Categories
Life hack

How to test your roku’s internet connection

@agirlkenndream_
May 21, 2020, 8:30 am EST | 1 min read

If you have a Roku TV or streaming stick, you can sometimes run into internet connection issues. The error can be the connection or the internet itself, so checking the link first is a must. Here’s how to reset your smart TV’s network connection.

Checking Your Roku’s Network Connection

Once you turn on your Roku device and are viewing the Home page, select the “Settings” option in the bottom left-hand corner of the side menu.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

Next, click on the “Network” button.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

Once on the Network Settings menu, select “Check Connection.”

How to test your roku’s internet connection

Your smart TV and or streaming stick will run a network test and then display its results after a minute.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

The network test is essential because it lets you know if your problems are caused by the connection between the device and your Wi-Fi network. It could also be that your internet is down, so the results will make it easier for you to troubleshoot the issue.

Resetting Your Roku’s Network Connection

Once the Roku’s network connection test is done, you’ll be taken back to the Network Settings menu. If your device’s issues are internet-related, you’ll want to select “Set Up Connection” to connect your streaming box to your Wi-Fi network.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

Select the “Wireless” option to reset your Roku’s network connection.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

Click your Wi-Fi network’s name and then enter its password.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

You will be taken you back to the Network Settings menu one last time. To verify that your Roku’s connection was reset, select “About” to view information about the connected network.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

Once on the About page, you’ll see your streaming device’s Wi-Fi signal strength as well as if it’s connected to the internet or not.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

With your smart TV or streaming stick network connection reset, you’ll be able to go back to watching your favorite shows and movies. Roku devices are wonderful, making it extremely easy for just about anyone to stream content from Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, and more.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

Roku TV allows you to effortlessly stream online content from several hosting networks. But to stream flawlessly, you need a good internet connection. If the Roku TV fails to connect to the internet or has connectivity issues, you will be unable to access most of the content.
Fixing connection issues in Roku TV is not difficult. You can do it yourself by following these steps.

How to Fix Roku TV Connection by Disabling Network Pings?

1. Press Special Keys in Start Up Menu
Press the ‘Home’ button to bring up the Home menu. Then press these keys in quick succession, in this order: ‘Home button’ 5 times, ‘Fast Forward’, ‘Play’, ‘Rewind’, ‘Play’, ‘Fast Forward’. The ‘Platform Secret Screen’ will appear on your TV.
This menu can be used to access hidden network and advanced system features of your Roku device.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

How to test your roku’s internet connection

How to test your roku’s internet connection

How to Fix Roku TV Connection by Restarting.

1. Go to ‘Settings’
Scroll down the ‘Home’ menu and select ‘Settings’. The ‘Settings’ menu will appear on the screen.

Most people who buy a Roku think it’s one of the best inventions ever. However, quite a few Roku users complain about problems keeping the device connected to their home WiFi networks. Fortunately, there are some easy steps you can take to fix these issues.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

Roku WiFi Issues Make It Hard to Enjoy Netflix or Amazon Videos

You may have Roku WiFi issues if the show or movie you’re watching stops, usually with a message such as “connecting” or “transferring.” You might also see a message that says Roku has lost its WiFi connection.

Rebooting the Roku can temporarily resolve the problem, but it keeps coming back. This might happen even if your Roku says it has a strong signal from your WiFi router.

One commonly suggested fix for Roku WiFi problems is to forget the wireless connection and directly connect a LAN cable from the Roku to your home network. That’s easier said than done for most people!

Maybe your home network equipment (WiFi router, cable or DSL modem, etc.) lives downstairs and your Roku resides in your bedroom upstairs. You probably don’t want to drill a hole in the floor and drop Ethernet cable downstairs, then run the cable across to the network box.

If you’re willing to go this route, though, problem solved. If you’re like the rest of us and need to figure out how to fix your Roku WiFi problems, keep reading.

Time For a New WiFi Router?

If you haven’t replaced your WiFi router for several years, you may want to consider buying a new WiFi router. Many older WiFi devices were designed before TV streaming became common and user older, outdated technology.

Your home wireless network might operate on the 2.4 GHz spectrum, sharing what may be an already crowded WiFi space. Almost all of the WiFi devices in your home, including tablets, smartphones, laptops and cordless phones (the kind you hook up to a landline or VOIP line), squeeze into the WiFi spectrum along with your Roku devices. If you have neighbors nearby, their devices might grab part of that 2.4 GHz spectrum, too.

