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How to use google photos to store an unlimited amount of photos

Google launches Google Photos to store, organize and share photos and videos easily. It has a “Back up & Sync” feature which allows you to automatically upload all photos and videos taken with your device to Google Drive. If you want to get photos into Google Photos, then you just need to visit https://photos.google.com/ website on your computer and sign in with your Google account. To upload photos to Google Photos, drag and drop your photos from computer to your browser window. Google Photos offers you unlimited storage for free, with a few gotchas.

It offers you to choose 2 upload sizes i.e. “High Quality” and “Original” size. If you choose “High Quality”, then you will be able to upload an unlimited amount of photos to Google Photos. High quality photos can be up to 16 megapixels in size and video resolution to 1080p. It saves high quality photos and videos while reducing size. If you choose “Original” size, then you can upload larger photos without having them shrinked. It uses your Google account’s 15 GB of free storage space to backup your photos. It stores your photos and videos exactly as you captured them. Google recommends that if you take photos with DSLR camera, then upload those photos with original upload size. If you backup photos to Google Drive, then by default they will appear in Google Photos.

Quick Tip to Keep your Photos Safe
Making backups of your photos & videos is a chore you probably skip, but it really doesn’t have to be hard. Here’s an effortless way to backup photos – PicBackMan. PicBackMan is the easiest and simplest way to keep your photos safely backed up in one or more online accounts. Simply download PicBackMan (it’s free!), register your account, connect to your online store and tell PicBackMan where your photos are – PicBackMan does the rest, automatically. It bulk uploads all photos and keeps looking for new ones and uploads those too. You don’t have to ever touch it.

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How to use google photos to store an unlimited amount of photosHave you used Google Photos to store an unlimited amount of photos and videos? It is easy to store an unlimited amount of photos and videos using Google Photos. You can easily upload the photos from Android or iPhone using various apps that are available in the market. Earlier Google Photos was a part of Google ++ but now it has been moved to a separate platform. Using your Google account, you can easily access Google Photos to store an unlimited amount of photos and videos.

Steps involved in Using Google to Store an Unlimited Amount of Photos and Videos

Before you start with your process of using Google Photos to store an unlimited amount of photos and video files, you need to plan correctly. There are many places where you can store your photos, but some of them are not as convenient as Google. Apple has the “iCloud Photo Library,” which allow iPhone or iPad users to share photos. The main problem with it is that it has only 5 GB of storage space and it is not convenient to share with web or Android apps. Whichever service you opt for storing your valuable photos and videos, you need to keep in mind it is not a good idea to store photos and videos in your system, because if anything happens to the hard disk, then you will lose all the valuable pictures and videos.

To use Google Photos to store an unlimited amount of photos and videos, you need to first log into your Google account and then visit the “Google Photos” website. From the Settings, select the option “High quality” to upload an unlimited amount of photos and videos. By selecting the option “Original Size,” you can store photos without making any changes to the size of the photos.

You can also store an unlimited amount of photos and videos in the Google Drive storage system and it will automatically show your photos and videos in the Google Photos by default. You can also use different apps to automatically download photos and videos from your Android Smartphone or from your iPhone.

Apps for Automatically Downloading Photos and Videos

  1. For iPad and iPhone: If you are using iPhone or iPad, you need to first install the Google Photos app on your phone. Once you have installed the app in your Smartphone, it will automatically upload the photos and videos from your camera roll.
  2. For Android Smartphone: Android Smartphone users should first install Google Photos app from the play store. The app will then automatically upload the photos and videos to Google Photos.
  3. Windows Machine: Google has an application that can automatically upload photos and videos from your desktop. The Google Photo app for desktop will automatically detect photos and videos from your computer’s hard disk and upload it.

Conclusion

Using Google Photos is an easy way of storing all your favorite photos and videos from the Smartphone and the desktop. You can easily upload an unlimited amount of photos and videos without worrying about storage space or about photos getting lost.

Google Photos is now limiting free storage at 15GB, encouraging people to sign up for its Google One storage subscription service instead.

How to use google photos to store an unlimited amount of photos

As of June 1, Google has ended its unlimited free storage policy for Google Photos.

The time has finally come: Google Photos has ended its unlimited free storage policy for photos and videos. As of June 1, any new photos and videos you upload will count toward the free 15GB of storage that comes with every Google account. But don’t worry: The photos or videos you uploaded before then won’t be part of the cap. And Google has added a new free tool to help you manage your storage quota.

