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How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

The Mac has many visual animations that draw on screen as you perform various actions throughout the operating system, whether it’s the zooming in and out of opening Mission Control, or sliding between desktops in Spaces, amongst others. These provide for some enjoyable visual eye candy, but some users may find the animations cause motion sickness, or serve as unnecessary glitz.

If you want to disable animations in Mac OS, you can toggle a setting called Reduce Motion that greatly diminishes the interface animations on the Mac.

How to Disable Most Mac Animations with Reduce Motion

  1. Pull down the  Apple menu and choose ‘System Preferences’

Choose “Accessibility” from the preference panels

  • Select the “Display” option from the left side menu of Accessibility options
  • Locate and check the box for “Reduce Motion” to disable most animations in Mac OS

    Opening and closing Mission Control is one of the most notable examples of where Reduce Motion has a big impact, transforming the moving window animations into a simple fade in and fade out transition effect.

    Likewise, switching between desktop spaces will no longer slide a desktop on and off the screen, instead it will be a fading animation.

    The animated gif attempts to demonstrate this animation reduction in Mission Control, though ultimately if you want to see it yourself you should just enable the Reduce Motion setting and see it.

    Some animations persist even with this feature enabled, for example the Mac App Store still zips and slides around from all angles regardless of how Reduce Motion is set. But, using Reduce Motion on the Mac will turn off video auto-play in the Mac App Store.

    While some Mac users may turn on Reduce Motion to stop the animations from displaying for various reasons, another sometimes desirable side effect of using Reduce Motion is that it can speed up some Macs (or at least the perception of speed). Likewise, using Reduce Motion in the Photos app for Mac too can speed up the Photos app. If you’re aiming for performance improvements, disabling interface transparency on the Mac can also be desirable, since it reduces the resource requirements to render various windows and interface elements.

    While this obviously is focused on the Mac, if you have an iPhone or ipAd you can also disable animations in iOS by using the Reduce Motion setting on iPhone and iPad, which has a similar result of turning many animations into a nice and fast fading transition effect instead.

    Oliver Haslam is a professional freelance writer with nearly ten years of experience. His work has been published on Macworld, PCMag, 1Password’s blog, and other websites. He writes about all things Apple. Read more.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    The Mac, just like iOS, has more than its fair share of fancy animations that accompany most user interactions. They can look pretty great, but they can also make people prone to motion sickness feel unwell. That’s no good, so here’s how to disable them.

    Unfortunately, no matter what you do it’s impossible to stop macOS from getting a little carried away with itself, flinging interface elements around the screen with nary a thought for your health. You can, however, limit the amount of on-screen motion to which you are subjected to by ticking one checkbox.

    The “Reduce Motion” option is one that does exactly what it sounds like. By reducing the motion and animations on-screen, the setting should make it easier for everyone to use their Mac without feeling queasy. If you suffer from motion sickness, this is a setting you absolutely ought to try.

    Enabling Reduce Motion

    As the description of the feature might lead you to believe, “Reduce Motion” is an accessibility setting, so to get started head on over to System Preferences. To do that, click the Apple logo at the top of the screen and then click “System Preferences.”

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Next, click “Accessibility.” You’ll find it towards the bottom of the System Preferences panel.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    In the left pane, click the “Display” category. On the right, tick the “Reduce Motion” checkbox to enable to feature.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    That’s all there is to it, and you can close System Preferences. You should now notice that motion is greatly reduced as you use your Mac. Things like changing Spaces and entering Mission Control will immediately appear different, with fades replacing sliding panes and windows. The new transitions are easier on the eye and, depending on your preferences, may even seem faster.

    Unfortunately, not all areas of macOS respect this setting. The Mac App Store in particular will continue to work as it did, although you should notice that videos will no longer automatically play.

    The Mac has many visual animations that draw on screen as you perform various actions throughout the operating system, whether it’s the zooming in and out of opening Mission Control, or sliding between desktops in Spaces, amongst others. These provide for some enjoyable visual eye candy, but some users may find the animations cause motion sickness, or serve as unnecessary glitz.

    If you want to disable animations in Mac OS, you can toggle a setting called Reduce Motion that greatly diminishes the interface animations on the Mac.

    How to Disable Most Mac Animations with Reduce Motion

    1. Pull down the  Apple menu and choose ‘System Preferences’

    Choose “Accessibility” from the preference panels

  • Select the “Display” option from the left side menu of Accessibility options
  • Locate and check the box for “Reduce Motion” to disable most animations in Mac OS

    Opening and closing Mission Control is one of the most notable examples of where Reduce Motion has a big impact, transforming the moving window animations into a simple fade in and fade out transition effect.

    Likewise, switching between desktop spaces will no longer slide a desktop on and off the screen, instead it will be a fading animation.

    The animated gif attempts to demonstrate this animation reduction in Mission Control, though ultimately if you want to see it yourself you should just enable the Reduce Motion setting and see it.

    Some animations persist even with this feature enabled, for example the Mac App Store still zips and slides around from all angles regardless of how Reduce Motion is set. But, using Reduce Motion on the Mac will turn off video auto-play in the Mac App Store.

    While some Mac users may turn on Reduce Motion to stop the animations from displaying for various reasons, another sometimes desirable side effect of using Reduce Motion is that it can speed up some Macs (or at least the perception of speed). Likewise, using Reduce Motion in the Photos app for Mac too can speed up the Photos app. If you’re aiming for performance improvements, disabling interface transparency on the Mac can also be desirable, since it reduces the resource requirements to render various windows and interface elements.

    While this obviously is focused on the Mac, if you have an iPhone or ipAd you can also disable animations in iOS by using the Reduce Motion setting on iPhone and iPad, which has a similar result of turning many animations into a nice and fast fading transition effect instead.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Is your Mac running more slowly than when it was shiny and new? Has it become prone to freezing? Or perhaps it seems to be taking forever to start up?

    When it comes to speeding up an ailing Mac, there’s no shortage of advice out there, but in this article we’ll be covering one of the more unusual methods of boosting your Mac’s performance.

    By the end of this article, you’ll know how to use Terminal commands plus a third party app, to disable all of macOS’ nice-to-have-but-far-from-essential animations, taking pressure off the processor and ultimately speeding up your Mac.

    Disabling these little animated flourishes may not seem like it should make a huge difference, but all of these small tweaks can add up a noticeable performance boost. Plus, if your Mac is already struggling to perform an intensive task with the amount of processing power available, then that little animated flourish may be the thing that finally pushes your Mac over the edge, causing it to freeze up completely.

    Disabling animations with the Terminal

    You can disable (and enable) a range of macOS animations, using the Terminal application. To access the Terminal:

    • Open a new “Finder” window.
    • Navigate to “Applications/Utilities” and launch the Terminal.

    You can now toggle some of macOS’ most frequently-used animations, on and off:

    Window opening animations

    To disable window opening animations, copy/paste the following command into the Terminal, and then press the “Enter” key on your keyboard:

    defaults write NSGlobalDomain

    If you change your mind and want to restore these animations at any point, then copy/paste the following command into the Terminal:

    defaults write NSGlobalDomain NSAutomaticWindowAnimationsEnabled -bool true

    Then, press the “Enter” key and the window opening animations will be restored.

    2. The resizing animation

    This animation occurs when you resize a window, and may also occur when you open or save a file within an application. You can speed up the window resizing animation, creating something that’s slightly choppier, but puts less strain on your Mac’s processor.

    To speed up this animation, run the following Terminal command:

    defaults write NSGlobalDomain NSWindowResizeTime -float 0.001

    If you miss the smooth resizing transition, then you can restore the animation’s default settings, with another Terminal command:

    defaults write NSGlobalDomain NSWindowResizeTime -float 0.2

    3. The Quick Look window animation

    By default, if you select any file or folder on your Mac and press the Space bar, the Quick Look window will expand smoothly across the screen, providing you with a preview of the selected item.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    macOS opens the Quick Look window with a smooth animation, but you can remove this transition so that the window simply appears onscreen.

    To disable the Quick Look animation, copy/paste the following command into the Terminal and then press the “Enter” key on your keyboard:

    defaults write -g QLPanelAnimationDuration -float 0

    If you change your mind at any point, then you can restore the Quick Look animation to its former glory:

    defaults delete -g QLPanelAnimationDuration

    Restart your Mac, and the Quick Look animation should be back in action.

    4. Launching an app from the Dock

    The Dock provides easy access to all of your most frequently-used applications, but every time you launch an application from the Dock, it appears with a brief animation.

    To suppress this animation, copy/paste the following command into the Terminal window:

    defaults write com.apple.dock launchanim -bool false

    To restore this animation, run:

    defaults write com.apple.dock launchanim -bool true

    Access hidden system preferences, with TinkerTool

    You can also disable animations using the free TinkerTool application, which grants you access to some of macOS’ hidden system settings:

    • Head over to the TinkerTool website and download the correct version of TinkerTool for your version of macOS.
    • Once the file has downloaded, launch it and follow the onscreen instructions to install.
    • Read the warning, and if you’re happy to proceed then click “Understood.” This will launch the main TinkerTool interface.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    You can then use TinkerTool to disable a range of animations:

    • Finder animations. Select the “General” tab and then disable the following: “Animation opening info panels and Desktop icons,” and “Animation selecting info panel categories.” To apply your changes, select the “Relaunch Finder” button.
    • Dock animations. Select the “Dock” tab and deselect the following: “Disable animation when hiding or showing Dock.” To apply your changes, select “Relaunch Dock.”
    • Launchpad animations. Select the “Launchpad” tab and deselect one, some or all of the following: “Disable fade-in effect when opening,” “Disable fade-out effect when closing,” and/or “Disable animation when switching between pages.” When you’re happy with your choices, select “Relaunch Dock.”
    • Rubberband scrolling. This is an overscrolling effect that can occur when you scroll past the window’s scrollable region. To remove this scrolling animation, select the “General” tab and then select the “Disable rubber band scrolling” checkbox. While you’re in the “General” tab, you may also want to disable the following animation effects: “Accelerate animation when rolling out sheets,” and “Animate opening windows.” To see your changes in action, log out of your user account and then log back in again.