You may want to look at replacing your WiFi router with a dual band model (like the one we recently purchased – the TP-LINK Archer C9 AC1900 Dual Band Wireless AC Gigabit Router, 2.4GHz 600Mbps+5Ghz 1300Mbps ). It’ll offer more channels and therefore less likelihood of having to fight for bandwidth with other devices on your network and your neighbors’.

Even if you spend $50 to $100 on a new WiFi router, it’s still a lot cheaper than signing up for cable or satellite TV again if you’ve cut the cord but can’t enjoy programming on your Roku due to connectivity problems.

Slow Internet?

If your internet drags everywhere (not just on the Roku device), you might consider buying a new cable modem. If you don’t already own your own cable modem, you can knock $10 or so off your monthly internet service bill by owning your own cable modem.

Other symptoms of a cable modem hardware problem include frequent internet downtime that causes you to restart the modem on a regular basis. We bought the NETGEAR CM500 Cable Modem DOCSIS 3.0, which is certified for Comcast XFINITY, Time Warner Cable, Cox, Charter & more (CM500-100NAS).

Change the Channel

Wireless networks transmit data over “channels,” and most people don’t change the default channel when setting up a WiFi network. This means that your wireless network and all of the devices connected to it compete with each other, AND all the devices on your neighbors’ networks if they use the same channel, commonly set to 11 by default.

You might not notice this contention in the WiFi spectrum when using laptop computers, tablets and smartphones. You will more likely notice it, however, with a TV streaming device such as a Roku, because of the enormous amount of data the device needs to pull over your home network in order to bring programming to your TV set. Changing the WiFi channel can help with this problem, and it’s fairly easy to do.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

First, on your tablet or smartphone, download a WiFi scanner such as WiFi Analytics Tool, which will check to see which channels are the most heavily used and which ones are hardly used at all.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

After you’ve used the app to choose a fairly vacant WiFi channel, you need to login to your wireless router to change its settings. You’ll probably do this by going into your Web browser and entering the WiFi router’s IP address. Check your wireless router’s user guide for more information on accessing and changing its settings.

Change the wireless channel to the one you selected from the WiFi analyzer app and be sure to save your changes. Your home’s WiFi devices should automatically reconnect to the network using the new channel within a couple of minutes.

How to test your roku’s internet connectionAfter about 15 minutes, try the Roku again and see if the situation has improved. You can always try another channel if you don’t notice any positive changes in Roku WiFi connectivity.

Location, Location, Location

If changing WiFi channels does not help, try keeping other wireless devices (tablets, smartphones and laptops) out of the room when you’re using the Roku. You might even try moving the Roku device slightly, like to the other side of the TV set, making sure you still have a strong WiFi signal in the Roku’s new spot. You could also relocate any cordless phones out of the room, or as far away as possible from the Roku box.

If you own more than one Roku device, try swapping their locations to rule out the Roku device as the problem. There’s a slight possibility that you might have a bad device on your hands. Should you decide you have a bum device, contact Roku tech support through the company’s website for assistance.

Assuming there’s nothing wrong with your Roku device or your internet connection, replacing your WiFi router with a dual band model like the Archer C9 should resolve your Roku WiFi issues without having to worry about changing channels or relocating your equipment.

Is It the Roku?

If these steps don’t fix your Roku WiFi issues, your Roku device might be the problem. This is especially true if your Roku worked fine for awhile and then suddenly stopped working.

For a Roku that’s still under warranty, you can contact Roku support. They might send you a replacement unit.

If these tips don’t help you, you can reach Roku’s customer service at 888-600-7658.

You can pick up a new Roku for as little as $49 if your old Roku has problems that can’t be fixed.

This article was originally published in January 2015 and last updated in April 2019. Roku is registered trademark of Roku Inc. This post is neither endorsed nor affiliated with Roku Inc.

If you enjoyed this post, could you please like it on Facebook?

Get My Swipe File and Fix-It Worksheet!

Never again have to look up a company’s tech support or customer support phone number or website. They’re all in this comprehensive swipe file, along with a handy troubleshooting worksheet. Enter your email below for instant access.