The move, announced in November, is meant to encourage people to sign up for Google’s storage subscription service, Google One . Google One plans start at $2 a month in the US for 100GB of storage and other features, like Google Store discounts.

Here’s what you need to know about what the change means for you, including how to manage your Google Photos storage, subscribe to Google One and more.

How to manage your Google Photos storage

Any photos and videos you backed up in Google Photos before the June 1 deadline will be considered free and exempt from the storage limit. Though that deadline has passed, you can still check your backup quality in the Photos app by going to Settings > Back up & sync.

Even with the change, more than 80% of current Google Photos users should still be able to store about three years of content with that free 15GB. Google will notify you in the app and by email once you get close to hitting your 15GB limit. You can also find a personalized estimate for how long your free storage may last, based on how frequently you back up photos and videos to your Google Account.

In May, Google added a new tool in the Photos app to help you manage the photos and videos you’ve backed up that count toward your 15GB storage quota. It will surface photos or videos that you might want to delete, like photos that are blurry or screenshots, or videos that are large, to better manage the storage you have.

Keep on top of the latest news, how-to and reviews on Google-powered devices, apps and software.

Should I subscribe to Google One now?

If you’re someone who uploads a ton of photos and videos to Google Photos and think you’re going to run out of the free space quickly, it may be worth it for you to subscribe to Google One. There are several different plans available (check out our in-depth look at each Google One plan and what it includes here):

  • 100GB: $2 a month or $20 annually
  • 200GB: $3 a month or $30 annually
  • 2TB: $10 a month or $100 annually

You can sign up on the Google One site. Just make sure you’re signed into the Google account you want to use.

A lot of Google One’s features can be accessed easily through the app.

If I have a Google Pixel phone, are my photos limited too?

If you have a Google Pixel phone , you are exempt from any Google Photos limits. That means you can continue to upload as many photos and videos as you want, with no cap.

More than 4 trillion photos are stored in Google Photos, the company said in November, with 28 billion new photos and videos uploaded each week. In May, Google unveiled new Photos features including the ability to remove photos from your Memories and new AI-powered techniques to make your photos come alive .

Google Photos has told users that as of June 1, 2021, it will no longer have free, unrestricted storage of ‘high quality’ photos.

Google Photos to stop free unlimited storage in 2021

Since its launch in 2015, Google Photos has provided unlimited free photo storage in the so-called “high-quality” environment, making it one of Google’s best services. That, however, is coming to an end, as reported in November. Google Photos will start charging for storage over 15GB in a month, on June 1.

About Google Photos

Google has created a photo storage facility.

Google Photos is a Google-developed photo sharing and storage service. In May 2015, it was revealed as a separate social network from Google+, the company’s previous social network.

Google Photos’ free tier allows users to store an unlimited number of photos and videos up to 16 megapixels and 1080p quality (anything larger gets down-scaled to these sizes).

Google Images, which has long been regarded as a lifeline for those who want to take a lot of photos but have limited phone storage, is about to undergo a significant overhaul that will severely restrict what is available to free users.

Google said in a blog post that more than 4 trillion images and videos have been uploaded to its cloud service since it launched five years ago.

However, beginning June 1, 2021, unrestricted, unlimited cloud storage of “high quality” images and videos will be capped at 15GB. Backing up photos and videos before the deadline would not count against the 15GB cap.

After this date, those who want more than 15GB of image storage will need to sign in for a Google One account. This offers at least 100GB of cloud storage for €1.99 a month or €19.99 a year in Ireland.

Backing up “original quality” images is also included in users’ storage limits, and will continue to be included in the 15GB of free storage per Google Account.

However, Google has provided an incentive for snap-happy Pixel phone owners, as the new cap would not apply to high-quality images uploaded from these cameras.

“This transition enables us to keep up with the increasing demand for storage,” said Shimrit Ben-Yair, vice-president of Google Photos.

“And, as always, we honor our promise not to use details from Google Photos for commercial purposes. We recognize that this is a significant change that can come as a surprise, so we wanted to inform you ahead of time and provide tools to help you.”

Google added in an email to users that it didn’t “take this decision lightly.” Based on your current use, the company has built a page that predicts how long your free storage will last. It will also give users a series of notifications and warnings if they approach the 15GB limit before the June deadline.

