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How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

Just like Facebook, Instagram lets you connect your account with third-party apps and services. Now, you might have used your account to log in into some app in the past, and even if you’ve stopped using it now, it’s likely to remain authorized to your profile.

For instance, you may have used your account in apps to see your unfollowers, manage multiple social media accounts, for feed automation and scheduling, or logging into dating platforms. These apps stay linked and can access your personal information even after you’ve uninstalled them from your phone.

Therefore, to keep your privacy and get rid of services you no longer use, it’s essential to revoke these services from your account. In this article, let’s see how you can remove authorized apps on Instagram. Read on.

Remove Third-party Apps on Instagram

While Instagram does offer an option to remove authorized apps from your account, it’s currently limited to the web version. And hence, you won’t be able to do this on the Android or iPhone app except for your phone’s browser.

Step by Step Guide to Remove Third-party Apps on Instagram

1] On your PC or Mobile, open the web browser of your choice and head to Instagram Web.

How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

2] Hit your avatar on the top right of the screen to go to your profile section. Here, tap the Gear icon next to the ‘Edit Profile’ button.

How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

3] A pop-up menu will appear on your screen. Choose Apps and Websites from the list of available options.

4] On the next screen, you’ll see the apps and websites that are currently authorized to access your account. How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

5] Look for the app that you no longer use and want to revoke access for. Then, click the Remove button under the app and confirm when prompted. Do the same for other applications if required.

How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

That’s it; the app you disconnected from your account will no longer be able to access your profile information. Though, it may still have access to the info you previously shared.

As a matter of fact, Instagram automatically marks apps as expired if you haven’t used them in a while. They can be seen in the Expired section under Apps and Websites menu.

Wrapping Up

So, this was a simple guide on how you can remove third-party apps from your Instagram account. If you find that a malicious app had entrance to your account, make sure to change your password once after revoking its access token.

Moreover, avoid using your Instagram account in unknown third-party applications. Even if you choose to, do check reviews before proceeding. Keep a tab on your privacy settings and do not enter your account credentials on links sent by someone else, unless you verify the site URL and security certificate. Follow the necessary precautions, and you’re good to go.

With a lot of new integrations on the way and Music Hack Day coming up in Stockholm this weekend, we wanted to shed some light on what we call Connect with SoundCloud. The idea is to make it really easy for users to connect third-party apps and services to their SoundCloud accounts and thus get an even better flow for handling audio on the web.

Connect with SoundCloud is built on OAuth – “An open protocol to allow secure API authorization in a simple and standard method from desktop and web applications” – also used by Twitter and YouTube among others. The main benefit is that you don’t have to store your SoundCloud login credentials in any third-party app or service.

There are two common use cases:

  • Export to SoundCloud: upload tracks to SoundCloud account from a third-party application. Case study: FiRe Field Recorder
  • Import from SoundCloud: transfer tracks from SoundCloud account to a third-party service. Case study: Abbey Road Online Mastering

The authorization flow is similar in both cases:

  • Click “Connect with SoundCloud” in the third-party app.
  • This opens up the connect page on our server.
  • You can login (or sign up for a new account) and allow access.
  • An authorization token is sent to the third-party app.
  • The app can store the token and access the account until the user revokes the access in the SoundCloud account settings. That way you’re able to revoke the access without changing your SoundCloud password and also to change your SoundCloud password without affecting the third-party authorization.

So when you see this button on a web page, you know that you’re only two clicks away from connecting the service to your SoundCloud account and let it accessing to your tracks.

To get started with the implementation:

  • Check out the general description of Connect with SoundCloud.
  • Try connecting with SoundBoard.
  • Read the guide for implementing and the API documentation.
  • Make sure you get the right buttons.
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    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Google helps app and game makers with a single sign-on service similar to Facebook. Google has much stricter privacy policies about what third-party developers can do with your data, but it’s still a good idea to clear out any apps or games you no longer use. Take a look at what apps you’ve given permission to and revoke access to ones you no longer use. Here’s how.

    What the different app permissions are

    Google allows developers to request three levels of information, basic, read and write, and full access. Each tier offers deeper access. For some apps, it’s necessary (like being able to add an event to your Google calendar), while others shouldn’t be asking for anything more than your basic information (your name and email address for single sign-on purposes). When you view the apps that you’ve given permission to, what they can do will be listed next to them.

    Full account access

    This gives the developer complete access to your Google account, including the ability to change your password, delete your account, send money through Google Pay, view all of your Google account activity, including web searches and things you’ve watched on YouTube, and a whole lot more.

    Basically, you should never give full account access to any third-party app. You should only see this permission for Google apps. It’s too dangerous to give that kind of power to a third-party app. None of them should need it and none of them should ask for it.

