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How to breed ghost shrimp

How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

Ghost shrimp, also called glass shrimp or grass shrimp, average 1.5 inches long. You can see their insides, including the food in their stomachs, through their transparent bodies. Baby ghost shrimp, or fry, are so tiny that you cannot see them easily when they hatch. Most large aquarium fish will eat the nutritious ghost shrimp. Use a maternity tank for hatching and raising feeder ghost shrimp.

Tank Preparation

A 10- gallon freshwater aquarium is a suitable maternity tank for ghost shrimp. Place a layer of gravel in the bottom of the tank. A sponge filter with a small air pump will aerate the aquarium without harming ghost shrimp fry. Ghost shrimp require water temperature of 65 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Plant lots of small-leaved and floating plants, such as anacharis, duckweed and hornwort, and put a small artificial wood log in the aquarium.

Lighting

Ghost shrimp fry will swim toward light and can be injured by swimming into the walls of their aquarium. Prevent this by keeping a light turned on over the aquarium 24 hours a day. Cover all sides of the tank with black construction paper to keep out ambient light.

Selecting a Female

It’s not difficult to distinguish female ghost shrimp from males. Female ghost shrimp are larger than males; only females have a ridge along the tops of their tails. Pregnant females have a greenish hue — you’re seeing the green eggs she’s carrying, through her transparent body. Healthy ghost shrimp are active swimmers; they have no milky streaks or colorations.

From Eggs to Fry

A ghost shrimp has several pairs of legs under the rear of her body, called swimmerets. A pregnant female carries 20 to 30 eggs attached to her swimmerets. The pinhead-size eggs hatch after about three weeks. Fry stay on their mother’s swimmerets for the first week after hatching. They look like tiny mosquito larvae. Ghost shrimp fry are difficult to see until they reach 6 to 8 weeks of age.

Growing the Fry

Don’t vacuum the fry tank. Feed your ghost shrimp fry liquid fry food, daphnia, newborn brine shrimp and microworms every two to three hours, 24 hours a day. After the babies separate from their mom’s swimmerets, remove her from the maternity tank. The fry will molt every few months. Ghost shrimp are scavengers; as they mature they can eat flake food, young snails and small fish.

Ghost Shrimp as Feeders

A natural food source for predatory fish, ghost shrimp are feeder size at 1/2-inch to 3/4-inch long. They provide essential fats and protein for live-food eating fish, such as pipefish, seadragons and seahorses. Almost all large fish find ghost shrimp to be delicious.

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This article will teach you how to breed the easiest of the freshwater shrimp: red cherry shrimp (Neocaridina denticulata sinensis). Red cherry shrimp, or RCS, are in a group called “dwarf shrimp”. The adults can reach up to 1.5 inches (4cm) in length. RCS need no special tanks, foods, dances, or shamans to breed. Tank conditions are easy to set up. They are a fun addition to an aquarium and eat uneaten fish food.

How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

Set up your tank. You will need a 5 to 10 gallon or 20 to 40 litre tank, a heater (to keep temperature at 75F-80F or 24-27C during cool nights), gravel (dark will stress the shrimps less), and a bubble filter that is cycled.

  • To cycle a bubble filter in a new tank, put the new bubble filter in an old tank, turn it on, and wait for 4 weeks. RCS will not survive the cycling process and will die from high levels of ammonia or nitrites.
  • Do not use a power filter unless the whole intake is covered with pantyhose (or something with similar very small holes) and secured with a zip tie (otherwise shrimp may get sucked into the filter and pureed).

How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

Purchase 5-10 red cherry shrimp. RCS cost $1.50 – $3 (US) each at a pet store. They cost much less per shrimp via online on websites and forums, many people also offer free shipping like $20 or so for 20 or so shrimp, it is easy to get a good deal these days. Try to get a mix of clear (males can have some red as well) males and red females. If you get 10 shrimp, your chance of getting both males and females is pretty much guaranteed. [1] X Research source

  • If someone wants to ship with a method that takes longer than 3 days, ask for pictures about how the shrimp are packaged, Cherry shrimp are VERY hard to kill and will most likely have no problem with a week in transit. Take into consideration the weather over the distance it will be shipped, ask for heat packs or ice packs in the shipping container to help counter ambient temperatures if that is a potential problem. Also request breather bags.
  • Do not buy RCS (or any fish or shrimp) that the pet store received in the last 3 or 4 days. Any deaths from the stress of shipping tend to occur during the 3-4 days after putting them in the store tanks, so buy after this period. Buy only shrimp that have been in the store tanks at least 4 days.

  • It is normal and desirable for the shipping bag containing shrimp to be filled with 1/3 to 1/2 water. This maximizes the trapped oxygen in the bag during shipping. This only applies loosely to the bags that are just normal plastic. If shipping with these bags, see if seller can use pure oxygen opposed to just air.
  • 2 Answers

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    These are instructions on how to breed ghost shrimps.

    1.Set up a freshwater aquarium that is large enough to keep a breeding population of ghost shrimp. The tank should be 10 gallons or larger in order to house the population comfortably. If the tank is to be shared with other species, make sure they are non-aggressive types that won’t eat the shrimp. Set up the tank with gravel, a filter, light and aeration. Get sinking pellets to feed the shrimp.

    Step2.Use a side filter rather than an under-gravel filter. Once you have young ghost shrimp, they will be small enough that they can fit between the rocks and be sucked into the large holes that under-gravel filters have.

    Step3Add a few areas in the tank for the ghost shrimp to hide. The species love to hide under things, so provide castles, rocks or other items that the shrimp can crawl into.

    Step4Put several males and several females together. You can tell females by their larger size. They often have small green dots underneath their abdomens. These are eggs that will eventually hatch into the baby shrimp. A female whose eggs have already hatched will have tiny pink dots under her abdomen. These are the tiny babies that are clinging to their mother.

    Step5Take the females who have visible eggs or babies into another tank or into a special breeding area of the same tank. A new tank should be a similar size and set up as the old one. A breeding area is a closed-off portion of the main tank. But unless the closed-off breeding area is completely closed, the tiny baby shrimp may escape and be eaten by the other fish and shrimp in the tank. The safer option is to remove them to a completely separate tank until they grow larger.

    Step6Take the mother out of the fry tank after the babies have hatched. If the babies are clinging to the mother, place some feed in the water to try to draw them away from her. Feed the babies young brine shrimp. The younger the baby brine shrimp, the easier it will be for the baby ghost shrimp to eat them. Once the babies are about half an inch long, they can be taken out of the fry tank and placed into the adult tank.

    i want to breed ghost shrimp for my kribensis cichlids. they adore hunting them. i might put some in with my betta too so he can try hunting them. how do i breed them. i thought i would save money that way

    4 Answers

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    First thing I would suggest is to buy the ghost shrimp from the fish store that are allready holding eggs. You will see them in the tail end of the shrimp if you look closely. The reason I would suggest this is this way you know you are getting not only some females but females that can produce.So buy up what you can of the egg holders and scoop up some others that are just a little smaller because the males are a little smaller then the females and your obviously gonna need some of them to. Then take whatever containers you are going to use at home (you’ll need two one can be a bucket) and put sponge filters in them. From their all you will do is move the egg bearing females to isolation in the second container and keep them there until they release their eggs. A bit after they release their eggs take them and put them back into the nain tank of shrimp. For food I usually just mince up flake food and they eat it but they will take any type of fish flake/pellet as they are scavengers. Once the shrimp in the baby bucket are get a little larger just toss them in to the main tank of shrimp. Also on the subject of looseing shrimp to cannabilism you should really only move the large shrimp out of the baby bucket, also some stuff to climb on will keep them seperated a little, and as long as everything is well fed then you will lose a minimum. Any other steps to protect small ones are not worth the effort for what you will save.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Just buy like 20-50 shrimp and put them in a tank with a heater and sponge filter and you’re set! I would actually recommend you use cherry shrimp, they’re a bit more expensive, but they won’t eat their babies, and ghost shrimp may. You can find really good deals on cherry shrimp on e-bay (like 20 for $24). Most stores will sell them for $3-5 each, so it’s a good savings.

    it is very easy to breed them. basically the female will produce eggson her swimming flap. and when she does a male must fertilize them. but u cannot tell if they are or not. but that is simply it. the babies will come out of the eggs and they will feed on microorganisms. the mother will not eat them but u should remove her. the babies take along time to get to eating size for the kribensis u have. about 4 months it will take. i reccommend getting something else for them to eat. get female guppies that have fat bellys and wait for them to give birth. the fry are a good size for the kribensis to eat from the day of birth.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Get a extensive team of them, and stimulate their organic habbitat, with many stay vegetation and hiding places. Then basically enable them to do their very own factor, and beofre you be attentive to it you have a lot of eggs(:

    i want to breed ghost shrimp for my kribensis cichlids. they adore hunting them. i might put some in with my betta too so he can try hunting them. how do i breed them. i thought i would save money that way

    4 Answers

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    First thing I would suggest is to buy the ghost shrimp from the fish store that are allready holding eggs. You will see them in the tail end of the shrimp if you look closely. The reason I would suggest this is this way you know you are getting not only some females but females that can produce.So buy up what you can of the egg holders and scoop up some others that are just a little smaller because the males are a little smaller then the females and your obviously gonna need some of them to. Then take whatever containers you are going to use at home (you’ll need two one can be a bucket) and put sponge filters in them. From their all you will do is move the egg bearing females to isolation in the second container and keep them there until they release their eggs. A bit after they release their eggs take them and put them back into the nain tank of shrimp. For food I usually just mince up flake food and they eat it but they will take any type of fish flake/pellet as they are scavengers. Once the shrimp in the baby bucket are get a little larger just toss them in to the main tank of shrimp. Also on the subject of looseing shrimp to cannabilism you should really only move the large shrimp out of the baby bucket, also some stuff to climb on will keep them seperated a little, and as long as everything is well fed then you will lose a minimum. Any other steps to protect small ones are not worth the effort for what you will save.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Just buy like 20-50 shrimp and put them in a tank with a heater and sponge filter and you’re set! I would actually recommend you use cherry shrimp, they’re a bit more expensive, but they won’t eat their babies, and ghost shrimp may. You can find really good deals on cherry shrimp on e-bay (like 20 for $24). Most stores will sell them for $3-5 each, so it’s a good savings.

    it is very easy to breed them. basically the female will produce eggson her swimming flap. and when she does a male must fertilize them. but u cannot tell if they are or not. but that is simply it. the babies will come out of the eggs and they will feed on microorganisms. the mother will not eat them but u should remove her. the babies take along time to get to eating size for the kribensis u have. about 4 months it will take. i reccommend getting something else for them to eat. get female guppies that have fat bellys and wait for them to give birth. the fry are a good size for the kribensis to eat from the day of birth.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Get a extensive team of them, and stimulate their organic habbitat, with many stay vegetation and hiding places. Then basically enable them to do their very own factor, and beofre you be attentive to it you have a lot of eggs(:

    Breeding and Raising the Ghost Shrimp
    Palaeomonetes patulous
    By: Corydora_FREAK
    All photos by author except as noted

    The Ghost Shrimp has been a staple in the aquarium hobby for many years, and I am always hearing questions on how to get them to breed in an aquarium. I have had great success not only getting them to breed, but also raising the fry, which seems to be the most challenging part of it all.