In June 2021, a new storage management feature for the Images app will be released, allowing users to control their backed-up photos and videos and remove those that aren’t worth keeping, such as blurry or dark photos.

The cloud division of Google’s parent company, Alphabet, continues to generate considerable sales, with $3.4 billion in revenue in the most recent period.

However, if you use Google Photos often, it’s probably worth investing in Google One storage. Google Photos is a fantastic service, so it’s understandable that it isn’t completely free, even though the free tier does restrict the quality of the material you may upload.

Many users will never need to pay in the first place, or at least not in the near future. According to Google, 80% of Photos users would not exceed 15GB for at least three years. Not to mention the fact that 15GB is three times the amount of free cloud storage offered by Apple’s iCloud, which only provides 5GB.

Consider yourself forewarned: Google Photos will begin to cost you a little more in the near future. However, if you use it often, you can invest in it — it’s a fantastic service that’s well worth the money.

· Updated 25 May 2021 ·

(Pocket-lint) – Google announced in November 2020 that it was changing how Google Photos backup was going to work, meaning that anyone using the service needs to take note.

The change happens on 1 June 2021, so if you want to take advantage of the free storage before the change happens, you need to take notice now.

What’s changing in Google Photos?

The big change is that photos uploaded in “High Quality” will no longer get unlimited storage. Google is also changing the name of this tier to “Storage Saver”, just to remind you that it’s not actually high quality, that it’s a compressed format. This update it rolling out, so some will see “High Quality” in Google Photos and some will see the new “Storage Saver” wording.

Google Photos offer two backup options – the first is “Original Quality” which has always counted against your allowance, the second is “High Quality/Storage Saver” which is a compressed format and has, until 1 June, been unlimited.

The change is that from 1 June, new “High Quality/Storage Saver” image uploads will count against the storage allowance in your Google Account. That’s 15GB as standard, with options to buy more storage through the Google One programme.

What about existing photos in Google Photos?

Anything you have in Google Photos, uploaded before 1 June 2021 remains free. So if you’ve uploaded lots of “High Quality/Storage Saver” photos previously, you’re not suddenly going to get hit with a bill.

But anything you upload after 1 June 2021 will count against your storage allowance.

What do I need to do now?

There’s nothing you really need to do, apart from be aware of the change happening.

Yes, if you have some images you want in Google Photos that aren’t already backed up there, then now is the time to get them moved over in “High Quality/Storage Saver” before the change comes in. This might include images that you have on your PC that you want to move into Google Photos before the restriction comes into place.

There are also some tools that Google is making available to help manage your storage. These can be found in the account area, although this is rolling out, so you might not see it in your app right away.

You’ll be able to see an estimate of how long your Google account storage will last, as well as storage management tools. These will highlight things like blurry images, or big video files that you might want to delete to get some space back. You’ll also be able to see all your screenshots here, in case you want to delete those.

What about “Original Quality” images?

These have always counted against your storage limit, unless you uploaded them from a Pixel, Pixel 2 or Pixel 3, which offered unlimited Google Photo storage when those devices launched. Those are protected in Google Photos, will always be “Original Quality” and won’t count against your limits.

If you use any other type of Android phone, your “Original Quality” images all count against your storage limited already. You might want to consider shifting to “High Quality” to save space, unless you really need those uncompressed images.

Are there any exceptions?

Yes. Pixel phones will still get unlimited “High Quality/Storage Saver” backup to Google Photos, so if you have a Pixel 1-5 device, you’ll still be able to store all those photos without it counting against your storage limited, as long as you’re uploading in “High Quality/Storage Saver”.

How to change your backup settings in Google Photos

If you want to check what you’re currently doing, open the Google Photos app on your phone and tap on your Google Account icon in the top right-hand corner.

This will give you a snapshop of your Google Account storage. Tap on the bar and you’ll go through the backup and sync settings. At the bottom of the page you can find the “upload size” which is where you can change the quality settings.

You can also buy storage here if you decide that it’s time to get more storage from Google.

If you are using the Backup and Sync app on your PC, you can find the settings in the app preferences.

How to change “Original Quality” images in Google Photos to “High Quality/Storage Saver”

If you’ve always used “Original Quality” and want to reduce those images to “High Quality/Storage Saver” to reduce the storage space you’re using, there’s the option in Google Photos to do that.