    If at any point you want to restore macOS’ default settings, then:

    • Select TinkerTool’s “Reset” tab.
    • Select either “Reset to pre-TinkerTool state,” or “Reset to defaults.”
    • Log out of your user account, and then log back in; your Mac’s original animations should have now been restored.

    Before you go

    After spending over 20 years working with Macs, both old and new, theres a tool I think would be useful to every Mac owner who is experiencing performance issues.

    CleanMyMac is highest rated all-round cleaning app for the Mac, it can quickly diagnose and solve a whole plethora of common (but sometimes tedious to fix) issues at the click of a button. It also just happens to resolve many of the issues covered in the speed up section of this site, so Download CleanMyMac to get your Mac back up to speed today.

    The Mac, just like iOS, has more than its fair share of fancy animations that accompany most user interactions. They can look pretty great, but they can also make people prone to motion sickness feel unwell. That’s no good, so here’s how to disable them.

    Unfortunately, no matter what you do it’s impossible to stop macOS from getting a little carried away with itself, flinging interface elements around the screen with nary a thought for your health. You can, however, limit the amount of on-screen motion to which you are subjected to by ticking one checkbox.

    The “Reduce Motion” option is one that does exactly what it sounds like. By reducing the motion and animations on-screen, the setting should make it easier for everyone to use their Mac without feeling queasy. If you suffer from motion sickness, this is a setting you absolutely ought to try.

    Enabling Reduce Motion

    As the description of the feature might lead you to believe, “Reduce Motion” is an accessibility setting, so to get started head on over to System Preferences. To do that, click the Apple logo at the top of the screen and then click “System Preferences.”

    Next, click “Accessibility.” You’ll find it towards the bottom of the System Preferences panel.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    In the left pane, click the “Display” category. On the right, tick the “Reduce Motion” checkbox to enable to feature.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    That’s all there is to it, and you can close System Preferences. You should now notice that motion is greatly reduced as you use your Mac. Things like changing Spaces and entering Mission Control will immediately appear different, with fades replacing sliding panes and windows. The new transitions are easier on the eye and, depending on your preferences, may even seem faster.

    Unfortunately, not all areas of macOS respect this setting. The Mac App Store in particular will continue to work as it did, although you should notice that videos will no longer automatically play.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    The macOS user-interface includes cool animations that are shown when you perform different actions. These animations make the user-interface of your Mac appear lively and adds flare to the overall experience. However not everyone is a fan of the bells and whistles the Mac has to offer, and if you are one of these people then you can easily get rid of them.

    In this article we will show you how you can reduce the animations and effects on your Mac and get a simpler user experience. This involves turning on the ‘Reduce Motion’ functionality, which is also found on iOS and has a similar effect on iPhone’s user-interface.

    When Reduce Motion is on you will no longer see animations when switching between apps, changing from one desktop to another, accessing mission control and launchpad and more. The genie effect will still appear when minimizing windows. You can turn this effect off from Dock settings found within System Preferences.

    Reduce Animations On Mac

    You can reduce animations and motion based effects by following the simple instructions below.

    1. On your Mac launch System Preferences.

    2. Find and Click on Accessibility options.

    3. On the Accessibility page click on the ‘Display‘ option from the side pane.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    4. Finally on the Display options page look for the ‘Reduce Motion‘ checkbox and click on it to mark it checked.

    After doing so the animations on your Mac will be greatly reduced and your computer will offer a simpler user experience without the often distracting animations.

    If you notice screen movement on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, you can turn on Reduce Motion.

    Your device uses motion effects to create the perception of depth on your Home screen and within apps. If you have sensitivity to motion effects or screen movement on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, you can use Reduce Motion to turn off these effects.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    To turn on Reduce Motion:

    1. Go to Settings > Accessibility.
    2. Select Motion, then turn on Reduce Motion.

    When Reduce Motion is on, certain screen effects change or are disabled on your device, including:

    • Screen transitions and effects use the dissolve effect instead of zoom or slide effects.
    • Parallax effect where your wallpaper, apps, and alerts that move or shift slightly as you tilt your device are disabled.
    • Animation and effects in certain apps are disabled. For example, weather animations in the Weather app.

    When Auto-Play Message Effects is on, bubble effects and full-screen effects play automatically. You can turn this feature off and manually play the effect. Just tap under the message.

    If you have an iPad Pro (10.5-inch) or iPad Pro 12.9-inch (2nd generation), learn how to limit the frame rate of your display.

    There is plenty of documentation around on how to use the prefers-reduced-motion media query in CSS.

    This is great but now that I’m using prefers-reduced-motion in my CSS, I want to be able to test what using my site is like for someone that has this setting enabled. I can’t find any information on how to do this though and I’m having difficulty finding this as a setting in browser settings.

    Maybe this isn’t a browser setting at all. Maybe this is something that is set at the Operating System level. 🤔

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    3 Answers 3

    Oh, I didn’t see the “User Preferences” section in the mdn documentation. 🤦🏻‍♂️

    For Firefox, the reduce request is honoured if:

      In GTK/Gnome, if gtk-enable-animations is set to false. This is configurable via GNOME Tweaks (Appearance tab or General tab, depending on version).

        Alternately, add gtk-enable-animations = false to the [Settings] block of the GTK 3 configuration file (

      /.config/gtk-3.0/settings.ini ).

  • In Windows 10: Settings > Ease of Access > Display > Show animations in Windows.
  • In Window 7 [& 8]: Control Panel > Ease of Access > Make the computer easier to see > Turn off all unnecessary animations (when possible).
  • In macOS: System Preferences > Accessibility > Display > Reduce motion.
  • In iOS: Settings > General > Accessibility > Reduce Motion.
  • In Android 9+: Settings > Accessibility > Remove animations.
  • It says “for Firefox” however since this is a system setting at the OS level, this is likely how you change the setting for all browsers that support this media query.

    Introduced in macOS Sierra, the user can control how fast the Mission Control animation moves to the “end view”, by how fast the action is performed on a trackpad.

    I think the default setting is much too slow, and I don’t want to overdo the gesture each time just to get better efficiency out of the animation.

    This 2012 article refers to settings like these:

    for fast animations, and to reset:

    I have tried them in Sierra and they don’t work.

    Here is a video of the approximate behaviour of Mission Control (source).

    5 Answers 5

    Aidan Marr is correct. BetterTouchTool can be used to get the old behaviour.

    First, disable three finger swipe up in System Preferences > Trackpad.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Then, use BetterTouchTool as follows:

    1. Select the “Trackpads” tab at top and “Select Application:” “Global” at left.
    2. Click “Add New Gesture”
    3. Select “Three finger swipe up” as your gesture and “Mission Control” as your action.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    The old behaviour is now restored and you will be able to use:

    Note, that you can use a similar process for “App Exposé”

    Bonus Tip: Since “Mission Control” is still a standalone App on your system you could use the utility of your choice to invoke it. For example, you could have Keyboard Maestro invoke it with a particular keystroke. Invoking the app this way uses the old (pre-Sierra) behaviour.

    Benj Edwards is an Associate Editor for How-To Geek. For over 15 years, he has written about technology and tech history for sites such as The Atlantic, Fast Company, PCMag, PCWorld, Macworld, Ars Technica, and Wired. In 2005, he created Vintage Computing and Gaming, a blog devoted to tech history. He also created The Culture of Tech podcast and regularly contributes to the Retronauts retrogaming podcast. Read more.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Windows 11 includes animation and fading effects that add eye candy but can make your PC feel sluggish for some by adding a slight delay to certain actions. For a more snappy experience, it’s easy to turn animations off. Here’s how.

    First, open Windows Settings by pressing Windows+i on your keyboard. Or, you can open Start, search for “Settings,” and then click its icon.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    When Settings appears, look in the sidebar and select “Accessibility.” In Accessibility settings, choose “Visual Effects.”

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    In Visual Effects, switch “Animation Effects” to “Off.”

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    That’s all you need to do. Your changes will be saved automatically. Close Settings and enjoy your new, snappier Windows experience! If you change your mind later, open Settings and navigate to Accessibility > Visual Effects again and switch “Animation Effects” to “On.”

    Also, if you need to disable animations in Windows 10, you’ll find the option in Settings > Ease of Access. Flip the switch beside “Show Animations in Windows” to turn them off. Have fun!

    Is it possible to turn off all animations on OS X?

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    6 Answers 6

    I have only enabled the first four of these, but here are all hidden preferences for disabling animations I have found.

    If you don’t want to copy-paste each of the commands shown in the top answer, just select this text, copy-paste it to the terminal and press enter (it will execute all commands at once without having to scroll)

    To undo the changes, paste this into the terminal:

    Mac OS also has dialog boxes, such as the ‘Save As’-box (CMD+SHIFT+S) or the ‘Print’-box (CMD+P). You can tweak the speed at which all of these boxes appear by using these commands:

    Default (0.2 seconds):

    1 = 1 second. To see the difference you have to re-launch an app such as Terminal and summon a dialog box by pressing CMD+S (‘Save’) for example. You can find more command-line tweaks at defaults-write.com

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Animation is everywhere in OS X, and it is not possible to disable all animation with one global setting, which makes this a very complicated question to answer completely.

    I would advise you to try disabling things one at a time as you find animations that annoy you. Check System Preferences to start. For example, the Dock magnification animation can be turned off in System Preferences -> Dock.

