect your Mac from ransomware and malware in general by taking active measures to protect your machine and to boost its security. Pick a few tips, and always stay alert!