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How to quickly preview a file in ubuntu’s file manager (like “quick look” in macos)

Lori Kaufman is a technology expert with 25 years of experience. She’s been a senior technical writer, worked as a programmer, and has even run her own multi-location business. Read more.

Sometimes, you don’t need to open an image in a photo editor–you just want to make sure which file is which. Instead of opening each file, you can preview each one in Ubuntu’s file manager program, Nautilus, without opening them.

We’ll show you how to install and use an add-in for Nautilus, called GNOME Sushi, that will allow you to preview image files, text files, PDF files, LibreOffice files, and even media files by pressing the spacebar. It’s similar to the Quick Look feature in macOS.

To install GNOME Sushi using Ubuntu Software, click the following link: apt://gnome-sushi

You can also copy and paste that link into the address bar in a browser and press Enter.

The following dialog box displays. Click “Install”.

The Authenticate dialog box displays. Enter the password for your Ubuntu account in the box and click “Authenticate”.

Ubuntu will install the software and show you its progress.

Once GNOME Sushi is installed, open Nautilus by clicking the Files icon on the Unity bar.

Find a file you want to preview and select it. For our first example, we’re going to preview an image file.

Press the Spacebar to preview the file. A preview window shows the image and a diagonal double arrow button is available when you move the mouse cursor over the image preview. Click this double-arrow button to enlarge the image preview.

NOTE: The previewer should work immediately without logging out and back in or restarting. If not, exit Nautilus and reopen it.

A larger preview of the image displays, also with the double-arrow button. Clicking the double-arrow button returns you to the original preview size. Press the Spacebar or the Esc key to close the preview window.

Hit the Spacebar or the Esc key to close the preview window.

You can also preview text files. Again, select the text file you want to preview and press the Spacebar to preview the file.

The text file opens in the preview window and you can scroll through the file using your mouse’s scroll button or the scroll bar on the right. The text does not wrap, so there is also a scroll bar on the bottom for scrolling to the end of the lines. When previewing text files, you can open them from the preview window. Click on the button at the bottom with the document icon on it. The file will open in the default text editor.

In addition to text files, you can also view LibreOffice files. For our example, we’ll select an .odt file, which is a LibreOffice Writer file.

To view a LibreOffice file, you must install an additional software package, if you don’t already have it. Click “Install” on the Install additional software package that displays.

Enter your password on the Authenticate dialog box and click “Authenticate”.

The Installing packages dialog box displays as the additional package is installed.

Once the additional software has been installed, the LibreOffice file displays in the preview window. For multi-page LibreOffice documents, you can scroll down through the pages of the document, or you can use the right and left page arrows. You can also enlarge the preview by clicking the diagonal double-arrow button.

To quickly preview a long list of files, you can select the first one, press the Spacebar to preview the file, press the Spacebar again to close the preview window, and then press the down arrow key to select the next file. Repeat this procedure to quickly preview one file after the other.

Lori Kaufman is a technology expert with 25 years of experience. She’s been a senior technical writer, worked as a programmer, and has even run her own multi-location business. Read more.

Sometimes, you don’t need to open an image in a photo editor–you just want to make sure which file is which. Instead of opening each file, you can preview each one in Ubuntu’s file manager program, Nautilus, without opening them.

We’ll show you how to install and use an add-in for Nautilus, called GNOME Sushi, that will allow you to preview image files, text files, PDF files, LibreOffice files, and even media files by pressing the spacebar. It’s similar to the Quick Look feature in macOS.

To install GNOME Sushi using Ubuntu Software, click the following link: apt://gnome-sushi

You can also copy and paste that link into the address bar in a browser and press Enter.

The following dialog box displays. Click “Install”.

The Authenticate dialog box displays. Enter the password for your Ubuntu account in the box and click “Authenticate”.

Ubuntu will install the software and show you its progress.

Once GNOME Sushi is installed, open Nautilus by clicking the Files icon on the Unity bar.

Find a file you want to preview and select it. For our first example, we’re going to preview an image file.

Press the Spacebar to preview the file. A preview window shows the image and a diagonal double arrow button is available when you move the mouse cursor over the image preview. Click this double-arrow button to enlarge the image preview.

NOTE: The previewer should work immediately without logging out and back in or restarting. If not, exit Nautilus and reopen it.

A larger preview of the image displays, also with the double-arrow button. Clicking the double-arrow button returns you to the original preview size. Press the Spacebar or the Esc key to close the preview window.

Hit the Spacebar or the Esc key to close the preview window.

You can also preview text files. Again, select the text file you want to preview and press the Spacebar to preview the file.

The text file opens in the preview window and you can scroll through the file using your mouse’s scroll button or the scroll bar on the right. The text does not wrap, so there is also a scroll bar on the bottom for scrolling to the end of the lines. When previewing text files, you can open them from the preview window. Click on the button at the bottom with the document icon on it. The file will open in the default text editor.

In addition to text files, you can also view LibreOffice files. For our example, we’ll select an .odt file, which is a LibreOffice Writer file.

To view a LibreOffice file, you must install an additional software package, if you don’t already have it. Click “Install” on the Install additional software package that displays.

Enter your password on the Authenticate dialog box and click “Authenticate”.

The Installing packages dialog box displays as the additional package is installed.

Once the additional software has been installed, the LibreOffice file displays in the preview window. For multi-page LibreOffice documents, you can scroll down through the pages of the document, or you can use the right and left page arrows. You can also enlarge the preview by clicking the diagonal double-arrow button.

To quickly preview a long list of files, you can select the first one, press the Spacebar to preview the file, press the Spacebar again to close the preview window, and then press the down arrow key to select the next file. Repeat this procedure to quickly preview one file after the other.

Sometimes file thumbnails in Nautilus aren’t enough. Sometimes you need a closer look at a file, photo, or folder to make sure it’s the one you actually want, but without the hassle of opening a full-blown app to find out.

And that’s where GNOME Sushi comes in.

GNOME Sushi is an alternative to macOS ‘Quick Look‘ for Linux desktops that use Nautilus, aka GNOME’s famous file manager.

You select a file in Nautilus, tap the spacebar, and an instantaneous (and usually interactive) preview of the file appears — no need to open a full app.

Sushi supports file previews for most plain-text documents, including scripts with syntax highlighting, as well PDFs, HTML files, and LibreOffice documents. Music and video file previews use the GStreamer framework to let you to seek/scrub through them.

And, of course, GNOME Sushi is particularly great for gawking at photos:

You can use your keyboard’s arrow keys to page between different files when viewing a preview, with Sushi automatically adjusting the size and features of the window to accommodate. E.g., say you preview an image file beginning with the letter ‘a’, you can then press the right arrow key to select a PDF beginning with the letter ‘b’, and it “just works”.

To close a Sushi preview press the space bar again. It’s an intuitive behaviour that is easy to adopt; a spacebar tap to preview, a spacebar tap to dismiss.