    Also, check out TinkerTool, which allows you to do the following:

    • Disable the animation effect when opening files in the Finder
    • Disable the animation effect in Mail
    • Disable the animation effect in Mission Control
    • Disable animation when hiding or showing Dock
    • Disable fade-in and fade-out effect,and animation when switching between pages, in Launchpad
    • Disable animation in opening windows
    • Disable the animation effect when opening information panels or Desktop icons
    • Disable the animation effect when selecting information categories
    • Accelerate the animation of opening and closing sheets

    If there’s an animation that really bugs you and you can’t figure out how to disable it, try posting a separate question here at Ask Different for that specific issue — you will get a fast and accurate response. (And as a nice side effect, both you and the people helping you will earn more rep that way.)

    Office 2013 is the first release to use hardware acceleration throughout the user experience to deliver beautiful, fluid animations. However, if you use your computer without a display or you simply prefer to eliminate unnecessary animations, you have the choice to turn them off.

    To turn off Office animations in Windows 7 or 8

    Open the Ease of Access Center by pressing the Windows logo key + U

    Under Explore all settings, click Use the computer without a display

    Under Adjust time limits and flashing visuals, click Turn off all unnecessary animations (when possible)

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    To turn off Office animations in Windows 10

    Open the Ease of Access Center by pressing the Windows logo key + U.

    Under Simplify and personalize Windows, turn off Show animations in Windows.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Close the Settings window.

    Note: By turning off Windows animations, you will automatically turn off animations for Office apps.

    To turn off Office animations in Excel

    Open the File > Options dialog

    Under Advanced tab (For Excel 2016 or 2019) or Ease of Access tab (For Microsoft 365) un-check ” Provide Feedback with animation“

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Here is a tutorial on how to disable transparency effects in macOS Big Sur and speed things up on older Macs like the 12-inch MacBook.

    Disable Transparency Effects in macOS Big Sur and Gain Some Performance on Older Macs

    macOS Big Sur runs like a champ across pretty much all supported Mac hardware. If you are an eagle-eyed user, then you will obviously notice some stutter on some older hardware. That’s very normal, and something you can expect on pretty much any computer.

    The stutters can happen for a wide variety of reasons, but mainly the effects the OS maker throws in, just to make things as presentable as possible. This includes fancy animations, transparency effects and whatnot. Turning these off can actually help you regain some performance and even help with battery life in some cases.

    In today’s tutorial we will show you how to disable those transparency effects in macOS Big Sur. Just read through and try it yourself on your Mac as well.

    Tutorial

    Step 1. Click on the Apple logo in the Menu Bar at the top of the display

    Step 2. Click on System Preferences

    Step 3. Click on Accessibility

    Step 4. From the left hand list of options, select Display

    Step 5. On the right, you will see more options, just click on Reduce transparency and close the window

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Immediately you’ll notice that the fancy blur / transparency effects have disappeared across macOS Big Sur. If you have an older or underpowered Mac like the 12-inch MacBook, you will actually see a performance boost as well.

    This will, obviously, make Big Sur look slightly bad in certain places. But if you are all about performance gains then this is the route you should take in order to fix things up. You can also try to enable the Reduce Motion option by the following the steps above to cut down on certain system animations.

    Unlike Microsoft, Apple has been successful in keeping macOS as optimized as possible in many key areas. The magic stick Apple has is a very obvious one – the way hardware and software comes together for the ultimate experience. Even though that’s a good thing, but there’s only so much anyone can do to deliver a consistent experience across the board. Ultimately, older hardware will fail to keep up.

    Beyond spotlight-grabbing features like Dark Mode and computer mice support that iOS 13 contains, Apple has also made its mobile platform more user-friendly for people that exhibit sensitivity to on-screen animations. If you’ve always found the transitional effects between app pages jarring, your iPhone now has a setting to help with that, preventing possible motion sickness and anxiety.

    The traditional sliding animations give your iPhone a more natural feel as you go from one page to another while browsing an app. However, the pleasant experience isn’t universal to everyone. According to Apple, one in three users suffer from motion sensitivity in one form or another, with on-screen animations a potential source of discomfort for a smaller subset.

    To help the few who are physically and mentally upset by the sliding transitions, as well as for those of us who prefer a different animation for customizability’s sake, there’s now a cross-fade for smoother page-to-page transitions. The option can be found inside the “Motion” page within the “Accessibility” menu in Settings, though you’ll need to enable “Reduce Motion” first to see it.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Keep in mind that with “Reduce Motion” toggled on, “Prefer Cross-Fade Transitions” is disabled by default, so you’ll need to toggle the setting on manually. Otherwise, your iPhone will have an inconsistent feel as you go from lateral slides when going from page to page inside an app to Reduce Motion’s fading effects when going back to the home screen or from one app to another.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Enabling “Prefer Cross-Fade Transitions,” on the other hand, applies dissolved animations within native apps like Settings and Contacts for a smoother experience. And besides doing a great job at reducing potentially panic-inducing motions on-screen, these cross-fade animations, along with Reduce Motion, give your iPhone visually appealing transition effects that anyone can enjoy.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Keep Your Connection Secure Without a Monthly Bill. Get a lifetime subscription to VPN Unlimited for all your devices with a one-time purchase from the new Gadget Hacks Shop, and watch Hulu or Netflix without regional restrictions, increase security when browsing on public networks, and more.

    Motion Effects are a powerful set of controls for adding beautiful transitions and animations to your design.

    Until now, web designers who wanted to incorporate animations and motion effects needed to use either external libraries and or custom code.

    Elementor Pro 2.5 offers an all-in-one solution for creating parallax, animations and other motion effects – all seamlessly integrated into the Elementor editor.

    Scrolling Effects

    Use Scrolling Effects to create amazing animations and interactions when the user scrolls through the page. Here’s a list of the scrolling effects:

    Vertical Scroll

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    This is the classic parallax effect you’ve been waiting for. Vertical scroll makes the element move at a different speed than the page while scrolling, in the direction and speed of your choosing.

    Horizontal Scroll

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Horizontal scroll means when the visitor scrolls up and down, the element moves right and left accordingly. An example of use – a section with clouds that moves to the right when the visitor scrolls down.

    Transparency

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Transparency lets you gradually make elements more transparent or more visible in correlation to the visitor’s scroll. An example is having a title appear and then dissolve in accordance with the scroll.

    There are 4 possible effect directions:

    Fade in – Meaning the element starts as transparent and gradually becomes visible.

    Fade out – The element starts as visible and gradually becomes transparent.

    Fade out in – The element starts as visible, then fades out, then becomes visible again.

    Fade in out – The element starts as transparent, then becomes visible, then transparent again.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    This setting is similar to Transparency, only instead of transparency, the element gets blurred. A good example is background images, that get proper focus only when the user scrolls down.

    Rotate

    Here, the element rotates as you scroll. A nice example is seen in the rotation of stars in the image below:

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Note: The two settings, X & Y Anchor Points, determine the axis around which the element scales or rotates. If you set orientation left-top, the rotation will happen around the left-top point of the element. If you set orientation center-center, the rotation will rotate around its center, like a wheel. This setting is relevant only to the above ‘Rotate’ effect as well as the ‘Scale’ effect listed below.

    Scale

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Scale lets you grow and shrink elements according to scroll. Example: A background that grows while scrolling.

    Note: Use the ‘ Apply effects on ’ to determine if motion effects are applied on mobile, desktop or tablet. Mouse effects will only affect desktop devices.

    Mouse Effects

    Mouse Track

    Create a sense of depth by making elements move in relation to the visitor’s mouse movement.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    3D Tilt

    Similarly to how Mouse Track moves the element in relation to the mouse movement, the 3D Tilt effect tilts the element according to the same movement of the cursor.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Motion Effects Browser Compatibility

    Chrome Firefox Safari Opera Edge Internet Explorer
    Supported Supported Supported Supported Supported * Not Supported

    * Slightly laggy behavior

    Note: Elementor respects the “reduced motion property” preference that a user may set. If a user has set any of the following, then motion effects will be disabled for that user:

    • Mac: “System Preferences > Accessibility > Display” and check/un-check the box for “Reduce motion”
    • iOS: “Settings > General > Accessibility” and turn on/off “Reduce Motion”
    • Windows 10: “Settings > Ease of Access > Display > Simplify and personalise Windows”

    Note: In Safari, if you are not seeing mouse effects, or you are experiencing the problem of elements disappearing in Safari, this is due to an old jQuery version being used by WordPress. In some cases, viewing Mouse Track effects via Safari might cause a jQuery error which will cause elements to disappear, such as missing carousel arrows, for example. If this happens, you may also see an error which references “maximum call stack size exceeded”. To resolve the issue, either remove entrance animations from widgets with motion effects and/or remove mouse effects from areas that have both scrolling and mouse effects simultaneously activated.

    Success Criterion 2.3.3 Animation from Interactions (Level AAA): Motion animation triggered by interaction can be disabled, unless the animation is essential to the functionality or the information being conveyed.

    Intent

    The intent of this Success Criterion is to allow users to prevent animation from being displayed on Web pages. Some users experience distraction or nausea from animated content. For example, if scrolling a page causes elements to move (other than the essential movement associated with scrolling) it can trigger vestibular disorders. Vestibular (inner ear) disorder reactions include dizziness, nausea and headaches. Another animation that is often non-essential is parallax scrolling. Parallax scrolling occurs when backgrounds move at a different rate to foregrounds. Animation that is essential to the functionality or information of a web page is allowed by this Success Criterion.

    “Animation from interactions” applies when a user’s interaction initiates non-essential animation. In contrast, 2.2.2 Pause, Stop, Hide applies when the web page initiates animation.

    The impact of animation on people with vestibular disorders can be quite severe. Triggered reactions include nausea, migraine headaches, and potentially needing bed rest to recover.

