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How to bypass the water heater of your rv

One of the common service calls I receive begins with,”The water coming out of the hot water faucet is only hot for a few seconds, then it goes cold.” Only rarely does a call like this result in a service call. I want to explain what’s happening and why you don’t need to spend your money for someone like me — at least until you check a few things on your own.

First, to get any hot water at a faucet, it means you’ll need a full tank of hot water. You won’t get hot water unless the water in the water heater is hot. That means the controls need to be working. Do not replace the module board or any other parts of the water heater. The problem is not a lack of hot water in the water heater. The task is getting it through the faucet.

Most often the problem is simply that the bypass valve or the cold water and hot water valves on the back side of the tank are set incorrectly. Here is a common example: First you’ll need to look at the rear of your water heater. That is often done by removing a panel inside of your RV, but you have to be able to see the backside of your water heater somehow. It is never done by simply dropping the outside door on the water heater.

Let’s suppose you can see the back of the water heater. There is a cold water line connected at the bottom right-hand corner of the heater, and a hot water line at the top right-hand corner. Water goes in at the bottom and out at the top. Attached to those water lines you will see one of three possible combinations of water valves. They have to be set correctly or even with a full tank of hot water you will not get more than a teacupful of hot water at the faucet.

If you see three valves, turn the handle on the top and bottom valves so they’re in line with the water line. Doing that opens the valve and water will flow through the water heater. At the same time, the valve that connects the water line running between the top and bottom water lines, the “bypass” valve, must be closed. It is closed when the handle is turned across the water line to which it is attached. The only time that valve is ever open is when you are winterizing your RV. If you leave it open, you create a path for water to flow without going through the water heater, thus no hot water or lukewarm water at the faucet.

The next case is one is which you have a valve on the cold water line and a bypass valve in the middle, but there is no valve on the hot water line. What you will see instead of a valve is a brass fitting at the hot water outlet on the water heater. This is called a “back check” valve. It allows water to flow out of the top of the water heater but will not allow water to flow in at the top. The rule here for the valve positions is the same. Make sure the bottom valve is open and the bypass valve in the middle is closed.

In the last case, you have a back check valve on the top water heater outlet and a single tee-valve connecting the cold water line and bypass line. The single valve combines the functions of the cold water valve and the bypass valve. Turn the handle in line with the cold water line and the bypass is closed. Turn the handle so it points up and the bypass line is opened and the cold water line is closed. Since in this scenario the bypass valve can be located remotely, you may not find it directly on the back of the water heater, although that is far and away the most common location. Fleetwood, for example, often located it inside the bathroom vanity on some models.

Now here are some things to remember. Give your water heater about two hours before you start checking for hot water. Recovery is slower on electric than gas and you can run both at the same time without hurting anything. If you start out heating the water with one system (electric or propane), once the water is hot and the thermostat opens, you cannot check the other system. For example, if the water is hot on electric, the propane will often not fire because the thermostat has opened. The water has to cool off first, so the thermostat calls for heat before the propane system will fire.

Let’s suppose the valves are correctly open. Are there other possibilities? Yes, but provided you have hot water, anything else is much less likely. Just in case you are wondering how to tell if the water in the water heater is hot, you can do one of two things. The simplest thing to do is just put your hand on the hot water outlet on the back of the hot water heater. If the water is hot, you will have no trouble telling it as the outlet will be hot to the touch. You can also open the temperature/pressure relief valve on the outside, but be careful as that water can be very hot. If you have hot water, you have a water circulation problem, not a water heater problem. That means either a valve closed or, if you have a back check valve, the valve may be broken internally.

Lastly, you might be wondering, if the valves are incorrectly set, why do you get any hot water at the faucet, even though it is brief? Although the water is not circulating through the water heater, there is enough convected heat on the water line to heat the water in the line allowing for a brief rush at the faucet before that supply is exhausted.

Last Updated: January 8, 2016

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Bypassing your water heater allows you to drain the water from it without affecting the rest of the water system. Here are some tips on how to bypass your RVs water heater.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

  • One Valve System: Turn the valve to the vertical position. This valve should be on the lower line connected to the water heater.
  • Three Valve System: Turn the top and bottom valves to the closed position (usually perpendicular to the line). Then turn the middle valve to the open position (usually parallel to the line).

