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How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

We've covered proper solid state drive maintenance before , but one of the most overlooked factors in proper SSD care is partition alignment. Here's how to make sure your partitions are aligned correctly and that you're getting the most out of your SSD.

How to Maximize the Life of Your SSD

An SSD drive is a worthwhile investment, but like any storage device, it can fail. In fact, failing

We talked about partition alignment in our SSD migrating tutorial , but if you've already migrated to an SSD, you might not have realized that you're sacrificing performance with misaligned partitions. A regular hard drive usually starts its first partition after 63 empty blocks, while SSDs require 64 blocks of data for optimal performance. This means that sometimes, if your SSD was formatted by something other than Windows' installer, it can be aligned incorrectly and will transfer data much slower than intended .

How to Migrate to a Solid-State Drive Without Reinstalling Windows

A solid-state drive is one of the best upgrades you can make to your desktop computer. And it’s not

To see if your partitions are aligned correctly, hit the Start menu and type in msinfo32 . Enter Msinfo32 and go to Components > Storage > Disks. Look for your SSD on the list and find the "Partition Starting Offset" item. If this number is divisible by 4096 (that is, if dividing it by 4096 equals a whole number and not a decimal), your partition is correctly aligned. If not, you need to realign it. Luckily, this is pretty easy to do with the Gparted live CD. If you have an Ubuntu live CD lying around, that will work too, since it has Gparted available under System > Administration.

Target breakouts and wrinkles at the same time
Each item is also free of all possible pore-cloggers and contains zero hormone disruptors.

Start up Gparted and find your SSD in the upper-right dropdown menu. Select it, and click on your first partition in the menu. Hit the Resize/Move button in the toolbar. Change the "Free Space Preceding" box to 2MB, uncheck "Round to Cylinders", and hit "Resize/Move". (If you're using a newer live CD, check the "MiB" box). Hit Apply once and let it do its thing.

Now hit Resize/Move again, and change the "Free Space Preceding" box to 1MB. Uncheck "Round to Cylinders" again, hit Resize/Move, then click Apply. Now your drive will be aligned to exactly 2048 blocks after the beginning of the disk, which allows for optimal SSD performance. Note that if you have multiple partitions on your SSD, you'll need to repeat this process for each partition, not just the first one on the disk.

Yes, moving it 2MB away then moving it back 1MB seems like a long, roundabout method, but Gparted measures space in a weird way. When you first start up Gparted, your partition will have less than 1MB of space preceding it, but Gparted will only measure it as 0-meaning if you align it to 1MB right off the bat, it'll keep the drive annoyingly misaligned at 1.03MB. If you set it to 2MB, hit Apply, and then move it back to 1MB, it works fine.

Boot back into Windows, open Msinfo32 back up, and run the above check again. If you get a whole number this time, your partition is correctly aligned. If you get an error when you try to boot back into Windows, that doesn't mean you did anything wrong—sometimes Windows gets a little confused and can't find a partition if you move it (even if you only move it 0.7MB away). Grab your Windows installation disc, boot into it, and hit Repair Your Computer on the main menu. It should automatically detect the issue and fix your boot menu for you.

That's it. It seems a little complicated and roundabout, but it's something not a lot of people know to do, so you may have been sitting with a non-optimized SSD for all this time (I know I have been for a few months). This should fix the problem, and if you've had your SSD for awhile, you might even notice a speed boost.

How to Speed Up Your Solid-State Drive by Re-Aligning Its Partitions

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

If you’ve migrated your operating system from a mechanical hard drive to a solid-state drive, the partitions may not be properly aligned. This could result in slower performance, which you can fix by re-aligning them.

What Is Partition Alignment, and Why Should I Care?

A typical mechanical hard drive generally starts its first partition after 63 empty blocks, while a solid-state drive starts its first partition after 64 empty blocks.

The Windows installer knows how to handle this properly, so most people shouldn’t have a problem. If you bought a computer that came with Windows installed on an SSD, your partitions should be correctly aligned. If you installed Windows on your SSD from scratch, your partitions should be correctly aligned. The installer does it all automatically.

However, if you migrated an existing Windows installation from an old mechanical hard drive to a solid state drive, the software may not have accounted for this. Some do, some don’t. If it didn’t, your partitions won’t be correctly aligned, and which can slow down your SSD. How much slower performance depends on your specific SSD.