    How can a website reduce the chances of triggering a vestibular disorder? Choose any one of the following solutions. Avoid using unnecessary animation. Provide a control for users to turn off non-essential animations from user interaction. Take advantage of the reduce motion feature in the user-agent or operating system.

    What about movement caused by a user scrolling a page? Moving new content into the viewport is essential for scrolling. The user controls the essential scrolling movement so it is allowed. Only add non-essential animation to the scrolling interaction in a responsible way. Always give users the ability to turn off unnecessary movement.

    Benefits

    • Vestibular Disorder
      • People with vestibular disorders need control over movement triggered by interactions. Non-essential movement can trigger vestibular disorder reactions. Vestibular (inner ear) disorder reactions include distraction, dizziness, headaches and nausea.
      • Persona Quote: “Stop that extra movement! You are making me so dizzy I cannot concentrate. Now I have to turn off my computer and go lie down.”

    Examples

    • Parallax scrolling with option to turn off unnecessary motion globally:
      • A site includes extra animations when the user scrolls. Decorative elements move in and out of view horizontally when the essential page content is scrolled vertically. A control at the top of each page allows the user to turn off unnecessary animations. The ability to turn off non-essential animations is a site-wide setting.
    • Transitions that support the reduce motion preference:
      • A site includes a non-essential transition when loading new content. The transition is a page-flipping animation that respects the reduce-motion CSS media query. When the user enables the reduce motion preference, the page-flipping animation is turned off.
    • Essential animation:
      • A web application provides a feature to author animated sequences. As part of this tool the author needs to preview the animation.

    Related Resources

    Resources are for information purposes only, no endorsement implied.

    Techniques

    Each numbered item in this section represents a technique or combination of techniques that the WCAG Working Group deems sufficient for meeting this Success Criterion. However, it is not necessary to use these particular techniques. For information on using other techniques, see Understanding Techniques for WCAG Success Criteria, particularly the “Other Techniques” section.

    Sufficient Techniques

    • C39: Using the CSS reduce-motion query to prevent motion
    • Gx: Allowing users to set a preference that prevents animation.

    Key Terms

    if removed, would fundamentally change the information or functionality of the content, and information and functionality cannot be achieved in another way that would conform

    addition of steps between conditions to create the illusion of movement or to give a sense of a smooth transition

    For example, an element which moves into place or changes size while appearing is considered to be animated. An element which appears instantly without transitioning is not using animation. Motion animation does not include changes of color, blurring, or opacity which do not change the perceived size, shape, or position of the element.

    Guest blog by Paul Christopher Nathaniel , Parallels Support Team

    Living in today’s world of “Big Data,” the size of the files we create, share, and store doesn’t matter so much anymore. Do you remember those times when we had to shrink the size of pictures just to save some hard disk space? These days, most PCs and Mac devices come with 500+ GB hard disks—not to mention, we’ve also entered the age of cloud storage.

    However, it isn’t the same story for users with an older Mac or MacBook Air owners, who only have between 128 GB and 256 GB available. Native hard drives fill up pretty fast, so with the default size of Parallels Desktop virtual machines (64 GB for most OSes), you might have to shrink your VM during or after setup. On the flipside, users with the latest Mac devices may want to increase the size of their virtual machine(s) for a bigger value.

    The good news is that both of these procedures (shrinking and expanding the VMs) are very similar. Bad news? No bad news, but I’ll also share some tips on how to prevent any issues and get them fixed if they arise.

    I’m going to walk you through the process of resizing a Windows 10 VM running on Parallels Desktop 11 for Mac Pro Edition, but the steps are very similar (if not the same) for other operating systems and editions/versions of Parallels Desktop.

    Let me point out that these instructions are not applicable to VMs based on a Boot Camp partition. Please contact Apple if you want to resize your Boot Camp partition. A Parallels Desktop VM based on Boot Camp will be the same size.

    Also, if you’re reading this blog before you set up a virtual machine and you’re wondering how to customize the VM size during the setup process, I’ve created this short video for you:

    OK, let’s get started! First, I strongly recommend that you check your VM’s hard disk for errors and back it up .

    To resize the virtual hard disk size for an existing Windows virtual machine, follow these steps:

    1. Start Parallels Desktop and do not start your virtual machine. Shut it down if it is either suspended or running.
    2. Click on the Parallels icon on Mac menu bar and select Control Center:
      How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion
    3. Right-click on your virtual machine and choose Configure to open its configuration.
    4. For Parallels Desktop 14 and above:

    Go to the Hardware tab, select Hard Disk which requires increasing the size then expand Advanced Settings drop-down menu, then click Properties.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    For earlier Parallels Desktop versions:

    Go to the Hardware tab, select Hard Disk which requires increasing the size then click Properties.
    If the virtual machine has Snapshots the following notification window will appear. Press Manage Snapshots… to open the corresponding dialogue window then remove Snapshots to start editing the disk size.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion
    Choose the size you want for the virtual hard disk and click Apply.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion
    After that Parallels Desktop will suggest creating a backup of the virtual machine.
    To proceed further click Continue.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    NOTE: As mentioned above, we strongly recommend to create a backup of the virtual machine. In case of power surges/failures with the Mac, Mac’s unpredictable restarts or third-party applications interventions, during the operations with the virtual hard drive may result in its corruption result in in the inability to use the virtual machine.

    Is Windows still showing the old disk size after following these steps? Here are a few troubleshooting steps for you:

    • Go to the Start menu, type cmd, right-click on cmd.exe in the search results, and choose Run as Administrator.
    • Execute the commands below one by one:

    diskpart
    list disk
    select disk # (Where “#” is the disk you want to correct.)
    list partition
    select partition # (Where # is the partition you want to correct.)
    extend filesystem

    You can also try this KB article if you’re unable to increase hard disk space in a Windows 10 virtual machine .

    That’s all for now! As always, questions and comments are welcome. Let me know how Windows 10 runs on your Mac with the new virtual drive size, and don’t forget to follow Parallels Support on Twitter . Need to run Windows on your Mac? Download our free 14-day trial.

    Beautiful, subtle animations throughout macOS convey status, provide feedback, and help users visualize the results of their actions. For example, when the user duplicates a TextEdit document, the copy springs forth from the original to illustrate that it’s a duplicate, and becomes the active window.

    Standard interface elements automatically benefit from the system’s built-in animations. If you want to design custom animations for your app, do so with goals of keeping people oriented, providing clear feedback in response to user actions, and calling attention to specific locations on the screen.

    Strive for realism. Realistic movement can help people understand how something works. For example, when using Mission Control to reveal the Desktop, all open windows slide out of the way as if you were swiping physical papers out of the way on a desk.

    Avoid using animations for interactions that occur frequently. Repetitive animations that occur often can lead to the perception that efficiency is being compromised for the sake of animation. The system already employs subtle animations for interactions with standard interface elements. Don’t make people spend extra time watching unnecessary animation every time they interact with something.

    Enhance feedback and understanding. It’s important that people don’t lose context when performing actions with immediate results. Use animation to put these actions into a more human time frame. For example, when minimizing a window, it doesn’t just disappear from the screen and reappear in the Dock; instead, it moves fluidly from the screen to the Dock so the user knows exactly where it went.

    Transition smoothly between object states. Showing only the beginning and ending states during a transition, such as a resize, can be jarring. Animated transitions provide continuity and feel more natural.

    Allude to consequences. Build confidence and reduce mistakes by previewing the results of actions. For example, when you drag an item to the Dock, other items move aside, showing where the new item will reside when dropped.

    Make sure full-screen mode transition animations are smooth. The system automatically animates windows as they enter and exit full-screen mode. If your app includes elements that aren’t animated by this transition, use custom animations to ensure a consistent experience. For example, if a window includes a secondary bar below the toolbar (like a favorites bar), it should seamlessly transition along with the toolbar.

    Use animation and motion effects judiciously. Don’t use animation for the sake of using animation. Excessive or gratuitous animation can make people feel disconnected or distracted, especially in an app that doesn’t provide an immersive experience.

    Make animations optional. When the option to reduce motion is enabled in accessibility preferences, your app should minimize or eliminate application animations. For guidance, see Motion.

    Some people absolutely love Lion’s new eye candy and flamboyant visuals; others are not so keen and would like to disable many of the newly introduced effects, such as animated window transitions and Mail animations. While the animations and effects rarely hinder the way you use your Mac, anybody that uses many of the features day in, day out may find that productivity can be improved when the unnecessary eye candy is disabled.

    This tutorial describes several Lion items that can be tweaked to suit your own personal preferences, such as how to:

    1. Disable automatic window animations
    2. Disable Mail’s send and receive animations
    3. Revert Mail back to the classic look
    4. Remove Reading List and Top Sites From Safari bookmarks
    5. Disable Mission Control animation
    6. Speed up Mission Control animation
    7. Disable Launchpad effects

    These tweaks to Lion’s interface require command line directives to be typed directly into Terminal, such as the ever-versatile command defaults write, but don’t worry because it’s just as easy to go back to the defaults if you don’t like the new behaviour. Unfortunately, many elements of Lion’s UI are hard to change, and many of its features don’t have any settings to play around with. You may want to consider any of the various “power tool” apps that can help to customise many aspects of Lion, especially if you’re not comfortable using Terminal.

    Automatic Window Animations

    The window animations in Lion are perhaps not obvious at first – each new window starts small and zooms in quickly to the correct size. The animation doesn’t take long, but it can be quite frustrating at times. You will have to Quit and restart an application for the changes to take effect, as it uses the settings it finds upon launch.

    Disable

    To disable automatic window animations, open Terminal and type the command:

    Enable

    To enable window animations, enter this in Terminal:

    Mail Animations

    Mail animations are completely separate from any others, and controlled by their own defaults write command. When you send a mail, the Message window flies off the top of the screen – a feature that some people love and others hate. When you replyto a mail, the Message window pops out of the Mail application and centres in the middle of the screen.