The worst kind of repair is the preventable kind. Be very thorough when winterizing your RV.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

There really is no need to put anti-freeze in the hot water heater, fresh water holding tank, grey and black water tanks, as they are drained, and large enough to expand and contract without any damage occurring.

The water lines in an RV are usually very thin and have little room to expand. They need RV anti-freeze.

The RV water heater has a water line at the bottom where the cold water goes in. On top of that line, there is a hot water line that feeds your pipes. If there is a middle pipe that connects these two lines, congratulations, you have just located the RV’s bypass valve.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

A bypass prevents anti-freeze from going into the heater. If for some reason anti-freeze does enter the heater, you will need to flush it out completely before you can store more water for showering. Most RVs have this bypass installed. Some RVs have one, two or three bypass valves.

  • Three-valve system
    Ensure that the valves on the cold and hot water line are turned perpendicular to the line. Turn the bypass valve in such a way that it is parallel to the line. The anti-freeze will now pass straight through the line bypassing the tanks.
  • Two-valve system
    Turn both valves so that they lie parallel to the line. This will allow the water to bypass the heater.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

  • One-valve system. Simply turn the valve perpendicular to the line on a one-valve system to bypass the hot water tank.

You should also bypass your filter, or remove it, before you pour anti-freeze in the system.

The winterization process can be a baffling practice for a new RV owner. It varies slightly depending on the model of the vehicle, but certain aspects are standard in all RVs. One such practice is the water heater bypass.

RV hot water heater bypass valve

Some water heaters come with a bypass valve installed which makes things super easy. If your RV does not have one, have it installed.

  • Find your heater. It is located on the outside of your van, and is most likely located behind a large cover, with a screen on the upper right hand side.
  • Open the screen. Behind it you will find an anode which is usually removed, when draining the tank for winterization. The anode gets loose with age, so replace it when it starts to look aged. You will need a 1- 1/16 socket for the anode rod.
  • Now go into your RV and find the heater from the inside. You may need to remove a cover to access it.
  • Cold water comes in at the bottom and hot water comes out of the top of the heater. If your RV has a bypass valve, these two pipes will be connected directly to each other using a third pipe.
  • The lever of the valve should point in the direction that you want the water to flow. If it is turned 90 degree towards the bypass line, it will flow into the bypass line and not enter the tank.
  • Both valves on the hot and cold water line should be turned to prevent anti-freeze from entering the hot water tank.
  • Remove the fuse of your heater to prevent it from going on while no water is in it.

There is more to winterizing than simply bypassing the hot water system. Install a bypass valve if your RV does not have one, to make winterization easy.

RV hot water heater check valve

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

The check valve line is where the RV and the city water first meet. This needs some anti-freeze too. Your water pump should be off before adding the anti-freeze.

• Remove the screen that’s attached to the water hook-up. The check valve is inside this.
• Push the valve in until all the water in it comes out and anti-freeze starts to dribble out.
• Reconnect your water pump.

Remember, if anything sounds too complicated to do, don’t do it. Take your RV to a service department.

Thanks for reading and don’t forget to comment below!

In this post I wanted to help RV owners learn everything you need to know about RV water heater by-pass systems.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Most RV manufactures today install water heater by-pass systems on the RVs they sell. The water heater by-pass system is used to separate the water heater from the RV’s plumbing system. The by-pass system can be used to drain the water heater, and to winterize the RV water system. When the by-pass system is used, it takes the cold water going to the water heater and routes it to the hot water plumbing line. When that happens the water heater is by-passed

Typically, you would use the by-pass system when the RV is winterized using an RV approved anti-freeze. When you bypass the water heater you can drain the water heater tank and the tank is safe for winter storage. By-passing the water heater saves you the cost of filling the water heater tank with six or more gallons of RV antifreeze to winterize the RV water system. For more information on winterizing your RV check out our RV winterizing and storing online training course.

How many types of RV water heater by-pass systems are there?