    The Ghost shrimp is really a ready spawner in the home aquarium, but like any animal, conditions need to be right or you will not get anything. I keep my Ghost Shrimp in a 10 gallon tank all to themselves simply because these small animals are prey to almost all tropical fish, and they will not produce eggs if they feel threatened.

    Anatomy
    Before we get started lets review on some Ghost Shrimp biology.
    http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m. myofshrimp.jpg
    Courtesy of Google images (ghost shrimp anatomy)

    Getting Started
    The reproductive cycle will not begin if you don’t have 4 things for the shrimp
    Security: they wont breed if they are threatened by predators
    Males and Females: Seems obvious right? Can you sex your shrimp? Well Yes, you can! And it’s rather easy! Although it is almost impossible until the shrimp are full grown. The female has a much larger body size full grown, she will max out at about an inch and a quarter, while males stay much smaller at about 3 quarters of an inch, and they also have a much slimmer body style, the females tail and pleopods will be much larger to accommodate the eggs. Unlike most fish, you can have a relatively low number ratio of males to females. I have 1 male fertilize 2 females.
    The Water parameters: As with breeding any fish or invertebrate, you need 0 Ammonia, Nitrite, and as close to zero as possible on Nitrates. Shrimp are very delicate and need matured substrate and clean water to thrive and in turn, breed. The temperature needs to be 73-78 degrees Fahrenheit or 20-30 degrees Celsius. Keep the salinity low, I use one teaspoon of aquarium salt for 10 gallons. Very small amounts.
    Readiness of Food( but feed properly!) The shrimp breed in the abundant seasons in the wild, if they have plentiful food sources it will greatly increase the chances of eggs to be laid. I cant stress enough the importance of NOT overfeeding!! A great way to give your shrimp plenty to eat is to let the algae grow on the ornaments like rocks( but you don’t have to let it overgrow, a little is all you need, not a forest!), they love to eat it off, although they are NOT entirely algae eaters and you will need to supplement their diet with protein and calcium to and that can be found in bottom feeder pellets. Remember these are small animals and a little goes a very long way. Take a quarter of the bottom pellet and crush it the size of crumbs, then put it in, that amount will sustain my 3 full grown shrimp for about 2 days depending on how hungry they are

    So, we have eggs!

    The female shrimp will lay anywhere from 20 to 30 eggs and carry them on her enlarged pleopods for 21 to 24 days. The eggs look like little black dots under all over her pleopods. When fertilized the eggs will become clear. Over the 21 day incubation period, the eggs will stay clear until the last 4 or 5 days, then you will actually notice little black dots on each of the eggs. This is the larval shrimps eyes! When you can see eyes, you know the hatch is coming very soon. Turn off your filter and pull out the intake tube if you have a power filter as the young shrimp will be sucked to their doom, they need still waters.

    After the 21 to 24 days the eggs will then hatch and the young will still be clung to the female’s pleopods. The mother will swim up into the water column and rapidly paddle her pleopods to release the larval shrimp into the water column, she will not release all the young at once because she is vulnerable to predators in the wild, and lets face it they think they are in the wild. She will make many intervals to shake loose all the larvae. Do not disturb her if you happen to witness this as she will take cover instead of releasing the young and they will die under her if they stay for more than an hour as they need to get out and get food.

    So the eggs hatched and the larvae are out and free swimming! Alright, now the real work has begun. Before I continue I would like to state that a third or more of the larvae may die from lack of food or predation by parents. Now, the fry have enough energy to survive without food for only an hour or two, they are not born with yolk like fish to survive, and they will immediately start to forage for food. The larvae have no legs (paraeopods) so they will be swimming in a vertical position with heads down. They are extremely small, but will grow very fast. They will double in size in 4 to 6 days depending on the nutrition they receive. What do the larvae eat? The answer, infusoria. Infusoria are bacteria that digest plant matter and will be plentiful in a cycled mature tank with algae or live plants. They are highly nutritious and will be the larvae’s food, after just 2 days they will then begin to eat algae as well. Mine tend to love the thin layer on the glass, they can use their extremely tiny budding legs to hold on to the algae and eat their fill. Remember they cant walk, only propel themselves along with their tails. They are usually skittish and if you walk by and get close they will use their tails to jet them away from you to the nearest cover. Its rather funny to see the little specks dashing around so fast. Remember, keep clean water since the filter is disconnected, do a 10 percent water change every day! Now lets take a look at some larval shrimp!

    http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m. 16/Larval1.jpg
    This shrimp is brand new, as it was shaken loose from its mother only 6 hours ago, all your larvae will adopt this up and down position as they have no legs to walk, They will drift around engulfing food as it drifts by. This is why its crucial that you have the tank for the shrimp only, these floating young would be easy targets for fish.

    http://i103.photobucket.com/albums/m. impupclose.jpg
    Up close with the larvae, see the underdeveloped legs the absence of pleopods. Don’t worry, they will come in extremely quickly, in anywhere from 3 to 5 days.

    Grow shrimp, grow!
    Ok so your shrimp larvae have survived the first crucial week! Ok, the hard part is over! Now after 1 week they are called juveniles. Their legs will have grown in and they will now forage as miniature adults. If you think you lose one because you cant find it, don’t fret, remember these creatures are extremely small still, and remember their coolest quality, transparency. So don’t worry they are probably just hiding. After 2 weeks have passed they will be miniature copies of the adults and will grow rapidly. They will reach adulthood in 5 weeks.

    Well I would like to thank you for taking the time to read this, I sure hope it helps and if you have any further questions drop me a line, though PM or this thread.

    • Thread starter
    • #1

    Mvt109

    New Member

    Hello all. Just curious if anyone can give me some information on how hardy red cherry shrimp are compared to ghost shrimp. I know ghost shrimp are mainly used as food, but I occasionally buy 5 or so from petsmart to put in the tank to do a little bit of cleaning work.

    They normally only last for about a month or so and then die/dissappear. I am considering ordering some Red Cherry Shrimp in the future to add some more color to my tank, as it is fully planted and has a ton of green. Only my Dwarf Gouramis and Black Skirt tetras stand out.

    I guess the bottom line is, do they normally live /last longer than ghost shrimp? Or is it just a waste of money for me to get them? I haven’t had a fish die in 2 years, so my water is normally in great condition.

    Thanks for any info!

    Well Known

    leafofgrass

    New Member

    A couple different sources state 1.5 to two years.

    Heres a page on them I found:

    I just got RCS for the first time less than two weeks ago and I already had one die on me. The other one is starting to show signs of distress and I think he’s on his way out too. I think the cause was too big of a water change. oops. So if you get RCS do water changes much more gradually than you normally would.

    Dolfan

    Fishlore VIP

    Ghost shrimp are generally very hardy and will last a while. If they are dying or disappearing on you, then something is wrong. They are somewhat weak when you get them, so some may die in the first week or so, but if they are lasting a month and then disappearing I would think the GouramI is having a snack. Ghost shrimp are harder to breed as their babies are born in a larval stage that is hard to care for. They need a quick and ample supply of food in the form of green water or infusoria. Most tanks are kept clean and don’t have enough of these for them to survive. I have a few in my tank and occasionally I will see a baby survive and get bigger, but they mothers are constantly “berried” so many more are dying or getting eaten in the larval stage before they get to juvie more adult status.

    Cherry shrimp are also pretty hardy, and do reproduce somewhat easily. But the GouramI and possibly the tetras would definitely eat the babies if not the adults too. I have some neon tetras in my 40 gallon tank and they may occasionally eat a baby if they can catch it, but I also have a lot of plants and hiding areas for the babies, so they breed well for me.

    If it were me, I would stick to the ghost shrimp for now. At least until you can keep the ghost shrimp alive for more than a month. Otherwise the cherries will surely not last that long as they are even smaller and easier targets as they are bright red.

    The two major types of shrimp that are extremely popular in aquaculture today are red cherry shrimp and crystal red shrimp. Cherrie’s are popular due to their reproductive nature, give them time and they will exponentially populate your aquarium. Click on the links below for a guide on the specific species. Further down the page there is a link to setting up a shrimp tank.

    Red Cherry Shrimp

    Popular but less ornamental varieties include Ghost Shrimp and Amano Shrimp. Amano Shrimp are omnivorous and are noted for their ability to consume most types of aquarium algae. Amano Shrimp are primarily wild caught and are difficult to breed in captivity. Ghost shrimp are a low cost small algae eating variety. They are often used as feeder shrimp for larger fish. They are easy to breed and a useful addition to any aquarium.

    Red Crystal Shrimp are popular due to their rare, fragile and ornamental nature. They originated from a mutation in Japan, leading to one of the most extraordinary popularities in the modern world.

    There are countless other freshwater shrimp species and breeds, specific to each region of the world. Ghost or glass shrimp are excellent algae eaters, as are Japonica Amano Shrimp. The Bee Shrimp and Mandarin shrimp are similar to CRS and RCS with a low key color but just as active. This link below provides a how-to article explaning how to setup your shrimp tank from beginning to end.

    Before keeping any species of freshwater aquarium shrimp it is important to understand that they are very sensitive to water conditions. Being a crustacean they do not have an active immune system as fish do. This leaves freshwater shrimp much more susceptible to disease and mutation. Fish require stable water conditions but shrimp require very stable conditions that rarely fluctuate.

    Shrimp are also very sensitive to heavy metals ESPECIALLY copper, be sure to read what is in any additives before they go into the aquarium. Before heavily investing in shrimp it is advisable to have your tap water tested for trace elements to ensure it is suitable for long term use with freshwater shrimp.

    It goes without saying but shrimp are not suitable for an aquarium with predatory or large fish. Any fish with a mouth large enough to swallow a shrimp will risk your entire community. Even smaller fish such as ember tetra’s will make breeding virtually impossible as freshwater shrimp eggs and young are irresistible. A shrimp only tank is advisable for the serious keeper.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    How to Breed Ghost ShrimpRed Cherry shrimps (Neocaridina denticulata sinensis) are freshwater shrimps that can be easily bred and maintained in an aquarium.

    Ranging in various shades of red, these shrimps make beautiful ornamental additions to any aquarium. They are also preferred by owners of aquariums for their immense appetite for organic detritus and algae, which make them useful cleaning agents for the aquarium and a credit to any clean up crew.

    These shrimps are also highly adaptive and can be adept at socializing with other shrimp species housed in the same aquarium. (Although mixing different species of shrimp is not recommended)

    Having a mix of male and female shrimps ensures that breeding will take place within the span of one month. Nevertheless, it is essential to keep an eye on the temperature and composition of the water in the aquarium, since fluctuations in the same can prove to be quite fatal for these miniature inhabitants.

    Preparing the Environment of the Aquarium

    Temperature:

    The optimum temperature for breeding Red Cherry Shrimps is 80⁰F (a little above 26⁰C ). Lower temperatures negatively affect the health, behaviour and breeding of these shrimps.

    Higher temperatures tend to improve the breeding, but it is advisable not to go beyond 81⁰F , as this leads to a reduction in the dissolved oxygen in the water – the essential component for sustaining life in a thriving aquarium.