    Sent mails in Mail whoosh off the screen

    ” data-medium-file=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Screen-Shot-2012-01-25-at-21.14.16-300×150.png” data-large-file=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Screen-Shot-2012-01-25-at-21.14.16.png” loading=”lazy” src data-src=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Screen-Shot-2012-01-25-at-21.14.16.png” alt=”Sent mail windows in Mail whoosh off the screen” width=”550″ height=”275″> Sent mail windows in Mail whoosh off the screen

    Disable Send and Reply Animations

    To disable both animations open Terminal and type:

    Enable Send and Reply Animations

    To revert to the default settings type:

    Classic Mode in Mail

    Mail’s new Lion layout won’t appeal to everyone, so thankfully it’s easy to use the old classic layout. Enter Mail preferences (hit COMMAND and ,) and choose the Use classic layout option under the Viewing section. Mail switches to a more traditional split-pane view with messages in the top section and content in the lower half.

    Classic view in Mail

    ” data-medium-file=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Mail-Classic-View-300×132.png” data-large-file=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Mail-Classic-View.png” loading=”lazy” src data-src=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Mail-Classic-View.png” alt=”The classic layout in Mail” width=”424″ height=”187″> The classic layout in Mail

    The Safari Reading List and Top Sites Icons

    Remove Both Icons From the Bookmarks Bar

    Both the Reading List and Top Sites icons can be removed from Safari’s Bookmarks bar with a simple defaults write command:

    Remove One Icon From the Bookmarks Bar

    To remove one or the other, use one the strings below – remember that the item in quotes is the one you wish to keep.

    Restore Both Icons to the Bookmarks Bar

    To restore both icons back to the default location, type the following into Terminal:

    Remove the unwanted icons

    ” data-medium-file=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Safari-TopSites-ReadingList.png” data-large-file=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Safari-TopSites-ReadingList.png” loading=”lazy” src data-src=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Safari-TopSites-ReadingList.png” alt width=”275″ height=”114″> Both icons can be easily removed The Bookmarks menu

    ” data-medium-file=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Safari-No-Buttons.png” data-large-file=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Safari-No-Buttons.png” loading=”lazy” src data-src=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Safari-No-Buttons.png” alt width=”215″ height=”112″> A clutter-free Bookmarks menu

    Mission Control Animation

    Mission Control is a very useful feature of OS X that helps keep all your open applications, windows and spaces organised. But wouldn’t you like to disable the “zoom” animation and make the windows appear immediately in the correct place?

    Disable

    You can disable the zoom animations by typing this command into Terminal:

    Enable

    Mission Control animations can be turned back on with:

    Speed Up Mission Control Animation

    Rather than disable animations in Mission Control completely, it’s possible to speed them up considerably. The following command will do the trick – the example here uses a value of 0.1 seconds, but any number can be used.

    Launchpad Effects

    Launchpad fades smoothly into view when activated, but the animation can be disabled so that it appears immediately.

    Launchpad fade-in effects

    ” data-medium-file=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Launchpad-Effects-300×187.png” data-large-file=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Launchpad-Effects.png” loading=”lazy” src data-src=”https://www.chriswrites.com/wp-content/uploads/Launchpad-Effects.png” alt=”Launchpad’s fade-in effects” width=”550″ height=”342″> Launchpad’s fade-in effects

    Disable

    Launchpad’s show and hide durations can be set independently. To set both to minimal delay, use these defaults write commands:

    Enable

    To reset the animation times back to the default values, use:

    Before you go

    After spending over 20 years working with Macs, both old and new, theres a tool I think would be useful to every Mac owner who is experiencing performance issues.

    CleanMyMac is highest rated all-round cleaning app for the Mac, it can quickly diagnose and solve a whole plethora of common (but sometimes tedious to fix) issues at the click of a button. It also just happens to resolve many of the issues covered in the speed up section of this site, so Download CleanMyMac to get your Mac back up to speed today.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Richard Bennett

    Slow Motion films are unique, don’t you think? Occasionally, individuals use their phones to shoot slow-motion films if they have an in-built function, and if their phone does not have an in-built feature, they may use slow-motion video creator applications to assist them.

    But what happens if you have previously filmed a video at regular speed and now want the movie to be converted to slow motion?

    Maybe a video of you from the pool when you’re flipping your hair, but no one remembers to take it in slow motion? Don’t be concerned! Today, we will show you how to turn any video into a slow-motion video on different operating systems.

    In this article

    Part 1: How to Turn Videos Into Slow Motion on Windows for Free?

    If you need to conduct some simple editing and effects on your films, there is no need to invest hundreds of dollars in a video editing software application. For example, you may use the Photos App pre-installed on Windows 10 machines to apply the slow-motion effect to your photographs.

    Step 1: Right click the video and choose Open with Photos. If it has been recorded by an iPhone or Android device and stored up to OneDrive, it should appear in the Microsoft Photos app without any further effort. Just click it to preview the video.

    Step 2: Go to the Edit & Create option on the right corner on the top, and then select Add slo-mo option.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Step 3: Using the slider, you can determine how slowly you want it to go. Microsoft has built-in support for “Slow” and “Super-Slow” performance levels. Drag the slide to the right end will trigger the super slow mode.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Step 4: Specifiy the part that you want to apply slow motion in the playback bar at the bottom, and then save the video that you have just created with slow motion effects on Windows 10.

    The possibility exists that you are using an older version of Windows 10 on your computer if you do not see the option anywhere in the Photos app. You can also follow the steps above to create a slow motion video on Windows 11.

    Browse Windows Update from the system menu and click on the appropriate button. When all of the updates have been installed, you will have the most recent version of the Photos app, which includes this functionality.

    Part 2: How to Convert Normal Video to Slow Motion for Free on Mac?

    Slow-motion videos are among the most enjoyable parts of utilizing your iPhone for videography. Video may be recorded with a frame rate of 120 or 240 fps and then played back at a considerably slower rate than usual.

    However, if you don’t record video on your iPhone, making slow motion out of videos shot on other cameras or devices is more challenging. The good news is that iMovie for Mac can do this for you. We’ll show you how in this guide.

    Slow-motion films are easy to make using iMovie on your Mac. Just follow the steps listed below.

    Step 1: Click on the Import Media option in iMovie once launched on your Mac.

    Step 2: Click on the blue Import Selected button once you’ve selected the video file in the file browser to slow it down.

    Step 3: You may now open the movie in iMovie. Creating a Project is required at this stage. To do so, click on the Projects option.

    Step 4: Once you’ve entered a name for your project, click the blue OK button.

    Step 5: By dragging the movie onto your timeline, you may modify the video. Select the video by clicking on it and clicking on the Speed option to change its speed.

    Step 6: The speed-editing interface will be shown here. Change Normal to Slow in the Speed drop-down menu.

    Step 7: The duration of your movie will be increased by halves the pace at which it was initially recorded. The video may be slowed down even further by moving the speed slider.

    Step 8: Go to the Menu Bar and choose File > Share. Select the file you want to share.

    Step 9: Click the blue Next button once you’ve selected the properties you want for the file.

    Step 10: Select a name for the file, store it, and then click the blue Save button to save it to your computer.

    Part 3: How to turn Normal Video to Slow Motion With VLC On Linux Computer?

    The video speed may be controlled in two ways using VLC. Using shortcut keys or hotkeys is one method, while menus and buttons are another. Both methods are OK, but the shortcut option is the quickest and most efficient.

    Speed up and speed down buttons appear on the upper right of the movie when you press them. Depending on how much you tweak it, the speed is represented as 1.50x or 0.80x. This option is available for those who like to use other shortcut keys.

    Step 1: From the VLC menu bar, head over to the Playback for Speed and choose a speed option: slower, slower (fine), normal, faster (fine), and faster.

    Step 2: Right-clicking is also possible to access these parameters from the Playback > Speed menu.

    Step 3: The video’s speed may be altered by selecting one of those options and then clicking the appropriate button.

    If you are running VLC on Windows and Mac, you can check this article to find out the detailed information about how to playback video in slow motion in VLC.

    The Motion Editor in Animate helps you create complex Motion Tweens with minimal effort. The Motion Editor presents a compact view of all Properties applied to a selected tween span as two-dimensional graphs. You can choose to modify each of these graphs, and hence their corresponding tweened properties individually. With precise control and high granularity, you can greatly enrich your animations to emulate real-world behavior using the Motion Editor.

    The Motion Editor is desgined to make it easy for you to create complex tweens. Motion Editor lets you control and manipulate properties of a tween. After creating a Motion tween, you can take advantage of the Motion Editor to precisely refine your tween. The Motion Editor facilitates focused editing of the tween by allowing you to select and modify one property at a time.

    Why use the Motion Editor?

    The Motion Editor is designed to make it easy for you to create complex tweens. Hence, the Motion Editor offers granular control over tween and its properties. The following can only be achieved using the Motion Editor:

    • Easy access and modification of all Properties applied to a tween within a single panel.
    • Add different ease presets or custom ease: The Motion Editor lets you add different presets, add multiple presets, or create a Custom ease. Adding Ease to a tweened property is an easy way to emulate real world behavior of objects.
    • Resultant curve: You can apply eases to individual properties, and see the effects of eases on individual property graphs using the Resultant curve. A resultant curve is a representation of the actual tween.
    • Anchor Points and Control Points: You can isolate and make edits to key sections of a tween using Anchor Points and Control Points.
    • Refined Animations: The Motion Editor is the only way to make certain kinds of animations, such as creating a curved path tween on an individual property by adjusting its Property curve.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    In this article, it is assumed that you have already created a Motion Tween, and are using the Motion Editor to refine your tween.