  • Subscribe to RSS Feed
  • Mark Topic as New
  • Mark Topic as Read
  • Float this Topic for Current User
  • Bookmark
  • Subscribe
  • Mute
  • Printer Friendly Page
  • Mark as New
  • Bookmark
  • Subscribe
  • Mute
  • Subscribe to RSS Feed
  • Permalink
  • Print
  • Email to a Friend
  • Report Inappropriate Content

Wow, was about 2 days overdue canceling DISH. Glad I didn’t and this happened. Taking this thing back for a refund.

Also in a 1 month trial for youtube TV. It is awesome. So much for cord cutting.

Recently my rokus have also started displaying ‘not connected’ after having connected without problem for years. I too many times went through the process of rebooting rokus and modems. Every time I would ‘set up connection’ it would connect to modem but not internet. I went through a number of rounds with roku support via email where I was instructed to test my internet speed and and reported 6Mbps. I was told ‘You need a minimum of 15 Mbps internet download speed.’ Here in rural America few of us have that and my rokus had worked for years with 6Mbps and as the service goes, often much less. Though we do not detect modems other than our own I decided to switch my modem channel from ‘auto’ to 11 and Voila! the rokus connect. Since that time my rokus have on occasion reverted to the dreaded ‘not connected’ and switching to another channel (even back to previously used channels) has allowed them to reconnect. Note that this is not a *solution*, it is a *workaround* (it’s like treating the symptoms but not actually curing).

As others have mentioned in this thread, it is solutions that make a product better. Support
nonsense like ’15Mbps required’ that was given in a ‘and that’s that’ way more-or-less is *NOT* a solution – it did not solve my problem, that is obviously a Roku problem, it did not even provide a workaround. When I troubleshoot (I program various devices) I do assume that any recent changes are a good place to start in finding a problem. Given no changes in my system (modem and attendant internet service unchanged) *and* no other devices experiencing connectivity problems and only the roku is having a problem and the roku problem is new then the roku itself must have changed. Of course, the roku does not provide a method to revert to earlier firmware (much less the access to earlier firmware) so I have no way to test this.

Roku could take a tip from the Raspberry Pi forums: I frequently see the RPi *engineers* chime in to solve problems and on many occasions actually act to change the RPi OS to fix problems called to their attention by problems brought up in the forums. Now *that’s* helpful!

Posted on October 15, 2020 by Mitch Bartlett 4 Comments

If you wish to manually set the speed of your connection to a specific value for video streaming on the Roku video player, there is a way. Follow these steps to enter a code to access the speed override settings.

  1. Break out the Roku remote and go to the Home screen.
  2. Use the remote control to enter the following sequence to access the “Bit Rate Override” screen:
    • Home 5 times
    • Rewind 3 times
    • Fast Forward 2 times.
  3. A screen will appear where you can select “Manual selection“.
  4. Choose the desired selection on the “Select bit rate” screen, then press “OK“.
    Note: You may want to start by trying the 3.5Mbps setting, test playback, then try a different setting for best results.
    How to test your roku’s internet connection

What is the “Enable playback debugging” setting?

The “Enable playback debugging” option turns on a feature that will display the speed you are getting while playing video on the screen. Enabling it could help you figure out which setting works best for you.

You Might Also Like

  • How to test your roku’s internet connectionUpgrading Pixel 4 Phone to Android 11 Manually
  • How to test your roku’s internet connectionHow To Set Up a Windows VPN Connection
  • How to Speed Up Chromebook
  • How to test your roku’s internet connectionHow to Speed Up Firefox
  • How to test your roku’s internet connectionDoes SSD Speed Matter?
  • How to test your roku’s internet connectionDoes RAM Speed Matter?
  • How to test your roku’s internet connection“Your Connection Is Not Private” in Google Chrome -…
  • How to test your roku’s internet connectionWindows 10: How to Configure a Metered Connection
  • How to test your roku’s internet connectionTroubleshooting Galaxy Note 10S Pen Connection

Filed Under: Hardware Tagged With: roku

Reader Interactions

Comments

Terry Mullin says

Wow! I have the same problem. Just bought a brand new 65 inch Roku Tv. Every time I change the bandwidth, it goes back to automatic. Tried calling the support team but they don’t understand. If someone can figure this out It would be fantastic.