One feature Sushi (sadly) lacks from its macOS counterpart is ‘actions’. You can’t preview an image and then hit a button to annotate it there, in the same window.

For most common file previews Sushi does give you the option to open the file in the default app associated with the file type, which is better than nothing.

Install GNOME Sushi on Ubuntu

GNOME Sushi is a simple feature that makes a major impact on your workflow. Its seamless preview prowess is such that, after a few days of use, you will begin to wonder how you managed without it!

To install GNOME Sushi on Ubuntu run this command:

Alternatively, install the app using Ubuntu Software:

You may need to restart Nautilus (log out and back in) for the feature to take effect, but once you’ve done that it’s ready to use: open Nautilus, select a file using your mouse or keyboard, and hit the spacebar to preview it!

In short, GNOME Sushi gives you a quick and effective way to take an instantaneous look at PDF files, photos, and other documents without needing to open them fully. I consider this tool a must have on my desktop, but let me know what you think of it down in the comments!

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Home » Apps » Get macOS ‘Quick Look’ on Ubuntu with GNOME Sushi

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times and Reader’s Digest, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

Use Nautilus-Actions to easily and graphically create custom context menu options for Ubuntu’s Nautilus file manager. If you don’t want to create your own, you can install Nautilus-Actions-Extra to get a package of particularly useful user-created tools.

Nautilus-Actions is simple to use – much simpler than editing the Windows registry to add Windows Explorer context menu options. All you really have to do is name your option and specify a command or script to run.

Creating Your Own Actions

Grab the Nautilus-Actions Configuration Tool from the Ubuntu Software Center or run this command to install it:

sudo apt-get install nautilus-actions

After installing it, quit and restart the Nautilus file manager with the following command. You can also press Alt+F2 and type this command instead of running it in a terminal.

Launch the Nautilus-Actions Configuration Tool from the Dash after installing it.

An Example Action

Nautilus-Actions has quite a few options to work with, but creating a basic action is pretty easy. For example, the Thunar file manager (install it from the Ubuntu Software Center or with sudo apt-get install thunar, if you like) has a pretty good Bulk Rename tool. Let’s create an action to open selected files in Thunar’s Bulk Rename tool, integrating it with Ubuntu’s file manager.

First, click the New Action button on the toolbar and type the name of your action into the Context Label box.

Click the Command tab and enter the command or script you want to use into the Path box — thunar -B, in our example. You should also enter the appropriate parameter into the Parameters box — you can click the Legend button to see a list of parameters you can use. In this case, we want the %B parameter to feed the Bulk Rename tool a space-separated list of file names. Nautilus-Actions shows you a preview of the command it will run, so you’ll know you’re on the right track.

Nautilus-Actions offers quite a few more options we can play with, but they’re unnecessary in this case. Click the Save button on the toolbar and your action will immediately be added to Nautilus. Right-click some files in Nautilus and you’ll see your new action in the Nautilus-Actions submenu.

If you created the Bulk Rename With Thunar action, you can click it and Thunar’s Bulk Rename interface will open (assuming you installed it) with the files automatically selected.

If you don’t like the submenu, click the Preferences button in the Nautilus-Actions Configuration Tool window and uncheck the “Create a root ‘Nautilus-Actions’ menu” option.

After running nautilus -q again to restart Nautilus, the submenu will disappear and you’ll see your new option in Nautilus’ main menu.

Advanced Options

Nautilus-Actions offers many more configuration options on its other tabs. For example, you can tell Nautilus-Actions to launch the specified command in a terminal.

Your action will appear for all files and folders by default, but you can match specific mimetypes (file types), file names, folders, and more.

Installing & Using Pre-Created Actions

To download some particularly useful actions that have been created by other users, install the nautilus-actions-extra package on your system:

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:nae-team/ppa
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install nautilus-actions nautilus-actions-extra

If you only want specific actions, you can install them from the PPA instead of installing the entire nautilus-actions-extra package.

Quit and restart Nautilus after installing the actions:

After installing Nautilus-Actions-Extra, you’ll find quite a few new options in the file manager’s right-click context menus. Some actions appear when you right-click any file or group of files — for example, a mass rename option — while some actions only appear when you right-click a certain type of file — for example, an image or multimedia conversion option.

For example, the Set Emblem action, also known as Emblemizer, allows you to apply emblems to your folders and files. This feature was removed from Nautilus’ Properties dialog in Nautilus version 3.

Nautilus-Actions-Extra includes many more tools for everything from advanced search, editing text files as root, and mounting ISO files. If you want to do something from Nautilus’s right-click menu, there’s a good chance this package includes an option for it.

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  • Kako hitro predogledati datoteko v Ubuntujevem upravitelju datotek (kot “Quick Look” v macOS)

Včasih vam ni treba odpreti slike v urejevalniku fotografij – samo želite poskrbeti, katere datoteke je. Namesto da bi odprli vsako datoteko, si lahko vsak izmed njih ogledate v programu Ubuntujevega upravljalnika datotek, Nautilus, ne da bi jih odprli.

Pokazali vam bomo, kako namestiti in uporabiti dodatek za Nautilus, imenovan GNOME Sushi, ki vam omogoča, da predogledate slikovne datoteke, besedilne datoteke, datoteke PDF, datoteke LibreOffice in celo predstavnostne datoteke s pritiskom na preslednico. Podobno je funkcija Quick Look v macOS.

Če želite namestiti program GNOME Sushi z uporabo programa Ubuntu, kliknite naslednjo povezavo: apt: // gnome-suši

To povezavo lahko tudi kopirate in prilepite v naslovno vrstico v brskalniku in pritisnete Enter.

Prikaže se naslednje pogovorno okno. Kliknite »Namesti«.

Prikaže se pogovorno okno Authenticate. Vnesite geslo za svoj račun Ubuntu in kliknite »Preverjanje pristnosti«.

Ubuntu bo namestil programsko opremo in vam pokazal napredek.

Ko je nameščen program GNOME Sushi, odprite Nautilus tako, da kliknete ikono Datoteke v vrstici Unity.

Poiščite datoteko, ki jo želite predogledati, in jo izberite. Za naš prvi primer bomo pregledali slikovno datoteko.

Pritisnite preslednico, da predogledate datoteko. Okno za predogled prikazuje sliko in diagonalni gumb z dvojno puščico je na voljo, ko premaknete kazalko miške nad predogled slike. Kliknite ta gumb z dvakratno puščico, če želite povečati predogled slike.

OPOMBA: Predogledovalnik bi moral delovati takoj, ne da bi se odjavil in znova ali znova zagnal. Če ne, zaprite Nautilus in ga ponovno odprite.

Prikaže se večji predogled slike, tudi z gumbom z dvojno puščico. S klikom na gumb s puščico vas vrne v prvotno velikost predogleda. Pritisnite preslednico ali tipko Esc, da zaprete okno za predogled.