    To open the Motion Editor, do the following:

    1. On the Timeline, select the motion tween span you want to refine, and double-click the tween span. You could also right-click on the tween span and select Refine Tween to bring up the Motion Editor.

    The Motion Editor represents Properties of a tween using two-dimensional graphs called Property Curves. These graphs are composited within a grid on the Motion Editor. Each property has its own Property Curve plotted against time on the horizontal axis (from left to right), and the change to the value of a property on vertical axis.

    You can manipulate Motion Tweens by editing Property Curves within Motion Editor. To its end, the Motion Editor facilitates smooth editing of Property Curves, there by allowing you to gain precise control over the tween. You can manipulate a Property Curve by adding property Keyframes or Anchor Points. This allows you to manipulate key parts of the Property Curve, where you want the tween to display transitions for a said Property.

    Take note that the Motion Editor allows you to edit only such properties that can be altered during a tween span. For example, the Quality property of the Gradient Bevel filter can only be assigned one value during a tween span, and hence, cannot be edited using the Motion Editor.

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    Avast временно приостановил свою деятельность на территории Российской Федерации.

    При необходимости, мы будем рады помочь или ответить на ваши вопросы на странице Службы поддержки.

    Недоступность продуктов Avast в России: часто задаваемые вопросы

    Beautiful, subtle animation throughout iOS builds a visual sense of connection between people and content onscreen. When used appropriately, animation can convey status, provide feedback, enhance the sense of direct manipulation, and help users visualize the results of their actions.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Use animation and motion effects judiciously. Don’t use animation for the sake of using animation. Excessive or gratuitous animation can make people feel disconnected or distracted, especially in apps that don’t provide an immersive experience. iOS uses motion effects, such as a parallax effect, to create the perception of depth on the Home screen and in other areas. These effects can increase understanding and enjoyment, but overusing them can make an app feel disorienting and difficult to control. If you implement motion effects, always test the results to make sure they work well.

    Strive for realism and credibility. People tend to accept artistic license, but they can feel disoriented when movement doesn’t make sense or appears to defy physical laws. If someone reveals a view by sliding it down from the top of the screen, for example, they should be able dismiss the view by sliding it back up.

    Use consistent animation. A familiar, flowing experience keeps users engaged. They’re accustomed to the subtle animation used throughout iOS, such as smooth transitions, fluid changes in device orientation, and physics-based scrolling. Unless you’re creating an immersive experience, such as a game, custom animation should be comparable to the built-in animations.

    Make animations optional. When the option to reduce motion is enabled in accessibility preferences, your app should minimize or eliminate application animations. For guidance, see Motion.

    Most of the sins of the modern web can be easily undone

    Most of this could be easily undone, but it won’t be. Rest assured that whatever is going to cause you the most pain is what will happen.

    . and then of course you have the dummies like this who probably caused these idiotic trends:

    The real problem is the lack of configurability. You could change the window border width to anywhere from invisible to some insanely huge number on the older versions of Windows, and everyone would be happy. Now you’re forced to use whatever some stupid “designer”‘s idea is.

    Thanks for those links – I’ll play around with those options to see if I can restore some sanity to my desktop.

    I loved SGI IRIX’s brutally bold borders, but those of Windows 7 are still just as good.

    Truth is, we had knobs and switches, then typewriters which naturally transition to command line, then we had window managers which are like a desk(top) covered in papers. Then we had. well that’s all we have. I guess the next thing is AR/VR and 3D UIs but until then.

    A mobile phone or tablet UI I would say is like a spiral bound pocket notebook, as compared to the proper desktop metaphor of full laptop/desktop computers.

    It’s like trying to reinvent the book. It _can_ be enhanced, but most of the time it doesn’t change the overall reading experience.

    Mac Command+Space search (Spotlight?) is about as good as it gets for driving a ui these days.

    As for masking the delays, see below.

    I have a problem with this “animations hiding delays” pattern, because it’s straight-up dishonest and disrespectful. If the computer has to take time, let me know; if it doesn’t, just give me the results immediately. Stop running what would be a piece of background feedback about the state of my machine through a low-pass filter!

    Adding animations to software tends to make it slower (a good potential for a self-fulfilling prophecy here). Often enough, the animations are of fixed “developer’s best estimate” length, and can take longer than the task itself, slowing the user down.

    The whole idea behind “reducing perception of delay” seems to be borne out of paternalistic and exploitative thinking, “how to make the user feel better about our app, despite its shortcomings”. Trying to make the user like you more than they should. Instead of that, why not focus on ensuring the user is maximally effective in getting maximum value out of the application – that they’re not confused, and not waiting for the machine?

    Not many developers explicitly add support for this, but it’s included in eg bootstrap.

    I would happily pay for a third party app to nuke every single damn animation if I could but Apple make it impossible (or at least that is what is claimed).

    And of course this doesn’t even touch on how laggy resizing many applications on macOS is (yes even on the shiny new M1 models). The Microsoft Office suite, Chrome and a whole bunch of other applications are horrible when resizing. It isn’t often an issue with Apple’s applications for what that’s worth.

    Also, Tinker Tool in OSX did that, IDK it it’s still working.

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    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motionIf you recently upgraded from Excel 2007 or Excel 2010 to either Excel 2013 or Excel 2016 for Windows, you’ve probably noticed a change that can be quite distracting (and even annoying!). Microsoft Excel now animates certain actions as you work. For instance, when you move from one cell to another, it animates the move. When you paste copied information, it animates the paste. Or when you enter a formula, it animates the calculation. While these animations may look cool at first, over time they can become distracting to many users – especially those who are used to working in earlier versions of Excel. The animations also use unnecessary computer processing power, which is sorely needed on slow machines or when working in large workbooks. Many Excel users have decided to turn these animations off, myself included, and so I thought I’d share an Excel tip on how to do this in Excel.

    How to Disable Animations in Excel 2013 for Windows (and presumably in Excel 2016)

    Disabling this “feature” in Excel 2013 for Windows is a two-part process; disable hardware graphics acceleration in Excel and turn-off controls and elements animation in Windows’ Performance Options.

    1. To disable graphics acceleration in Excel, open the File ribbon, click ‘Options’, go to ‘Advanced’, then under ‘Display’, check the ‘Disable hardware graphics acceleration’ box.
    2. To disable controls and elements animation in Windows, go the ‘Control Panel’ (Windows Key + X + P), in the search box in the upper-right hand corner of the Control Panel, search for ‘Performance Options’. Click the “Adjust the appearance and performance of Windows’ under ‘System’. The ‘Performance Options’ box opens. Uncheck the ‘Animate Controls and Elements Inside Windows’ box.
    Click to Get it Now

    Turn-Off Animations in Excel 2016 for MacHow to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    UPDATE (April 5, 2016): As of April 2016, Microsoft has enabled deactivating the animation features in Mac Excel. In order to turn off this animation and assuming you have Mac Excel 15.21 or greater, you’ll want to go to Excel > Preferences > Edit and uncheck the “Provide feedback with animation” checkbox.”

    PREVIOUS TO UPDATE: I am a Windows user, but have heard from my Mac friends that this “feature” also exists in Excel 2016 for Mac. Unfortunately, as of the date of this post, there is no known way to turn off animations in Mac (see update above). However, there is a movement by Mac users to convince Microsoft to add a disable button for this feature. If you’d like to upvote this idea, you can do so at Microsoft Excel’s User Voice Forum. It is as simple as clicking ‘Vote’ next to the “Allow User to Turn Off Cursor Glide” suggestion. Perhaps, if enough people express an interest in being able to disable animations on the Mac, Microsoft will act.

    Are you interesting in improving video quality of your streams and reducing the CPU usage? Just check the box ‘Use optimized encoder…

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Are you interested in improving video quality of your streams and reducing the CPU usage? Just check the box ‘Use optimized encoder settings’ before going live with Streamlabs Desktop.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motionEnable video encoding optimization when you click go-live and select a game

    So what is this all about?

    All existing video codecs use algorithms that provide a decent video quality. These algorithms try to adapt to user requirements by proposing presets. However, they always represent a generalized use case.

    In other words, up until this point all video broadcasting software applied a general solution to a very specific problem. With optimized video encoding we are tuning Streamlabs Desktop to the specific game that you play.

    Results? Extensive testing has shown better video quality and lower CPU usages in most cases.

    How does it work?

    We use a proprietary algorithm to fine tune every codec in Streamlabs Desktop. We take into account what game you’re playing, which preset you’re using, and what is your available bandwidth. This enables you to have a higher quality video stream and lower CPU usage.

    Let’s look at actual results.

    • Regular video is here and optimized video is here
    • Left screenshot is regular and the optimized version is on the right

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    In the screenshots above, our AI engine decides to reduce default resolution. The engine is taking into account available bitrate and the game complexity. The outcome is better video quality.

    Here is another example, an improvement from x264 ultrafast above and the optimized version below. Both encoded at 1280×720 with 2.5Mbps.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Here, we use machine learning to tweak x264 options based on the game, available CPU, and bandwidth.

    To sum-up, let us recap how Streamlabs Desktop video encoding optimization helps you stream:

    1. Higher visual quality
    2. Lower CPU consumption
    3. Or both 1 and 2, depending on your presets

    Full transparency: there is a single case where we are not able to reduce CPU usage. This case is the

      preset of the x264 encoder. In this case we choose to improve the video quality. Please note that this may lead to a very small increase of your CPU usage.

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    This page is part of my survey on how to make movies.

    You can create a movie from an image sequence using iMovie’09 . It comes with every new Mac, so for the occasional animator this is a simple way to get going. Although it’s easy to work with movie clips (combine them, edit them, add sound etc.), it’s not so straightforward to make “flip-book” animations (a.k.a. time-lapse movies) from a sequence of images.