I have the same problem bite rate goes right back to automatic at highest level. how to keep it at the rate I want?

Chip, I have the same issue. I set it and it goes right back to Automatic on our Roku Ultras

Chip Stockard says

1) After selecting a desired bitrate for my Roku Stick, pressing the OK button on the Roku remote and then returning to Home, I find that the bitrate is still set to Automatic. i.e. Bitrate did not change.
Question: After selecting a bitrate other than Automatic and pressing OK, how do I get my new bitrate setting to stay set? It’s always set to Automatic when I return to reset it.
2) Where is the current bitrate setting displayed on my TV screen, with “Enable playback bebugging” enabled?
3) I have no buffering delays while watching content on my Roku Stick. However, I experience long buffering delays on Roku bootup, changing streaming services within Roku and changing channels within a service. Is this a bitrate issue? (My AppleTV device has no buffering delays at all. Everything switches instantaneously.)

Did this help? Let us know! Cancel reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  • Subscribe to RSS Feed
  • Mark Topic as New
  • Mark Topic as Read
  • Float this Topic for Current User
  • Bookmark
  • Subscribe
  • Mute
  • Printer Friendly Page

So I have an excellent wifi signal strength connection but no internet.

I have reset my router, restarted the tv, gone to advanced setting and reset the network connections, and even factory reset the Roku tv. I even tried changing my router channel to 1, 6, and 11. Nothing is working.

I tested my iPad, phone, laptop, and Switch and each are able to connect with 20mb/s.

I have a TCL Roku tv and a Roku Premier both experiencing this same thing.

  • All Topics
  • Previous Topic
  • Next Topic
  • Mark as New
  • Bookmark
  • Subscribe
  • Mute
  • Subscribe to RSS Feed
  • Permalink
  • Print
  • Email to a Friend
  • Report Inappropriate Content

Hopefully this helps for you guys. I was able to solve my connectivity problem by opening the Wi-Fi secret menu and adjusting my router based on the antenna strength and glitch/sec bars. I had to move my tv about an inch forward which dropped the glitch/sec down to 1/4 the bar. Before the inch move it was maxed. Stupid, I know. But, it seemed to work.

To access the secret menu you have to go to the home screen and hit the following button order quickly: Home, Home, Home, Home, Home, Fast Forward, Play, Rewind, Play, Fast Forward.

This opens the secret menu. I selected Wireless Secret Screen which shows the Antenna and Signal Strength and the Glitch/sec. I then reset my drivers and adjusted my tv (moved it forward about an inch) and the glitch/sec went from max to 1/4 bar.

Since I’ve done this I haven’t had any connectivity issues. Hopefully this helps others who were experiencing the same error.

  • Mark as New
  • Bookmark
  • Subscribe
  • Mute
  • Subscribe to RSS Feed
  • Permalink
  • Print
  • Email to a Friend
  • Report Inappropriate Content

When the roku tv makes the wireless connection, it is verifying both wireless and internet connectivity before it completes successful. It looks like that is what is happening to you, but the download speed is low. If your other devices on the network are working ok, then the problem may be that where the tv is located. Try moving it to a different location to see if this works better, at least you will know if that is the cause. If that does not improve, I would go to the settings to reset the network to default and try again.

  • Mark as New
  • Bookmark
  • Subscribe
  • Mute
  • Subscribe to RSS Feed
  • Permalink
  • Print
  • Email to a Friend
  • Report Inappropriate Content

I have (and have had for months) this same issue. All of my connections are solid and I have no issues with other devices on the network. My router is less than 20 ft from my TV with no walls in between. Any help on this issue would be appreciated.

  • Mark as New
  • Bookmark
  • Subscribe
  • Mute
  • Subscribe to RSS Feed
  • Permalink
  • Print
  • Email to a Friend
  • Report Inappropriate Content

there used to be a channel called SPEEDTEST to install and test but think you have to go to something like Netflix. You can check your internet connection speed from the channel to see if it’s the same. But more important, are you able to start a video stream or does the channel not connect because there is no internet?

  • Mark as New
  • Bookmark
  • Subscribe
  • Mute
  • Subscribe to RSS Feed
  • Permalink
  • Print
  • Email to a Friend
  • Report Inappropriate Content

Hopefully this helps for you guys. I was able to solve my connectivity problem by opening the Wi-Fi secret menu and adjusting my router based on the antenna strength and glitch/sec bars. I had to move my tv about an inch forward which dropped the glitch/sec down to 1/4 the bar. Before the inch move it was maxed. Stupid, I know. But, it seemed to work.