Pritisnite preslednico ali tipko Esc, da zaprete okno za predogled.

Predogledate lahko tudi besedilne datoteke. Ponovno izberite besedilno datoteko, ki jo želite predogledati, in pritisnite preslednico za predogled datoteke.

Besedilna datoteka se odpre v oknu za predogled in se lahko pomikate po datoteki s pomočjo gumba za pomikanje miške ali drsnega traku na desni. Besedilo se ne zavije, zato je na dnu tudi drsna vrstica za pomikanje do konca vrstic. Pri predogledu besedilnih datotek jih lahko odprete v oknu za predogled. Kliknite na gumb na dnu z ikono dokumenta na njej. Datoteka se bo odprla v privzetem besedilnem urejevalniku.

Poleg besedilnih datotek si lahko ogledate tudi datoteke LibreOffice. V našem primeru bomo izbrali datoteko .odt, ki je datoteka LibreOffice Writer.

Če si želite ogledati datoteko LibreOffice, morate namestiti dodatni programski paket, če ga še nimate. Kliknite “Namesti” v namestitvenem dodatnem programskem paketu, ki se prikaže.

Vnesite geslo v pogovorno okno Authenticate in kliknite »Preverjanje pristnosti«.

Pogovorno okno Nameščanje paketov se prikaže, ko je nameščen dodatni paket.

Ko je dodatna programska oprema nameščena, se v oknu za predogled prikaže datoteka LibreOffice. Za večstranske LibreOffice dokumente se lahko pomikate navzdol po straneh dokumenta ali pa uporabite puščice na desni in levi strani. Predogled lahko tudi povečate tako, da kliknete diagonalno puščico z dvema puščicama.

Če želite hitro pregledati dolg seznam datotek, lahko izberete prvo, pritisnete preslednico za predogled datoteke, znova pritisnite preslednico, da zaprete okno za predogled in nato s puščico navzdol izberete naslednjo datoteko. Ponovite ta postopek, če želite hitro predogledati eno datoteko za drugo.

Geoffrey_Carr

Néha nem kell képeket megnyitnia a fotószerkesztőben, csak azt szeretné tudni, hogy melyik fájl melyik. Az egyes fájlok megnyitása helyett az Ubuntu fájlkezelő programjában, a Nautilus-ban előnézeteket tekinthet meg anélkül, hogy megnyitná azokat.

Megmutatjuk, hogyan telepíthetünk és használhatunk egy kiegészítőt a Nautilushoz, a GNOME Sushi néven, amely lehetővé teszi a képfájlok, szöveges fájlok, PDF fájlok, LibreOffice fájlok és médiafájlok megtekintését a szóköz billentyű megnyomásával. Ez hasonlít a MacOS Quick Look funkciójához.

A GNOME Sushi Ubuntu szoftverrel történő telepítéséhez kattintson a következő linkre: apt: // gnome-sushi

Ezt a hivatkozást a böngésző címsorába másolhatja és beillesztheti, majd nyomja meg az Enter billentyűt.

Megjelenik a következő párbeszédpanel. Kattintson a “Telepítés” gombra.

Megjelenik a Hitelesítés párbeszédpanel. Írja be az Ubuntu fiókhoz tartozó jelszót a mezőbe, majd kattintson a “Hitelesítés” gombra.

Az Ubuntu telepíti a szoftvert és bemutatja Önnek a fejlődést.

Miután a GNOME Sushi telepítve lett, nyissa meg a Nautilust az Unity sáv Fájlok ikonjára kattintva.

Keresse meg az előnézeti képeket, és válassza ki azt. Az első példánkban egy képfájl előnézetét fogjuk megnézni.

Nyomja meg a szóköz billentyűt a fájl megtekintéséhez. Az előnézeti ablakban megjelenik a kép, és átlós dupla nyílgomb áll rendelkezésre, amikor az egérmutatót a kép előnézetére mozgatja. Kattintson dupla nyílra a kép előnézetének nagyításához.

MEGJEGYZÉS: Az előnézetnek azonnal ki kell jelentkeznie a bejelentkezéstől, a visszaállításból vagy az újraindításból. Ha nem, kilép a Nautilus-ból, és nyissa meg újra.

A kép egy nagyobb előnézete is megjelenik, a dupla nyíl gombbal is. A dupla nyílra kattintva visszatér az eredeti előnézeti mérethez. Nyomja meg a szóköz vagy az Esc billentyűt az előnézeti ablak bezárásához.

Nyomja meg a szóközt vagy az Esc billentyűt az előnézeti ablak bezárásához.

A szövegfájlokat is megtekintheti. Ismételten válassza ki az előnézeti szövegfájlt, és nyomja meg a szóköz billentyűt a fájl előnézetének megtekintéséhez.

A szövegfájl megnyílik az előnézeti ablakban, és görgeti a fájlt az egér görgetőgombjával vagy a jobb oldali görgetősávval. A szöveg nem burkolódik, ezért alul van egy görgetősáv is, amely a sor végére görget. A szöveges fájlok megtekintésekor megnyithatja őket az előnézeti ablakból. Kattintson az alján lévő gombra a dokumentum ikonján. A fájl megnyílik az alapértelmezett szövegszerkesztőben.

A szöveges fájlok mellett megtekintheti a LibreOffice fájlokat is. Példánk esetén válasszuk ki a .odt fájlt, amely egy LibreOffice Writer fájl.

LibreOffice fájl megtekintéséhez további szoftvercsomagot kell telepítenie, ha még nem rendelkezik vele. Kattintson a “Telepítés” gombra a megjelenő kiegészítő szoftvercsomag telepítéséhez.

Adja meg a jelszavát a Hitelesítés párbeszédpanelen, majd kattintson a “Hitelesítés” gombra.

A Csomagok telepítése párbeszédpanel megjelenik a kiegészítő csomag telepítésekor.

Miután telepítette a kiegészítő szoftvert, a LibreOffice fájl megjelenik az előnézeti ablakban. A többoldalas LibreOffice dokumentumoknál lefelé görgetheti a dokumentum oldalát, vagy használja a jobb és bal oldali nyilakat. Az előnézetet az átlós dupla nyílra kattintva is kinagyíthatja.

A fájlok hosszú listájának gyors megtekintéséhez kiválaszthatja az elsőt, nyomja meg a Szóköz gombot a fájl megtekintéséhez, nyomja meg újra a Szóköz gombot az előnézeti ablak bezárásához, majd a lefelé mutató nyíllal válassza ki a következő fájlt. Ismételje meg ezt az eljárást, hogy gyorsan előnézzen egy fájlt egymás után.