    Read and write access

    Read and write access is how some apps access limited features of your Google account. A third-party email app might have access to read, send, and delete your Gmail emails. You shouldn’t be scared of this if you trust the company providing the service. I’ve given read and write permission to a handful of email clients that I trust.

    This also works for calendar apps, which might request permission to manage your Google Calendar and create task lists for you, contact management apps, which have access to your Google contacts, or note-taking apps that have access to Google Drive.

    If you trust the company, allowing them read and write access is not dangerous. It’s useful, and in many cases, necessary to provide you the service you’re looking for.

    Basic Information

    When a developer asks for your basic information only, they’re just connecting you to the Google sign-on feature, which includes your email address and name. It’s not totally clear what else is included in the basic information permission, but your Google personal info page shows what basic information you share with your contacts, like your age and gender identity.

    Some apps and practically all games should only be asking for basic information. If a game is asking for read and write permission, you should definitely do some digging to find out why the developer needs more than that.

    How to revoke third-party app permissions for your Google account

    It’s a fairly simple process, and you should probably check your app permissions every few months to make sure you’re OK with the apps you’ve given permission too.

    I recommend visiting your app permissions page on both mobile and PC/Mac because app permissions may be different, depending on what device you use them on.

    1. Navigate to your Google Security Page from a web browser.
    2. Click on Apps with account access from the side menu on PC or Mac or scroll down to the section on mobile.

    Click or tap on Manage Apps.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Click or tap on Remove Access.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    You should do this for any apps you no longer use.

    What happens when you revoke access to your Google account for third-party apps

    In some instances, like basic information permissions, you’re simply going to be logged out of an app or game and have to allow permission again if you want to use it again.

    For apps that request read and write permissions, you’ll be logged out of the app and it will no longer have access to your Gmail, Google Calendar, Google+, Google Drive, contacts, or other information you’ve previously given permission to before.

    For apps that ask for full access, they won’t be able to delete your Google account, change your password, or send money to themselves through your Google Pay account. Revoke those and don’t look back.

    For any app that you revoke permission for, you can always give permission again in the future. Most of the information will sync with Google and you won’t lose data anyway. You might have to rebuild task lists, or you might lose PDFs you saved to Google Drive using the app, but it shouldn’t be too big of a process if you revoke an app and decide to give permission back at a later date.

    Any questions?

    Do you have any questions about how to revoke third-party app permissions to your Google account? Put them in the comments and I’ll help you out.

    It is quite common to see websites and apps offer their users the chance to sign up and sign in with Facebook or Twitter. For the app developer or website owner, the advantages are numerous. Mainly that everything the user does gets put on social media which is free advertising for the site or app. For the user, using social media to sign in means convenience. But when you are done, you MUST revoke third-party app access for the sake of security.

    If you use Facebook or Twitter to sign into everything, those third-party permissions will soon stack up. This presents security challenges if those apps or sites become corrupted or fall into the wrong hands. You must jealously guard access to your social media accounts!

    Revoke Third-Party App Access On Twitter

    When you log into your Twitter account, go to Settings & Privacy.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    On the next screen, on the left hand side menu, choose Apps. Or click here.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    On the right hand side of the page, you will now see the apps and sites which you have authorised to use your Twitter account data. Go down the list, and if you are not using any of them anymore, click the “Revoke access” button.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Have you changed your mind or made a mistake? Well, when you click the “Revoke access” button, it changes to “Undo Revoke Access“. Simply clicking that button will put things back to the way they were before.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    If you use Twitter on your iOS and MacOS devices, there is a different procedure for revoking access. You will see this on the Twitter website page. Instead of “Revoke access“, it will say “Learn how to revoke an iOS app“.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    That link will take you to a Twitter help page but in essence, what you need to do is log out of the Twitter account on your iOS device. Then in the iOS settings, remove the Twitter account details. That will “revoke” the access and remove it from the Apps page above.

    Revoke Third-Party App Access On Facebook

    When you log into your Facebook account, click the little downwards arrow and select “Settings“. Or click here.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    On the next page, choose “Apps” from the left-hand menu.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Now, on the right hand side, are all of the apps authorised to access your Facebook account. If you have lots, there will be a drop-down “Show More” menu link at the bottom of the list.