Head to Google Photos settings in your browser at photos.google.com/settings and you’ll see the option to “Recover storage”. This will compress images you already have in Google Photos, converting them to “High Quality/Storage Saver”.

There’s something to note here: this process cannot be reversed, once you press that button, Google will go off and compress those images, so if there’s anything you need in the highest quality, you’ll need to make sure you don’t lose that.

How to use google photos to store an unlimited amount of photos

Again, anything that was uploaded from a Pixel 1, Pixel 2 or Pixel 3 in “Original Quality” during the period where this was offered as unlimited, won’t be compressed: it doesn’t count against your storage, so Google won’t touch it.

Google Photos has long been a free and easy way to keep all of your pictures in one place. For years, you could store all of the high-quality images you wanted, especially as a Pixel owner. Now, things are changing, and Google is doing away with its unlimited storage. Here’s everything you need to know about Google Photos and your options from now on.

How does Google Photos work right now?

Google currently offers three ways to keep your images safe and sound on Photos. The first of which is unlimited high-quality storage, which it provides for free. This compresses your shots slightly so that they take up less space, but you can add as many images as you want. Your still images will resize to 16MP while videos will move to 1080p.

Another way to manage your pictures is with free express-quality storage. It compresses your images even further down to 3MP for stills and 480p for videos so you can download or back them up faster.

The final way to keep your images in Google Photos is at original quality, but you won’t find an unlimited option here. You’re stuck with just a 15GB Google Photos storage limit to save these top-quality shots, and that storage is shared between Drive, Gmail, and Photos.

Google Photos also packs the power of the Google Assistant, which generates edited versions of some of your best shots. You can then view these images in special flipbooks, galleries, and more. It also filters your pictures into albums using facial recognition, which can provide a serious organizational boost.

If you’d rather make your own edits, you can do so in minutes. Of course, Google Photos doesn’t offer the most extensive set of tools, but it’s better than nothing. You can even pay to order some of your favorite images as books or prints to hang around your home.

What is changing about Google Photos?

As of June 1, 2021, Google Photos’ storage options are in for a significant overhaul. Starting on that day, your high-quality and express quality content will count towards your 15GB Google Photos storage limit. Once you reach that limit, you will either have to add a Google One subscription or begin to delete content that you don’t need to have backed up.

Cost plays a significant factor in this decision, as Google is finding it simply too expensive to support the sheer volume of unrestricted uploads. There are already more than four trillion photos packed into Google’s servers, and that number has only continued to grow.

Luckily for you, there are a few ways to maximize your storage space before the June 1 cutoff. Any high-quality or express quality images that you back up before June will not count towards your limit. That means you may want to take some time and find images that you don’t want to be without. Original quality shots will still count towards the 15GB limit, as will original quality images you compress to high-quality after June 1.

On the bright side, Google has constructed a handy tool to estimate how long you have before you run out of storage space. It works best if you regularly back up your photos, though estimates are not always available. For example, if you are close to your limit or your account is provided through a school or a job, you may not have access to an estimate.

What does it mean for Pixel owners?

Google has never been shy about showing some love to Pixel owners, and that’s not changing. If you have a Pixel 5 device or earlier, you won’t have to worry too much about the changes detailed above. You will still be able to upload unlimited images at varying levels of quality past June 1, 2021.

For Pixel 3a through Pixel 5 owners, that means unlimited high-quality images. Pixel 3 owners can still upload unlimited original quality images to Google Photos through January 31, 2022, when it will switch to unlimited high-quality pictures. Unfortunately, Pixel 2 owners have already made the switch to unlimited high-quality uploads as of January 16, 2021. Finally, original Pixel owners will be able to continue uploading at original quality with no limits.

How does Google One work?

How to use google photos to store an unlimited amount of photos

If you find yourself up against your storage limit, or you know you’ll get there soon, it’s time to consider a Google One membership. Google One is a cloud storage platform that kicks your 15GB limit up to 100GB, 200GB, or 2TB. Of course, it’s not free, but the base plan will only cost you $1.99 per month. If you’d rather have 200GB, you’re looking at $2.99 per month, and the 2TB plan costs $9.99 each month.