Kartais nereikia atidaryti nuotraukos į foto redaktorių, ką tik norite įsitikinti, kuris failas yra. Vietoj to, kad atidarytumėte kiekvieną failą, galite peržiūrėti kiekvieną failą “Ubuntu” failų tvarkyklių programoje “Nautilus”, neatverdami jų.

Mes parodysime, kaip įdiegti ir naudoti “Nautilus” priedą, vadinamą “GNOME Sushi”, kuris leis peržiūrint vaizdo failus, tekstinius failus, PDF failus, “LibreOffice” failus ir netgi daugialypės terpės failus. Tai panaši į “Quick Look” funkciją “MacOS”.

Norėdami įdiegti “GNOME Sushi” naudodamiesi “Ubuntu” programine įranga, spustelėkite šią nuorodą: apt: // gnome-sushi

Taip pat galite nukopijuoti ir įklijuoti šią nuorodą į adreso juostą naršyklę ir paspauskite Enter.

Rodomas toks dialogo langas. Spustelėkite “Įdiegti”.

Rodomas dialogo langas Autentiškumas. Įveskite savo Ubuntu paskyros slaptažodį ir spustelėkite “Autentifikuoti”.

“Ubuntu” įdiegs programinę įrangą ir parodys jūsų pažangą.

Kai įdiegta “GNOME Sushi”, atidarykite “Nautilus”, spustelėkite “Failų” piktogramą “Unity” juostoje .

Raskite failą, kurį norite peržiūrėti, ir pasirinkite jį. Pirmame pavyzdyje mes ketiname peržiūrėti vaizdo failą.

Norėdami peržiūrėti failą, paspauskite tarpo klavišą. Peržiūros langas rodo vaizdą, o dvigubo rodyklės įstrižainė yra galimas, kai perkeliate pelės žymeklį ant vaizdo peržiūros. Paspauskite šį dvigubo rodyklės mygtuką, kad padidintumėte vaizdo peržiūrą.

PASTABA: peržiūros priemonė turėtų veikti nedelsdama, neišsijungus ir vėl įkeliant arba iš naujo paleidus. Jei ne, išjunkite “Nautilus” ir vėl ją atidarykite.

Rodomas didesnis vaizdas peržiūrai, taip pat su dvigubo rodyklės mygtuku. Paspaudus dukart rodyklės mygtuką grąžina jus į pradinį peržiūros dydį. Paspauskite tarpo klavišą arba esc mygtuką, kad uždarytumėte peržiūros langą.

Paspauskite tarpo klavišą arba esc mygtuką, kad uždarytumėte peržiūros langą.

Taip pat galite peržiūrėti teksto failus. Dar kartą pasirinkite teksto failą, kurį norite peržiūrėti, ir paspauskite tarpo klavišą, kad galėtumėte peržiūrėti failą.

Teksto failas atidaromas peržiūros lange, o jūs galite pereiti per failą naudodami pelės naršymo mygtuką arba slinkties juostą dešinėje. Tekstas nėra apvyniojamas, todėl apačioje yra ir slinkties juostos, kad būtų galima slinkti iki eilučių pabaigos. Peržiūrėdami tekstinius failus, galite juos atidaryti iš peržiūros lange. Paspauskite mygtuką apačioje, kuriame yra dokumento piktograma. Failas atidaromas numatytojo teksto redagavimo priemonėje.

Be tekstinių failų taip pat galite peržiūrėti “LibreOffice” failus. Pavyzdžiui, mes pasirinksime .odt failą, kuris yra “LibreOffice Writer” failas.

Jei norite peržiūrėti “LibreOffice” failą, turite įdiegti papildomą programinės įrangos paketą, jei to dar neturite.

Įveskite savo slaptažodį dialogo langelyje Autentifikuokite ir spustelėkite “Autentifikuoti”.

Dialogo langas Diegimo paketai rodomas, kai papildoma paketas yra įdiegtas.

Kartą įdiegta papildoma programinė įranga, “LibreOffice” failas rodomas peržiūros lange. Daugelio puslapių “LibreOffice” dokumentuose galite slinkti žemyn per dokumento puslapius arba galite naudoti dešinę ir kairę puslapio rodykles. Taip pat galite padidinti jo peržiūrą spustelėdami įstrižainės dvigubo rodyklės mygtuką.

Norėdami greitai peržiūrėti ilgą failų sąrašą, galite pasirinkti pirmąjį, paspausti tarpinį klavišą, norėdami peržiūrėti failą, dar kartą paspauskite tarpinį klavišą, kad uždarytumėte peržiūrą. langą, tada paspauskite rodyklę žemyn norėdami pasirinkti kitą failą. Pakartokite šią procedūrą, kad greitai peržiūrėtumėte vieną failą po kito.

Tai baisus laikas būti” Windows “vartotoju. “Lenovo” buvo sujungtas su “HTTPS” užgrobimo “Superfish” reklamine programine įranga, “Comodo” tiekia dar blogesnę saugumo skylę, vadinamą “PrivDog”, ir dešimtys kitų programų, tokių kaip “LavaSoft”, daro tą patį. Tai tikrai blogai, tačiau, jei norite, kad jūsų užkoduoti žiniatinklio seansai būtų užgrobti, tiesiog eikite į “CNET” atsisiuntimus ar bet kurią nemokamą svetainę, nes jie visi yra “HTTPS” pažeidžiamų reklaminių programų susiejimas.

Kai “Apple” sumažino trečios kartos “Apple TV” kainą iki 69 dolerių, mes vis dar rekomendavome laikytis, kol “Apple” išleido naują versiją. Naujasis “Apple TV” atvyko, todėl šiandien mes ketiname aptarti, ar dabar manome, kad atėjo laikas šokti. Nauja Apple TV žymi dramatišką technologinį šuolį virš jo pirmtako.

บางครั้งคุณไม่จำเป็นต้องเปิดภาพในโปรแกรมแก้ไขภาพคุณเพียงแค่ต้องการให้แน่ใจว่าไฟล์ใดเป็นไฟล์ใด แทนที่จะเปิดไฟล์แต่ละไฟล์คุณสามารถดูตัวอย่างแต่ละไฟล์ในโปรแกรมจัดการไฟล์ของอูบุนตูชื่อ Nautilus โดยไม่ต้องเปิด.

เราจะแสดงวิธีการติดตั้งและใช้ Add-in สำหรับ Nautilus หรือที่เรียกว่า GNOME Sushi ซึ่งจะช่วยให้คุณสามารถดูตัวอย่างไฟล์รูปภาพไฟล์ข้อความไฟล์ PDF ไฟล์ LibreOffice และแม้กระทั่งไฟล์มีเดีย มันคล้ายกับคุณสมบัติ Quick Look ใน macOS.

ในการติดตั้ง GNOME Sushi โดยใช้ซอฟต์แวร์ Ubuntu ให้คลิกที่ลิงค์ต่อไปนี้: apt: // gnome-sushi

กล่องโต้ตอบต่อไปนี้จะปรากฏขึ้น คลิก“ ติดตั้ง”.