There are three common types of bypass systems, and you need to know which type you have. The types are 1, 2 & 3 manual valve operation.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

On 1-valve systems the valve is located at cold water line and the by-pass line.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

On two 2-valve systems, one valve is located at the cold-water inlet and the other valve is in the by-pass plumbing line.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

On 3-valve systems, one valve is at the cold-water inlet, one is at the hot water outlet, and the third one is in the by-pass plumbing line.

The proper operation of each bypass system:

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

On a 1-valve system turn the valve at the cold-water supply line 90 degrees to the supply line. This stop the water supply to the water heater and open the by-pass line. Note: Some bypass valves use knobs rather than handles. In this case, just turn the knob until it is fully open or closed.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

On a 2-valve system turn the valves located on the cold-water inlet and hot water outlet so the handle is in-line with the by-pass line. This will open the by-pass, connecting the cold and hot water plumbing lines. Note: Some bypass valves use knobs rather than handles. Simply turn the knob until it is fully open or closed.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

On a 3-valve system turn the manual valves located on the cold-water inlet and hot water outlet so the handle is in-line with the by-pass line just like the 2-valve system, then turn the manual valve in the by-pass line until the handle is in-line with the by-pass line. Note: some bypass valves use knobs rather than handles. Simply turn the knob until it is fully open or closed.

With the valves in these positions you can drain any water from the tank.

Caution: Never drain the tank when it is hot or under pressure. Open a hot water faucet to relieve pressure and allow the water to cool prior to draining.

To disengage the bypass system and allow water to enter the water heater, reverse the positions of the handles.

Symptoms of improperly positioned bypass valves are:

1. No hot water coming from the water heater.
2. You only get a short supply of hot water, which quickly turns lukewarm, and then cold.

If you experience these symptoms look to see if the by-pass valves are in the proper position.

When you de-winterize your RV, make sure your water heater tank is completely full of water prior to turning on the gas or electric systems on. A tank not full of water can damage the water heater controls. An easy way to check if the tank is full is to lift the lever on your temperature and pressure relief valve. If it is full, you will get water at the valve. Caution: Never open the T&P valve lever when the water heater is hot or under pressure.

For more information on RV water heater bypass systems watch this video we produced for Suburban water heaters. Top learn more about using and maintaining your RV visit our RV Online Training site.

A brief guide on RV water heaters for beginners

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Multi-bits / Taxi / Getty Images

If your RV has plumbing, chances are you have a water heater. The RV water heater will be smaller than the unit you have at home or in your apartment, but it works the same. It heats water so that you have access to hot water for everything from showers to washing your hands to doing the dishes.

All RV owners should know these basics when it comes to their RV water heater as this comes in handy whether you’re cooking, cleaning, showering, or more on the road.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

RV Water Heaters 101

The first thing to know about RV water heaters is that they’re powered by propane. Unless you’ve invested in a tricked-out class A motorhome, motorcoach, or luxury RV, you’re going to be using propane with your water heater and other appliances.

Most RVs use anywhere from a six-gallon tank to a ten-gallon tank depending on the size of the unit. Some water heaters work only with propane; others work with propane and electricity hook up. Refer to your RV’s manual to determine the power source for your water heater.

Most RV water heaters use a pilot light. Some models may come with direct spark ignition. If you have the latter installed in your RV, you’ll use a switch inside the RV or trailer to turn on the water heater once parked. If you use the former system, you’ll need to light the pilot light of the water heater after parking and leveling your RV or trailer.

Like your water heater at home, there are built-in safety systems to ensure that the water doesn’t get too hot or that pressure doesn’t build up. Make sure to refer to the instructions that came with the recreational vehicle on your unit’s water heater to ensure you know what measures are in place and how to deal with any safety issues that occur for your specific model.

Pro Tip: The hotter you like your water, the more propane you’ll use to heat it. Try and find a moderate water temperature, a bit cooler than you’d enjoy at home to save on propane costs during a trip.

Before Your RV Water Heater’s First Use

Before using your RV water heater for the first time, you want to make sure it’s filled with enough water. Again, refer to your manufacturer’s guidelines for how to fill and maintain the water within the unit.

For most RVs, the following steps can be applied to RV and trailer water heaters:

  • Check the water heater bypass valve.
  • Open it up and let the water flow into the primary tank.
  • Now, connect your RV to a nearby water outlet and use the onboard pump to start pumping water.
  • Turn on the hot water tap.
  • Water will begin to flow through your lines into the heating tank.
  • Fill it to its fill line and then your water heater will be ready to go.