Thankfully, there’s a quick way to check whether your partitions have this problem and fix it if they do.

How to Check if Your Partitions Are Correctly Aligned

You can check this very easily from the System Information tool. To launch it, open your Start menu, type “msinfo32”, and press Enter to launch the System Information tool. You can also press Windows+R on your keyboard, type “msinfo32” into the Run dialog, and press Enter.

Head to Components > Storage > Disks. Scroll down in the left pane, locate your SSD, and find the “Partition Starting Offset” value below it. There will be a different partition starting offset value for each partition on the drive.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

Check if this number is evenly divisible by 4096. If it is, the partition is correctly aligned. If it isn’t, the partition isn’t correctly aligned.

For example, for the number above, we’d do this math:

There’s no decimal remainder, so the number is evenly divisible. That means the sectors are correctly aligned. If we did the math and found a decimal remainder (e.g. 256.325), that would mean the numbers aren’t evenly divisible, and the sectors aren’t correctly aligned.

How to Fix Incorrectly Aligned Partitions

If you find that your partitions are incorrectly aligned, you can fix them and hopefully get a nice speed boost.

While you could just reinstall Windows and have it partition your drives from scratch, you don’t have to do that. Quite a few partition managers can realign your partitions for you. However, this often involves some complex fiddling.

While this shouldn’t cause any problems, it’s always a good idea to have backups of your important data–especially when messing with your computer’s partitions.

The fastest way we’ve found to do this is to use the free version of MiniTool Partition Wizard–you don’t need to pay for a premium version, the free version can do everything you need. Install it on Windows, launch the partition manager, right-click the partition you want to align, and select “Align”. It’ll do all the hard work for you.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

When you’re done, you should hopefully find that you’re getting the best possible speeds out of that blazing fast SSD.

How to Speed Up Your Solid-State Drive by Re-Aligning Its Partitions

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

If you’ve migrated your operating system from a mechanical hard drive to a solid-state drive, the partitions may not be properly aligned. This could result in slower performance, which you can fix by re-aligning them.

What Is Partition Alignment, and Why Should I Care?

A typical mechanical hard drive generally starts its first partition after 63 empty blocks, while a solid-state drive starts its first partition after 64 empty blocks.

The Windows installer knows how to handle this properly, so most people shouldn’t have a problem. If you bought a computer that came with Windows installed on an SSD, your partitions should be correctly aligned. If you installed Windows on your SSD from scratch, your partitions should be correctly aligned. The installer does it all automatically.

However, if you migrated an existing Windows installation from an old mechanical hard drive to a solid state drive, the software may not have accounted for this. Some do, some don’t. If it didn’t, your partitions won’t be correctly aligned, and which can slow down your SSD. How much slower performance depends on your specific SSD.

Thankfully, there’s a quick way to check whether your partitions have this problem and fix it if they do.

How to Check if Your Partitions Are Correctly Aligned

You can check this very easily from the System Information tool. To launch it, open your Start menu, type “msinfo32”, and press Enter to launch the System Information tool. You can also press Windows+R on your keyboard, type “msinfo32” into the Run dialog, and press Enter.

Head to Components > Storage > Disks. Scroll down in the left pane, locate your SSD, and find the “Partition Starting Offset” value below it. There will be a different partition starting offset value for each partition on the drive.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

Check if this number is evenly divisible by 4096. If it is, the partition is correctly aligned. If it isn’t, the partition isn’t correctly aligned.

For example, for the number above, we’d do this math:

There’s no decimal remainder, so the number is evenly divisible. That means the sectors are correctly aligned. If we did the math and found a decimal remainder (e.g. 256.325), that would mean the numbers aren’t evenly divisible, and the sectors aren’t correctly aligned.

How to Fix Incorrectly Aligned Partitions

If you find that your partitions are incorrectly aligned, you can fix them and hopefully get a nice speed boost.

While you could just reinstall Windows and have it partition your drives from scratch, you don’t have to do that. Quite a few partition managers can realign your partitions for you. However, this often involves some complex fiddling.

While this shouldn’t cause any problems, it’s always a good idea to have backups of your important data–especially when messing with your computer’s partitions.

The fastest way we’ve found to do this is to use the free version of MiniTool Partition Wizard–you don’t need to pay for a premium version, the free version can do everything you need. Install it on Windows, launch the partition manager, right-click the partition you want to align, and select “Align”. It’ll do all the hard work for you.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

When you’re done, you should hopefully find that you’re getting the best possible speeds out of that blazing fast SSD.

