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How to upgrade or replace your pc’s wireless card

‎11-01-2018 02:09 AM

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My HP Pavilion 27-n143d Touchsmart All-in-One Desktop PC is standard equipped with an Integrated Bluetooth 4.0 and Wireless LAN 802.11b/g/n single band 2.4 GHz module. Would it be possible to upgrade this to a dual band 2.4/5 GHz module that supports Wireless LAN 802.11ac?

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  • HP Pavilion 27-n143d Touchsmart All-in-One Desktop PC

‎11-01-2018 07:25 AM

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Most likely your PC only has one antenna connected to the wifi card in there now.

There is only one dual band wifi card that I know of that will work with one antenna, and that is this one.

Realtek RTL8821CE 802.11 ac 1×1 WiFi + Bluetooth 4.2 Combo Adapter (MU-MIMO supported)
L17365-005/ 915620-001/915621-001

The only place I have been able to find them is on eBay.

I cannot guarantee the card would work in your PC. because the parts list for your model only lists the card in there now.

You might be better off buying an external USB dual band wifi adapter which would be guaranteed to work.

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  • HP Pavilion 27-n143d Touchsmart All-in-One Desktop PC

‎11-01-2018 07:33 AM

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That is possible, but quite involved.

Do you really want to replace the wifi antenna setup that is there. It would require a complete disassembly of the PC and sourcing an appropriate 2×2 antenna

A simpler solution would be to purchase a USB 802.11ac dongle to lug into one of the ports at the rear of the PC.

I am not an HP Employee.

‎11-01-2018 08:01 AM

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I must admit that the issue is actually mainly cosmetic. Earlier the internal card had intermittent problems and was replaced under warranty. While waiting for HP to send their technician, I purchased a TP-Link T9UH, but plugging the cable into one of the USB 3.0 ports at the bottom of the screen just looks very ugly. The ports at the back are all USB 2.0, if I’m not mistaken. Wouldn’t that limit the performance of the T9UH, as the data transfer speed of USB 2.0 is limited?

Moreover, I also have a HP Pavilion 27-a271d which does have 802.11ac – very possibly the Realtek module that was mentioned by the other poster. I was hoping that it would be a matter of just swapping the modules (and I would be calling a HP technician to do that for me).

The main reason why I’m looking to optimize my wireless network speed is because my files are residing on a NAS. I’m not so worried about internet speed.

‎08-29-2017 05:54 PM

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We just got fiber optice but to get the highest speed for my desktop I have to upgrade the card from a 2.4ghz to 5ghz. Is there any card that I can replace the 802.11 wireless b/g/n & bluetooth 3.0 half-length PCI-Express Mini Card with?

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  • Microsoft Windows 10 (64-bit)

‎08-29-2017 06:47 PM

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If your PC has two antenna leads currently connected to the wifi card, you can get one of these.

If you have a dual band AC router.

Broadcom BCM4352 802.11ac 2×2 Wi-Fi + Bluetooth 4.0 combo

HP Part # 724935-001

If you have a dual band wireless N router, and don’t plan to upgrade it in the near future.

Broadcom BCM943228HMB WiDi 802.11 a/b/g/n 2×2 Wi-Fi + Bluetooth 4.0 combo

HP Part # 730668-001

Do your search by the HP part number, not the model of the wifi card.

Either card should be available on eBay or Amazon.

‎08-29-2017 08:07 PM

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The router is a At&T router model 5268ACFXN. I assume this is a dual band AC router?

Also my parents have a HP P6-2120. I believe it has a Interface: PCI Express x1, Technology: Realtek RTL8171E gigabit ethernet controller, Data transfer speeds: up to 10/100/1000 Mb/s, Transmission standards: 1000-Base-T Ethernet Is this the best for this computer or is there another card that will get higher speed. The best that we have gotten is around 600 down and 700 up and this is connected hard line to the router.

‎09-19-2017 04:11 AM

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I have a Pavilion dv6 7052sr. I wount to replace my wi-fi card but i dont know model type, cuold somebody help me with this problem?

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  • 7052sr

‎09-19-2017 07:50 AM – edited ‎09-19-2017 07:51 AM

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There are no specifications listed for your notebook, but the driver page shows Intel drivers for the chipset and graphics.