    Facebook is slightly better with third-party access in that it gives you more granular control over the app permissions, as I will soon demonstrate.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Take the first one, Adobe. Let’s assume I want to ditch that one. Mousing over it will reveal a pencil icon for editing it and a cross icon for deleting it.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Let’s first take a look at the “edit” function. If you click the pencil icon, a window opens up, showing those granular controls that I talked about. Maybe you don’t want to necessarily delete the whole thing, but instead alter the permissions? This is where you would do it.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    You can turn notifications on and off for the app. Under “App visibility”, you can also change who sees the status updates that the app or site may choose to post on your behalf.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    If you just want to completely revoke the third-party access and remove it from your Facebook account, click the cross button. You will get an “are you sure” dialogue box. Click “Remove“.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    With some, it will ask you if you want Facebook to remove all signs of timeline activity (such as status updates) made by that app or website. You can either choose to, or opt to keep it all. It’s entirely up to you. If you choose to delete that data, just tick the little box provided at the bottom.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Conclusion

    As I said at the beginning, this is a good security practice. Once a week or once a month, go through your access permissions on social media and delete the ones you won’t be needing anymore. Right now, those apps and sites may be operated by honest ethical people. But tomorrow? Next week? Next year? If somebody dishonest takes over and you still have the door open to your social media account, let’s just say you would have a bit of a problem on your hands.

    It is quite common to see websites and apps offer their users the chance to sign up and sign in with Facebook or Twitter. For the app developer or website owner, the advantages are numerous. Mainly that everything the user does gets put on social media which is free advertising for the site or app. For the user, using social media to sign in means convenience. But when you are done, you MUST revoke third-party app access for the sake of security.

    If you use Facebook or Twitter to sign into everything, those third-party permissions will soon stack up. This presents security challenges if those apps or sites become corrupted or fall into the wrong hands. You must jealously guard access to your social media accounts!

    Revoke Third-Party App Access On Twitter

    When you log into your Twitter account, go to Settings & Privacy.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    On the next screen, on the left hand side menu, choose Apps. Or click here.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    On the right hand side of the page, you will now see the apps and sites which you have authorised to use your Twitter account data. Go down the list, and if you are not using any of them anymore, click the “Revoke access” button.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Have you changed your mind or made a mistake? Well, when you click the “Revoke access” button, it changes to “Undo Revoke Access“. Simply clicking that button will put things back to the way they were before.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    If you use Twitter on your iOS and MacOS devices, there is a different procedure for revoking access. You will see this on the Twitter website page. Instead of “Revoke access“, it will say “Learn how to revoke an iOS app“.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    That link will take you to a Twitter help page but in essence, what you need to do is log out of the Twitter account on your iOS device. Then in the iOS settings, remove the Twitter account details. That will “revoke” the access and remove it from the Apps page above.

    Revoke Third-Party App Access On Facebook

    When you log into your Facebook account, click the little downwards arrow and select “Settings“. Or click here.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    On the next page, choose “Apps” from the left-hand menu.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Now, on the right hand side, are all of the apps authorised to access your Facebook account. If you have lots, there will be a drop-down “Show More” menu link at the bottom of the list.

    Facebook is slightly better with third-party access in that it gives you more granular control over the app permissions, as I will soon demonstrate.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Take the first one, Adobe. Let’s assume I want to ditch that one. Mousing over it will reveal a pencil icon for editing it and a cross icon for deleting it.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Let’s first take a look at the “edit” function. If you click the pencil icon, a window opens up, showing those granular controls that I talked about. Maybe you don’t want to necessarily delete the whole thing, but instead alter the permissions? This is where you would do it.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    You can turn notifications on and off for the app. Under “App visibility”, you can also change who sees the status updates that the app or site may choose to post on your behalf.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    If you just want to completely revoke the third-party access and remove it from your Facebook account, click the cross button. You will get an “are you sure” dialogue box. Click “Remove“.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    With some, it will ask you if you want Facebook to remove all signs of timeline activity (such as status updates) made by that app or website. You can either choose to, or opt to keep it all. It’s entirely up to you. If you choose to delete that data, just tick the little box provided at the bottom.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Conclusion

    As I said at the beginning, this is a good security practice. Once a week or once a month, go through your access permissions on social media and delete the ones you won’t be needing anymore. Right now, those apps and sites may be operated by honest ethical people. But tomorrow? Next week? Next year? If somebody dishonest takes over and you still have the door open to your social media account, let’s just say you would have a bit of a problem on your hands.

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    Need help? Check out Spotify Answers for solutions to a wide range of topics.

    How to revoke 3rd party app access?

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    I imported all my songs from Rdio by granting access to 3rd party web apps like Mooval , now I want to stop them from SPYING on my activities.

    How do we manage 3rd party application access to our account (revoke access to applications, so they can no longer access your account), something similar to the way Twitter does it, or Last.fm.