To uninstall OneNote app:
get-appxpackage *onenote* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Camera app:
get-appxpackage *camera* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Weather app:
get-appxpackage *bingweather* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Maps app:
get-appxpackage *maps* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Xbox app:
get-appxpackage *xbox* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Get Skype app:
get-appxpackage *skypeapp* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Skype app:
get-appxpackage *messaging* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Groove Music app:
get-appxpackage *zunemusic* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Sports app:
get-appxpackage *bingsports* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall People app:
get-appxpackage *people* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Sway app:
get-appxpackage *sway* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Phone app:
get-appxpackage *commsphone* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Movies & TV app:
get-appxpackage *zunevideo* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Money app:
get-appxpackage *bingfinance* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall News app:
get-appxpackage *bingnews* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Phone Companion app:
get-appxpackage *windowsphone* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Mail and Calendar app:
get-appxpackage *communicationsapps* | remove-appxpackage

To uninstall Alarms & Clock app:
get-appxpackage *alarms* | remove-appxpackage

How to Speed Up Your Solid-State Drive by Re-Aligning Its Partitions

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

If you’ve migrated your operating system from a mechanical hard drive to a solid-state drive, the partitions may not be properly aligned. This could result in slower performance, which you can fix by re-aligning them.

What Is Partition Alignment, and Why Should I Care?

A typical mechanical hard drive generally starts its first partition after 63 empty blocks, while a solid-state drive starts its first partition after 64 empty blocks.

The Windows installer knows how to handle this properly, so most people shouldn’t have a problem. If you bought a computer that came with Windows installed on an SSD, your partitions should be correctly aligned. If you installed Windows on your SSD from scratch, your partitions should be correctly aligned. The installer does it all automatically.

However, if you migrated an existing Windows installation from an old mechanical hard drive to a solid state drive, the software may not have accounted for this. Some do, some don’t. If it didn’t, your partitions won’t be correctly aligned, and which can slow down your SSD. How much slower performance depends on your specific SSD.

Thankfully, there’s a quick way to check whether your partitions have this problem and fix it if they do.

How to Check if Your Partitions Are Correctly Aligned

You can check this very easily from the System Information tool. To launch it, open your Start menu, type “msinfo32”, and press Enter to launch the System Information tool. You can also press Windows+R on your keyboard, type “msinfo32” into the Run dialog, and press Enter.

Head to Components > Storage > Disks. Scroll down in the left pane, locate your SSD, and find the “Partition Starting Offset” value below it. There will be a different partition starting offset value for each partition on the drive.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

Check if this number is evenly divisible by 4096. If it is, the partition is correctly aligned. If it isn’t, the partition isn’t correctly aligned.

For example, for the number above, we’d do this math:

There’s no decimal remainder, so the number is evenly divisible. That means the sectors are correctly aligned. If we did the math and found a decimal remainder (e.g. 256.325), that would mean the numbers aren’t evenly divisible, and the sectors aren’t correctly aligned.

How to Fix Incorrectly Aligned Partitions

If you find that your partitions are incorrectly aligned, you can fix them and hopefully get a nice speed boost.

While you could just reinstall Windows and have it partition your drives from scratch, you don’t have to do that. Quite a few partition managers can realign your partitions for you. However, this often involves some complex fiddling.

While this shouldn’t cause any problems, it’s always a good idea to have backups of your important data–especially when messing with your computer’s partitions.

The fastest way we’ve found to do this is to use the free version of MiniTool Partition Wizard–you don’t need to pay for a premium version, the free version can do everything you need. Install it on Windows, launch the partition manager, right-click the partition you want to align, and select “Align”. It’ll do all the hard work for you.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

When you’re done, you should hopefully find that you’re getting the best possible speeds out of that blazing fast SSD.

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SSD Alignment

  • This topic has 13 replies, 4 voices, and was last updated 11 months ago.

Determined (I think) that SSD is not aligned by dividing the Partition Starting Offset of 8,225,280 by 4096 and getting an uneven number 2008.125 meaning my SSD is not aligned.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

Saw on this site:

that I could use this tool:

MiniTool Partition Wizard Free 12.1

however before I tried it I thought I should check to see if anyone has had an experience with it.

  • This topic was modified 11 months ago by ECWS .
  • This topic was modified 11 months ago by ECWS .
  • This topic was modified 11 months ago by ECWS .