So, if your notebook has an Intel processor, you can upgrade to one of these two wifi cards.

Here is the information on the replacement wifi cards.

If you have, or plan to get an AC router.

Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 7260 802.11 ac 2×2 WiFi + BT 4.0 HP Part #710661-001

If you only have a dual band wireless N router, and don’t plan on replacing it anytime soon.

Intel Dual Band Wireless-N 7260AN 802.11 a/b/g/n 2×2 WiFi + BT4.0 HP Part # 717381-001

Either card is readily available on Amazon or eBay.

Do your search by the HP part number, not the model of the wifi card.

Now, if your notebook does not currently have an Intel wifi card installed, it is very important that you uninstall the current wifi card and driver in the device manager (and the same for the bluetooth if your notebook comes with bluetooth), before installing the replacement wifi card.

‎12-06-2017 03:59 PM

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  • Tags:
  • Example: Pavilion HPE h8-1110t

‎12-06-2017 04:25 PM

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Do you remember what model wifi card your PC has?

It is possible that it went bad on you, but certain model wifi cards such as the Ralink models don’t work well with W10, and the latest W10 releases are causing them to ‘disappear’ from the device manager.

So either way, you should replace the card.

Here is the problem. You will first have to open up the PC and determine if there is one or two antennas connected to the present wifi card, so I can recommend a suitable replacement.

Because your model is a configured to order model, it could have come with a few different model wifi cards, as shown in the parts list below (under the PC Board (Interface) section.

The other thing you can do is to purchase an external usb wireless network adapter, and not be concerned with compatibility as long as you get one that has support for W10.

‎12-07-2017 10:23 AM

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‎12-07-2017 10:50 AM

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The wireless card can only be in one place, looking at the picture of the motherboard.

Here is a picture of the motherboard your PC has.

The wifi card should be plugged into an adapter that fits in one of those 3 small black PCIe x1 slots on the bottom left side of the picture.

There should be one or two very thin and delicate antenna wires going from the wifi card to somewhere inside the case, which is where the other side of the antennas fasten to.

I do not see anywhere else in the picture that it could have gone.

Some of the newer motherboards have a half mini card slot where the wifi card plugs into lying flat.

I don’t see such a slot in the picture.

How to upgrade or replace your pc’s wireless card

‎12-07-2017 12:38 PM

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The Wi-Fi card isn’t plugged into one of those 3 small black PCIe x1 slots on the bottom left side of the picture. There is nothing plugged into those slots.

However, based on matching part numbers from the link included in your initial reply, I believe I have located it. It is located in the long, off-white slot in the bottom right corner of the photo you sent, just above and to the left of the red connector on the right side. It has one fine black wire running to the frame of the desktop.

I matched the HP P/N: 638403-001 to the link which has Wireless LAN – Flamingo, Halfmini 802.11 bgn 1×1 in the description. The card also has the following printed on it:
MAC ID: 74DEZBD46399
CT: GBUCB01MM1NI1I
RT5390
WN6605RH-H8

Would you confirm that this is indeed the Wi-Fi card and what I should look for to replace it? Thank you.

Ian Paul is a freelance writer with over a decade of experiencing writing about tech. In addition to writing for How-To Geek, he regularly contributes to PCWorld as a critic, feature writer, reporter, deal hunter, and columnist. His work has also appeared online at The Washington Post, ABC News, MSNBC, Reuters, Macworld, Yahoo Tech, Tech.co, TechHive, The Huffington Post, and Lifewire. His articles are regularly syndicated across numerous IDG sites including CIO, Computerworld, GameStar, Macworld UK, Tech Advisor, and TechConnect. Read more.

Upgrading a PC? Your choices range from installing more RAM to custom building a case designed for a DIY liquid cooling system. Which upgrades are the best depends on your PC. What specs does it have right now? Are you gaming, editing 4K videos, or just browsing the web?

Here are five common PC upgrades and which systems will see the most improvement from them. We’re also marking how hard we think these various upgrades are. Most are easy to do, though some might take a little more thought and planning than others.

Add a Solid-State Drive

This is the classic rudimentary upgrade that makes a dramatic difference—especially for aging systems. If your laptop or desktop computer is running off a hard drive, then grabbing a 2.5-inch SSD will make a big difference. Your PC will feel more responsive, and boot times can shorten dramatically. Given the current state of flash storage, you’re probably better off with a triple-level cell (TLC) drive than quad-level cell (QLC).

