Categories
Life hack

Windows xp support ends today here’s how to switch to linux

Windows XP is officially retired as of April 8, 2014. Microsoft has tried to retire XP several times before, but due to enterprise customer demand had to continue supporting it. But this time they really really mean it, for reals.

If you’re using Windows XP, it won’t stop working. All this means is you won’t get security patches or technical support anymore. So what should you do? You can continue using it, as you always have. Or, you can upgrade to Windows 8.1, the newest Windows, or Windows 7. Or switch to Linux. Let’s look at the pros and cons of upgrading to a newer Windows.

Windows xp support ends today here’s how to switch to linux

Windows 8.1 has a completely re-designed interface that looks a lot like an over-excited automated teller machine. It adds support for touchscreens, and is supposed to be less obese and peppier than 7. Windows 7 does not support touchscreens, and doesn’t look much different from XP. If you buy a new computer that comes with 8.1 and decide you don’t like it, you can “downgrade” to Windows 7. Downgrading is a huge hassle that requires having the proper “license rights”, the purchase of Windows 7 Professional at $139 for the OEM version, or $209 for the full retail version, phoning home to Microsoft for permission to do what you want with your own computer, and then installing it. The OEM version comes with no technical support; otherwise it’s pretty much the same as the full retail version. Microsoft considers this a temporary downgrade, until you come to your senses and learn to love 8.1.

Another option is to purchase Windows 8.1 or 7 and install it on your XP computer. If your XP machine is more than six years old, chances are it won’t support the newer Windows releases, because they need considerably more power and storage. Your favorite XP applications may or may not work on the newer Windowses, if you even still have the original installation media, and peripherals such as scanners and printers may not be supported. So the most likely scenario is buying a whole new computer, and possibly new applications and peripherals. You can still get Win 7 PCs, though that option is slowly evaporating.

Try Linux

Any option other than keeping your existing Windows XP system is going to cost money, hassles, or both. So why not give Linux a try? It is a mature, rock-solid professional computing platform you can rely on. You can download it for free, copy it to a USB stick or DVD, and try it without installing it to your hard drive. If there is enough room on your hard drive, you can install Linux alongside XP and choose the one you want to run at boot. If your XP computer is powerful enough and you have your original installation media, you can run XP inside a virtual machine on Linux. Yes, you can have it all.

Let’s run through the pros and cons of switching to Linux. First the good parts:

  • Immune to Windows malware, and you don’t need anti-malware software
  • Offers both free of cost and supported options
  • Runs great on older, less-powerful hardware
  • No insane license restrictions
  • No artificially crippled versions to justify multiple price points
  • No phoning home to the mothership for permission to use your own computer the way you want to
  • Flexible and configurable
  • Easy one-click software installation and removal, from secure sources
  • Great hardware support, without having to hunt down drivers
  • A giant world of great software for free, and lots of great commercial software
  • Maintained by an open, global community of first-rate developers and contributors
  • All Linux software is available on the Internet, so you never lose it.

There are also some downsides you must take into account. Your Windows applications won’t run on Linux, unless they also have Linux versions. For example, Web browsers such as Firefox, Opera, and Chrome run on Windows and Linux. Productivity apps like Moneydance (personal finance), LibreOffice (office suite), Thunderbird (email) and a lot of games run on Windows and Linux. Windows apps like Outlook, Internet Explorer and MS Office do not run on Linux. So you’ll need to make an inventory of the apps you need and see if they have Linux versions, or if there is an equivalent you can use. I’ll be surprised if you can’t find equivalent or better alternatives.

You can make Linux look like Windows. You’re still going to have to learn some new ways of doing thing, but as it’s all just pointy-clicky it’s no big deal. Windows 7 is different from XP, and Windows 8.1 is radically different, so any change means you’ll have to learn some new things.

Buying a Linux Computer

Installing Linux is pretty easy, but if you’d rather buy a good computer with Linux already installed there are a lot of great independent Linux computer vendors. They are skilled specialists, and you’ll get good hardware and great service. The typical low-budget Windows PC is specced to the micro-penny, and built with the cheapest possible components. Linux shops like System76 and ZaReason engineer their computers with reliable, good-quality components, and they stand behind their products.