There are actually two partitions:

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

I use MTPW to check alignment. Not only does it tell you if it needs doing, it will make the change for you.

As always, make an image backup first.

I could not find an option in the program to check the alignment. All I saw was an option to align the partition.
Should I align Partitions 0 and 1?

Which software do you use for Image Backup?

Download the free portable AS SSD Benchmark

The app will display OK if the partition is aligned.

Here are they readings. What do they mean?

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

  • This reply was modified 11 months ago by ECWS .
  • This reply was modified 11 months ago by ECWS .

@ECWS … for us non-German speaking posters, under the “Sprache” menu item, you can change the language from German (default) to English

Win7 – PRO & Ultimate, x64 & x86
Win8.1 – PRO, x64 & x86
Groups A, B & ABS

The drive is not aligned and is very very slow.

Thanks. Is that what bad means? Or is it referring to bad sectors. I ran chkdsk and it did not find any bad sectors.

Thanks. Is that what bad means? Or is it referring to bad sectors. I ran chkdsk and it did not find any bad sectors.

Very slow read/writes speeds.
A modern NVMe SSD is

x5-15 times faster.

  • This reply was modified 11 months ago by Alex5723 .

If I am planning to image then upgrading to Windows 10, should I align after imaging but before upgrading? Or align after upgrading?

What causes the disk to get out of alignment?

  • This reply was modified 11 months ago by ECWS .
  • This reply was modified 11 months ago by ECWS .

Formatting the SSD drive and partitioning in Windows 10 will automatically align and set TRIM ON on the SSD.

Plan is to Image the 256 drive w/ Windows 7 then restore to 512 drive. Then upgrade to Windows 10 (1909?).

  • When would I format the drive or realign it?
  • Will the upgrade to Windows 10 automatically align?
  • When upgrading do I have the option to set up up auto align and set Trim On?
  • Which drive image software do you use?

I could not find an option in the program to check the alignment

Select the disk.
From the menu: Disk > Align All Partitions

Plan is to Image the 256 drive w/ Windows 7 then restore to 512 drive

All the free 3rd party backup apps will create the image and then align it when you restore. See this post for details: #1540723

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Under most current versions of Windows, Indexing creates and maintains a database of file attributes of hard drives. This can lead to multiple small writes when creating/deleting/modifying files. Searching for files works with indexing off, just a bit slower. You can turn indexing off for all drives, or just for the SSD at your discretion.

Write Caching write combining (NCQ)

Write caching in a hard drive refers to the use of high-speed volatile memory (RAM) to collect write commands sent to the drive and cache them until the hard drive can accomodate them. The downside of write-caching is that data not yet written to disk can be lost in the event of power interruption. As flash-based SSDs are much faster than traditional mechanical HDDs, the benefit of using write caching in terms of speed is much smaller. Some SSD guides may even go as far as recommending turning it off. Keep in mind that write caching adds the very relevant benefit of reduced small block writes. If write caching is off, every write command is sent by the OS one at a time to the SSD, including any TRIM commands, waiting for responses for each. With write caching enabled, they’re combined in RAM before being written to the disk. Write combining (NCQ) is important and can benefit any drive, including SSDs, so we recommend that you leave write caching enabled.

Disabling Superfetch (prefetch/bootfetch) frees up some RAM and resources by not preloading program files. Its benefits are minimal with SSDs, and disabling it reduces unnecessary writes to the drive as well. To make changes to the Superfetch behavior, open regedit.exe and browse down to the following key:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Memory Management\PrefetchParameters
EnablePrefetcher = 0 ( 0 = disable, 1= applications only, 2 = boot files only, 3 = cache everything [default])

We recommend using one of the more conservative Superfetch settings with SSDs, or turning it off completely.

My son's laptop had some disk errors (and he lives on that thing), so I decided buy some cheap backup PCIE drives for the family and make some clones so that they could quickly switch to a backup drive.

I got this Addlink drive for myself:

Bought it for $278 (which was about what I paid for a 1TB Samsung 970 less than a year ago).

I cloned the drive, dropped it in my laptop and here is the performance:

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

OOTB Matebook 512GB SSD

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

Samsung 970 EVO 1TB SSD

And the new Addlink drive beats the Samsung.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

Addlink 2TB SSD

It will be interesting to see how the drive does over time, but at the moment, this looks like a fantastic value. It costs a little more than half price of the Samsung 970 2TB.