If you’re already rocking a 2.5-inch SATA-based SSD, the next step would be upgrading to an NVMe M.2 drive. This will also improve general responsiveness and boot times, but not as dramatically as with a hard drive.

M.2 drives come with one caveat: Your PC needs a special M.2 PCIe slot. Most modern desktop motherboards should have it, but laptop capabilities will vary a lot. Check your motherboard or device manual to see if your system supports these drives.

More RAM

Should you add more RAM to your setup, or will it be a pointless exercise? That depends a lot on what you’re doing. If you use a PC to stream video, write documents in Microsoft Word, and edit the occasional photo, then 8 gigabytes (GB) might be all you need. Gamers will often be happiest with at least 16 GB, especially when playing modern AAA video games.

Then there are media-rich tasks. If you’re getting into serious video editing as a hobby, 32 GB of RAM might be ideal.

The bottom line is there’s an optimal amount of RAM your system needs to do its job. If you add more RAM beyond that, you won’t see much improvement, if any.

Using these general guidelines, you should be able to estimate how much RAM you need. If it’s not enough, then try doubling it and see how that goes.

Also consider the limits of your motherboard and CPU. They can handle only a certain amount of RAM—though it’s usually quite a bit. Remember that when you buy new RAM, it must all be the same speed (measured in MHz). Learn more in our guide to replacing your PC’s RAM.

Once you’re organized, changing RAM on a desktop is as simple as slotting in the new RAM modules and turning on the machine. Laptops are a little more complex and usually require opening an access panel on the bottom, or sometimes removing the keyboard. Be aware that some laptops cannot accept RAM upgrades at all because the RAM is soldered onto the motherboard’s PCB.

Swap Out Your Graphics Card

If you have the right amount of RAM in your system and your games are running off an SSD, the next step to improving performance is to upgrade the graphics card. Before you swap your GPU, ask yourself what resolution your monitor is. If you get a graphics card that’s awesome for 4K gaming but you only play at 1080p, then you could’ve done with a far cheaper graphics card.

If your CPU is particularly old, you might need a newer one before upgrading your graphics card. However, you can get surprisingly far with an older CPU combined with a newer graphics card. Besides, if it’s time to upgrade the CPU, then it’s likely time for a total system overhaul.

Once you’ve got a new card, undo the slot latch, remove the old card’s power cable and take it out, slide in the new one, and reconnect the power, if your card requires it. Then you just have to install the card’s new drivers and you’re off to the races. For a more detailed look at the upgrade process, check out our tutorial on how to upgrade and install a new graphics card in your PC.

Upgrade Your CPU

Upgrading your CPU is not difficult, but it’s harder than slotting in some new RAM modules or changing your graphics card. Before you decide to get a new CPU, check which models are compatible with your motherboard. The motherboard CPU socket must be compatible with the processor you want—the socket is the space where the CPU fits on a motherboard.

Beware, however, that CPU makers (particularly Intel) can have different versions of the same socket type. A SkyLake-compatible LGA 1151 socket, for example, is not compatible with the LGA 1151 sockets that Coffee Lake processors use.

In general, it’s better to upgrade your motherboard and CPU at the same time. However, at times, it will make sense to just upgrade the processor. For example, you might catch a really good CPU sale.

If you don’t upgrade your motherboard when changing the CPU, there are often some trade-offs—especially if the newer processors have more advanced features. Anyone with an AMD X470 motherboard, for example, could use a Ryzen 3000 CPU. However, they would lose out on PCIe 4.0 which both the CPU and motherboard must support.

Changing the CPU is a little different depending on whether you have an AMD or Intel motherboard. Essentially, however, all you do is remove the old CPU, gently drop in the new one, and secure it. Then it’s just a matter of attaching your CPU cooling fan or liquid cooling solution.

Add an All-in-One Liquid Cooler

Heat: It’s what keeps custom PC builders up at night, or at least awake enough to contemplate how to keep computer temperatures lower. Keeping your PC cool helps your components last longer, and makes it easier to overclock your system.