    Chemicals:

    Copper, ammonia, and nitrite can be fatal to Red Cherry shrimps. These shrimps are adept at cleaning up organic detritus, but any of these chemicals – if accumulated in the water owing to the over-accumulation of organic waste – can be fatal.

    The water must be tested even for traces of such chemical agents before attempting to breed Red Cherry Shrimps in it.

    It is also advisable to maintain nitrate concentrations at very low levels, as well. If it is not possible to nullify the concentration, the concentration should not be allowed to exceed 20ppm .

    Water changes:

    Since shrimps are very much sensitive to metals and chlorine, it is advisable to use a dechlorinate solution for treating the water prior to adding it. Also, the temperature of the water being added should be brought as close to the temperature of the water in the aquarium as possible.

    pH of the water:

    The optimum pH of the water in a tank containing Red Cherry Shrimps is 6.8 . Anything below 6.2 or above 7.3 can be quite harmful to the shrimps.

    If the pH is higher, one might consider adding a chemical additive such as peat to lower it. This needs to be done in case the water in the tank is filled from taps carrying water at a higher pH.

    Plants:

    Red Cherry shrimps and plants are known for building up the perfect ecosystem in an aquarium. Shrimps thrive on algae and plant detritus.

    The green of the plants also stands in sharp contrast against the red of the shrimps, complementing the ornamental beauty of the aquarium.

    However, care should be taken while adding fertilizers, since too much of fertilizer often interferes with the pH of the water and becomes fatal for the shrimps.

    CO2 injections:

    Maintaining plants often requires the administration of CO2 injections on a periodic basis. However, this needs to be performed with extra care, since an excess of carbon dioxide can bond with the water molecules to form carbonic acid, which affects the pH of the water.

    Housing, Feeding and Breeding the Shrimps

    Adding the shrimps to the aquarium is a lot trickier than adding new fish. Since shrimps are extremely sensitive to the environment of the tank, it is important to acclimatize them to the water prior to adding it.

    Therefore, the first thing to remember is – never transport the shrimps to a new source of water straight away.

    A good practice is to gradually add the water (if necessary, through slow decantation) from the new environment to the bag or bowl containing the shrimps in their old environment.

    It is important to observe the behavior of the shrimps for at least half an hour in order to be certain that they are able to adapt to the new environment. It is advisable to move the shrimps to the tank only after ensuring that the shrimps do not show any signs of stress, such as becoming agitated and swimming upwards.

    While feeding the Red Cherry shrimps, there are two considerations to be made. Firstly, these shrimps can feed on algae as well as organic matter accumulating in the tank.

    Secondly, the food must be in such a condition that the nutrients gradually dissolve in the water, or the solid food sinks to the bottom. The organic matter will be present aplenty if there are fish and aquatic plants in the tank.How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Vegetables like spinach can also drop into the tank, but these must be boiled and shredded.

    That way, the vegetables would sink to the bed of the tank and the shrimps would be able to feed.

    Processed foods can also be purchased from stores. These provide balanced nutrition to the shrimps and do not interfere with the pH of the tank.

    Housing Red Cherry shrimps in a tank containing large predatory fishes like the Oscars and Angel Fish would only result in the obliteration of the shrimp population.

    They can, however, be kept alongside other species of shrimp. However, as the population grows for all the species, it is quite probable that territorial disputes might occur during breeding.

    Red Cherry shrimps generally breed during the summer. Raising the temperature of the aquarium by a couple of degrees Farenheit induces their mating behavior. Since the eggs require minerals and calcium to mature, the hardness of the water can also be raised slightly using limestone chips to induce mating.

    One of the first mistakes that newbie shrimp breeders make is not replacing the filter with an aerator. The filter can suck out the eggs from the tank, resulting in a completely futile breeding cycle.

    It would take at least a month for the eggs to hatch. It is essential to maintain the temperature of the water at one or two degrees over 80⁰F .

    can ghost shrimp, cherry shrimp and blue velvet shrimp live together?

    You shouldn’t have any aggression issues, but they very well may interbreed!

    would they eat each other’s offspring?

    The ghost shrimp may eat their and others offspring. The ghost shrimp will only breed with ghost shrimp. If the cherrys and velvets breed their offspring would be dull colours.

    Definitely Cherries and Blue Velvets can. They are both technically Neocaridina davidi, just different color types. Same basic care applies to both and they get along fine. I have a mixed color tank that I love! The only problem with mixing different colors of the same species, is that when they breed, you can end up with uglier colors, but you can get a few really funky colors too!

    As for ghost shrimp, I’ve heard of people doing it with good results, but I’ve also heard of some stories where the ghosts get aggressive and pick on the smaller cherries. I also think that they are not as pretty as the Neos, but that’s my personal opinion.

    I say, stick with Neocaridinas and you’ll have a great low-maintenance tank with lots of colour!

    Side note: if you can find a good Neo breeder, get your shrimp from there. they often have way better prices than pet stores. I got my blues for $2 each!

    These are mine before I put them into the tank back in October.

    The thing with Ghost shrimp is that there is more than one species called Ghost. The North American native, Palaemonetes paludosus, is not aggressive and should get along fine with Cherries. They are larger and compete for food, but that’s not too hard to address.

    I’ve kept them all together quite successfully and even had Blue Claws in with them too. Blue Claws are one of the Machrobrachium family, well known for its aggressive members, but even they got on well with the cherries and Ghosts. They’re not commonly seen, must have marine conditions for their larvae to survive, but they’re not like most of their relatives, being peaceful in temperament.

    You may even get Ghost shrimp babies, as their life cycle is fully fresh water. The eggs float to the surface and hatch into larvae, zoeys, which take a few days to morph into shrimplets that look like adults. These hang just under the surface for a few days as they can’t swim right away. Once they become free swimmers, they act just like the adults. Super cute just after they morph too. Where there are fish, most get eaten, but in a shrimp only tank, you may well get some baby Ghosts.

    Sometimes you may get similar looking species mixed into a Ghost shipment and some of those miscellaneous shrimp may indeed be aggressive. So you have to pay some attention to the Ghosts to ensure they are all the same species.

    There is at least one Ghost, which may be a subspecies or simply a variant of P. paludosus, which has orange markings. There is a hot orange ‘dash’ mark on each tail segment and a bracelet around the wrist joint on the longest front legs. May be some other orange marks too – been awhile since I’ve seen one of these guys to remind me. Might be in the blog I wrote on keeping and breeding Ghosts.

    They all will turn darker with age, acquiring some brownish markings on their shells and the whole shell slowly turns to a slightly orangish shade. Not all of them have the hot orange markings but they all show the other changes with some age.

    Shrimp molting is a good sign that they are growing well. Unfortunately, there are a lot of misunderstanding on this behavior.

    In this article, you are going to learn about the shrimp molting cycle, including their frequency. You are also going to learn how to help your shrimps to molt properly and the kind of problems that might arise.

    How often do shrimp molt

    Different breeds of shrimps have different molting frequency. On average, shrimps molt around 2-6 weeks. The frequency will increase based on a number of factors including how stress they are, how stable the water condition is etc. Below is a more detail breakdown of molting frequency according to breed:

    • Cherry Shrimp: 3 to 6 weeks
    • Ghost Shrimp: 2 to 4 weeks
    • Cleaner Shrimp: 2 to 3 weeks
    • Amano Shrimp: 5 to 6 weeks
    • Fire Shrimp: 4 to 8 weeks
    • Peppermint Shrimp: 2 to 3 weeks

    Why do shrimp molt – good or bad?

    Shrimp molt mainly to grow and is a normal process that you will observe in your shrimp tank. However, shrimps sometimes also molt due to negative external conditions such as too much chemical concentration.

    This is why it is important to know the frequency of your shrimp’s molting to know whether are they molting excessively.

    If yes, you might need to check the condition of your shrimp tank to detect any possible problems with water perimeters.

    Factors affecting frequency of shrimp molting

    While molting is a normal part of a shrimp’s growth process, there are a number of externals factors that can affect the frequency:

    • Breed: As you can see from above, different breeds have different molting cycles. Fire shrimps for example molt less than say, ghost shrimps.
    • Age of shrimp: Younger shrimps molt more frequency as they are growing up. Adult shrimps should molt more slowly, and should be between 4-6 weeks.
    • Chemical concentration: Shrimps also molt to get rid of unwanted chemicals on their shell. This is not a good sign. So I strongly advice checking your water’s perimeter if you find that your shrimps are molting excessively. Usually, it might happen when your tank is not cycled enough or you introduce too many things into the tank at once.
    • Water change: Shrimps might molt to adapt to the water condition. Since water change does affect its perimeter, your shrimp should molt more frequency if you change water frequency.
    • New tank: Similar to the water change reason, shrimps might molt when they brought into a new tank. The reason is to adjust to the new water conditions. If you want to avoid this, try to match your new tank’s water perimeter to the store or your previous tank.

    What to do with shrimp molt

    Once the exo skeleton has been shed, it is good to leave them in the tank.

    The molt act as calcium source for the shrimps to intake after their molting. Usually, you wouldn’t see the molt after a day as the shrimps consumed them as food.

    So yes, shrimp do eat their molt.

    However, if you see them floating around the surface after 2 days, you can scoop them out with a net. This means the shrimps probably have enough food.

    Shrimp molt or dead

    One common challenge of shrimp molting is not knowing whether the shrimp is really molting or dead. This is especially difficult for a beginner.

    The main thing to look out for is color.

    A dead shrimp looks like a cooked shrimp with a pinkish color. A shrimp molten is transparent and when shed, is ghostly white in color.

    You can see how each looks like in the images below.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    How to help shrimp molt with molting problem

    Molting, like all natural processes, does not always happen without issues. Some shrimps molted and die, probably due to losing too much calcium. Some shrimps simply don’t molt enough to grow properly.

    Here are a few ways to help your shrimp molt more efficiently:

    • Maintain your water perimeters well: A healthy tank tend to encourage more molting as there is sufficient minerals for the shrimp to eat and grow. Important to make sure the gH/kH/TDS are at the right levels. In the long run, it is better to have a natural tank, rather than adding man made chemicals that might disturb the water’s stability.
    • Balanced diet: Try to let your shrimps have 2-3 food types, rather than relying on one particular mineral supplement. Tannin in particular is a good source to boost the shrimp’s immune system and can be found in things like almond leaves, alder cones etc. Also make sure there is sufficient calcium in their diet.
    • Avoid big water changes: Big water changes leads to sudden changes to water perimeters. This might have an adverse effect of the shrimps as they try to adapt to the new condition. Keep it at 20-30% water change is recommended especially when the shrimps are molting.
    • Use Ro water for water change: If your tap water spikes the TDS too much, it might cause molting waters. When that is the case, use Ro water instead. However remember to remineralize it to the right levels as shrimps do need some minerals to grow well.

    Conclusion

    Shrimps are at their more vulnerable when molting. If you see a prawn stuck in molting, you need to isolate it asap before they become food for other aquatic creatures.