4K Alignment

I did want to add a note about drive cloning. When I cloned my Matebook drive to the Samsung, things sped up nicely. After some time, I noticed that the partitions were not 4k aligned. After aligning with Easeus, there was another tangible performance increase. So, if you cloned your drive, but never aligned the partitions, then you might be able to speed things up even more. Here is some info on how to check:

I will have to do some more testing, but here is my initial impression (after 1 day of use)

The Samsung 970 is the slightest bit faster feeling overall. (Even though the Addlink benchmarks higher)

The 970 is almost twice the price,

When I installed the 970, I did not connect it to the heat sink with a pad. This was mostly due to laziness, but there was a practical consideration. Under load, the laptop gets real hot and I was not sure I would be helping or hurting things by bridging that gap.

The 970 does throttle a lot under load. I’ve done some benchmarks where the storage performance was cut in half due to the SSD thermal throttling

With that said, here is something I did not consider and could really make the difference:

The Phison 12 controller in the Addlink drive uses about 30-40% less power while idle and almost 1 watt less power under load (

.6w for addlink vs

1.4w for samsung). That is a lot of heat and electricity.

I think that the laptop is actually a bit cooler and the battery shows a bit more run time than usual.

Like the Samsung, I also did not connect the Addlink drive to the heat sink.

Considering both the heat management problems and importance of battery life on an ultra book, I’m even happier with the purchase.

ONCE AGAIN: These results are VERY early impressions and not properly vetted,

If you want to transfer data from HDD to SSD, you can use "copy and paste", or apply the disk cloning method that can more easily migrate all content from HDD to SSD.

By Emily / Last Updated September 27, 2021

User Case

So I just got my SSD in the mail but sadly my dad (who recommended it and was going to help me install it) isn’t going to be home for the holidays. I wanna give it a shot myself though, though it’ll be my first time. Do you guys know how can I transfer my data from old HDD to new SSD? Also can I keep the hard drive in my computer for additional storage? Thanks a lot!

How to transfer data from HDD to SSD in Windows 11/10/8/7?

Installing a solid-state drive is one of the most effective ways to speed up your computer because it is much faster in reading and writing, quieter during working and more durable than traditional hard disk drive (more details can be found in the table below). So it is a wise choice to replace your old HDD with an SSD drive to make your computer work better. However, how to transfer all files from HDD to SSD? Today, we would like to introduce two ways to do this job in Windows 10/8/7.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

Way 1. Move data from HDD to SSD using “Copy and Paste”

When it comes to transferring data from HDD to SSD drive, most users might think about “copy & paste” first of all, which is a traditional way for moving data between different hard drives. To do that, you have to right-click the files and choose “Copy” or “Cut” option, and go to your SSD partition and right-click a blank space to choose “Paste” option.

For moving a small amount of data to SSD, that could be a nice method. What if you need to transfer a large amount of data or the files are in different directories in one partition? What if the “Copy and Paste” function does not work? Moreover, some copied system files or program files cannot work as they did before. Therefore, we prepare another method to transfer mass data from HDD to SSD drive.

Way 2. Transfer all files from HDD to SSD via disk clone

To move mass data (including programs, videos, images, documents, music, etc.) from HDD to SSD, AOMEI Partition Assistant Professional provides a secure, easy, and fast way. You can use it to migrate files to SSD by cloning your old HDD to SSD drive through the following two different clone methods.

1. Clone Disk Quickly: only copy the used space to another disk, so you can copy a larger disk to a smaller disk in this method.
2. Sector-by-Sector Clone: copy all sectors of the disk to a target disk no matter it is used or not. This method can copy the deleted or lost files.

No matter which method you choose, you can optimize the SSD performance in the disk cloning operation. Moreover, after migration, the OS or programs can start up successfully. You can also use the tool to transfer only one or multiple apps from SSD to HDD.

Now please download the Demo version and learn how to transfer data from HDD to SSD through the cloning method.

Before proceeding:
Connect the destination SSD drive to a Windows computer and make sure it is detected successfully. If you are using a laptop with only room for one drive, you might need a SATA-to-USB adapter.
Back up everything you need on the SSD drive since all data will be deleted from it during the cloning process.
You can delete some unnecessary files or applications from the HDD in advance to make it smaller to fit the target SSD drive better.