กล่องโต้ตอบการตรวจสอบความถูกต้องจะปรากฏขึ้น ป้อนรหัสผ่านสำหรับบัญชี Ubuntu ของคุณในช่องและคลิก“ รับรองความถูกต้อง”.

เมื่อติดตั้งซูชิของ GNOME แล้วให้เปิด Nautilus โดยคลิกที่ไอคอนไฟล์บนแถบ Unity.

กด Spacebar เพื่อดูตัวอย่างไฟล์ หน้าต่างแสดงตัวอย่างจะแสดงรูปภาพและปุ่มลูกศรแนวทแยงสองเส้นจะพร้อมใช้งานเมื่อคุณเลื่อนเคอร์เซอร์ของเมาส์ไปเหนือภาพตัวอย่าง คลิกที่ปุ่มลูกศรสองครั้งนี้เพื่อขยายภาพตัวอย่าง.

หมายเหตุ: ผู้ดูภาพตัวอย่างควรใช้งานได้ทันทีโดยไม่ต้องออกจากระบบและกลับเข้ามาหรือเริ่มใหม่ ถ้าไม่ใช่ให้ออกจาก Nautilus และเปิดใหม่อีกครั้ง.

ภาพตัวอย่างขนาดใหญ่แสดงพร้อมปุ่มลูกศรคู่ การคลิกปุ่มลูกศรคู่จะทำให้คุณกลับสู่ขนาดภาพตัวอย่างดั้งเดิม กด Spacebar หรือปุ่ม Esc เพื่อปิดหน้าต่างแสดงตัวอย่าง.

กด Spacebar หรือปุ่ม Esc เพื่อปิดหน้าต่างแสดงตัวอย่าง.

คุณยังสามารถดูตัวอย่างไฟล์ข้อความ อีกครั้งเลือกไฟล์ข้อความที่คุณต้องการดูตัวอย่างและกด Spacebar เพื่อดูตัวอย่างไฟล์.

ไฟล์ข้อความจะเปิดขึ้นในหน้าต่างแสดงตัวอย่างและคุณสามารถเลื่อนดูไฟล์โดยใช้ปุ่มเลื่อนของเมาส์หรือแถบเลื่อนทางด้านขวา ข้อความไม่ได้ห่อดังนั้นยังมีแถบเลื่อนที่ด้านล่างเพื่อเลื่อนไปยังจุดสิ้นสุดของบรรทัด เมื่อดูตัวอย่างไฟล์ข้อความคุณสามารถเปิดได้จากหน้าต่างดูตัวอย่าง คลิกที่ปุ่มด้านล่างพร้อมไอคอนเอกสาร ไฟล์จะเปิดขึ้นในโปรแกรมแก้ไขข้อความเริ่มต้น.

นอกเหนือจากไฟล์ข้อความคุณยังสามารถดูไฟล์ LibreOffice สำหรับตัวอย่างของเราเราจะเลือกไฟล์. odt ซึ่งเป็นไฟล์ LibreOffice Writer.

ในการดูไฟล์ LibreOffice คุณต้องติดตั้งแพ็กเกจซอฟต์แวร์เพิ่มเติมหากคุณยังไม่มีไฟล์ คลิก“ ติดตั้ง” บนแพ็คเกจติดตั้งซอฟต์แวร์เพิ่มเติมที่แสดงขึ้น.

เมื่อติดตั้งซอฟต์แวร์เพิ่มเติมแล้วไฟล์ LibreOffice จะแสดงในหน้าต่างแสดงตัวอย่าง สำหรับเอกสาร LibreOffice แบบหลายหน้าคุณสามารถเลื่อนหน้าลงในหน้าเอกสารหรือใช้ลูกศรหน้าซ้ายและขวา คุณสามารถขยายภาพตัวอย่างได้โดยคลิกที่ปุ่มลูกศรสองแนวทแยง.

หากต้องการดูตัวอย่างรายการไฟล์แบบยาวอย่างรวดเร็วคุณสามารถเลือกรายการแรกกด Spacebar เพื่อดูตัวอย่างไฟล์กด Spacebar อีกครั้งเพื่อปิดหน้าต่างแสดงตัวอย่างจากนั้นกดปุ่มลูกศรลงเพื่อเลือกไฟล์ถัดไป ทำซ้ำขั้นตอนนี้เพื่อดูตัวอย่างไฟล์หนึ่งไฟล์อย่างรวดเร็วหลังจากอีกไฟล์หนึ่ง.

Introduction

Ranger is a terminal file manager with vim-like keybindings that uses the ncurses library to provide a powerful interface for your filesystem.

Ranger uses conventions common to both text-based file managers, such as Midnight Commander, and graphical file managers, such as Mac OS X’s Finder.

Installing Ranger

Ranger is in Ubuntu’s default repositories. It can be installed easily with apt-get.

We will also install some other applications that allow ranger to preview various file formats effectively.

Start ranger for a moment and exit. This will allow ranger to create the directory structure for its configuration files:

Now ranger has created its configuration directory and we can copy its configuration files with the following command:

If you would like to modify the configuration files later, you can locate them in

Using Ranger

Before we begin exploring the features of ranger, it would be helpful to have some example files to look at. Let’s acquire some files:

Now start ranger:

You should see a three column layout. This type of file tree representation is known as “Miller columns”. It is a style that most people today would associate with Mac OS X’s “Finder” file manager.

The middle column is the current working directory. In this case, it should be showing your home directory.

The left pane is the current directory’s parent directory. The right pane shows a preview (if available) of the file you are currently interacting with in the middle column.

Ranger showing a gzipped text file in its preview pane.

If you move down the list of example files using the arrow keys, you will see how the preview pane changes depending on the file type you are viewing.

Text files are displayed in a simple pager, usually with the “less” program. Zipped files are automatically uncompressed and viewed in the same way. Even the example pdf file is converted to text for our viewing.

If you choose an image file, it is displayed using colored ascii art. The image clarity will depend a lot on your window size. If you expand the window, you should be able to see more detail.

Ranger showing an ascii representation of an image file in its preview pane.