To access the secret menu you have to go to the home screen and hit the following button order quickly: Home, Home, Home, Home, Home, Fast Forward, Play, Rewind, Play, Fast Forward.

This opens the secret menu. I selected Wireless Secret Screen which shows the Antenna and Signal Strength and the Glitch/sec. I then reset my drivers and adjusted my tv (moved it forward about an inch) and the glitch/sec went from max to 1/4 bar.

Since I’ve done this I haven’t had any connectivity issues. Hopefully this helps others who were experiencing the same error.

  • Mark as New
  • Bookmark
  • Subscribe
  • Mute
  • Subscribe to RSS Feed
  • Permalink
  • Print
  • Email to a Friend
  • Report Inappropriate Content

My Roku Stick+ worked for months and months and then suddenly stopped working. At that point I had good WiFi strength at 2.4 GHz and sometimes the Internet would show as connected and sometimes not. My channels would all show up, but no content would appear/play when I selected a channel.

Two things subsequently worked for me: (1) I have a mobile hotspot on my iPhone–connecting the Roku to THAT network worked–Roku would deliver actual content. But I have only limited mobile hotspot time available. (2) My Router has more than one WiFi radio–the 2.4 GHz is the one that I normally use and my Roku does not work anymore using that frequency. The 5.0 GHz radio DOES work, however. The signal strength on the 5.0 GHz WiFi, given the relative locations of my Router and Roku Stick, is only “Fair” (as opposed to “Good” for the 2.4 GHz WiFi) but the 5.0 GHz WiFi allows Roku to use both of its internal antennas as opposed to only one antenna with the 2.4 GHz WiFi. Apparently, while the signal is weaker, the connection is more reliable/robust–I believe this is typical of 2.4 GHz vs. 5.0 GHz, i.e., 2.4 GHz has a longer range, but 5.0 is more robust. The 5.0 GHz WiFi displays significantly less glitches/second, as seen on the Secret WiFi Screen, which can be reached by pressing, on the Roku remote, the following sequence without any delays: Home, Home, Home, Home, Home, Fast Forward, Play, Rewind, Play, Fast Forward. Then, on the resulting screen, select “Wi-Fi.”

I don’t know why my Roku device suddenly won’t work on 2.4 GHz. Interference from some other device perhaps? I also haven’t tried actually sitting through a whole show/movie using 5.0 GHz. Is a “Fair” WiFi connection good enough? I guess I’ll find out.

With plenty of great features, Roku is one of the most popular streaming platforms in the world. However, there’s one feature that seems to be lacking – an internet browser.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

Of course, you can browse the databases of channels, movies, and even YouTube, among other content, but there’s no official web browser support.

Still, it’s possible to browse the internet with your Roku in two ways – by getting an unofficial web browser from the channel store, or by simply casting the screen from your Android or Windows system. This article will explain both methods.

Download Roku Web Browsers

Although you won’t find an official web browser on your Roku device, some developers managed to create two web browsers compatible with Roku – Web Browser X and POPIRISM. You can find both web browsers on the channel store and download them to your channel list.

Once you launch one of these browsers, you’ll notice that they lack plenty of features a modern web browser should have – their interface is outdated and slow, navigation is difficult, and they may have issues displaying more complex web pages. However, until (or if) Roku releases an official web browser for its streaming platform, this is as close as you can get.

Web Browser X

You may find some interesting features on the Web Browser X. For example, you can add a web page to your list of favorites (similar to bookmarks), and those favorites will appear when you first launch the browser.

To navigate the web page, you’ll need to use the arrow keys on your remote (up/down to scroll and left/right to go highlight the links on the page). On the other hand, the browser can’t play any videos or fill web forms (you can’t sign in for example), and it’s not free – there’s a monthly subscription of $4.99.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

POPIRISM

If you think that Web Browser X is unsatisfying, it’s best not to try POPIRISM at all. This web browser is even lighter and contains only the basic features. It doesn’t display any images whatsoever, but that’s not the biggest issue.