Step 1. Install and run AOMEI Partition Assistant Pro, click the disk you want to copy and select “Clone Disk”.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

Step 2. In this window, choose a suitable copying method based on your special requirements. Then click “Next” to continue.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

Step 3. Select the SSD drive as the destination disk. And tick the “Optimize the performance of SSD” option at the bottom, which can improve the performance of your SSD. Click “Next”.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

Step 4. Now, you can edit your destination disk in this window if you choose “Clone Disk Quickly” method in step 2.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

Step 5. In the main interface, click “Apply” to execute the operation.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

How do I transfer Windows 10 from HDD to SSD?

The above demonstration is based on transferring all files from non-system HDD to SSD drive. But I have found many users are asking: “how do I move Windows 10 from HDD to SSD?”.

Actually, you just need to choose the system disk as the source disk and follow the instruction. If you want to only transfer Windows 10 partition to SSD drive, not all partitions, you can try the “Migrate OS to SSD Wizard”, which can move only Windows 10/8/7 volume to another hard drive without boot issue.

How to speed up your solid-state drive by re-aligning its partitions

For transferring Windows 10 from HDD to SSD drive, you need to note:
1. If you are planning to clone system MBR disk to GPT SSD drive, you need to ensure your motherboard supports EFI/UEFI boot mode, or you can first convert GPT into MBR before cloning.
2. After cloning, you need to restart your computer, enter the BIOS environment and change boot order to boot computer from destination disk.

Summary

In this article, we have shown how to transfer data from HDD to SSD in Windows via two different methods. Hope you can find the best way to do the job. AOMEI Partition Assistant Professional does not only support transferring data from HDD to SSD, but also supports moving data from HDD to HDD or SSD to SSD. Besides that, AOMEI Partition Assistant Pro also allows you to clone partition to SSD.

To perform cloning tasks in Windows Server such as cloning Windows Server 2016, 2019, 2012, etc to SSD/HDD, you can try AOMEI Partition Assistant Server instead.

SSD is known for its high reading and writing speed compared to normal hard drive with low-power dissipation, high portability etc features. With its popularity of SSD drive, more problems also occurred to SSD users.

Due to improper operations, low disk space left in SSD with a large number of useless junk files or other reasons may all slow down the computer performance, leaving SSD partitions not aligned. Here below you’ll find more problems that caused by SSD partition not aligned error and solutions to optimize SSD drive so to speed up your PC.

How to optimize the SSD in my computer

“Hi, guys, do you have the same problem that the SSD becomes slower and the computer works no longer that fast than before. Recently, I noticed that my SSD drive is becoming full but the case is that I didn’t save quite a lot of files inside it. How to optimize the SSD drive? Someone recommend me to try 4K alignment, do you know what is it? And how to 4K align the SSD drive?”

So what is 4K alignment? 4K alignment is not allocation units but allows SSD to adopt the smallest 4K sector in the file system to save data, which will allow SSD to read and write data with the fastest speed. And this would also affect the computer’s running speed. So when your computer slows down and SSD is not functioning properly, the best way is to 4K align your SSD drive and optimize it. How? How to optimize SSD? Professional 4K alignment software will help.

Find 4K alignment software to optimize SSD drive

So how to find a reliable and secure 4k alignment software to align the SSD partition and its sectors? Here we’d like to recommend you try a 4K alignment software to maximize SSD performance and speed up your PC.

Happy autumn sale once for all

100% secure

This software is known as EaseUS Partition Master which can help you to 4K align SSD drive with its 4K alignment feature, optimize computer by cleaning up junk files in the system, optimize disk and even remove large files in system drive. All these features can also be applied to optimize SSD. Only simple clicks will do.

Steps to optimize SSD with 4K alignment software – EaseUS Partition Master

So now you can directly download EaseUS Partition Master and follow the below steps to 4K align SSD and every sector in SSD partitions:

Step 1. Select the SSD disk that you want to align, right-click it and choose “4K Alignment”.

Step 2. Go to find task by clicking the “Execute 1 Operation” button at the top-left corner and click “Apply”. Then, the SSD drive partitions are all 4K aligned with all sectors on it.

Then your SSD drive partitions are all 4K aligned with all sectors on it. You can even clean up all junk files and even optimize disk with its Cleanup and Optimization feature in EaseUS Partition Master. After all these, your computer will then get a faster running speed and higher reading and writing efficiency in your SSD drive.