    The key to a healthy molting experience is to make sure the tank is well maintained and that the shrimps have a balanced diet. Inevitably, you will lose some of your shrimps to this process. Don’t feel bad.

    Just makes sure you improve the tank and diet and your shrimp casualty rate will go down over time.

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    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Ghost Shrimp, also commonly known as Glass Shrimp, are a class of decapods crustaceans, swimming crustaceans commonly seen in freshwater aquariums.

    Their easy availability means that they are a common addition to many tanks. They generally have two positions, one as feeders to larger fish and the second as highly effective tank cleaners.

    Easily overlooked by most enthusiasts, the Ghost Shrimp is an interesting and active addition to a small freshwater aquarium.

    Ghost Shrimp are a small invertebrate, growing to a maximum of 1.5 – 3 inches in length. They are transparent, with a yellow to orange spot in the center of the tail. They have 10 legs and their body is segmented.

    Females are larger than males, have a green saddle that runs underneath their body (absent in males) and a ridge on top of their tails that is very pronounced.

    Ghost Shrimp Origin

    The earliest dated shrimp fossils found are from the Lower Jurassic and Cretaceous periods. Ghost Shrimps originate from North America and have been in the hobby aquarium ever since people began creating aquaria in the 1850s.

    Palaemonetes paludosus is the Latin name and they are common in the southern states, east of the Appalachian Mountains. They are bred in captivity throughout the world and have generally been used as feeders for larger, more aggressive fish.

    Ghost Shrimp Diet

    Known as pests to clam farmers who spend a fortune clearing them from their clam farms, Ghost Shrimp are omnivores which will eat just about anything left in the tank.

    They will feed on leftover food, parts of live plants that shed and even on dead tank mates. It’s important to remove dead fish from the tank as soon as possible though, as they may cause an ammonia spike in the tank.

    They will also eat flake foods and sinking pellets, even ones intended for other fish.

    Algae is another source of nutrition for them. One algae pellet per day (we love the sinking algae wafers by API) will feed a tank with lots of shrimp, but take care not to put them in a tank with much smaller fish as they will occasionally attack and eat them.

    These shrimp are scavengers and they can often be seen swimming upside down at the top of the tank waiting to feed on food flakes.

    How To House Ghost Shrimp

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    These small invertebrates are best kept in a small tropical aquarium environment. The ideal PH is 7.2 and the ideal temperature is 75 Fahrenheit.

    The water should be fairly hard and certainly within the range of 3-15 DKH (degrees of carbonate hardness).

    Although the shrimp can survive in lower temperatures they become less active the lower the temperature. In this environment their peaceful nature can lead to them being attacked.

    They certainly thrive in slightly warmer temperatures, but they have been known to become more active in warmer climates, resulting in them attacking other species within the tank. It’s therefore important to attain the right balance of temperature to ensure the ecology system of the tank.

    The aquarium should contain live plants and some hiding places for the shrimp to escape to from time to time. They burrow so they need some sand or gravel to give them a place to hide.

    Ghost Shrimp molt and when their shell is regenerating they are very vulnerable to other tank mates. So they need a space to hide during the molting process.

    Ghost Shrimp are best kept with similar species, such as the Amano Shrimp (as long as it’s larger than the Ghost Shrimp), Bamboo Shrimp, Vampire Shrimp, Nerite Snails, Gold Inca Snails and Ivory Snails.

    Any larger fish will feed on them so it’s important to keep them in a separate aquarium.

    Ghost Shrimp Behaviour

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Shrimp are burrowers and they use this technique to feel safe within the tank and to feed. Their 10 legs are used for different purposes, always keeping them busy and on the move.

    The claws of the first and second set of legs are used to help them dig their burrow. When they create their burrows of about 2 – 3 feet in length, they use another set of legs to hold the sandy mud.

    Whenever they reach the capacity that they can carry, they turn around and exit the burrow, depositing the sand outside.

    They continue this until they have created a collection of burrows with at least two openings. These burrows are only temporary and the Ghost Shrimp will create new burrows in a never ending cycle.

    The remaining legs are either used for grooming or bracing the shrimp whilst it’s burrowing.

    Ghost Shrimp Lifespan

    As these shrimp are mainly used as bait, it’s likely that the environment they have been kept in when being transported to pet shops and aquarium supply shops is not optimal for their survival.

    Even when they arrive at the shop they are often kept in over stocked tanks where the environment is not completely accurate to ensure their survival.

    When being transferred into your aquarium environment the likelihood of some of them dying within the first couple of days is high.

    If the shrimp survive the first few days they can live up to one year or slightly more.

    Molting

    Ghost Shrimps go through a molting stage in their lifespan. This is the process where their outer shell drops off as they eat and grow.

    During this period the shrimp is very vulnerable, so it is very important that they have somewhere to burrow during this time, preferably live plants or somewhere with lots of little hiding places.

    It’s an amazing transition to watch live, if you can catch it. Have a look at this video to see exactly how they do it…

    Breeding Ghost Shrimp

    These shrimps are difficult to breed, simply because their eggs hatch as free floating larvae. They do not metamorphose into miniature versions of the adults until at least a week and therefore it’s difficult to keep an eye on them.

    When the eggs are hatched, they need a good powdered algae such as Spirulina, and they should be kept in a separate tank until they have reached the stage where they look like their parents.

    Important Information

    As with all shrimp, it’s very important to ensure no copper is introduced to the water system. Copper is toxic to Ghost Shrimp and is contained within many fish medication. If you need to medicate other species make sure you remove your Ghost Shrimp to another tank to ensure their survival.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Ghost Shrimp Care And Breeding

    What’s up aquascaper? welcome back to Aquascping Paludarium blog and today we are gonna get to know the Ghost Shrimp Care And Breeding tutorial, now the ghost shrimp also known as the glass shrimp, ghost shrimp is a very popular crustacean amongst fish keepers, these guys are extremely easy to breed which is what tends to keep them at that lower price range in the aquarium store and with that low price tag, this makes them a very popular option amongst fish keepers and this also makes them a very popular option to use as feeders, now ghost shrimp is considered a very peaceful species when it comes to keeping them in your aquascaping, but as with all species of fish there are always exceptions to the rule, so when you are adding new species that you’ve never kept before always kind of keep an eye on them, to make sure that they are getting along with others, there have been cases where ghost shrimp have attacked things like betta fish in their tanks, so always always… always add new species to your tanks with a little bit of caution!

    Now glass shrimp, in general, tend to like to be kept in tanks with a lot of hiding spaces, they need a lot of space, to be able, to feel like they are secure, especially in cases where you are trying to breed them heavily planted tanks with additional hideouts for your shrimp is recommended, like I said especially if you are trying to breed shrimp, now, unfortunately, ghost shrimp don’t actually live very long lives, they do have a very short lifespan of only about one year, so that can be a little bit of a downside, if you get these glass shrimp, then you may not have them very long, if they are not breeding tips in your shrimp tank , so if you’re getting one or two as a pet just kind of keep in mind, unfortunately, they don’t really have a very long life span, if you are trying to breed them then the recommended tanks I for them is a minimum of 5 gallons, although as of course with all species I recommend bigger is always better, if you can get a bigger tank size that is always a plus now the pH for these guys is going to be between 7 & 8 and the temperature range is going to be between 72 and 82 degrees, so ghost shrimp can fit in quite a wide temperature range and my cat is trying to eat my betta fish. Now as the name ghost shrimp would suggest these guys are typically clear translucent shrimp you can pretty much see, when they are eating, what they’re eating in their stomach, it’s kind of interesting man my cat really really wants my fish right now, badly so badly, they are a very small crustacean as they only get to be about one to one and a half inches in size, so they are not very large, now one fun thing about shrimp though when you are adding them to tanks, they can be a little jumpy, they are really good at popping their bodies and winding up in strange places sometimes, now when I worked at the aquascape paludarium online store, I remember trying to catch ghost shrimp was always fun, because you can’t really net them per se and keep them in the net, so a lot of times if I am acclimating things like shrimp to my tanks, I will not just float the bag as I do with a lot of my fish!

    I will actually get a bucket and start acclimating them, that way adding slowly a little bit of water from the tank into the bucket, before I add the shrimp into the tank being careful not to lose any ghost shrimp jumping overboard in the process, because again these guys are really good at like flipping, their body and it’s almost like they just pop up. I don’t know if you’ve ever played with those little pop pop things. but yeah it’s kind of like that they just pop their body and ghost shrimp can they can jump pretty pretty long distances surprisingly, so anyway guys that’s all I really have for you all today as always, thank you so much for reading Ghost Shrimp how to care and breeding tips, I hope you will understand how to care and breeding Ghost Shrimp correctly and don’t forget to see tutorial for keeping shrimp in aquascape, I will see you in my next tips and trick for aquatic fish and plants, keep on scaping brader!

    Scientific name: Palaemonetes sp.

    Other names: Glass Shrimp (Glass Shrimp), Grass Shrimp (Grass Shrimp), Ghost Shrimp (Ghost Shrimp).

    Glass Shrimp Care Level: Simple.

    The size: 3-5cm (1-2 inches).

    Glass Shrimp Life Span: 1-2 years, sometimes longer.

    pH: 6,5-8.

    t 0: 18-27 0 C (65-80 0 F).

    Origin of Glass Shrimp: found throughout North America. For sale, they are mainly grown on farms involved in the breeding and sale of aquarium fish.

    Ghost Shrimp Temperament / Behavior: fry can sometimes eat, but more often they are food for other fish. They also sometimes fight among themselves, especially if the aquarium is too small or there are too many of them.

    Propagation of Glass Shrimp: carried out quite simply. The hardest thing is to feed the young.

    If you run several Glass Shrimps into the aquarium, they will mate anyway. Then the females will have greenish eggs on their tummies. They will be visible, since the shrimp have transparent bodies. This can happen even without any human intervention.

    Females lay eggs for several weeks, and if you want to raise as many young shrimps as possible, then you will need to move the female to a separate aquarium as soon as possible during pregnancy (before the baby is born) and deal with the issue of feeding future larvae. If this is not done, then most young animals can simply die of starvation. Hatching, they will be so small that they simply can’t eat conventional adult shrimp feeds. At the initial stage, the larvae do not even have paws.

    The first food for Glass Shrimp should be zooplankton or ciliates. Also, many experienced aquarists involved in shrimp breeding recommend putting a few leaves of trees in the aquarium. In the aquarium, they will begin to decompose, and entire colonies of microscopic organisms will appear on them, serving as an additional feed for the larvae. In addition, a bundle of Javanese moss can be put in an aquarium with a pregnant female, since many microorganisms useful for young animals also live in it. Then, after the first molt, the larvae take the form of shrimp, and they can be fed with special feeds designed for young shrimps.

    Aquarium size: from 20l (5 gallons).

    Glass Shrimp Compatibility: if you want to save them, then be careful when choosing their neighbors. Larger fish can eat them. They are perfectly combined with small peaceful species of fish.

    Diseases: symptoms and treatment of fish. They are not very susceptible to disease, but do not tolerate any chemicals used to treat diseased fish. Before introducing any medicine into the water, be sure to find out how it works on invertebrates. If there are shrimp in the aquarium, then do not use copper-based medicines in it. Experts recommend removing shrimp from the aquarium if fish treatment is planned.