    It’s misleading to have an ability to grant access with no way to revoke it. I would never have granted access to 3rd party apps if I had known that it was not possible to manage these access grants.

    This actually puts me on the edge of flat out removing my Spotify account entirely because it’s a huge breach of trust

    I DON’T WANT to be DATA MINED BY OTHER COMPANIES and STRANGERS, Please let us remove SPYS like Google does:

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    Unfortunately Spotify does not have a way to manage third party access.

    Users can add kudos to your idea to show support:

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    That is not a solution.

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    Iti is not, but by looking at the number of kudos of that idea, I don’t think people care that much about it. That’s sad though, because they should.

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    They deleted the Kudos, it was 175 with 4 pages of replies this morning

    They are trying to bury this. Are you going to let them?

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    You have my kudos.

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    Added kudos and some relevant tags, plus a note as to Spotify support’s absurd response to a request of revoking a third party’s access.

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    I could be wrong here, but since you have to grant your Spotify password to the app in question for it to function. won’t changing your Spotify password deny the app access to your account?

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    At least for any legitimate app in the sense this is referring to, it doesn’t (and shouldn’t ever) directly ask for your Spotify password. This link provides the technical details if curious but the basic idea is that it triggers Spotify’s Auth prompt in a new window with some data saying what it wants access to, where you log directly into Spotify itself, and then that passes a different piece of data back to the app or site saying “yes this person is ____ and you can now access what was requested with this key.”

    What people have an issue with is that right now that extra piece of data, the “key” to access account data possibly including the ability to make changes to followers/playlists/etc if it was requested, can’t be revoked by users unless it expires on its’ own. Based on my followup in one particular case, Spotify claims to be unable to revoke that access as well, which is downright dangerous. Futhermore, support suggested that I contact the third party in question to have access removed, which is reliant on the third party being well-intentioned and responsive, but also impossible according to Spotify’s own documentation and developer comments since there is no way for an app/site to “give up” access once it’s granted either.

    Put simply: Since this is completely independent of your account details, the point of it being that you don’t need to give your actual login info to a third party, changing your password has zero effect on it. Most well-designed systems for third party access to information of an account use this type of process (Facebook, Google, Twitter, etc.), but I’ve never seen one that you can’t revoke access after it’s been given which is the case here.

    What truly scares me is that there are numerous video games with more secure implementations than what appears to be the case at Spotify, including one with half a million users and only one developer maintaining their API (though admittedly more are likely involved with their auth setup) which is in much better shape than this.

    Edit: Added some more info on inability for a third party to give up access and on other systems which use this type of process.
    Edit 2: Finished reading the docs, editing for accuracy.

    Unroll me from Unroll.me, please

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    Share All sharing options for: How to revoke access for third-party apps like Unroll.me

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    A New York Times report revealed, as part of a broader story about Uber’s recent troubles, that analytics firm Slice Intelligence sells the data it gathers from your inbox with its Unroll.me app. And some people, understandably, are Mad As Hell and Not Going to Take This Anymore.

    By now it’s safe to assume that almost every free internet service that provides some kind of utility isn’t really “free,” and that the price you pay, if it’s not in the form of an actual withdrawal from your bank account, is in the currency of your personal data. Unroll.me, which scans people’s inboxes for marketing emails and newsletters and offers to unsubscribe them in big batches, fits this bill: it is helpful, and it is “free.”

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    But Unroll.me never made it abundantly clear that it was looking at other emails in your inbox, like receipts, and selling that data to other firms. And the company’s apology, issued earlier this week, reads more like a “Sorry we’ve been caught” note (We don’t read Terms of Service agreements either! But really, you should) rather than expressing any kind of chagrin over its practices.

    So now seems like as good of a time as any to go through your Gmail, Facebook, and other services you might have given third-party apps access to, and revoke app access if you’re really not using said apps anymore — or if you just don’t want them having access to more of your data. Here’s how to do this in a few short steps:

    Gmail

    From the dropdown menu of your Google profile picture, go to My Account —> Sign-in & security —> Connected apps & sites —> Manage apps. From there, click on the apps or devices you no longer want to have access to your Google accounts, and hit “Remove.”

    Facebook

    From your home page, go to the dropdown menu on the upper right-hand side of the screen. Select Settings —> Apps —-> App Settings —> Show All. Click the “X” next to each app you no longer want to have access to your Facebook friend list or other profile information.

    Instagram

    From Instagram on the web, go to your own profile and click on the Settings gear next to Edit Profile. From there, go to Authorized Applications and click on “Revoke” Access for the apps you want to get rid of. Another tip: the interface here is a little confusing, because of a line that’s drawn under each app name; the blue Revoke Access button for each app falls below the app name, lengthy app description, and listed permissions.