Which Linux?

Another Linux advantage is hundreds of variants called distributions, or distros for short. Every one is tailored a little bit differently. Ubuntu Linux is very popular, and offers both free-of-cost downloads, and commercial support options. Linux Mint is a popular Ubuntu variant. openSUSE and Fedora Linux are great distros for advanced users who like to stay on top of new technologies. Mageia Linux is a wonderful desktop Linux for beginners to advanced users. Please visit the Resources section (below) for pointers to all kinds of helpful information.

The Myth That Must Die

I am not a Windows fan. I’ve worked exclusively in Linux since the early 2000s, except for occasional forays into Windows to keep up with new developments. I’ve written books, hundreds of how-to articles, done Web development, and all of my multimedia production on Linux. You’d think the richest software company on the planet would be able to make a bulletproof, secure, easy-to-use operating system. They have failed at this, and are still failing. One of my biggest peeves is that Microsoft’s marketing created the false illusion that personal computers are easy to use, and require no special training. This is not true. It has never been true. A personal computer is an extremely complex and sophisticated power tool. Just owning a computer does not magically bestow all manner of skills on you. It does not make you into an accountant, publisher, artist, musician, big data analyst, security expert, writer, scientist, or anything at all. Except perhaps befuddled a lot. Windows is not easy. Linux is many times easier to operate and maintain, and many times less restrictive.

You Might Want Android

If all you really need is a nice little portable device for Web surfing, social media, email, reading books, listening to music, playing games, and watching movies then get an Android tablet. Android is a Linux variant, but stripped-down and simplified. You literally poke it with a finger to operate it. ZaReason has a really nice 9.7″ tablet, the ZaTab, that is completely open, and not locked down like so many Android devices. Android is also coming to laptops and desktops, so keep an eye on the market to watch for something that might work for you.

The bottom line is that any change away from Windows XP is going to involve expense and a learning curve, so why not consider leaving Windows-land, and investing your time and money in the solid, reliable Linux world?

The end of Microsoft support for XP has some considering Linux or other OS moves. Think hard before you go down that path

Years back, I was very interested in Linux as a desktop OS. Red Hat was my first choice, but I moved on to Caldera, then Ubuntu. I installed it, played around a bit, downloaded some applications to try and mimic my Windows OS, get bored, and moved back to Windows.

I repeated this exploration every few years to confirm that Windows still rules the desktop world. I’ve also played with Google’s Chrome OS on a Chromebook, and I like it — but not so much that I would switch. For better or for worse, I’m a Windows guy. No doubt many of you are as well.

[ Why I won’t miss Windows XP. | InfoWorld special report: Requiem for Windows XP. | Want a new PC but not Windows 8? Our picks for the best 12 Windows 7 PCs still available. | Stay atop key Microsoft technologies in InfoWorld’s Technology: Microsoft newsletter. ]

But all the angst around the end of support from Microsoft for Windows XP has resurrected the question of whether Linux is a viable desktop option for those who simply don’t want to go from Windows XP to Windows 7 or 8. Personally, I understand not wanting to move yourself or your users to Windows 8. Even Microsoft seems to have realized the switch to the Metro UI was too fast (and we should see a better endeavor with Windows 9).

But there is no legitimate reason to avoid Windows 7. Aside from the small visual adjustment of a Start orb instead of a Start button, the UI transition is practically invsible. And you get a ton of really cool security enhancements and feature upgrades. Users shouldn’t balk at that move.

Nevertheless, I see a lot of pitches for Linux — Zorin, Ubuntu, Mint — as the better path for those leaving Windows XP. I’m sorry, but your users will hate you if you dump a Linux system on them after years of working with XP. Just because you (or your company) has been too cheap to upgrade to modern Windows doesn’t mean your people haven’t been buying new PCs at home. Many of them are already Windows 7- (or even 😎 savvy, and giving them a Linux PC won’t go smoothly.

It’s true that many of the modern Linux OSes today are cooler than XP, but if you think that users haven’t seen a new Windows OS in the last 10 years, you’re wrong. Trust me, they have. Their frame of comparative reference isn’t XP, but Windows 7 and perhaps Windows 8 or Mac OS X.