    Diet / Food for Glass Shrimp: omnivores. They will eat almost all the food you offer them. It is recommended to use feed that sinks to the bottom.

    Region: usually remain close to their mink, so that in any danger they can dig in sand or gravel.

    Floor: it is difficult to determine, since external differences between males and females are not visible. After mating, females carry eggs.

    Cost: You can buy Glass Shrimp for $ 0.2-1.

    Content

    How to Breed Ghost ShrimpGlass shrimp is easy to maintain. Glass shrimp prefers water at a temperature of 22 – 25 ° C, with parameters KH 3 – 10 and a pH of 6.5 – 7.5. However, it feels great in water with characteristics that are different from optimal. So the water temperature can be in the range of 20 – 29 ° C, pH 6.0 – 8.0.

    For shrimp in the aquarium, shelters (grottoes, driftwood, moss thickets) should be provided that imitate natural conditions. These friendly shrimp can only live next to peaceful fish that will not try to eat them.

    Glass shrimp are larger than most other species found in the aquarium. Females can reach 60mm. Therefore, small aquariums are not suitable for them.

    In the aquarium, the shrimp eats everything that it finds at the bottom, algae, delicate leaves of plants, the remains of fish feed, as well as detritus (dead leaves, waste products). In case of insufficiency of natural food sources, they can be fed with special granules.

    Breeding

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Glass shrimps do not require special conditions for reproduction and willingly reproduce in the aquarium, provided a sufficiently large population. If you are interested in breeding this species, then females with caviar must be planted in a separate aquarium. A pregnant female is easily distinguished by small green eggs under her tail. After the emergence of juveniles, the females are returned to the main aquarium. If this is not done, the fish can eat all the offspring.

    Young crustaceans are fed with ciliates, artemia, rotifers.

    Subject to optimal conditions of detention, their life expectancy reaches 3 years.

    Its versatility Glass shrimp perfectly satisfies aquarium requirements – unpretentiousness, average size, peaceful disposition. You can also not be afraid that they will crawl out of the aquarium, like many other species (especially Amano shrimp), they are not inclined to this.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

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    Ghost Shrimp: Collection, Breeding, Feeding

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    Freshwater shrimp make a good addition to most aquariums due to their ability as scavengers. Many freshwater shrimp species are very good at finding even the smallest food particle hiding in the sand and can thereby help you keep the aquarium clean and the water quality high. All freshwater shrimp are however not good scavengers since some are capable hunters and it is therefore impossible that you learn more about the particular species in question before getting it.

    There are a wide variety of freshwater shrimp available in the aquarium trade and the different specie differs greatly in regards to size and behaviour as well as physical appearance. Some of the smaller species are to be considered adult at a length of 1 inch / 2.5 cm while the larger species easily grows larger than 4 inch / 10 cm.

    All freshwater shrimp moult their exoskeleton every few months as they grow larger and their old exoskeletons become too small. The shrimp are very vulnerable a period after moulting before their new exoskeletons hardened and they can during this period is eaten by fish that normally wouldn’t touch them. Freshwater shrimp should be offered hiding places of appropriate size during. These caves keep the freshwater shrimp save and make them feel more secure and at home in the aquarium.

    It is very easy to create suitable hiding places for most freshwater shrimp by putting flowerpots upside down on the bottom of the aquarium. Choose a flower pot with bottom holes of suitable size for your shrimps.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Different freshwater shrimp are suitable to keep with different companions. Small species are best kept with small peaceful species such as Raboras, Livebearers, Danios and small tetras. Small freshwater shrimp should not be kept with aggressive species or specie large enough to eat them. Larger shrimp species can be kept with larger fish species and a little more aggressive species without the shrimp taking damage from it. Avoid keeping larger predatory freshwater shrimp with smaller fish since these easily become prey for the shrimp.

    There are freshwater shrimp available in the aquarium trade that thrives in most water conditions and water temperatures. Many adult freshwater shrimps accept a wide variety of water conditions while the larvae often are more sensitive and require more specific water conditions to survive.

    Most freshwater shrimp are scavengers and very easy to feed. They will accept most food types that are small enough for them to eat. Most species can be kept on a diet of flake food and the occasional portion of frozen food. Predatory freshwater shrimp can be feed pieces of fish meat as well as crab and shrimp meat. Feeding your shrimp should usually not be a problem since most freshwater shrimp are very easy to feed.

    Breeding freshwater shrimp is possible but raising the fry is often very hard because it’s hard to provide the larvae with enough small food. Most freshwater shrimp are more easily breed and raised in ponds where there are a normal presence of plankton sized food. Some freshwater shrimp will breed readily in their holding tanks while other requires salinity in the water to breed and for the larvae to survive. You will have to read about breeding your particular species to get a more detailed description on how to breed that species.

    Species of freshwater shrimp commonly available in the aquarium trade includes Ghost shrimp, Amino shrimp, Vampire shrimp, Red shrimps, Midget shrimps and redfronted shrimp

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    General Aquaria Discussion • trying to breed ghost shrimp

    trying to breed ghost shrimp

    by brandon O » Sun Mar 20, 2011 4:07 pm

    Share On:

    by Narwhal72 » Tue Mar 22, 2011 2:36 pm

    It’s not going to be easy.

    Ghost shrimp have a pelagic larval stage that is also marine. That means that after the eggs hatch you need to adapt them to saltwater to raise the larvae. During this time the size and amount of food necessary to keep them alive needs to be very carefully supplied and regulated. After the larvae settle they make their way back to freshwater.

    You may be better off breeding shrimp that have an entirely freshwater lifecycle like Cherry shrimp.

    by Fogelhund » Tue Mar 22, 2011 2:38 pm

    We used to raise ghost shrimp in completely freshwater.. not in very large numbers, but we did have survivors. It is something I never knew about them.

    by Narwhal72 » Tue Mar 22, 2011 3:23 pm

    My apologies. You are correct. I was thinking the Amano shrimp when I wrote it. The ghost shrimp or Glass shrimp commonly sold in the U.S. is Palaemontes paludosus and the larval stage does survive in freshwater.

    Although feeding the larvae is still difficult requiring green water first, followed by rotifers, freshly hatched brine shrimp, and finally finely crushed flake food. They can survive on detritus in a larger aquarium without any predators but you won’t get much of a survival rate.

    by brandon O » Wed Mar 23, 2011 1:38 pm

    by Narwhal72 » Wed Mar 23, 2011 1:47 pm

    Green water is phytoplankton that you can culture to feed the larvae. You will probably need to purchase a starter culture and the method of culturing is more complex than can be explained in a forum post.

    here is a link to a method of culturing green water. There are many methods that are also alternatives.
    http://www.instructables.com/id/Culture . ic-bottle/

    by brandon O » Wed Mar 23, 2011 3:52 pm

    by Anthraxx8500 » Sat Apr 02, 2011 9:31 am

    by jordanroda » Sat Apr 02, 2011 12:07 pm

    by czar_wilson » Thu Sep 08, 2011 10:24 pm

    by mccluggen » Thu Sep 08, 2011 10:39 pm

    by czar_wilson » Thu Sep 08, 2011 10:43 pm

    Hmm wish I would of asked opinions before I started this experiment. That sounds a million times easier than the process of breeding ghost shrimp.

    Cherry shrimp will be next if I fail here.
    At any case I believe I’ll have quite a few weeks of treats for my Oscar lol

    by k19smith » Thu Sep 15, 2011 2:40 am

    by czar_wilson » Thu Sep 15, 2011 10:43 am

    by k19smith » Thu Sep 15, 2011 1:00 pm

    I will be breeding the inverts for my puffer and want to know if I can do it in the same tank or if they would eat each others offspring. xD If necessary I can breed them separately, just wanted to save a bit on my electric bill if possible. LOL

    That’s what I was afraid of xD Would a tank divider solve the problem or is it still a no go?

    5 Answers

    If you want to do that put a divider in the middle to keep the 2 species separate, Make sure the divider is down in the gravel an inch or 2 to make sure they dont crawl under. That should work pretty good and then you don’t need 2 tanks. And yes the snails would eat the shrimp.

    Ghosts find pond snails quite delicious and it’s not stupid to try or at least I raise ghosts with pond snails and I don’t feel stupid. It’s a very smart approach depending on how you look at it.

    Once the mother ghost has released all the eggs I take her out and put her back with the male to breed again. There are claims she will eat her babies, others say she won’t.

    The babies have no legs at first so they drift upside down in the water column for food. The snails cannot eat them because the babies don’t really land anywhere, and even when they do (later when they start growing legs and land on the tank wall their antennae detect anything coming. At about 3 weeks old the ghost babies discover the snail eggs and baby snails to eat.

    So why not do both? Have some snails in with the ghost babies and other pond snails in their own tank or divided part of the tank.

    I am including this link – the mother ghost is just fine in this set up until she releases the eggs and then removed. This set up is for the babies, to feed them. They need to be moved to a larger tank later to get to adult size. And, in this setup the pond snails thrive, get quite large and multiply quickly. http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AoKNV.

    Here is another link about ghosts I found most helpful then I tweaked it a bit http://www.fishforums.com/forum/invertebrates/1799.

    I think you’d be fine. Ghost shrimp carry they’re eggs so the snails would have to eat the whole shrimp to get at the eggs lol. I don’t really foresee that happening. Once the eggs have hatched then the baby shrimp would be more vulnerable but they are a lot faster than snails and they should be able to get away fine.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Ghost shrimp carry their eggs, so I highly doubt the snails would eat the eggs, and it would be the shrimp eating the snail eggs if anything. I once had snails enter my aquarium via plants, and I already had ghost shrimp, but that didn’t stop either from breeding. They should be fine, but the shrimp might cause more problems to the snail then the other way around.

    Do Ghost Shrimp Eat Algae

    Algae is the scourge of the aquarium world since it grows prolifically on just about any surface, can obscure light sources, and can grow over other plants and sometimes even fish! Unchecked algae can also suck up nutrients in the tank that other plants or fish need.

    Thankfully, there are several ways to deal with algae. The first line of defense is always keeping your tank clean, though even the cleanest tanks can see algae growth. This is where ghost shrimp come in. When I found myself fighting an infestation of hair algae, I added a few of these little guys to my tank and was impressed at how quickly they cleaned the place up!

    Ghost shrimp are omnivores, so they will eat dead plant or animal matter, waste, and most string- or bush-type algae (though they don’t help much with black beard algae or any film algae).

    The answer to the question “Do Ghost Shrimp Eat Algae?” is: absolutely! Let’s take a look at how well they can keep a tank clean, what other shrimp eat algae, and what you need to know about keeping ghost shrimp healthy and happy.

    Do Ghost Shrimp Eat Algae Enough to Keep Tanks Clean?

    Ghost shrimp are good tank cleaners since they have voracious appetites and are omnivores. In the wild, a ghost shrimp’s diet is comprised mostly of algae, which means they will eat any algae they can get into their mouths, though they prefer hair algae. They are primarily bottom feeders and like to stay in the substrate, so any slime algae that is growing on your tank’s walls or floating on the surface won’t be eliminated by ghost shrimp. They also tend not to like black beard algae, which is common for most shrimp and bottom feeders.