While the extra storage is nice, it’s not the only reason to sign up for Google One. Once you upgrade to a paid plan, you’ll get access to Google experts, the option to add your family to your plan, and even extra member bonuses. The 200GB and 2TB plans offer 3% and 10% back at the Google Store, respectively.

Google Photos has told users that as of June 1, 2021, it will no longer have free, unrestricted storage of ‘high quality’ photos.

Google Photos to stop free unlimited storage in 2021

Since its launch in 2015, Google Photos has provided unlimited free photo storage in the so-called “high-quality” environment, making it one of Google’s best services. That, however, is coming to an end, as reported in November. Google Photos will start charging for storage over 15GB in a month, on June 1.

About Google Photos

Google has created a photo storage facility.

Google Photos is a Google-developed photo sharing and storage service. In May 2015, it was revealed as a separate social network from Google+, the company’s previous social network.

Google Photos’ free tier allows users to store an unlimited number of photos and videos up to 16 megapixels and 1080p quality (anything larger gets down-scaled to these sizes).

Google Images, which has long been regarded as a lifeline for those who want to take a lot of photos but have limited phone storage, is about to undergo a significant overhaul that will severely restrict what is available to free users.

Google said in a blog post that more than 4 trillion images and videos have been uploaded to its cloud service since it launched five years ago.

However, beginning June 1, 2021, unrestricted, unlimited cloud storage of “high quality” images and videos will be capped at 15GB. Backing up photos and videos before the deadline would not count against the 15GB cap.

After this date, those who want more than 15GB of image storage will need to sign in for a Google One account. This offers at least 100GB of cloud storage for €1.99 a month or €19.99 a year in Ireland.

Backing up “original quality” images is also included in users’ storage limits, and will continue to be included in the 15GB of free storage per Google Account.

However, Google has provided an incentive for snap-happy Pixel phone owners, as the new cap would not apply to high-quality images uploaded from these cameras.

“This transition enables us to keep up with the increasing demand for storage,” said Shimrit Ben-Yair, vice-president of Google Photos.

“And, as always, we honor our promise not to use details from Google Photos for commercial purposes. We recognize that this is a significant change that can come as a surprise, so we wanted to inform you ahead of time and provide tools to help you.”

Google added in an email to users that it didn’t “take this decision lightly.” Based on your current use, the company has built a page that predicts how long your free storage will last. It will also give users a series of notifications and warnings if they approach the 15GB limit before the June deadline.

In June 2021, a new storage management feature for the Images app will be released, allowing users to control their backed-up photos and videos and remove those that aren’t worth keeping, such as blurry or dark photos.

The cloud division of Google’s parent company, Alphabet, continues to generate considerable sales, with $3.4 billion in revenue in the most recent period.

However, if you use Google Photos often, it’s probably worth investing in Google One storage. Google Photos is a fantastic service, so it’s understandable that it isn’t completely free, even though the free tier does restrict the quality of the material you may upload.

Many users will never need to pay in the first place, or at least not in the near future. According to Google, 80% of Photos users would not exceed 15GB for at least three years. Not to mention the fact that 15GB is three times the amount of free cloud storage offered by Apple’s iCloud, which only provides 5GB.

Consider yourself forewarned: Google Photos will begin to cost you a little more in the near future. However, if you use it often, you can invest in it — it’s a fantastic service that’s well worth the money.

Now that Google will soon start counting anything you’ve uploaded to Google Photos toward your storage limit—which tops out at 15GB for a free plan—it’s worth performing a personal audit. How much space am I using? How can I stretch my free plan as far as possible? And how can I move my photos to a different service entirely if I decide to abandon ship?

Worry not. We have answers to all three questions, and none of them is much trouble to deal with.

The Best Alternatives to Google Photos

The day has finally arrived. Google has flipped the switch on Google Photos from “free” to “paid.”…

How much space am I using on Google Photos?

This one’s easy. Click here , and you’ll see just how much space you have left on the tier of Google storage you’re using (free or paid). Google splits your storage use by app, so you can quickly see whether you need to roll up your sleeves and wade through your sprawling Gmail inbox or perhaps just delete a few gigantic files on Google Drive.

How much time do I have left until I’ve filled my Google storage quota?

The answer to this one depends on how much you upload to Google’s services, naturally. To help you figure this out, Google has released a tool that takes into account your current uploading and/or backing up habits, and attempts to predict when you’ll run out of space if you keep using Google’s services like you normally do.