    Twitter

    From your Twitter profile, go to Setting —> Apps —> and hit “Revoke Access” on the apps you no longer want connected to Twitter. Tip: if the “Revoke Access” option isn’t there, say, for certain iOS apps, you have to look revoke all access for “iOS Twitter integration” first, and then the associated apps should be disconnected from your Twitter account.

    Most internet services have similar taxonomies when it comes to settings and third-party apps, so if you regularly use another service that isn’t listed here, poke around the main menu and look for “Settings,” “Apps,” “Security,” or “Connected sites.” It should be easy enough to revoke access to any app that you no longer want connected to your everyday services.

    Final Thoughts

    If you follow the directions above, data from your accounts should no longer be accessible by third-party apps. but on their own, Gmail, Twitter, Facebook, Instagram are still free services that use advertisements as a way to make money. Remember that even though they may not be directly selling your personal data to other firms, they are still selling access to you by slapping targeted ads on your feed. That is the price of free.

    You can now upload your tracks using the SoundCloud app on your iOS or Android device.

    In order to upload tracks with the mobile SoundCloud app, your account must have been previously confirmed via email.

    Uploading on iOS

    1. Within the iOS app, tap the upward-pointing arrow on the top right of your home screen.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    1. Within the file picker view, you can browse to your most recent files or any location like iCloud, Google Drive, Dropbox, local files and audio from any compatible app when tapping “Browse”. Tap the file and the upload process will start (it won’t save, yet).

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Recent view in file picker Browse other apps such as Cloud integrations

    The Upload feature supports any audio file from your phone (upload lossless HD files like FLAC, WAV, ALAC or AIFF for best audio quality).

    1. Ensure your metadata is correct or add artwork, a new title, genre(s) and description on the spot, and select whether you want your track public or private by using the privacy toggle.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    1. Tap save (top right). It turns orange once the upload is finished.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    1. Head to your profile to see your newly uploaded track. In some cases, you will see a “processing” state on the track. This means we are still transcoding the file and it will be playable in a few moments. If you feel that maybe something has gone wrong, simply swipe up and it will refresh the upload status.

    Uploading on Android

    1. Within the mobile app, tap the upward-pointing arrow on the top right of your home screen.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud
    Grey arrow at the top right to start the Upload process

    2. Within the file picker view, you can browse to your audio files or any location like Google Drive, Dropbox, local files, and more from any compatible app. Tap the file and the upload process will start (it won’t save, yet).

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Browse by Audio folder or access other apps such as Drive, Dropbox, and any other compatible cloud integration.

    The Upload feature supports any audio file from your phone (upload lossless HD files like FLAC, WAV, ALAC or AIFF for best audio quality).

    3. Ensure your metadata is correct or add artwork, a new title, genre(s) and description, then select whether you want your track public or private by using the privacy toggle.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Edit view for Track data input

    4. Tap save (top right). It will close the Edit view and bring you back to home where you can see a blue spinner that shows the upload progress. The blue spinner will stop once the upload is finished.

    How to revoke third-party app access from soundcloud

    Orange checkmark to save the upload Blue spinner that tells you Upload is in process

    5. Head to your profile to see your newly uploaded track. In some cases, you might not be able to play the track straight away, this means we are still transcoding the file and it will be playable in a few moments.

    Create an account

    Signing up to SoundCloud is free and easy. Visit us at SoundCloud.com or download our app for mobile devices and click on Create Account, type in your email address and choose a password. Alternatively you can also sign up via Facebook, Apple or your Google account.

    What’s offered On the Go

    Never stop listening. Take your playlists and likes wherever you go.

    Download our official app for iPad and iPhone on the App Store or get the official app for Android on the Google Play store, where you can manage your account from anywhere or reply to comments.

    Types of subscriptions

    SoundCloud is an open platform for both listeners and creators. Anyone can still listen for free and anyone can still upload tracks, as long as they own all the rights to do so.

    For Listeners

    You can listen to tens of millions of tracks you can’t find anywhere else for free on SoundCloud. We also have released SoundCloud Go (available in these territories) to give you more out of your listening experience. By upgrading to SoundCloud Go, you’ll get access to the full catalog on SoundCloud, with offline listening and Ad Free ¹ streaming. Learn more about SoundCloud Go.

    Please note: ¹No interruptive audio or visual experiences.

    For Creators

    We have three different plans on SoundCloud. With a Free subscription easily upload your first tracks, build your profile and grow your audience. Pro subscriptions receive exclusive features, extensive stats, more upload time, support and opportunities. Pro Unlimited get all Pro subscription plus more features and unlimited upload space.