    Do ghost shrimp eat algae exclusively? No, in fact, ghost shrimp will eat any plant or animal matter they can. They are primarily scavengers, which means they prefer dead and decaying food like bits of plants and any fish that may have died and sunk to the bottom of the tank. This makes them great cleaners, as they will eliminate all kinds of waste and junk you don’t want in your tank in addition to clearing out the algae.

    Ghost shrimp will eat living things too, though, if they get hungry enough. This includes plants and occasionally fish that are small enough and get close enough to the bottom of the tank. If you start noticing damage to your plants, this is a sign that you need to drop some supplemental food into the tank to keep your shrimp happy. This will usually keep them from attacking the living occupants of your tank.

    Other Shrimp That Eat Algae

    Amano Shrimp (Japanese Algae Eater Shrimp)

    The Amano shrimp is one of the most popular shrimp options for keeping tanks algae-free. This is because their appetites are as voracious as the ghost shrimp’s, if not more so! Amano shrimp will eat pretty much any algae, including black beard algae if they get hungry enough. They are also slightly larger than ghost shrimp – about 3 inches on average, compared to the 2 inches that ghost shrimp usually grow to. The bigger size means they aren’t as easily eaten by other tank occupants.

    Amano shrimp are more expensive than ghost shrimp, though, and they are a little harder to find. Most pet stores don’t carry them, though a specialty aquarium store might, and you can usually find them online. They live slightly longer than ghost shrimp, though they are much harder to breed. If you’re hoping to replenish your shrimp population naturally, you might have a challenge on your hands!

    Red Cherry Shrimp

    Red Cherry Shrimp are also popular algae eaters who will eat just about anything a ghost shrimp will. Cherry Shrimp are bright red in color, and many prefer to use them as tank cleaners due to their pretty coloration. They are about half the size of ghost shrimp, which means you can keep more in a tank, but they are more susceptible to being eaten by bigger fish. They do reproduce easily, though, even more so than ghost shrimp do since they give birth to live, fully-formed young that don’t have to survive a larval stage before reaching maturity. They’re also less expensive and easier to find than Amano shrimp generally are.

    Adding Ghost Shrimp to a Tank

    Don’t Pair with Larger Fish

    Large fish love to eat ghost shrimp so much that these little transparent guys are actually most commonly sold as food. Only add ghost shrimp to a tank if you know the fish in it are small enough that they won’t try to eat the shrimp. If you do have large or aggressive fish, either choose a larger variety of shrimp to keep you tank clean like the Amano or maybe try snails or guppies instead.

    Don’t Pair with Small Bottom Feeders

    Ghost shrimp generally prefer dead and decaying matter – and algae – for their meals, but they are not above trying to take down a live fish on occasion. This usually happens when they haven’t had enough to eat, or there are too many in a tank and they start to develop more aggression, especially concerning food. To be on the safe side, don’t keep ghost shrimp and smaller bottom feeders like guppies in the same tank.

    Limit 3 to 4 Ghost Shrimp Per Gallon

    Ghost shrimp live in colonies, so you’ll want to have a minimum of five in the tank at a time. You can add up to 4 per gallon of water, but it’s likely some will die off due to lack of food, especially if you have other bottom feeders in the tank. I recommend starting off with around 20 for medium-sized tanks. You don’t want to over-stock in the beginning, but you should also know that many ghost shrimp don’t survive long once they’re brought home from a pet store. This is often because they are intended to be used as live food, so they aren’t raised, stored, or transported with the best of care. If you can, try to buy your shrimp from a store that raises them specifically to be tank occupants, not lunch.

    General Ghost Shrimp Care

    Ghost shrimp are pretty easy to take care of once you have a good colony of healthy shrimp established. They aren’t overly picky about water temperature or ammonia or nitrate levels, though they can be sensitive to drastic changes in pH levels. If you want to keep your colony alive, be sure to feed them supplemental food like algae cakes or shrimp food if the algae in your tank aren’t enough to sustain them.

    If you want your population to increase, provide an environment that is well-planted and has many hiding places for the eggs so fish can’t eat them, and add food specifically designed for baby shrimp if you think you might have some larvae developing.

    Final Thoughts

    So, do ghost shrimp eat algae? Yes, and quite effectively too! Ghost shrimp are great tank cleaners who will eat most kinds of algae as well as bits of dead plants, fish droppings, and even dead fish. As long as you make sure they always have enough food, they will be a great addition to your tank and will help keep the place clean for as long as you can keep the colony going!

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    Ghost Shrimp

    I’m not sure that Ghost Shrimp always get the attention they deserve. They seem hard to photograph but have a subtle beauty I love. Little red details and iridescence seal the deal. This one also has an abdomen full of greenish eggs. The Cherry Shrimp seem to breed more readily in my tank but over the course of a year I’ve gone from 2 ghosties to 5. Hope they can keep going.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk

    Last edited by stormvisions; 04-06-2019 at 10:45 AM .

    I agree, ghost shrimp look great once in a tank. They are great algae eaters.

    I love ghost shrimp, actually. I just stopped buying them because they die off so quickly due to being kept in terrible conditions as feeders.

    These have held up but I did pick up the original pair at a pet shop. It may be that some died and these are all babies that grew up but I think it is still the first two plus babies. If that’s true then the first two are over a year in my tank plus whatever age they were when I got them. Seeing babies is still rare but every few months I’ll see some new little guy in the plants and cross my fingers because very few seem to come up despite the frequent berries on the female.

    Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk

    Freshwater shrimp have turned out to be very popular as algae eaters, and interesting additions to planted nano tanks. Let me give you some tips for keeping shrimp in your tank.

    How do I take care of a shrimp tank?

    Do your research

    Before you buy any new shrimp, is crucial that you do your research, and find out all the things that you need to know about this species.

    This is important because you need to know what kind of environment the shrimp you’re desiring to get it needs to live it. This is important because you also need to know the diet of your shrimp and the water parameters which it lives in.

    It’s important that you do a thorough background check on any species before you buy it in the aquarium hobby.

    One type of shrimp per aquarium

    Keep one type of shrimp per aquarium. Different species of shrimp, require different types of water parameters. For example, cherry shrimp lives in a much different environment to the crystal red shrimp or the ghost shrimp.

    This means so if you keep both together, one species will thrive and the other one will probably perish.

    It is also almost certain that if you keep the same species of shrimp but in different colors in the same aquarium, that the shrimp will breed together and stuff up the colors of future generations of shrimp.

    So for these reasons and your enjoyment of the hobby, it is important that you only keep one species of shrimp per aquarium.

    Steady water parameters

    Keep steady water parameters in your aquarium. This is crucial for keeping any kind of shrimp because shrimp are very fragile and gentle species in the aquarium hobby.

    Shrimp require a steady environment, with little to no fluctuations in the water temperature and pH. Shrimp can become easily distressed and because of this, they can die.

    So because of these factors, it is important that before you buy any shrimp, that your tank is well cycled and has a steady balance of pH and temperature.

    Acclimate before you add shrimp to a new tank

    We have to drip-acclimate before you add any shrimp to a new aquarium. I can’t tell you how many times I made this mistake and killed a bunch of shrimp because of doing it.

    Because shrimp is so fragile and could become easily distressed, moving them from an environment to a different environment in a really short period of time, can actually stress them out and kill them all.

    So it’s really important that you drip-acclimate them for a couple of hours, before adding them to a new aquarium.
    This will ensure that their tiny bodies become used to the new aquarium water parameters before they’re introduced.

    pH level should be low

    Keep the aquarium pH at a very low level. Different kinds of shrimp can handle a neutral pH of around 7-8, but different kinds of crystal red cherry shrimp will not survive at this pH level.

    It is important that you keep the pH level of your aquarium below 8 for any kind of shrimp. A pH level range of 6-7 is generally the sweet spot for any kind of shrimp.

    Add hiding place to the tank

    Keep plenty of hiding spaces available for shrimp in your aquarium. This is important as it will give a little shrimp place to hide when they are newborns. And it’ll also give adults places for refuge and relaxation.

    Hide spaces will make shrimp feel secure and safe in your aquarium, and thus bring down the rate of stress in the aquarium.

    Shrimp like Java moss

    Add java moss to your shrimp aquariums. Java moss is great because it gives shrimp plenty of spaces to hide, and also forms a little micro bacteria, which the shrimp can eat when there’s no food available in the aquarium.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp Java Moss

    Java moss is a cheap and affordable plant, which is available at most local fish stores and will grow rapidly. Java moss is one of the keys to a successful shrimp aquarium where the shrimp feels safe and secure and can breed with ease.

    I would highly recommend this plant to anyone who keeps in breed shrimp in the aquarium hobby.

    The ghost shrimp is a very unique creature. Read on to know more about it and the reason why it makes an excellent pet in the aquarium.

    The ghost shrimp is a very unique creature. Read on to know more about it and the reason why it makes an excellent pet in the aquarium.

    The ghost shrimp belongs to the Palaeomonetes genus and is found both in fresh and brackish water. The reason why it is so named is because it is totally transparent and is also known as the glass shrimp. As a matter of fact, the food particles it eats and are present in its stomach can be seen by the naked eye.

    Physical Characteristics

    The female can grow up to 1.5 inches in length while the male seldom reaches more than 1 inch. Its lifespan is about two years. It molts a new exoskeleton every few months as it grows, and is very vulnerable the first time it molts till its exoskeleton hardens. The body is segmented and consists of 10 pairs of legs. The first four sets of legs have tiny claws that help in feeding. It has a totally-clear body and the food in its digestive tract is visible to the naked eye. It also has an orange-yellow dot on each side of its tail. The female carries the eggs in a dark ball under her belly.

    In Aquariums

    Would you like to write for us? Well, we’re looking for good writers who want to spread the word. Get in touch with us and we’ll talk.

    It has been observed that this creature is a little aggressive towards others of its own kind. The larger ones can get very aggressive towards the smaller ones if too many are kept in an aquarium tank. Hence, the number of shrimp kept in a tank should be moderate. A right number is calculated by allowing 1 shrimp per gallon or 4 liters of water.

    The ideal temperature of the water in the aquarium is between 65 and 80 degree Fahrenheit. It needs a lot of hiding space, which it uses when it is molting. The aquarium should contain plenty of hiding spaces that are too small for other fish in the aquarium. Add a few plants that the shrimp can climb on.

    Suitable companions for the ghost shrimp are small livebearers, small Tetras, Rasboras, and other fish that are small and not capable of eating it. Aggressive fish should not be kept in the same tank as the ghost shrimp.

    This creature is a scavenger by nature and eats just about any small bit of food that it can find while scanning the bottom. It also swims upside down and eats food from the surface of the aquarium or pond. In an aquarium, the ideal food would be flake food. It is also recommended that some kind of variation be included occasionally, and the ghost shrimp can be given small bits of frozen food.