From an enterprise perspective, the key argument against Linux is the lack of Active Directory integration. However, there are tools like Samba (an open source project for Windows/Linux integration) and Winbind (a daemon that runs on Samba clients) that can help authenticate users with ActiveDirectory credentials. But you still can’t apply group policies to Linux PCs, and there’s no email client for Linux that’s compatible with Exchange Server 2007 or later; you’re stuck with MAPI connections. Once again, Windows rules the enterprise.

Moving to Linux also means giving up most business software you and your users know. Mac users have struggled with this dilemma for decades, but they have a much wider variety of business software options than Linux users do. If you’re struggling with software parity for Macs, see what happens when you bring in Linux.

You might be thinking that one of the new Android PCs might be the way to go for people who need to leave XP but don’t want Windows 7 or 8. Maybe — there’s good Exchange and third-party Active Directory support and some decent productivity apps for Android, but the app options drop precipitously after that.

And forget about the familiar multiwindow work style. It might make sense for Google to get the Chromebook and Android OS teams together to create one solution if the plan is to put Android on the desktop, but the truth is that “one OS to unite them all” hasn’t worked out so well for Microsoft, and I’m not sure Google would do better. By contrast, Apple has wisely kept its OS and iOS separate. I love Windows 8 on my tablet but prefer Windows 7 on my desktop: two systems, two OSes.

When your XP users come in and see their new computer running Windows 7 (or 8) with Office 2013, they might be nervous, and they might need some training to get up to speed with 10 years of Windows development. But they will not be completely lost. They will, however, be lost if you switch them to any other operating system: OS X, Linux, Chrome OS, Android OS, or whatever.

Furthermore, the hoops you’ll have to jump through to get those OSes integrated into your enterprise will have you regret the day you wanted to break free from the Microsoft mothership. Face it: It’s not “you will be assimilated.” You already have been assimilated. Admit it, and move on.

What is Windows XP end of support?

Microsoft provided support for Windows XP for the past 12 years. But the time came for us, along with our hardware and software partners, to invest our resources toward supporting more recent technologies so that we can continue to deliver great new experiences. As a result, technical assistance for Windows XP is no longer available, including automatic updates that help protect your PC.

Microsoft has also stopped providing Microsoft Security Essentials for download on Windows XP. If you already have Microsoft Security Essentials installed, you’ll continue to receive antimalware signature updates for a limited time. However, please note that Microsoft Security Essentials (or any other antivirus software) will have limited effectiveness on PCs that do not have the latest security updates. This means that PCs running Windows XP will not be secure and will still be at risk for infection.

What happens if I continue to use Windows XP?

If you continue to use Windows XP now that support has ended, your computer will still work but it might become more vulnerable to security risks and viruses. Internet Explorer 8 is also no longer supported, so if your Windows XP PC is connected to the Internet and you use Internet Explorer 8 to surf the web, you might be exposing your PC to additional threats. Also, as more software and hardware manufacturers continue to optimize for more recent versions of Windows, you can expect to encounter more apps and devices that do not work with Windows XP.

How do I stay protected?

To stay protected now that support has ended, you have two options:

Upgrade your current PC

Very few older computers are able to run Windows 10, which is the latest version of Windows. We recommend that you check out the Windows 10 specifications page to find out if your PC meets the system requirements for Windows 10. For more detailed information, read the FAQ.

Get a new PC

If your current PC can’t run Windows 10, it might be time to consider shopping for a new one. Be sure to explore our great selection of new PCs. They’re more powerful, lightweight, and stylish than ever before—and with an average price that’s considerably less expensive than the average PC was 14 years ago.

Tweet This

Forget Wolverine, clearly there is nothing more difficult to kill than Windows XP . Having finally ditched support for the 12 year old operating system in April,

No Microsoft hasn’t changed its mind yet again. Instead the life extension comes courtesy of a simple hack spotted by betanews. The workaround exploits Microsoft’s continued support of ‘Windows Embedded Industry’ (previously ‘Windows Embedded POSReady’) which will last until 2019. Embedded Industry is designed for use in industry devices across retail, manufacturing, healthcare and – you guessed it – the operating system is based on Windows XP Service Pack 3.