    The steps shown here let you make a basic animation with sound . There are other free applications that can make animations without sound, e.g., Time Lapse Assembler. The iMovie approach is more complicated but rewards you with more editing flexibility, including sound.

    Another approach to do the same thing, but platform-independent (and open-source), is to use the 3D modeling software Blender.

    A limitation of iMovie ’09 is that single images can’t be played back at the fastest frame rate of 30 fps appropriate for NTSC video. However, if the frame rate is too slow for your purposes, you can always speed up the end result later. This is the first method I’ll describe.

    There is one drawback: if you have to work with a slow frame rate that doesn’t correspond to real time, it gets difficult to synchronize sounds. Imagine you have an existing sound file and want to adjust the frame durations to that sound; then you need to edit your clips in real-time. Therefore, I also tried an alternative solution: first convert each frame image to a one-frame movie, then import these movies and string them together to make your animation. With this trick, you can coax iMovie ’09 into producing a 30 fps frame rate.

    Import an image sequence to create your animation

    To begin, import the image sequence into iPhoto by drag-and-drop. Then open iMovie and follow these steps:

    1. It’s convenient to have the image sequence as your last import in iPhoto ,because then you’ll immediately find them under that same folder name in iMovie’s image browser.
    2. In iMovie , create a New Project, call it (e.g.) “StopMotion”
    3. In iMovie , open the media browser,
    4. In this example, I select 77 images from the iPhoto library, shown in the media browser:
      How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion
    5. Drag the images to the new project:
      How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion
    6. The process may take a while:
    7. Select all images in the new project, and select Window > Clip Adjustments . Type in a duration such as 0.05 and check the box for “Apply to all stills”:
      How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion
      Click Done .
    8. What if you can’t get the duration short enough? It may be that your version of iMovie doesn’t allow you to go below a clip duration of 0.1s . That’s too slow for a smooth movie with fast-moving objects. The work-around for this involves some arithmetic: say you want the shortest frame in your animation to be 0.025 seconds long. Then set its duration to the minimum of 0.1s for now, and scale up the durations of all other frames in your animation by the corresponding factor of 4 . You will then be exporting a movie that looks four times slower than desired. However, we’ll fix this with one additional step at the end. Let’s first complete the settings for exporting the movie.
    9. With all images still selected, select Window > Cropping, Ken Burns and Rotation :

      Select “Fit” .

    10. Now you will likely want to fine-tune the animation by adjusting the frame duration of individual images. To do that, select the frame (or frame range) you want to change. Enter a modified frame delay, but make sure not to apply this to all stills. For the delay, you can enter the format 1:23 (seconds separated by a colon from milliseconds), or 0.2 (to specify fractions of a second). Press Enter or Done to make the change stick!
    11. Optionally, add sound effects by dragging from the sound browser
      How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion
      to the desired frame in the project:
      How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion
      If your movie isn’t at the desired speed yet (because you had to scale the frame durations up as described above), skip this and the next step.
    12. To change audio settings (e.g., fade out the sound), click on the audio clip and select Window > Audio Adjustments :
      How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion
    13. Under the Share menu, choose Export using Quicktime (adjust preferences if needed):
      How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion
    14. Now come the optional steps to speed up the exported movie . Create another New Project and go to File > Import > Movie. to re-import your newly created movie back into iMovie.
    15. Drag the imported movie to the new project, select it and choose Window > Clip Adjustments as we did earlier for the still images. But unlike before, you’ll now see an entry “Speed” (depending on the format of the imported movie, you may need to click a “convert” button before you can change this setting). A slider will appear that lets you speed up the movie:
      How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion
    16. Finally you can go back to Share > Export using Quicktime and export the movie at the new speed.

    Import animation frame stills as movies

    This is an alternative approach which lets you import still frames with a shorter per-frame duration. I chose to aim for a duration of 0.03 seconds because that corresponds to the 30 frames per second at which iMovie exports movies (when set to NTSC format in the Preferences).

    In principle, you can reduce the frame duration even further, but I noticed that when I do so it sometimes causes iMovie to lose track of the order of the imported movie clips when dragging them into a project. This is undesirable because you may then have to manually sort the frames. So the 0.03 s duration is what I consider safe, as it is also the shortest duration allowed by the old version, iMovie HD .

    1. The first thing you need is a way to convert all your images to .mov format. Here is a python script that does that.
      • The easiest way is to use the droplet Application linked here:

        image2StillMovie
        The file linked above can be unzipped into your Applications directory (or anywhere you like). To use it, just select all images and drag them onto the icon. The mov files will be created next to the original images.

      • Step 2 is only needed if you want to use the command line . If you’re using the droplet above, you may skip to step 3 now.
        If you want the command line option, save the script below somewhere in your command $PATH , say at

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    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Apple has today released iOS 7.0.3, bringing several bug fixes and enhancements as well as some new and tweaked features to the OS that was released last month.

    On the feature side, iOS 7.0.3 introduces support for iCloud Keychain, which allows you to keep Safari passwords and credit card information in sync across your iPhone, iPad, and Mac running the just-released OS X Mavericks. Once enabled, iCloud Keychain will be available in Settings > iCloud, encrypting information as you use Safari.

    Second, iOS 7.0.3 brings back the ability to search Google and Wikipedia from Spotlight. The feature had been removed from the first release of iOS 7, but it’s now back in the new Spotlight, which is always available in any Home screen page just by swiping down.

    iOS 7 was criticized by early adopters for the slowness and amount of animations and transitions throughout the OS. A subset of users asked Apple to reduce the motion of the OS as it was causing motion sickness for them; a setting that the company had included in the Settings app wasn’t enough, as it disabled the parallax effect of iOS, but not the new animations.

    Apple has listened, and in iOS 7.0.3 the Reduce Motion setting (available in General > Accessibility) now truly reduces animations: switching to apps and back to Home screen, unlocking the device, and moving between folders is now a cross-fade that is much faster than Apple’s animations with Reduce Motion turned off.

    Here’s a video showing the new Reduce Motion setting.

    iOS 7.0.3 is available through Software Update and iTunes, where you’ll also be able to read a full changelog.

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    He can also be found on his two other podcasts on Relay FM – Connected and Remaster.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    In pitching iOS 7, Apple makes note of the fact that the revamped mobile operating system relies on “cinematic animations” and “new approaches to animation and motion to make even the simplest tasks more engaging”. Most would agree with the sentiment, but not a number of people with certain conditions who’ve flocked to Apple’s Support forums to complain how iOS 7 makes their life difficult.

    Motion sickness stems from iOS 7’s heavy focus on parallax and zooming effects. Regardless of where you stand, it’s a very real problem. Now, Apple does provide a very limited control in Settings to somewhat reduce motion in iOS 7, but people demand the firm take a more proactive approach and design granular controls to help alleviate motion sickness…

    A range of health-related problems are being reported by users, ranging from nausea and eye pain to dizziness, feelings of illness, severe vertigo and more.

    “The zoom animations everywhere on the new iOS 7 are literally making me nauseous and giving me a headache,” one poster wrote in a thread which spans more than eight pages. “It’s exactly how I used to get car sick if I tried to read in the car”.

    “I had severe vertigo the minute I started using my iPad with iOS 7,” another poster wrote. “Lost the rest of the day to it.” The user who goes under the nickname ‘nybe’ “had to go home ‘sick’ from work because of the intense nausea due to using my iPhone with iOS 7.”

    This is exactly why computer and console games come with standard epilepsy warning.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Moreover, one poster reported calling Apple’s support line, but to no avail – representatives for the company made it clear that iOS 7 does not allow users to completely turn off motion effects.

    Some people even downgraded to iOS 6 because it doesn’t use slam-cuts as much. Note that motion sickness is even more pronounced on iPads due to a much larger canvas.

    Now, iOS 7 lets users reduce user interface motion, including the parallax effect of icons and alerts, in Settings > General > Accessibility > Reduce Motion, as seen below. Unfortunately, flipping the Reduce Motion switch does not get rid of slam-cuts, zooming when opening apps and using task switcher and other aggressive Minority Report style user interface transitions.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motionHow to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    It’s all too easy to rubbish the problem, but that would be terribly unfair to folks with certain conditions. There’s no denying that vestibular and neurological conditions are very real.

    Hence, Apple should respond.

    For starters, Apple could do nothing, which is pretty much what they’ve done thus far. In that regard, a class action lawsuit from disgruntled users could force the company to take action, though Apple has changed a lot since Tim Cook is in charge.

    On the other hand, Apple’s dealt with similar issues before by adding Accessibility settings for vision and hearing-impaired users and support for physical and motor devices, as seen below. This gives us reasons to be mildly optimistic that Tim Cook & Co. will double down on iOS Accessibility in terms of motion sickness.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motionHow to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    For what it’s worth, many people are blogging about the issue and vestib charities are apparently hearing from plenty of people, too. I had a very productive exchange about these problems on Twitter with writer and designer Craig Grannell.

    At the very least, Apple should tweak the Reduce Motion switch to kill motion effects other than the parallax effect, depicted in Jeff’s hands-on video below.

    Reduce Motion should at least kill the zooming animation when opening apps/multitasking by replacing those dizzying slam-cuts with more bearable crossfades. As Sebastien points out, there should also be granular options in Settings to turn animations on and off on a per-app basis, similar to per-app Privacy settings.

    For example, Apple could implement toggles to disable user interface animations on the iOS Home screen, zooming when opening/switching apps and animations in stock iOS 7 apps like Messages. That could be a positive step in the right direction.

    At its core, motion sickness is difficult to tackle.

    In my view, it calls for a major rethinking of how iOS approaches accessibility features. The fact that iOS 7 is heavily game-fied doesn’t help either. Throwing a bunch of switches might appease disgruntled users but only to a certain extent.