The main problem is that you can’t see the interface of the web page at all – only text. There’s no JavaScript or CSS and you can only see letters on a white background. However, some may enjoy the minimalist nature of this browser, which is more than enough for simple browsing tasks.

How to test your roku’s internet connection

Cast Your Browser on Roku

Some may say that you don’t need a separate web browser for your Roku device when you can cast it from your PC or your phone. If you just want to browse the internet on a bigger display, you can simply mirror your smartphone’s display on your huge TV screen and browse it from there.

Before you proceed, you should check if you have the latest version of Roku by following these steps:

  1. Press the ‘*’ button on your Roku remote to access the settings.
  2. Go to the ‘System’.
  3. Select ‘System Update’.
  4. Choose ‘Check Now’.

This process will check whether you have the latest version. If not, Roku will automatically update.

Furthermore, all the devices should be connected to the same wireless connection, or else you won’t be able to link them.

Casting Your Web Browser from Android

You can easily cast your web browser to the TV screen using Roku. This is what you should do:

  1. Launch the ‘Settings’ app on your Android.
  2. Find the ‘Connected Devices’ option.
  3. Go to ‘Pair new Devices’.
  4. Wait until the system scans your Roku (box or stick).
  5. Tap on your Roku when it appears on the screen.
  6. Open the web browser on your phone and it will appear on your TV screen through the Roku device.

Note: Some Android phones don’t support the Miracast technology used to mirror the screen via the Roku device. If you can’t connect your smartphone to Roku, there’s a chance that it’s not supported. The best way to go is to contact your smartphone’s customer service and check with them.

Casting Your Web Browser from Windows

If you have a Windows 10 operating system, there’s an easy way to cast the screen to your Roku. Do the following:

  1. Press both the ‘Windows Key’ and the ‘Lshift’ key to open the action center at the bottom-right of the screen.
  2. Select the ‘Connect’ icon from the list (if you don’t see it, click the ‘Expand’ option).
  3. Wait for the system to find your Roku.
  4. Select your Roku when it appears. It should automatically connect.
  5. Launch the browser.

Waiting for an Official Roku Browser

As of now, there are no indications that Roku will release an official web browser. There’s still a chance that developers will release upgraded unofficial browsers that will have more features than those mentioned in this article.

On the other hand, if you just need to browse the internet on a bigger screen, simply casting the image on the bigger screen may be the best option. However, this option is only available for Windows and Android-based devices.

Would you use the Roku web browsers mentioned in this article? Why (or why not)? Share your thoughts in the comments section below.

  • All Roku devices require the internet to stream video content to your television.
  • Roku devices are streaming devices that connect to your television via an HDMI cable and allow it to behave like a “Smart TV,” streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, and thousands of other channels without the need for cable or over-the-air broadcast television.
  • Most Roku devices rely on WiFi, but the Roku Ultra also features an ethernet port, so you can connect it directly to a router by cable.
  • Roku needs the internet to stream video, but it’s also possible to download content to other devices to play back without WiFi.
  • Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories.

Do you need the internet to use a Roku device? In a word, yes — a wired or wireless internet connection is required to power any Roku product.

Roku offers a large line of video streaming devices that give your ordinary television the ability to display content like Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, HBO Now, and more. In other words, they turn “dumb TVs” into “smart TVs.”

In order to use a Roku product in your home or office, you’ll need to connect the Roku to the internet so the device can stream video to your TV.

How to connect your Roku device to the internet via a wired connection or WiFi

There are two ways to do this: You can use wireless internet (WiFi) or wired internet (by connecting the device directly to a router or hub using an Ethernet cable).

Not all Roku devices support wired Ethernet, though. Any Roku will connect with WiFi, but if WiFi isn’t an option for you — or your WiFi is too slow or spotty to stream video reliably — you might consider getting the Roku Ultra. This streaming box is currently at the top of the Roku product line (it costs $100), but has an Ethernet jack and can be connected to your router directly.

Regardless of which Roku model you choose, setup is quite simple.

1. Connect the Roku device to your TV via an HDMI cable, and plug in the AC adapter. Turn on the TV on and set it to the correct HDMI input for your Roku; you should now see the Roku welcome screen and setup instructions.

2. Insert batteries into the included remote control, and using the remote, follow the on-screen instructions to connect your Roku to your WiFi network. Note that you will need your WiFi network’s password to complete the setup process.