Navigation

Ranger uses many of the same keybindings as “vim”. For instance, the movement commands mirror vim closely:

  • j = Move down
  • k = Move up
  • h = Move to parent directory
  • gg = Go to the top of the list
  • G = Go to the bottom of the list
  • -f = Page down
  • -b = Page up
  • J = Page down 1/2 page
  • K = Page up 1/2 page
  • H = Go back through navigation history
  • L = Go forward through navigation history

There are also some directory-specific shortcuts to move to common directories:

  • ge = cd /etc
  • gu = cd /usr
  • gd = cd /dev
  • go = cd /opt
  • gv = cd /var
  • gm = cd /media
  • gM = cd /mnt
  • gs = cd /srv
  • gr = cd /
  • gR = cd to ranger’s global configuration directory
  • Working with Files

    Ranger allows you to perform many different operations on files from within its interface. Here are some of the most common:

    • i = Display file (useful if you’d like to view a text file in a pager instead of editing it)
    • l or E = Open file (opens file in default file-handler)
    • r = Open file with… (allows you to choose program to use)
    • o = Change sort order (follow by character in menu selection)
    • z = Change settings (commonly used toggle settings)
    • zh = View hidden files
    • = Select current file
    • t = Tag file (you can perform actions on tagged files)
    • cw = Rename current file
    • / = Search for files
    • n = Jump to next match
    • N = Jump to previous match
    • yy = Yank (copy) file
    • dd = Mark file for cut operation
    • = Delete selected file

    Tagged and selected files in ranger’s current working directory.

    Tabbed Browsing

    Ranger also incorporates tabbed functionality to allow multiple viewports into the filesystem. Here are the most common tab control keys:

    • -n = Create new tab
    • -w = Close current tab
    • = Next tab
    • = Previous tab

    General Commands

    These commands control ranger itself:

    • ? = View ranger man page
    • 1? = Keybindings help
    • 2? = Command help
    • 3? = Settings help
    • R = Reload current directory
    • Q = Quit

    Command Interface

    Like vim, ranger also includes a robust command interface. This allows you to manipulate files in more complex ways. The abilities are extensive, so we will only be covering a few:

    • ! = Execute a command from the shell (non-ranger commands)
    • : = Execute a ranger command
    • du = Measure disk usage of current directory
    • chmod = Change permissions of current file

    There are a number of flags that you can pass to commands to modify the operation of the commands. They should be used with a dash “-” after typing “!” for shell commands or “:” for ranger commands:

    • -s = Discard the output of the current command.
    • -d = Detach the process and run in the background
    • -p = Return the output in ranger’s file pager
    • -w = Do not return immediately after command execution. Hang until “Enter” is pressed
    • -c = Perform command on current file, not the selected files

    Ranger also allows you to target specific files by substituting groups of files for command operations. It accomplishes that by using placeholders that will be expanded with the correct files upon execution:

    • %f = Substitute highlighted file
    • %d = Substitute current directory
    • %s = Substitute currently selected files
    • %t = Substitute currently tagged files

    For example, if we wanted to change the names of multiple files, we could select them all with the space bar. After that, we can type:

    This is a great way to rename multiple files. It gives you every file you’d like to change in a text editor. You simply modify as necessary and then exit out. The file manager will perform your changes when after you confirm.

    Renaming with ranger’s bulkrename command.

    Ranger allows us to mark different groups of files at the same time. This gives us great flexibility if we want to perform multiple operations based on different criteria.

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    One of Windows’ neatest features is PowerToys, Microsoft’s open-source add-on that lets you tweak your Windows desktop to your heart’s content. Being a Linux user, though, doesn’t mean you have to miss out.

    RELATED: All Microsoft’s PowerToys for Windows 10 and 11, Explained

    What’s great about PowerToys is that it’s a one-stop shop for all kinds of improvements, from how you manage window tiling to preventing your PC from going to sleep for a set time to quickly resizing an image without opening a photo editing program. A lot of the features you can find in PowerToys have Linux alternatives, of course. The various Linux distributions are the ultimate in operating system customizability.

    Unlike PowerToys, however, there aren’t many one-stop shops for all those tweaks. To make life easier for former Windows users who’ve converted to Linux, or Linux users looking for a few handy tools, here’s a look at five alternatives to the features built into PowerToys.

    For FancyZones: Tiling Assistant

    Tiling is a must-have feature for most modern PCs. It just makes life so much more comfortable when you can easily slide your various open windows into a configuration that makes sense to you. Truth be told, this feature is less important in Windows 11 since zone management is built right in.

    But for Linux users, an add-on is usually necessary to bump up your distribution’s tiling game. For anyone running GNOME 40 or 41 as their desktop environment, this is a little easier. There are a number of tiling options available as GNOME extensions, but if we had to pick just one it would be Tiling Assistant by GitHub user Lileat.

    Tiling Assistant lets you choose a number of configurations beyond the default double panel, it automatically resizes windows for you, and lets you customize the layout.

    In addition to having a variety of good features, Tiling Assistant is actively maintained, which is a key consideration.

    For Awake: Caffeine

    PowerToys Awake lets you keep your screen on without having to dip into your PC’s settings every time. Admittedly that’s already easier to do on Linux. Still, when you want to just quickly force your screen to stay on for a set period, or until you change it manually a utility can often be the faster choice.

    For Linux a good choice is Caffeine. This utility sits in the status bar and can prevent your computer from going to the lock screen or powering down into sleep mode.

    Notably, Caffeine doesn’t let you specify a set amount of time to shut down. Instead, it’s a simple on/off toggle to prevent your computer from going to sleep.

    RELATED: How to Temporarily Stop Your Windows PC from Sleeping

    For File Explorer Add-ons: GNOME Sushi

    Previewing files in your file browser is a very nice feature that avoids having to fire up a desktop program to quickly view the content of a file. It’s odd that Windows has never folded this feature into File Explorer by default. But at least it’s alive and well in PowerToys.

    For Linux users, one option is GNOME Sushi that integrates with GNOME Files (aka Nautilus). With Sushi all you have to is click on a file, tap your spacebar, and a new window pops up showing a preview of your file. This isn’t quite what File Explorer Add-on does, since the preview is built into File Explorer itself. Instead, this is closer to Quick Look in macOS. Nevertheless, it achieves the same result of a quick file preview.

    For Image Resizer: ImageMagick

    The PowerToys Image Resizer is a handy tool if ever there was one. It lets you right-click an image to resize it without having to open GIMP or another photo editing tool. It’s incredibly simple, and Linux users have an easy ticket too if they don’t mind using the command line. While the command line might not be everyone’s favorite tool it’s incredibly powerful, and for power users on Linux it’s an absolute must.

    The tool to use on Linux is called ImageMagick, and it’s a goldmine of helpful tools. It lets you quickly convert images from one format to another, it can also resize images which is what we’re looking for here. To do that, you simply install ImageMagick with your package manager such as Apt or Pacman.

    Then let’s say you want to resize a large image in your Pictures folder down to 1,200 by 675 pixels. You’d type the following into your command line program:

    Boom, it’ll be converted while maintaining its current aspect ratio, which means it will resize the image to fit within the specified dimensions. If you don’t care about keeping the same aspect ratio then you just add an exclamation mark to the end of the image size like so:

    Once you get used to it there’s really no replacement for an awesome and quick command line tool like ImageMagick.