    Breeding

    It is very easy to breed ghost shrimp. The female can be seen with pink eggs or baby shrimp under the belly in swimmerets. When she moves around, she may shake the eggs gently by moving the swimmerets to keep them well provided with oxygen. However, it is very difficult to raise baby shrimp. The main reason behind this is that they are very hard to feed as it is difficult to find food that is small enough to feed them. Hence, it is better and easier to breed ghost shrimp in ponds where there is plenty of food available for the young ones. A few females and a couple of males in a pond can result in many babies in a couple of months.

    It is also recommended that females that are carrying eggs should be relocated to another tank and kept there till the babies are released. After this, they can be returned to the main tanks while the babies can grow in the smaller tank until they are a little bigger. The reason behind this is that the babies are as small as mosquito larvae and are very easily eaten even by the smallest of fish.

    Ghost shrimp is ideal for any aquarium that is used for keeping small fish, as it is a great helper that keeps the aquarium clean and helps to maintain a high quality of water.

    Folks sometimes get confused between amano shrimp and ghost shrimp due to their color similarity.

    In this post, we will look at how they are different from one another.

    In particular, these are the differences between amano shrimp vs ghost shrimp

    • Size
    • Claw Length
    • Country of Origin
    • Life Span
    • Diet
    • Breeding
    • Price
    • Appearance

    Basically, amano and ghost shrimps are two entirely different species. The former comes from the Atyidae family while the latter is from the Palaemonidae family. The only thing in common is they have a clear and translucent look, which might confuse beginners.

    Let’s look at some of the differences in more details below.

    Amano shrimp can grow up to 2 inches while ghost shrimp’s is around 1.5 inches. As such, it is recommended that the minimal size for amano shrimp should be a 10 gallon tank while for ghost shrimp, you can go with a smaller 5 gallon nano tank.

    Claw Differences

    Amano shrimps have shorter claws relative to ghost shrimps.

    However, the claw grip is much stronger for ghost shrimp as it is used for prey catching. Amano shrimp usually feed off algae so their grip does not need to so tight.

    Country of Origin

    Amano shrimps originated from Japan. This is why another of their common names is called Japanese shrimps. The name Amano came from the Japanese cyclist, Takashi Amano, who introduced this breed of shrimps to the world

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Ghost shrimp from are US and are known since 1980s. Its official name is known as Palaemonetes paludosus.

    Lifespan

    Ghost shrimp have a much shorter lifespan relative to amano shrimp. On average, a ghost shrimp can live up to one year while amano shrimp can survive for 2 to 3 year.

    Ghost shrimps are also more delicate and are sensitive to changes in water conditions. One reason is because they are not very well taken care (see the section on price below to understand why). If you manage to buy a healthy ghost shrimp, they can live longer but most will not.

    As mentioned earlier, amano shrimp survives mainly on algae while ghost shrimp do feed on other aquatic creatures. This is why amano shrimps are generally considered to be great tank cleaners as they munch away the algae at a much faster rate than ghost shrimps.

    Both species however are considered to be omnivore.

    Breeding

    Ghost shrimp can breed and morph in freshwater. They also need lessor time to morph i.e. usually in the span of one week. Their fast breeding might be one reason why ghost shrimp are used as feeder food.

    Amano larvae unfortunately, must morph in saltwater. In particular, they need at least one month in salt water to be able to survive.

    This means that if you want to grow a shrimp colony, ghost shrimp will be much easier as no tank transfer is needed.

    If you try to breed amano shrimps, you need to prepare another tank and transfer the larvaes to the new tank. This is not as easy as it sound as you need to get the water condition of the second tank to be correct. If you are intending to breed amano shrimps, here is a useful comment that I found in a shrimp tank forum that might be useful to you (https://www.plantedtank.net/forums/88-shrimp-other-invertebrates/1099857-amano-ghost-shrimp.html#post9685609)

    Price

    Ghost shrimp are much cheaper, probably due to the ease of breeding them. As such, they are used as fish food most of the time.

    Amano shrimps, on the other hand, are a bit more pricey as they are sold as pets or cleaners for the tank.

    Their prices affect how well they are cared for and ‘packaged’ during shipping. It is not uncommon to see ghost shrimps being treated poorly and as such, have a lower survival rate when they are shipped. If you order online, don’t be surprise to see a survival rate of probably 40%.

    Appearance

    With the exception of their clear colors, ghost and amano shrimp have distinct appearances from each other.

    Ghost shrimps have very little markings on their body, making it rather difficult to tell the difference between male and female. The only way is to check the belly shape. Males have slender bellies in general while the females have a more rounded look.

    Amano shrimps do have different body markings on their body. Females have elongated markings (see image below) while males have more rounded markings.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Conclusion

    If you are considering whether amano or ghost shrimps make better pets, my suggestion is to go for the former because:

    • They are hardier and will be easier to take care of
    • They help to clean up the tank so making tank maintenance much easier as well
    • They look prettier due to the body markings.

    The only downside is the difficulty of breeding them into a colony.

    In addition, be beware they are strong enough to be able to jump out of a topless tank so a fish tank cover might be necessary.

    djblac

    AC Members

    breeding ghost shrimp. it’s easy! I have ghost shrimp in ALL my tanks, and every tank from my 55g to both my 10g have reproducing shrimp. But it didn’t happen with my first stocking of shrimp. ok here is what i’ve done.

    Ok i’ve had the most success in my 10g QT tank. It only has one med. common pleco, about 11 guppies and their fry, and for the moment 15 tetras. Well there are also about 20 or so ghost shrimp. The shrimp range from size, either born yesturday small or 1 inch large. A new shrimp gets pregant about once a week, and it takes maybe two weeks or so for the eggs to drop. I’ve watched them drop their eggs and they do it randomly just anywhere, when it’s time it’s time. In about a week you may notice very very tiny new shrimp. I started out with 10 shrimp in my 10g QT tank and they are close to doubling in under 2 months. not bad imo

    In my 55g i’ve added around 30 or so, and now maybe 10 are around, but they are HUGE (1inch or so) and get pregant about every other week. I have clown loachs and plecos so they have to tuff it out, but i always have tiny baby shrimp in my 55g also.

    So. in short i’d say just about any tank that wouldn’t have fish that would eat them in it would be just fine for ghost shrimp. They eat fish food (flakes) to algea thins, just about everything. They will even swim to the top of the tank to get food from you if you have them long enough to learn your feeding times. and they multiply with ease. all you need is a large starting batch and you can’t go wrong.

    I Have Tropical Freshwater Communites, Bettas and Goldfish, Since 05

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Ghost Shrimp | Info and Facts | Not Really Ghost

    Type: Fish
    Size: .5 to 1.5
    Lifespan: 1 to 1.5 years
    Environment: Freshwater
    Temperament: Aggressive towards same species

    Information / Facts: The name “Ghost Shrimp” is very appropriate for these small invertebrates. Ghost shrimp are small, transparent shrimp that tend to walk on the bottom of the tank. They are very interesting to watch as you can actually see the food inside them when they eat. The species commonly known as ghost shrimp ARE from a freshwater environment, though there is a species of marine shrimp known as “White Shrimp” that are sometimes confused. Ghost Shrimp are often used as feed for predator fish, but can be a lot of fun to use as a cleaner in non-aggressive tanks.

    Pros: Ghost shrimp are scavengers and help you keep your tank clean. They eat nearly any type of food, making it easy to keep them fed even if you have a number of other fish types in the same tank. Ghost shrimp are very easy to breed, so if you plan to raise a tank for feeders, you will find it is simple to get started. Finally, these shrimp are adaptable and do best in a tank temperature of 65 to 82 degrees, making them ideal for many unheated or heated tanks.

    Cons: Despite the small size of the ghost shrimp, these creatures do need at least a gallon of tank space per shrimp to have enough room to move around properly. Additionally, if your tank is on the smaller side, even more may be necessary. Ghost shrimp like to hide, so they do best in a tank with plenty of places to move in and out of on the bottom of the tank.

    well i have guppies and i want to get ghost shrimp i want to know how to breed them i already have an extra 10 gallon tank and a filter and and a air pump i also want to know how to care for them properly and how to breed them properly whats an average on how many babies they have and what are some tank mates what are some other types of fish that they can be with how many can i put in a 10 gallon what are some good hiding places sorry for all of these questions

    4 Jawaban

    You can expect your Ghost shrimp to live anywhere from one to two years if maintained properly. To properly maintain your aquarium the water should be freshwater kept at a temperature of 70F-78F. These shrimp can actually tolerate a wide range of temperatures but it is best to set your tank between these tempters. Next, have a lot of hiding spots and low lighting. These shrimp are considered scavengers and love to hide in tiny crevices. If your tank has a filtration system it should be the lowest filtration available. The water should be free of ammonia. The shrimp are extremely sensitive to ammonia. This is important to know as some medications do contain levels of ammonia. Therefore the aquarium should be free of medication. To feed your Ghost shrimp simply have some flake or pellet food on hand which you may already have if you keep fresh water fish.

    Now the aquarium is up and running. Wondering how to breed these awesome creatures? Actually it not hard to breed them but a little harder to care for the larva produced. As long as you keep at least six shrimp in a tank breeding should be fairly easy. Frequent water changes will aid in this process. The reason breeding can be more challenging in an aquarium is that is harder to tell the sex of the shrimp. This is why it is suggested to keep at least six in one tank. The next important thing to remember when trying to breed is that when larva are produced they float on top of the water as larva and do not instantly look like babies. At this point the larva will require some algae which is why removing them from you main tank is best. A smaller separate tank is highly recommended until the hatch which is around a week or so. Be sure your smaller tank is copper free as it is harmful to baby shrimp. Once hatched, you will have your new shrimp. You may wish to keep them in the separate tank for a while as some fish are aggressive and prey on the young. Oh yes, and they shouldnt be bigger than 2″.

    they dont decide on something particular, the basics like a filter out are a could. so some distance as nutrition, i consistently nonetheless some tetramin colorbits in my tanks and are available decrease back interior the morning and notice the ghost shrimp have a pink dot interior the pinnacle section, which shows that it has eatten the pink nutrition. They arent reallythat choosy, merely undergo in recommendations that they are able to bounce. some distance. and are sparkling on the floor. i replaced into very greatly surprised the 1st time my ghost shrimp jumped from a internet.

    here is the easy way-

    have a soft air current, not too disruptive

    ghost shrimp will get stuck in a power filter and die, so get a sponge filter (as they can eat the junk on the outside of it too)

    buy tablet foods

    crumple fish food and let it sink

    BBS baby brine shrimp

    dead-cuttings from plants in your other aquariums

    they are scavengers. remember that.

    i think the guppies will eat them, otherwise, ROCKSROCKSROCKSROCKS

    just make small crevices so that they can hide VERY well from you and the guppies

    A friend of mine put some ghost shrimp in a tank of big fish. It was horrible to watch them run for their lives. I asked if he could spare two for me, and he did. Now I don’t know how to take care of them. I cannot find out anything about them, only that they are fed to other fish. What kind of plants do they hide in? Where do they lay their eggs? They are also hard to see. What color of gravel is best? Can you help me?

    Barbara Loeb
    Reading, Pennsylvania

    Ghost shrimp (Palaemonetes paludosus) are interesting little creatures. These highly transparent shrimp are also called glass shrimp and grass shrimp. You can see right through ghost shrimp, and I always find it amusing to watch them swimming around after a heavy feeding. Their stomachs turn the color of the flakes or other fish food that they consumed, so the result is a bunch of color spots and black, beady eyes swimming around the aquarium.