Consequently the security updates that continue to be released for Windows Embedded Industry are essentially the same as what Microsoft would have released for Windows XP, had support continued. Now with a simple hack you can trick Windows Update into thinking Windows XP is Windows Embedded Industry.

This is how you do it:

1. Create a text document, and call it XP.reg. Be sure that the ending is ‘.reg’ not ‘XP.reg.txt.’ (check this in Windows Explorer by going to Tools > Folder Options > View and check ‘Show hidden files and folders’)

2. Right click the file, select ‘Edit’ and type in:

3. Save it and double click the file twice with the left mouse button which will add it to the registry.

You’re done. Windows XP will now tell Microsoft Update it is Windows Embedded Industry and automatically download and install security updates as they are released. The snag is this hack only works for Windows XP 32bit because Windows XP 64bit is based on Windows Server 2003. There is a more complex workaround for that which can be found here.

Now come the caveats. Firstly the updates are designed for Windows Embedded Industry not Windows XP and while that should not matter, it is possible there may be some compatibility issues. Secondly – and most importantly – it is impossible to say whether these hacks will keep working until support ends for Windows Embedded Industry in 2019 or if Microsoft will close this loophole.

The optimistic viewpoint is Windows XP’s end of life status should mean it receives no future software updates so Microsoft would have to make another U-turn to close the loophole.

The cynical viewpoint is Microsoft would prefer users to move to a newer operating system so closing the loophole would be in its interest. This is a fair point given the age of Windows XP, but countered by the fact 1-in-4 PCs still use it. Microsoft also hasn’t helped its case after releasing misleading data earlier this month suggesting Windows XP is safer than Windows Vista and Windows 7.

Either way Microsoft is left in a tricky situation. Following the controversial ‘Update 1’ patch Windows 8.1 is actually a very good operating system, but its reputation is irreparably damaged.

Furthermore, while it is fair to stop providing a free warranty service for a 12 year old OS, Microsoft is offering military and government organisations a paid service to keep their Windows XP computers safe as part of a scheme dubbed ‘Clandestine Fox ’. Surely this should also be a paid option for users who wish to stay safe, but can’t afford new hardware or fear the leap to a free Linux alternative like Ubuntu.

Windows XP support ends soon. I don’t want to change my OS so I want to download all of the updates and service packs and put them on a CD/flash drive. If I go here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/913086/en-us, do I need to download the whole list or just the most recent one to get all of them? If I need to download the whole list, is there somewhere else I can download them all in one file?

Report abuse

Replies (9) 

Report abuse

25 people found this reply helpful

Was this reply helpful?

Sorry this didn’t help.

Great! Thanks for your feedback.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback.

See 10crackers and Shenan Stanley’s reply to an earlier post

The current time and date right now in British Columbia, Canada is 5:34 PM
Thursday, April 3, 2014
Pacific Daylight Time (PDT) -0700 UTC

UTC/GMT is 00:34 on Friday, April 4, 2014

Current Weather Conditions in Vancouver

Light Rain 46°F / 8°C

Report abuse

6 people found this reply helpful

Was this reply helpful?

Sorry this didn’t help.

Great! Thanks for your feedback.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback.

Report abuse

9 people found this reply helpful

Was this reply helpful?

Sorry this didn’t help.

Great! Thanks for your feedback.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback.

Report abuse

3 people found this reply helpful

Was this reply helpful?

Sorry this didn’t help.

Great! Thanks for your feedback.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback.

The problem is that there is no way to properly assess what updates you need. It depends on what hardware you have, what software you have installed, what updates are already installed, etc.

The only entity that can properly tell you what updates you need is Windows Update.

Report abuse

3 people found this reply helpful

Was this reply helpful?

Sorry this didn’t help.

Great! Thanks for your feedback.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback.

Thank you so much for your answer and advice. Much appreciated!

Report abuse

4 people found this reply helpful

Was this reply helpful?

Sorry this didn’t help.