    RELATED: How to Quickly Resize, Convert & Modify Images from the Linux Terminal

    For Run: Albert

    It’s nice to have awesome search capabilities built into the OS, but these can sometimes be cumbersome. That’s why PowerToys Run is so awesome. It can do all kinds of things in addition to searching for files, folders, programs, Windows services, like execute shell commands, system commands, convert units, and more.

    The best alternative to this in Linux is Albert. Just like Run, it appears as a small text entry box with menu headings on your desktop. You can use it to find files, folders, or programs, or you can use it as a calculator, execute commands, restart the machine, search the web, get translations, and more. If you are using Linux, Albert is well worth adding to your system.

    PowerToys Clean-Up

    There are a number of other PowerToys alternatives that are already built into many Linux distributions such as Keyboard Manager which helps you quickly remap shortcuts, and the Shortcut Guide that quickly throws up all possible system keyboard shortcuts on your screen.

    There are many more awesome utilities and add-ons you can use with Linux that go well beyond what’s offered with Windows PowerToys. Because of course there is. Linux is thoroughly customizable and lets you get to work any way you want. Even if that means you want to run Linux inside a Windows PC with the Windows Subsystem for Linux.

    RELATED: What is Windows Subsystem For Linux (WSL), and How Do You Use It?

    Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times and Reader’s Digest, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

    Most people use their operating system’s included file manager, but many geeks prefer third-party file managers. After all, Windows Explorer doesn’t offer tabs, a dual-pane interface, batch file-renaming tools, and more advanced features.

    If you’re happy with your default file manager, that’s fine. These alternatives are really only useful if you’re craving a particular feature not found in your current file manager.

    Windows

    For as long as Windows Explorer has existed, Windows geeks have yearned for more features. There are many, many Windows Explorer alternatives out there. When installing them, be sure ot watch out for the junkware packed into their installers. The Windows software ecosystem is sick, and — in general — we hate recommending Windows software downloads for just this reason.

    FreeCommander is a good option if you’re looking for tabs, a dual-pane interface, and all the other powerful features a Windows Explorer replacement can offer. Unlike many of the other available applications, it’s available entirely for free — although it isn’t open-source. You’re free to use it all you like, even for commercial purposes. No features are restricted to some sort of professional edition you have to pay for. Multi Commander is similar and also free.

    Explorer++ is free and open-source, so it also won’t try to nag you for money or install junk onto your system. It includes tabs, a customizable user interface, file-filtering features, and can even run as a portable app without any installation. It offers a cleaner interview than Free Commander, but without the dual-pane view and some other powerful features. If all you want is a tabbed interface and a few other things, this is a great option

    Other file manager replacements include Xplorer2, XYplorer, Directory Opus, and Total Commander. All of these programs offer paid editions they want you to purchase. There are free versions available for most of them — Xplorer2 Lite, XYplorer Free, and Directory Opus Light. They often lack many of the more powerful features found in the paid versions, but they’ll provide you with many of the features found in the paid versions.

    Mac OS X

    The Finder app included with Mac OS X does the basics, but it can certainly leave you wanting. As usual on Mac OS X, many of the alternative file-manager options available to you are generally paid software. You’ll have to shell out a few bucks to use them. On the bright side, this means that they see more development than many alternative Windows file managers, and their business model is selling software instead of trying to load your computer with crapware in their installers.

    Cocoatech’s Path Finder is probably the most popular Finder replacement for Mac OS X, and we covered it as one of the best options if you want to merge folders on your Mac. It also includes a dual-pane interface and other powerful features. Developers in particular can get a lot of use out of its intergrated Git and Subeersion support, as well as easy access to a terminal.

    Path Finder costs $40, but you can use the free 30-day trial to determine if you actually need all those fancy features.

    If you want some of these advanced features — like a dual-pane interface — but don’t want to spend money on this type of program, try XtraFinder. It’a free application that adds features to the Finder, including a dual-pane interface, a copy queue, global hotkeys, and many new menu options. It doesn’t include nearly as many advanced features as Path Finder does, but most people don’t need all those bonus features. This could hit a good sweet spot for many people.

    Linux

    It’s hard to talk about alternative file managers for Linux, as every desktop environment tends to include its own unique file manager. These file managers also tend to see more development and often include advanced features you’d only find in alternative file managers on other operating systems. But, thanks to the modularity of the Linux desktop, you could actually run a different desktop environment’s file manager on your current desktop.

    For example, GNOME and Ubuntu’s Unity desktop include the Nautilus file manager. KDE includes the Dolphin file manager, Xfce includes the Thunar file manager, and LXDE includes PCManFM. Each file manager has its own unique features — for example, Xfce’s Thunar file manager includes an integrated Bulk Rename tool for quickly batch-renaming files.

    Every file manager tends to match its desktop environment in philosophy. For example, GNOME’s Nautilus file manager is shedding features with every release, chasing GNOME’s goal of simplicity and minimalism. Dolphin is more feature-heavy and uses the Qt toolkit instead of GNOME and Xfce’s GTK toolkit. Thunar, like Xfce itself, is a more minimal, barebones file manager that still has everything you need and gets the job done. Like LXDE itself, the PCManFM file manager offers a fairly minimal, lightweight interface.

    Perform a search for “file manager” or something similar in your Linux distribution’s package management interface and you’ll find a lot of options.

    So, do we think everyone needs to hunt down an alternative file manager? Not at all. We’ve usually been happy with the integrated file managers, which are there and get the job done if you don’t need anything special.

    But lots of geeks do love their alternative file managers, and for good reason. They offer powerful features that can save you a lot of time if you need them.

    Sometimes, you don’t need to open an image in a photo editor–you just want to make sure which file is which. Instead of opening each file, you can preview each one in Ubuntu’s file manager program, Nautilus, without opening them.

    We’ll show you how to install and use an add-in for Nautilus, called GNOME Sushi, that will allow you to preview image files, text files, PDF files, LibreOffice files, and even media files by pressing the spacebar. It’s similar to the Quick Look feature in macOS.

    我们将向您展示如何为Nautilus安装和使用名为GNOME Sushi的加载项,该加载项使您可以通过按空格键预览图像文件,文本文件,PDF文件,LibreOffice文件甚至媒体文件。 它类似于macOS中的“快速查找”功能。

    To install GNOME Sushi using Ubuntu Software, click the following link: apt://gnome-sushi

    要使用Ubuntu软件安装GNOME Sushi,请单击以下链接: apt:// gnome-sushi

    You can also copy and paste that link into the address bar in a browser and press Enter.

    The following dialog box displays. Click “Install”.

    The Authenticate dialog box displays. Enter the password for your Ubuntu account in the box and click “Authenticate”.

    Ubuntu will install the software and show you its progress.

    Once GNOME Sushi is installed, open Nautilus by clicking the Files icon on the Unity bar.

    Find a file you want to preview and select it. For our first example, we’re going to preview an image file.

    Press the Spacebar to preview the file. A preview window shows the image and a diagonal double arrow button is available when you move the mouse cursor over the image preview. Click this double-arrow button to enlarge the image preview.