Standard air cooling fans are great, but there’s nothing like a liquid cooling system when you want to get serious about overclocking—or your PC is generally too hot all the time. An all-in-one (AIO) cooler is a good first step. These are pre-built devices that circulate liquid from a radiator to a block over your CPU. Installing an AIO cooler into an existing PC requires you to remove the current cooling fan and then get rid of any existing thermal compound on the CPU. Next, install the radiator into your case and place the cooling block over the CPU—thermal compound is usually pre-applied to the block. Fit a few cables onto your motherboard or the power supply and you’re good to go.

Make sure your case can hold your AIO cooler. The four typical AIO sizes are 120 mm, 140 mm, 240 mm, and 280 mm. These are all based on radiator fan sizes. A 120 mm AIO has one 120 mm fan; a 140 mm has one 140 mm fan; a 240 mm has two 120 mm fans; and a 280mm has two 140 mm fans.

Whether or not a liquid cooler is right for your PC depends on how hot your machine tends to get. If you can an AIO on sale, there’s something to be said for how nice a liquid cooling system looks—especially if it’s packing a little RGB razzle-dazzle.

You could carry out many other PC upgrades, but those are some of the most common that don’t require much in the way of expertise to do well.

‎02-27-2017 07:33 AM

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For the past 2 weeks my wifi connection has started to have issues. The speedtest on the desktop is equal on upload speed to my laptop and ipad but the download speed is 50%. I’ve confirmed I have the latest driver for the

Ralink RT3290 802.11bgn Wifi Adapter.

At this point it would appear that replacing the card would be the quickest solution as I’ve not found any other options online.

Can anyone suggest a good replacement card?

Is this thing a PCI or some other interface card?

thanks in advance

  • Tags:
  • HP ENVY 700-215xt CTO Desktop

‎02-27-2017 09:08 AM

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The most recent W10 driver version for the wlan card your PC has is 5.0.57.0 Rev.A.

There are some unknown elements that I can’t help you with if you don’t want to simply add an external dual band usb wireless network adapter.

1. We don’t know if your PC has a BIOS whitelist, and unless someone who has your exact model PC can confirm they replaced the internal wlan card with no problem, a whitelist would prevent you from installing any other wlan card but the ones supported for your PC.

2. Replacing the wlan card with a better one would require that your PC have two internal antennas connected to the present wlan card. You would have to open the case to confirm that your PC does have two antennas present.

The wlan card in your PC is a standard Half Mini Card (HMC) that is used in notebook PC’s. The wireless card plugs into an adapter, that is plugged into one of the PCIe x1 slots.

Now, assuming the worst case scenario that your PC does have a BIOS whitelist, I looked up the parts list for your model and the best card that you can install would be:

LAN – Combo 802.11a/b/g/n (BBee)+BT4.0 HP Part # 666914-001

That is a BCM943228HMB a/b/g/n Dual Band Bluetooth 4.0 Half Mini PCIe Card

I would check on eBay for a replacement card after you confirm that your PC has two wireless antennas connected to the Ralink card in there now.

Query by the part number because if your PC does have a BIOS whitelist, the wlan card you buy must have the HP Part number on it or it will not work.

When I have purchased wireless cards for my HP notebooks with the whitelists, I query by the part number and check the photograph in the listing for the white ‘Replace with HP Spare’ sticker that shows the part number on it.

I’m leery about buying ones with stock photographs.

W10 wireless and bluetooth drivers are available for that model wlan card too.

If your PC does not have a BIOS whitelist, then you can install any model HMC wireless card you want.

Here’s how you can update your wireless (WiFi) driver on your PC running Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10:

  1. Determine the wireless driver that you’re running on your PC, along with the date and version. Open the command prompt (Win key + R, type “cmd”) and enter the following command:

You should get a screen like the one below:

How to upgrade or replace your pc’s wireless card

  1. If the driver is more than one year old, we suggest you update it. Copy the driver name from the command prompt screen and do a Google search.

How to upgrade or replace your pc’s wireless card

  1. Download the latest available driver for your wireless (WiFi) adapter from the manufacturer’s website. In the example above, go to the Download Center for Intel and choose the driver for the Windows version you are running. If you’re unsure of what version you’re running, just check the “System type” information in the System properties screen (Win key + Break). (We suggest downloading the file to your Desktop).