Great! Thanks for your feedback.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback.

You can start by reading this thread:

Report abuse

3 people found this reply helpful

Was this reply helpful?

Sorry this didn’t help.

Great! Thanks for your feedback.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback.

Report abuse

3 people found this reply helpful

Was this reply helpful?

Sorry this didn’t help.

Great! Thanks for your feedback.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback, it helps us improve the site.

How satisfied are you with this reply?

Thanks for your feedback.

Because the capability is exclusive to Windows Update. There are some tools out there like Belarc Advisor that attempt to show missing updates for your computer, but it will never be as complete of a list as Windows Update will do.

If you’re a business that still requires XP, then use a WSUS server as an intermediary to install updates.

This problem is completely solved in Windows 10 as it uses cumulative updates, so one update will have everything ever released for Windows 10.

Dear Lifehacker,
I have an old laptop running Windows XP, and I love it. I’ve upgraded my other machines to Windows 7 and 8, but this laptop is too old to do so. Now I’m hearing Microsoft will stop issuing any updates at all for XP next year. What does that really mean? What will happen if I continue to use XP, will it get hacked or viruses without Microsoft’s “support”?

Sincerely,
Netbook Lover

Dear Netbook Lover,
Using Windows XP isn’t a bad thing, regardless of how guilty Microsoft may want you to feel for not upgrading. Still, that doesn’t mean your beloved netbook (or any old PC) is destined for the trash heap. Here are some things you can do with your old machine that make sense, and how you can continue using it the way you like without fearing for your internet safety.

What “End of Support” Really Means

“End of Support,” according to Microsoft , means that after a given date, no additional service packs, fixes, online support, patches, or security updates will be released for a specific product. This also means that Microsoft will no longer issue security updates, patches, or fixes for freshly discovered exploits, viruses, or other security issues. The company’s default response will be to either update your operating system or use a utility for that operating system that can protect you from those threats, if one exists.

There are actually two “end of support” dates: the end of “mainstream support,” and the end of “extended support.” The difference between the two has more to do with the dates a product was released and when a new version of that same product comes around, and less to do with what Microsoft will or won’t do, so don’t worry too much about that (if you want to read more about the difference though, Microsoft’s Support Lifecycle Policy goes into great detail on the topic).

For example, Windows XP with Service Pack 3 went end of mainstream support on April 14, 2009. It’ll go end of extended support on April 8, 2014, after having been extended by Microsoft several times beyond its normal end-date. Microsoft has said several times they won’t extend the support date any longer here, and after April 8, 2014, you won’t get any more security updates or hotfixes. That doesn’t mean your XP machine is useless, but it does mean that Microsoft isn’t looking out for it anymore.

Use It For Non-Sensitive Tasks or Offline DIY Projects

If you’re comfortable using your Windows XP machine now, that shouldn’t change in the next year or so. If you are worried about security issues, just take your system offline and use it for lighter duties that don’t involve sensitive data. You could turn it into a feature-rich ebook reader , for example, and keep it off the internet unless you absolutely have to be. Alternatively, you could just use it for things like writing, music, movies, or anything else that doesn’t necessarily demand an always-on internet connection.

You could also use it for some useful DIY projects that don’t require an internet connection, like an under-the-cabinet kitchen PC for your family recipes or even tutorial videos, or a wall-mounted computer for looking up quick things like calendar appointments or for use as a digital picture frame. Check out these other low-cost ways to repurpose an old laptop , or our recent Hacker Challenge , which is full of other great, useful ideas, like turning your old laptop into a tablet, or using it as a wall-mounted command center.

It’s possible that new exploits and viruses will appear for Windows XP after it’s gone end of support that Microsoft won’t address with security updates or fixes. However, Windows 7 has already surpassed Windows XP in market share , and is a more attractive target, so don’t expect too much. If your XP machine is all patched up now and running an updated, working security suite, there’s no reason to assume that on April 9, 2014 it’ll suddenly get hacked. However, the most secure system is the one not connected to the internet, so if you’re worried, you can always keep it offline—that doesn’t make your computer useless.