If you have a Roku Ultra, you won’t need to set up WiFi; instead, plug the Ultra into your network router or hub at the same time as you are connecting it to HDMI and power. It’ll automatically detect the network and you won’t need to enter any sort of network password.

Due to technical limitations, your download speed results using your current browser may not reflect actual download capabilities. Please use another browser to run the speed test.

Please report any issue you encounter using our Speed Test by clicking on the feedback tab on the right of any screen so we can look into it.

Encounter a problem?
Please report by clicking the feedback tab at the right of any screen.

  • ROUTER
  • DEVICE
  • WIFI ANALYZER
  • Great
  • Get on board.
    Nearly 80% of US small businesses will be fully adapted to cloud computing by 2020.* Faster upload speeds are more crucial now than ever.
    *Small Business Success in the Cloud, Emergent Research and Intuit, 2014.
  • End the wait.
    Fios can give you upload speeds up to 15X faster than cable.
  • Here’s what’s fast.
    Fiber transmits data via light over strands of glass, unlike the copper, aluminum and plastic components that slow down your signal with cable.
  • Did you know?
    Fiber makes most of the internet possible. But cable providers use copper wiring for the last connection to businesses like yours. A 100% fiber connection uses fiber-optics right to your building.

Server Location: New York City, New York, USA

These results reflect speeds to the test server. You may experience different speeds when accessing particular internet content and applications.

* Speeds up to 940 Mbps download and 880 Mbps upload available in select areas.

  • Setup
  • Tools
  • Q/A
  • Resources
  • – Connect your computer directly to your router using an Ethernet cable
  • – Disconnect from any VPNs
  • – Avoid using video or music streaming apps
  • – Multiple devices on your home network during testing
  • – The processor speed of the device you’re using
  • – This test is intended to measure results on your home network, and should not be used on public Wi-Fi or cellular networks
  • For additional tools, please visit www.verizon.com/speedtest/ from your PC.
    How does the internet speed test work?

The Verizon Speed Test calculates upload and download speeds of your internet connection by measuring how many “bits” of data were transferred during the test duration.

The definitions for the terminology used in the speed test can be found below.

Download Speed: The speed of the connection when downloading from the Internet to your computer.

Upload Speed: The speed of the connection when uploading data from your computer to another computer somewhere on the Internet.

Latency: A synonym for delay, latency is an expression of how much time it takes for a packet of data to get from one designated point to another. In the Measuring Broadband America study, latency was measured by sending a packet that is returned to the sender and the round-trip time is considered the latency.

The bandwidth speed you get depends on lots of things, like network and Internet congestion, your computer’s configuration, WiFi adapters used, others using Video On Demand or online gaming, the wiring in your location, etc. Therefore, we cannot guarantee a specific speed.

Your results will also be affected if you run the test while connected to a Virtual Private Network (VPN).

Here are some things to check:

Are you plugged into your router?

Did you run the test while connected to a VPN?

If you subscribed to Fios internet service with 100Mbps or greater, are you using a 10/100/1000 gigabit Network Interface Card (NIC)?

There are a number of variables that could negatively and positively affect your internet connection speeds. Understanding each of them can help you determine the best solution for maximizing internet speed.

    Check the amount of bandwidth included with your current internet services plan

One of the most impactful items that would affect your connection speeds is the amount of bandwidth included with your internet services package. If your plan includes a very limited amount of Megabits per second (Mbps), the units of measurement that determine network speed, you’re more likely to experience a lackluster online experience.

Verizon offers a variety of high-speed internet plans, including broadband DSL and Fios services, reaching download speeds of up to 940 Mbps and upload speeds of up to 880 Mbps. Learn more about Fios Gigabit Connection to take advantage of Verizon’s fastest and most reliable network.

Running old software on your computer system could slow down your internet connection, among many other things. Websites and applications are becoming more and more demanding, and utilizing antiquated operating systems and hardware will prevent you from enjoying the Internet, content streaming, and more.

If you’re connected to your network via a WiFi router, try to limit the distance between your device and the router. The further you get from your router, the slower your internet speeds will be.

Additionally, if your WiFi signal has to pass through multiple walls or appliances, like refrigerators, televisions, and microwaves, its signal will be weakened.

Using an ethernet connection can help to eliminate lag time between your computer and the signal sent from your router.