    But ghost shrimp are not suitable for every fish aquarium . They are small, growing to only around 1.5 inches in length. Their small size and delicate nature make them easy targets. Many fish would happily munch on legs or antennae—or (if the fish is large enough) even swallow the shrimp whole. It should be no surprise that dealers sell more ghost shrimp as feeders for large fish than they sell as pets. It’s nothing to feel bad about because that’s how nature works — all animals eat some other living thing to survive.

    Still, if you keep small fish and have a heavily planted aquarium to provide cover, ghost shrimp can mix into your community. Pick small, unaggressive fish for tankmates. Fine-leaved plants, such as hornwort, cabomba and milfoil are good choices. I think the shrimp look best when kept in tanks with dark gravel—especially black gravel. The dark background causes various tiny specks and markings on the shrimp to darken and become apparent. It makes them a bit less transparent, but I think it adds to the interest.

    Feeding a ghost shrimp is no hardship. They are active scavengers and accept all foods, even flakes. The shrimp even munch on brush algae, a type of algae left untouched by most algae-eating fish. Ghost shrimp are not strictly bottom feeders, either. They readily climb plants and fish tank decorations looking for food—and they are such good swimmers that they take advantage of floating foods, too.

    Ghost shrimp spawn readily—and often — in the aquarium. It’s common to see females carrying masses of 20 to 30 pinhead-sized, green eggs between the swimmerets underneath their tails. The swimmerets paddle to bring oxygen to the eggs, which hatch in about three weeks. At that time, the female will use her swimmerets to disperse the baby shrimp into the water column. But you should not expect to be successful raising the babies. Young ghost shrimp go through a larval form. They are very tiny and free-swimming. They don’t even have legs yet — they have swimmerets (padlike appendages on the underside of the tail) that help them swim. The larvae live in the water column, eating infusoria and microscopic plankton for a few days, before molting and settling down as miniature shrimp. Because of this, any ghost shrimp youngsters not eaten by fish will starve in aquariums — which are much too clean to provide sufficient food. Power filters can also be murder, literally, to young ghost shrimp.

    If you want to try breeding ghost shrimp successfully, set up a heavily planted maternity tank and remove the female after she releases young. Use only an air-operated sponge filter for circulation. Lightly feed bits of strained egg yolk, finely powdered “egglayer” fry food, infusoria, rotifers and microworms until the fry settle. Then hope for the best!

    • How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    About:

    Also known as grass or glass shrimp, Ghost Shrimp is the most suitable Freshwater shrimp to keep as a pet in your aquarium. The term Glass Shrimp is used because of their glass-like appearance. They belong to a class of decapods crustaceans, swimming crustaceans. Native to the West coast of the North America, they are often sold as “feeders” for all sorts of aquatic life. They also act as highly effective tank water cleaners. It is an active and interesting addition to a small Freshwater aquarium.

    Appearance:

    Ghost shrimps are translucent looking shrimp that makes them an interesting pet in your tank. They are also known as glass shrimp because of their skin. Their They change their skin color based on the type of feed given to them. On changing the feed one can notice change in their translucent skin color. Female ghost shrimp measure around 1.5 inches in length while males seldom cross more than 1 inch. They have 10 pair of legs in total, out of which the front 4 have claws that help in feeding.

    Temperament:

    Ghost shrimps generally live peacefully with other aquatic creatures of the same size, such as small fish and snail. However, they should not be kept with bigger fishes than them as they will get eaten up. Also, they may eat baby fish at times. They are known to be decent scavengers and will eat up other dead fishes in the tank or their food as well, which will help in keeping the tank clean. They are generally more active in night, so it is always a good idea to keep the tank in a dimly lit room. They are usually calm but they may become aggressive around the breeding time.

    Habitat:

    Ghost Shrimps are best kept in an aquarium size of maximum 1″ 1/2 (3.8cm) (basically ten gallon set-up). They require a pH of 6.5-8.0. Add some plants to the tank. Also, provide some company to the Ghost Shrimp. Make sure the company is of small sized fish or snails and not the big fish as they will eat Shrimp.

    Ghost Shrimp feed on a variety of phytoplanktons and zoo planktons. They will feed on leftover food, parts of live plants that shed. They are scavengers and even feed on dead tank mates.

    Large Fish

    OK. so I came home with a bunch of ghost shrimp.

    I put them in the 3 gal tank by themselves.

    Any tips on keeping/feeding/breeding them?

    Large Fish

    2 days later. all are alive and well!

    Water temp was up to 87f so I have been slowly lowering the temp.

    They are really coming up to play when I start dropping crushed flakes in the tank.

    riseabovethesun

    Large Fish

    riseabovethesun

    My water temperature stays between 78-80 (rarely 82) and all of my shrimp are alive and well. I had a little moment with some Amanos dying off but had kept them for months before just fine with no changes, so no idea what that was. My shrimp LOVEEE blood worms and the fish of course, but my RCS have become more red and the Amanos have become more active. They just love the blood worms, so I’d give them some of those as a treat. I syringe feed my bamboo shrimp blood worms so that’s how I found out that they were psychotic for them, the Amanos get on the syringe and pull the blood worms out, ha. Nobody is thrilled with brine shrimp though maybe that’s like feeding a pig bacon kinda thing? Heh

    Crushed flakes are pretty good, I’m in an anti-flake food phase right now, but I know it works fine. Ghost shrimp are also not algae eaters, some shrimp eat algae more than others and ghosts are not huge fans, they are more like scavengers than anything.

    But it sounds like you have it down just fine, so that’s just my two cents!

    Large Fish

    Just gave ’em some blood worms. Thanks for the idea.

    This article will teach you how to breed the easiest of the freshwater shrimp: red cherry shrimp (Neocaridina denticulata sinensis). Red cherry shrimp, or RCS, are in a group called “dwarf shrimp”. The adults can reach up to 1.5 inches (4cm) in length. RCS need no special tanks, foods, dances, or shamans to breed. Tank conditions are easy to set up. They are a fun addition to an aquarium and eat uneaten fish food.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Step One

    Set up your tank. You will need a 5 to 10 gallon or 20 to 40 litre tank, a heater (to keep temperature at 75F-80F or 24-27C during cool nights), gravel (dark will stress the shrimps less), and a bubble filter that is cycled. To cycle a bubble filter in a new tank, put the new bubble filter in an old tank, turn it on, and wait for 4 weeks. RCS will not survive the cycling process and will die from high levels of ammonia or nitrites. Do not use a power filter unless the whole intake is covered with pantyhose (or something with similar very small holes) and secured with a zip tie (otherwise shrimp may get sucked into the filter and pureed).

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Step Two

    Buy a master test kit. This is absolutely required for keeping shrimp. It is impossible to determine the problem with a tank without a master test kit. You will need the following tests: ammonia, nitrite, nitrate. Get drop tests, not test strips. Test strips are expensive, and expire after about 6 months of being open. Drop kits are much cheaper per test and last longer.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Step Three

    Purchase 5-10 red cherry shrimp. RCS cost $1.50 – $3 (US) each at a pet store. They cost much less per shrimp via online on websites and forums, many people also offer free shipping like $20 or so for 20 or so shrimp, it is easy to get a good deal these days. Try to get a mix of clear (males can have some red as well) males and red females. If you get 10 shrimp, your chance of getting both males and females is pretty much guaranteed. If someone wants to ship with a method that takes longer than 3 days, ask for pictures about how the shrimp are packaged, Cherry shrimp are VERY hard to kill and will most likely have no problem with a week in transit. Take into consideration the weather over the distance it will be shipped, ask for heat packs or ice packs in the shipping container to help counter ambient temperatures if that is a potential problem. Also request breather bags. Do not buy RCS (or any fish or shrimp) that the pet store received in the last 3 or 4 days. Any deaths from the stress of shipping tend to occur during the 3-4 days after putting them in the store tanks, so buy after this period. Buy only shrimp that have been in the store tanks at least 4 days.It is normal and desirable for the shipping bag containing shrimp to be filled with 1/3 to 1/2 water. This maximizes the trapped oxygen in the bag during shipping. This only applies loosely to the bags that are just normal plastic. If shipping with these bags, see if seller can use pure oxygen opposed to just air.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Step Four

    Fill your tank with water that you have added dechlorinator to. Chlorine and chloramines will kill shrimp so make sure you get a dechlorinator that neutralizes both.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Step Five

    Get the shrimp used to the water using these steps. Put the bag into the water and clip it to the tank side using a binder clip. Add 1/4 cup tank water to the bag (perhaps use 1 turkey baster full of water). Wait 15 minutes. Repeat 2 more times. (An alternative to this is to test the bag’s water parameters and your tank’s if it is similar, just acclimate them to the temperature and dump them into the tank, cherries are very hardy and hard to kill relative to other shrimp.)

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Step Six

    Dump the shrimp in the tank. The temperature and water parameters (like pH) should have equalized enough not to shock the shrimp.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Step Seven

    Set your heater to about 80F or 27C. Use another thermometer (like a digital if you can afford it) to verify your heater is working accurately. Check it daily when you feed them.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Step Eight

    Feed the shrimp flake food, sinking pellets, or blanched squash or zucchini. Shrimp eat anything a fish would. You do not even need small pieces of food as they will rip off a piece of flake and feed it to themselves. Some shrimp do not like algae tablets, some do. (Foods with copper compounds are not ok for RCS.) If there is still food in the tank when you feed them, skip that feeding and check again later. Feed very small amounts once per day, especially if you just start with 10 shrimp. A flake the size of your pinky fingernail should last 10 RCS about 2, perhaps 3 days. To blanch zucchini, put one slice in a microwave safe bowl. Cover with about an inch or so or 3cm of water. Cook on high for 1 minute. Let cool for 20 minutes, then drop into tank. If the zucchini floats, weight it down with a zip tie, a piece of plastic, or a marble, but not metal.

    Step Nine

    If water temperature is warm enough and there is enough food, they will simply breed. Female shrimp should get greenish or yellowish eggs under their tail within 30 days of you receiving them, if they don’t already have eggs. Female shrimp get a yellowish “saddle-shaped” patch behind their head. These are eggs in their ovaries. The eggs should move to their tails in 7-10 days. Once the eggs are under their tails, the eggs will hatch in 3-4 weeks. You will notice how the mom fans the eggs occasionally to prevent fungus from growing on them. The eggs will hatch faster if the water is warmer. You may wake up one day to find tiny clear shrimp on the plants, or on the bottom. Baby RCS look just like the adults, but they are very small, about 2mm long, and clear. But their shape is the same as an adult RCS. Shrimp will not eat their babies unless they are starving. Besides, the babies are quick to get away.

    How to Breed Ghost Shrimp

    Step Ten

    Maintain the tank. A 10 gallon or 40 litre tank can safely hold 100-150 adult RCS if you change 25% of the water each week without exception. Do not vacuum the bottom of the tank, baby shrimp get a lot of their daily food out of the “waste”. However too much waste will cause a buildup of nitrates. High nitrates can kill shrimp.