How to upgrade or replace your pc’s wireless card

  1. Install the driver by running the installer. If the driver doesn’t have an installer:
    1. Open the Device Manager (You can do this by pressing the Windows but and typing it out)How to upgrade or replace your pc’s wireless card
    2. Right click on your wireless adapter and choose Update Driver Software. How to upgrade or replace your pc’s wireless card
    3. Choose the option to Browse and locate the drivers you downloaded. Windows will then install the drivers.How to upgrade or replace your pc’s wireless card
  2. Reboot your PC after installing the updated drivers.


Notes

Here are the driver update websites for some frequently used wireless (WiFi) cards:

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How to upgrade or replace your pc’s wireless card

The steps taken to replace a network card may vary depending on the manufacturer of the network card, and whenever possible the specific instructions provided by a card manufacturer should be followed. In general, however, replacing a network card typically involves uninstalling software that supports the existing card, then physically removing the card, installing new software for the replacement card, and then installing the network card inside the computer tower or case. If you are trying to replace a card with the exact same card, then you may not need to uninstall and reinstall the software that accompanies that card.

How to upgrade or replace your pc’s wireless cardMan holding computer

One of the first things you should consider as you try to replace a network card is that the replacement card needs to work with your computer and operating system (OS). You should also consider if you want to use an external or internal network card. External cards can be much easier to install and use, though they may not be as reliable and will require an external connection. To replace a card inside your computer, you will need to find a card that will work with your computer and OS and that can utilize a port you have free within your computer.

Regardless of whether you are trying to replace a network card inside or outside of your computer, you will likely need to first uninstall the software for the old network card. If you are replacing the card with the exact same card, then you may not need to do this as the software should simply recognize the new card as easily as it did the old one. Assuming you are trying to replace a network card with a different card, however, then once you uninstall the software you should shut down your computer. You can then physically remove the network card from your computer, either by unplugging an external card or by removing an internal card from the motherboard and computer case.

Once you remove the old network card, you can then turn your computer back on and wait for it to finish booting. You should then install the software for your new network card, and it will likely prompt you at a certain point to shut down your computer and install the new card. If it does not prompt you to do this, then simply wait for the software installation to finish and then shut down your computer. You can then install the new network card either by connecting it to your motherboard or by simply plugging an external device into your computer.

If you are trying to replace a network card with an external card, then you may not even need to shut down your computer before plugging in the new card. Start your computer back up, or wait for it to recognize the new external device, and the software you installed should finish installation and help you set up your new network card. This will typically include connecting to a local network or the Internet and helping you deal with any troubleshooting of issues encountered while trying to replace the network card.

‎01-02-2018 12:19 AM

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There are several other posts, satisfactorily answering the exact same question, but all for the particular notebook model of the member who started that conversation. @huffer @ Paul_Tikkanen

So, although I didn’t want to flod the forum, unfortunately I needed to start another topic with the same question for my own particular notebook model.

Product Name: HP Pavilion 13 x360 PC

Product No: L0B89EA#AB8

I also want to replace my wi-fi adapter with a “802.11 ac” type adapter.

As far as I can understand from the below photo of my notebooks internal board, I have two antennas already installed in my notebook.

So, can I upgrade and which brand/model Wi-Fi adapters (WLAN modules) can I purchase for this upgrade?

Many thanks and best regards,

  • Tags:
  • HP Pavilion 13-a200 x360 Convertible PC

‎01-02-2018 02:14 AM

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There should be no whitelist for your model, so you can upgrade with ac module which you prefer.

If we look on page 2 of service manual we can see that ceratain models of the series your PC is part of came with ac wifi module and this module will definetely work with your PC.

Intel Dual Band Wireless-AC 3160 802.11ac 1×1 Wi-Fi + Bluetooth 4.0 Combo Adapter

‎01-02-2018 02:15 AM

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The series supports the following wireless cards

Integrated wireless local area network (WLAN) options by way of wireless
module
Built-in WLAN antenna(s) (in display assembly)
Support for the following WLAN modules:
● Broadcom BCM43142HM 802.11 bgn 1×1 Wi-Fi + Bluetooth® 4.0 HMC Combo Adapter
● I ntel Dual Band Wireless-AC 3160 802.11ac 1×1 Wi-Fi + Bluetooth 4.0 Combo Adapter
Compatible with Miracast-certified devices

Please use part number 784638-005

BH
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