How do I reduce the amount of space I’m using in Google Photos?

It’s likely your Google Photos account is using more of your space than Google Drive or Gmail, especially if you’ve been uploading “Original Quality” content to take advantage of Google’s former “unlimited” offer.

V isit Google Photos’ settings and see if there any unsupported videos you can delete—movies that Google simply can’t convert for whatever reason. Download and/or delete them. Then, consider clicking on “Recover storage” to convert all of your “Original Quality” content to “High Quality” content, which should free up a lot of the space you’ve used in Google Photos so far.

After that, make sure you’re running the latest version of Google Photos on your Android or iPhone . Launch the app, tap on Library, and then tap on Utilities. Here, Google will give you plenty of suggestions for photos you might want to get rid of—such as any screenshots you’ve taken, for example. If not, keep checking back. They’ll be there.

If you stick with Google Photos until June of next year, Google is planning to release a tool that gives you even more useful suggestions for photos you might want to delete. This will include content like huge videos that are taking up way more space than they should in your Google storage, or blurry shots that you wouldn’t want to keep around anyway.

Y ou don’t have to delete anything now unless you’ve stored it at “ Original Quality ,” or “photos that have more than 16MP and videos with more than 1080p.” You can’t search Google Photos by megapixels, alas, but you can at least get a head start on taking care of any videos that are eating up a lot of space.

Pull up the site and type in any common file type for videos: “avi,” “mp4,” “mov,” et cetera. This should return videos you’ve uploaded in the results, and you can sift through all of them to download and archive anything you want to remove from the cloud.

How to start moving your Google photos somewhere else

If Google’s decision has you looking for a different hosting service , you’re probably also eager to find a quick and easy way to upload all of your photos and videos somewhere else. Please don’t try to download them manually from the Google Photos website . You’ll be there forever.

Instead, simply pull up Google Takeout in your web browser of choice. Deselect everything, and then go back and select the “Google Photos” option. Pick a delivery method for your files, as well as the options for the archives you’ll get, and then start the export process. Wait until you get Google’s email, download all of your photos and videos, and reupload them somewhere else.

Don’t delete them from Google Photos, though. You now have a free backup of your photos that can exist as long as you have a Google account—or, at least, until Google al ters its deal again.

How to use google photos to store an unlimited amount of photos

It’s the end of an era, folks. The era of free cloud photo storage, that is.

Google announced Wednesday that Google Photos would no longer allow unlimited high-quality photo and video storage for its previous price of free-99 (h/t The Verge). Beginning June 1, 2021, any new hi-res photos stored in Google Photos will count against the service’s limit of 15GB of free data. Once you eclipse that amount, it’s time to pay up.

The move appears to be part of a larger effort by Google to tamp down on — or at least make money on — the massive amount of data it stores. Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides will begin counting toward data limits, and Google will also start automatically deleting data from inactive accounts.

The Google Photos policy is not all bad. It won’t go into effect until next June, and all of the media you’ve previously uploaded won’t count against the 15GB limit — only new uploads. Google also points out that it has features to help you manage storage (like identifying blurry photos or large video files you might want to delete), and has a tool to estimate your data needs. As for the price of storage, users can get 100GB of storage for $1.99/month. That cap also includes data from Gmail and Google Drive.

These palliatives, however, did not stem the tide of mass-bemoaning that occurs whenever a tech company decides it’s time to pay for something that was previously free.

In a hand-wringing Twitter thread, David Lieb, the product head of Google Photos, announced the change, and tried to show all the ways Google was easing the blow. That didn’t stop his replies from filling up with frustrated customers.

Some people see where Google is coming from. For the privacy-minded, it’s better to ask users to simply pay for a service than monetize their data with ads and more.

Of course, Google does monetize data.

Google says it does not use Google Photos images for targeted ads. Nor does it use them to train its algorithms — it uses photos uploaded to Image Search for that.

But, as The Ringer points out, the way the service works now “won’t be the same way it functions in the future, and ideas that sound invasive today could be sold as innovative tomorrow.” Case in point: In 2017, Google told the Ringer it doesn’t use Google Photos uploads to train its AI. Today, in the most recent version of the app, it’s asking Photos users to help train its image recognition algorithms by voluntarily labeling their pictures.