Secure Your XP Installation As Much As Possible

Like we mentioned, the best thing for you to do is make sure your netbook is as up-to-date and secure as possible. If you’re running a security suite like our favorite , Avast! Free Antivirus , and it continues working and getting regular updates after end of support, you’re in pretty good shape.

Similarly, make sure that whatever web browser you enjoy using plans to continue support for Windows XP. Both Chrome and Firefox still support Windows XP, and still issue security updates and patches for their older versions. Keep your browser up to date as well, and make sure it’s bolstered by some good privacy-protecting browser extensions . You may even consider choosing and using a VPN to further enhance your security.

Granted, these are tips that are applicable to anyone, no matter what OS they’re using, but the older and potentially more vulnerable your operating system is, the more important it is for you to practice good internet hygiene and safe browsing. There will inevitably be more holes and issues with the software you use for an outdated OS, even if the OS itself doesn’t have significant issues. It’s definitely worse to be stuck using Firefox 3.6 than it is to be running Windows XP, for example.

Try to Upgrade Anyway

We know you mentioned that your system didn’t have the specs to be upgraded to Windows 7, but we would be remiss if we didn’t point out that the system requirements for Windows 7 are pretty forgiving. If your XP computer was built anywhere in the last five to seven years, odds are it can run Windows 7. It may not love it, and it may not be the fastest machine on the block, but it’ll run, and that’ll improve your overall security, get you continued support and updates, and net you updated, currently-supported applications without glaring or unpatched vulnerabilities.

We’d suggest backing up your data and doing a clean install on your machine, mostly because it’ll free you from anything left behind from your old operating system. If it’s still slow, you could always try to overclock it to eke out a little more speed. Check out out guide to making the most of your netbook too. Sticking to lightweight apps and services will vastly improve your experience, especially if you have to update the OS.

Updated on October 5, 2017

This article contains updated information regarding Windows XP Home and Professional Edition End of Support (EOS) for the following Trend Micro products:

  • OfficeScan 11.0 (including SP1) and XG (12.0)
  • Worry-Free Business Security 9.0 (Standard & Advanced On-Premise versions)
  • Worry-Free Business Security Services
  • Vulnerability Protection 2.0
  • Endpoint Application Control 2.0
  • Endpoint Encryption 5.0

Note that this is an updated XP EOS announcement that has been recently modified for the products mentioned above. You may visit the the original announcement for the unchanged dates meant for other products.

Since its release in October 2001, Microsoft Windows XP has been utilized extensively by both corporate and consumer users around the world. Even though it has officially reached End-of-Support (EOS) status, it remains a popular operating system (OS) even today, especially in corporate environments.

Microsoft announced the official EOS date for Windows XP (Home and Professional) last April 9, 2014, which effectively ended the Microsoft support for all bug fixes and vulnerability patches. Microsoft will not address any vulnerabilities targeted at Windows XP discovered after the official EOS date. This may be a concern for users, especially those in business and corporate environments who have not yet migrated to the latest supported OS.

Trend Micro strongly recommends that users migrate to the latest supported OS version as soon as possible, but we also understand the complexity of migrating a large environment. Many companies may still be in the process of migrating essential legacy systems.

Therefore, Trend Micro has decided to extend support for Windows XP-based clients using the business Endpoint Protection products and versions listed below (with dates) in order to help our business customers safely migrate to the latest supported Microsoft OS (currently Windows 10):

Product XP End of Life (Support)*
Worry-Free Business Security 9.0 January 31, 2018
Worry-Free Business Security Services January 31, 2018
Endpoint Encryption 5.0 January 31, 2018
OfficeScan 11.0 SP1 January 31, 2019
OfficeScan XG (12.0) January 31, 2020
Vulnerability Protection 2.0 December 31, 2020
Endpoint Application Control 2.0 December 31, 2020

*Please note that this date does not necessarily correspond directly to the End-of-Life (EOL) date for the product version itself. The date above specifically notes the last day that Windows XP will be officially supported for the listed product. However, for some product versions the date may be the same as the overall EOL date – i.e. OfficeScan 11.0 (11/17/2018).

Trend Micro will continue to re-assess Windows XP support for the above mentioned products that are still being supported and will update this article accordingly if/when there are any changes.