    @dujkan By default, new users would see no difference whatsoever. Those who can’t cope with animations could turn them off. Everyone wins.

    Which brings me to another layer of the issue: third-party apps.

    There’s no escaping the fact that too many iOS programs simply don’t honor users’ global Accessibility settings (aside from those which hook into iOS system controls). As a result, such apps would not automatically inherit the aforementioned Accessibility enhancements – unless Apple updated its iOS App Store agreement with developers to include a clause giving it the power to outright reject apps that don’t respect users’ Accessibility choices.

    Then there’s the question of Apple’s desktop operating system.

    People who complain about motion sickness in iOS 7 also suffer from potential epilepsy issues due to motion and animations in OS X. A few examples: the animated Time Machine interface, zooming of Spaces/Mission Control and sliding of full-screen apps.

    What do you propose Apple do to deal with motion sickness in iOS 7?

    Feel free to chime in with your thoughts down in the comments.

    By Doreen | Follow | Last Updated December 21, 2021

    What is stop motion? What is the best stop motion software? In this article, we’re going to talk about what stop motion is and list the top 8 best stop motion software that you can use on your device. Now, read this post and pick one that suits your needs.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Do you want to make a stop motion video by yourself? It’s pretty easy as long as you have professional and easy-to-use stop motion software. If you want to make music videos or other types of videos, try MiniTool software.

    What Is Stop Motion

    Stop motion is an animated technique in which objects are physically manipulated in small increments between individually photographed frames so that they will appear to exhibit independent motion or change when a series of frames are played.

    What is the best stop motion software? It is a waste of time to compare all the stop motion software on the market one by one. To make things easier, here list the top 8 best stop motion software for you to choose from.

    Top 8 Best Stop Motion Software

    1. Stop Motion Pro Eclipse

    Supported OS – Windows

    Stop Motion Pro Eclipse is a comprehensive software solution that can be used to create complex stop motion animations. The tool can play up to 30 frames per second and allows you to record audio while playing animations.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    2. Dragon Frame

    Supported OS – Mac/Windows/Linux

    As one of the most powerful stop motion animation software, Dragon Frame can help you create truly stunning images. It allows you to use advanced camera scanning tools to capture accurate movements, compose shots, illuminate perfect shots and edit images.

    3. iKITMovie

    Supported OS – Windows

    iKITMovie is a stop motion animation tool compatible with Windows. It has more than 2200 free sound effects and background music tracks to customize your work. The tool also has a green screen that allows users to replace the background with still or moving images.

    4. Stop Motion Studio

    Supported OS – Windows/Mac/Android/iPhone/iPad

    Stop Motion Studio is a powerful, full-featured movie editor with a whole host of features, which allows you to create stop motion animations. Some users claim that this is the simplest application in stop-motion filmmaking.

    5. Boinx iStopMotion

    Supported OS – Mac/iPhone/iPad

    iStopMotion from Boinx is a fully functional and user-friendly application that can be used to make time-lapse movies or stop motion animations on iPhone or Mac. This software can even be set to capture frames automatically at a given time interval.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    6. Heron Animation

    Supported OS – Windows/Mac/Linux

    Heron Animation is one of the best free stop motion software that allows you to shoot a series of images from a connected webcam and gather every shot in actual time moving animation. It has a clean and user-friendly interface, which makes it perfect for beginners.

    7. Kawping

    Supported OS – Web-based

    Kapwing is an online collaborative platform for creating images, videos, and GIFs. This program offers a wide range of tools, including Resize Video, Add Audio to Video, Collage Maker and so on. Therefore, making a stop motion video can also be done with it.

    8. Clideo

    Supported OS – Web-based

    Clideo is an easy-to-use online video toolset. Creating a stop motion video with Clideo won’t take much time. You just need to upload the footage and adjust the available settings: clip rate and speed. Moreover, you can add a reverse effect if needed.

    Want to make a happy birthday GIF? Here gives a guide on how to make a funny happy birthday GIF and lists 5 best sites to download free happy birthday GIFs.

    Bottom Line

    How to make a stop motion video? All of the above stop motion software can help you out. Which one do you prefer? If you have any questions or suggestions about it, please let us know via [email protected] or share them in the comments section below.

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    ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Position: Columnist

    Majoring in Business English at the university, Doreen is an editor of MiniTool at present, mainly writing tech articles.

    In her view, technology changes lives and all she wants is to share the lastest tech thoughts and knowledge with people.

    She enjoys reading books, watching movies, and climbing mountains with friends in her spare time.

    With many video games featuring incredibly lifelike graphics, it should come as no surprise that our brains can find it tricky to distinguish between real and virtual images. Yet thrilling as they are, high-definition visuals and bold animation rendered on a large, high-resolution screen can result in feelings of motion sickness among susceptible gamers.

    What is motion sickness and how do video games cause it?

    The term motion sickness is used to describe the nausea that people occasionally get when moving. It is most commonly experienced when travelling in a vehicle and is often referred to as ‘travel sickness’. Symptoms include:

    • Headaches
    • Nausea
    • Dizziness
    • Sweating
    • Excess saliva
    • Disorientation

    When these symptoms are experienced as a result of immersion in a virtual environment – for example, pilots undergoing simulator training – it is known as ‘simulator sickness’. However, doctors are still unsure as to the exact reason why gaming causes this form of motion sickness.

    Professionals suspect it is due to conflicting signals received by the brain: while someone’s eyes register the fast-paced motion they are seeing, delicate parts of the inner ear (which detect movement) tell the brain that the body is, in fact, completely stationary.

    The resulting confusion throws a person’s sense of balance, creating the unpleasant symptoms some gamers unfortunately encounter.

    Is ‘simulator sickness’ normal?

    In-game motion sickness can be a source of embarrassment for gamers forced to endure it. Some take the view that it is a ‘weakness’ which discredits the legitimacy of their claim to be a serious gamer.

    It’s important to understand that this is a completely normal (if uncomfortable) sensation, which studies have shown affects a broad swathe of the population. Fortunately, there are ways to combat the issue, which may help to maximise your enjoyment.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    What you can do to reduce motion sickness while gaming

    Take frequent breaks

    We all know it’s not advisable to stare at a screen for hours on end, but that can be tricky when you’re in the grips of an intense session. However, stopping play at regular intervals can help;

    It will allow your brain to readjust to its surroundings, preventing the mixed signals that leave you feeling worse for wear.

    Adjust your surroundings

    Try sitting further back from the screen. This will allow other parts of the room to enter your vision. If your brain can see stillness on either side of the screen, it will help it to understand that you are stationary, hence preventing the confusion.

    You should also play in a well-lit environment. Try to ensure that the light provided by your screen is accompanied by light coming in from behind the monitor. This approach complements the former suggestion: it reduces the likelihood of your brain being over-immersed in the sense of movement occurring on-screen.

    Make use of a game’s customisable settings

    You will find that most games have customisable settings, in order to make gameplay more enjoyable. Adjusting these settings can also help combat motion sickness. Configurations that may help reduce nausea when gaming include:

    • Turning off ‘head bobbing’
    • Turning off motion blur
    • Upping the field of view
    • Adjusting sensitivity of movement

    We’d recommend experimenting with the above settings to try and find a mode of game play that doesn’t make you feel unwell.

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motionCopyright © Activision Blizzard

    Try standard motion sickness remedies

    As simulation sickness is essentially the same as the feeling of being unwell when travelling, it is worth trying the same remedies. Many of those who suffer with travel sickness find respite when wearing a nausea relief wristband. The band works by apply pressure on an acupressure point associated with feelings of nausea.

    Root ginger is also proven to be an effective remedy. If you begin to feel nauseous whilst playing, try nibbling a ginger biscuit or slowly sipping a cup of ginger tea.

    Experiment with playing different games

    Ultimately, if you are particularly prone to sickness while playing a certain game, and none of the above methods solve the problem, you may be better off switching to another title.

    Where possible, avoid FPS games or POV adventure titles (aka ‘walking simulators’) that have a sightless gun or utilise ‘head bobbing’ animation. In more extreme cases, it may be better to stick with games containing less intense action or simpler movements (e.g. real-time strategy, RPGs, puzzle games, etc.)

    Motion sickness and virtual reality

    Due to the nature of a VR headset, many of the solutions explored above, are simply impracticable. So what can you do?

    Use a fan when wearing a VR headset

    Whilst keeping cool will likely be a helpful remedy for gamers across the board, aiming a fan at yourself during a VR play session has reportedly helped reduce symptoms for some people.

    It’s not entirely clear why this works, but theories circulating in discussion include:

    • The sensation of wind while appearing to move in a virtual space may trick your body into agreeing that rapid motion occurring on screen is really happening (e.g. when the in-game character is running or falling)
    • The feeling of an external sensation is providing a sensory link to the real world which helps anchor your perception

    How to reduce desktop animations on a mac with reduce motion

    Rejoin reality: take regular breaks from gaming

    As mentioned earlier, in relation to conventional gaming, regular breaks can help the brain to readjust to reality, reducing the chances of nausea.

    Try different VR game genres

    Another parallel with the advice offered to conventional gamers – playing games involving fewer action sets or less intense activity are less likely to leave you feeling sick. Sitting, standing or walking in the virtual world, rather than running, jumping or flying, will send fewer mixed signals to your brain, preventing it from getting confused.

    Hopefully you’ll find some of the suggestions contained in this article to be useful in diminishing any motion sickness symptoms you may experience while gaming. Here at Ghost we’re all keen gamers. We enjoy sharing our wealth of knowledge and expertise with the community and hope that – in our own way – we can help make your gaming experiences better and more fulfilling.

    Interested in immersing yourself deeper into online gaming, its culture and the pressing topics affecting both gamers and the wider industry? Check out some of the other articles in our knowledge base.