    按空格键预览文件。 预览窗口显示图像,将鼠标光标移到图像预览上时,对角双箭头按钮可用。 单击此双箭头按钮可放大图像预览。

    NOTE: The previewer should work immediately without logging out and back in or restarting. If not, exit Nautilus and reopen it.

    A larger preview of the image displays, also with the double-arrow button. Clicking the double-arrow button returns you to the original preview size. Press the Spacebar or the Esc key to close the preview window.

    显示图像的更大预览,也带有双箭头按钮。 单击双箭头按钮将返回到原始预览大小。 按空格键或Esc键关闭预览窗口。

    Hit the Spacebar or the Esc key to close the preview window.

    You can also preview text files. Again, select the text file you want to preview and press the Spacebar to preview the file.

    The text file opens in the preview window and you can scroll through the file using your mouse’s scroll button or the scroll bar on the right. The text does not wrap, so there is also a scroll bar on the bottom for scrolling to the end of the lines. When previewing text files, you can open them from the preview window. Click on the button at the bottom with the document icon on it. The file will open in the default text editor.

    文本文件在预览窗口中打开,您可以使用鼠标的滚动按钮或右侧的滚动条滚动浏览该文件。 文本不会自动换行,因此底部还有一个滚动条,用于滚动到行尾。 预览文本文件时,可以从预览窗口中打开它们。 单击底部带有文档图标的按钮。 该文件将在默认的文本编辑器中打开。

    In addition to text files, you can also view LibreOffice files. For our example, we’ll select an .odt file, which is a LibreOffice Writer file.

    除了文本文件,您还可以查看LibreOffice文件。 对于我们的示例,我们将选择一个.odt文件,它是LibreOffice Writer文件。

    To view a LibreOffice file, you must install an additional software package, if you don’t already have it. Click “Install” on the Install additional software package that displays.

    Enter your password on the Authenticate dialog box and click “Authenticate”.

    The Installing packages dialog box displays as the additional package is installed.

    Once the additional software has been installed, the LibreOffice file displays in the preview window. For multi-page LibreOffice documents, you can scroll down through the pages of the document, or you can use the right and left page arrows. You can also enlarge the preview by clicking the diagonal double-arrow button.

    一旦安装了其他软件,LibreOffice文件就会显示在预览窗口中。 对于多页的LibreOffice文档,您可以向下滚动文档的页面,也可以使用左右箭头。 您也可以通过单击对角双箭头按钮来放大预览。

    To quickly preview a long list of files, you can select the first one, press the Spacebar to preview the file, press the Spacebar again to close the preview window, and then press the down arrow key to select the next file. Repeat this procedure to quickly preview one file after the other.

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    • Så här visar du snabbt en fil i Ubuntus filhanterare (som “Quick Look” i macOS)

    Ibland behöver du inte öppna en bild i en bildredigerare. Du vill bara se vilken fil som är vilken. Istället för att öppna varje fil kan du förhandsgranska var och en i Ubuntus filhanteringsprogram, Nautilus, utan att öppna dem.

    Vi visar dig hur du installerar och använder ett tillägg för Nautilus, som heter GNOME Sushi, som låter dig förhandsgranska bildfiler, textfiler, PDF-filer, LibreOffice-filer och till och med mediefiler genom att trycka på mellanslagstangenten. Det liknar Quick Look-funktionen i macOS.

    Om du vill installera GNOME Sushi med Ubuntu Software klickar du på följande länk: apt: // gnome-sushi

    Du kan också kopiera och klistra in den här länken i adressfältet i en webbläsare och tryck på Enter.

    Följande dialogruta visas. Klicka på “Installera”.

    Dialogrutan Authenticate visas. Ange lösenordet för ditt Ubuntu-konto i rutan och klicka på “Godkänn”.

    Ubuntu kommer att installera programvaran och visa dess framsteg.

    När GNOME Sushi har installerats öppnar du Nautilus genom att klicka på ikonen Filer på enhetsfältet.

    Hitta en fil du vill förhandsgranska och välj den. För vårt första exempel ska vi förhandsgranska en bildfil.

    Tryck på mellanslag för att förhandsgranska filen. Ett förhandsgranskningsfönster visar bilden och en diagonal dubbelpilknapp är tillgänglig när du flyttar muspekaren över bildförhandsgranskningen. Klicka på den här dubbelpilknappen för att förstora bilden förhandsgranskning.

    OBS! Förhandsgranskaren ska fungera omedelbart utan att logga ut och återställa eller starta om. Om inte, avsluta Nautilus och öppna den igen.

    En större förhandsgranskning av bilden visas, även med dubbelpilknappen. Om du klickar på pilen med dubbla pilar återgår du till den ursprungliga förhandsgranskningsstorleken. Tryck på mellanslagstangenten eller Esc-tangenten för att stänga förhandsgranskningsfönstret.

    Tryck på mellanslagstangenten eller Esc-tangenten för att stänga förhandsgranskningsfönstret.

    Du kan också förhandsgranska textfiler. Välj igen den textfil du vill förhandsgranska och tryck på mellanslagstangenten för att förhandsgranska filen.

    Textfilen öppnas i förhandsgranskningsfönstret och du kan bläddra igenom filen med musens rullningsknapp eller rullningsfältet till höger. Texten viks inte, så det finns också en rullningsfält längst ner för att bläddra till slutet av raderna. När du förhandsgranskar textfiler kan du öppna dem från förhandsgranskningsfönstret. Klicka på knappen längst ner med dokumentikonen på den. Filen öppnas i standardtextredigeraren.

    Förutom textfiler kan du också visa LibreOffice-filer. För vårt exempel väljer vi en .odt-fil, som är en LibreOffice Writer-fil.

    Om du vill visa en LibreOffice-fil måste du installera ett extra programpaket, om du inte redan har det. Klicka på “Installera” i installationsprogrammet Installera ytterligare programvara som visas.

    Ange ditt lösenord i dialogrutan Godkänn och klicka på “Godkänn”.

    Dialogrutan Installera paket visas när ytterligare paket är installerat.

    När den extra mjukvaran har installerats visas LibreOffice-filen i förhandsgranskningsfönstret. För LibreOffice-dokument med flera sidor kan du bläddra ner genom sidorna i dokumentet, eller du kan använda pilarna till höger och vänster sida. Du kan också förstora förhandsvisningen genom att klicka på den diagonala dubbelpilknappen.

    För att snabbt förhandsgranska en lång lista med filer kan du välja den första, tryck på mellanslagstangenten för att förhandsgranska filen, tryck på mellanslagstangenten igen för att stänga förhandsgranskningsfönstret och tryck sedan på nedåtpilknappen för att välja nästa fil. Upprepa denna procedur för att snabbt förhandsgranska en fil efter den andra.