After 12 years, support for Windows XP ended April 8, 2014. Microsoft will no longer provide security updates or technical support for the Windows XP operating system. It is critical to migrate now to a modern operating system. The best way to migrate from Windows XP to Windows 10 is to buy a new device.

What does this mean?

Now is the time to take action and upgrade to Windows 10. Security updates patch vulnerabilities that may be exploited by malware and help keep users and their data safer. PCs running Windows XP after April 8, 2014, are not considered secure.

How do I migrate off Windows XP?

Placeholder Title

Windows xp support ends today here’s how to switch to linux

Small to medium business

Windows xp support ends today here’s how to switch to linux

Enterprise customers

Microsoft offers large organizations (500+ employees) in-depth technical resources, tools, and expert guidance to ease the deployment and management of Windows 10, Microsoft 365, and other products and technologies.

Now is the time to shift to Microsoft 365

Microsoft 365 offers a complete, intelligent solution, including Office 365, Windows 10, and Enterprise Mobility + Security; empowers creativity and secure collaboration.

Potential risks of staying with Windows XP

Security

Without critical Windows XP security updates, your PC may become vulnerable to harmful viruses, spyware, and other malicious software which can steal or damage your business data and information. Antivirus software will also not be able to fully protect you once Windows XP itself is unsupported.

Compliance

Businesses that are governed by regulatory obligations such as HIPAA may find that they are no longer able to satisfy compliance requirements.

Lack of independent software vendorsupport

Many software vendors will no longer support their products running on Windows XP as they are unable to receive Windows XP updates. For example, the new Office takes advantage of the modern Windows and will not run on Windows XP.

Hardware manufacturer support

Most PC hardware manufacturers will stop supporting Windows XP on existing and new hardware. This will also mean that drivers required to run Windows XP on new hardware may not be available.

Frequently asked questions

Windows XP can still be installed and activated after end of support. Computers running Windows XP will still work but won’t receive any Microsoft Updates or be able to leverage technical support. Activations will still be required for retail installations of Windows XP after this date as well.

Windows XP Mode followed the same support lifecycle as Windows XP, extended support ended on April 8, 2014.

Windows XP used with MED-V followed the same support cycle as Windows XP, support ended Aril 8th, 2014.

Microsoft Security Essentials installed before April 8, 2014 received anti-malware signature updates through July 14, 2015. PCs running Windows XP now should no longer be considered protected.

Microsoft’s Malicious Software Removal Tool for Windows XP continued through July 14, 2015. PCs running Windows XP now should no longer be considered protected.

While customers may continue to use System Center, Microsoft Intune, and the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit to manage and deploy Windows XP past April 8, 2014, those products will no longer support Windows XP, and any technical issues which may arise will not be addressed.

See the Windows Embedded product lifecycle page and Microsoft Support for more information on Windows XP Embedded lifecycles.

Today marks 60 days until the end of support for Windows XP and we need your help spreading the word to ensure people are safe and secure on modern up-to-date PCs. As a reader of this blog, it’s unlikely you are running Windows XP on your PC. However, you may know someone who is and have even served as their tech support. To help, we have created a special page on Windows.com that explains what “end of support” means for people still on Windows XP and their options to stay protected after support ends on April 8th:

Upgrade their current PC if it meets the system requirements for Windows 8.1. They can download and run the Windows Upgrade Assistant on their current PC to check and see if it can run Windows 8.1 and then follow the steps in this tutorial to upgrade (including backing up all their data). They will not be able to keep any files, settings, or applications when upgrading Windows XP, so they will need to back up all their files and locate any installation discs (or purchase confirmation emails) prior to doing the upgrade.

Get a new PC. The easiest path to Windows 8.1 is with new devices and there are offers and deals from many retailers to help people get a new device. They can stay up to date on the latest offers on Windows PCs and tablets via the Windows Buying Guide and learn how to choose a new PC. Once they choose and buy a new device, they can transfer their files from their old PC by copying them to an external hard drive, USB flash drive, or cloud storage like SkyDrive*. And they can watch these videos to get familiar with Windows 8.1.