Pro Tip: Again, check with your manufacturer’s instructions on how to fill the specific water heater for your RV or trailer before using it for the first time.

When not in use, make sure to drain your water heater, especially for winter and if putting the motorhome or trailer in storage for the off-season. If you fail to do this, you may end up with mold, mildew, and having to replace your water heater early.

RV Water Heater Maintenance

Like most of the components of your RV or trailer, they need little maintenance if you inspect, clean and take care of them on and off the road. Your water heater is no different.

  • Depending on the type of water heater you use, you may need more than once a year cleaning.
  • Make sure your water heater is part of your regular RV maintenance schedule and whenever you take your rig to the shop, have them look at it to ensure it’s in working order.
  • When winterizing your RV or trailer, you should always drain the water heater of all water and ensure its lines are cleared. You’ll follow the same steps for all the lines in your RV or trailer to ensure your water heater is ready for winter or a long stretch of being parked out of use.

Pro Tip: If you’re not confident you can maintain your RV water heater, consider taking it to your RV dealer or a repair shop and let them take care of it. Make sure to do this if you notice any issues or yearly before you start traveling for the year.

Now, you know everything you need to take care of your RV water heater and ensure it stays functioning on and off the road.

Winterizing your rig is one of the most important things you can do to protect it and ensure that it lasts for years to come. One way to make this whole process a bit easier is to install an RV hot water heater bypass valve and an RV water tank drain valve.

RV Hot Water Bypass Valve

Why do you need an RV water heater bypass valve? This valve is important during winterization because it allows you to bypass the hot water tank when blowing out the water lines or filling the lines with antifreeze, saving you time, effort, and antifreeze.

Some RVs come equipped with this valve, but if yours doesn’t have one, don’t worry; they’re super easy to install. In fact, alongside replacing an RV water heater check valve or an RV water heater gas valve, this job is one of the most common water heater DIY jobs out there.

RV Water Drain Valve

Now let’s talk about the drain valve we mentioned earlier. This RV water valve add-on is great for those who hate the task of removing the plug to empty their heater tank. It simply screws into the hole that usually holds your water heater drain plug and allows you to drain your tank with one quick turn.

How to Winterize

Begin by disconnecting the city water and emptying your entire water system by opening the water heater drain valve, RV black water valve, gray tank valve, and the RV fresh water drain valve. Once the system is completely empty, turn the knobs to bypass your water heater.

Blow Out Method

If you choose to blow out your lines, you’ll connect a blow out plug to your city water inlet, open the tap nearest the inlet and close all others, then blow air through the system using an air compressor and a tire pump tip. When the open tap squeals, stop the compressor, close the tap and repeat the process with the next tap. Continue this until all taps (including the toilet) have been opened.

It’s important to note here that you will want to ensure the RV water pump check valve is in working condition before starting, to avoid pump damage.

Antifreeze Method

Those who prefer to use antifreeze will put the winterizing hose of their onboard water pump into a jug of RV antifreeze. After switching the pump to pull from the jug and not the fresh water tank, open the tap nearest your pump and run the pump until you see antifreeze running from the tap.

Once you reach this point, close that tap and move to the next closest, repeating these steps until every tap runs pink. Be sure to run the toilet as well, and make sure to replace the antifreeze jug as needed.

Finally, turn off your pump, open one tap, and head outside and give your RV water inlet check valve a quick press. The RV water check valve tends to hold onto water, and pushing it will ensure antifreeze makes its way into the valve.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Finn McCuhil

Winterizing your cabin or RV is a tedious process. If you’re not afraid of doing a little bit of plumbing, you can skip filling your water heater with antifreeze before the cold weather sets in. You don’t have to remove your water heater; all you have to do is install a set of bypass valves.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Before You Start

Before heading to the home improvement center, check the size and type of pipes attached to your water heater. Make a list of the fittings and tools you will need to complete the job. Most water heater manufacturers specify that plastic fittings should not be used within 12 inches of the heating unit.

Bypass Design

The basic plan for a bypass is to put a pipe between the hot and cold water pipes that are connected to the heater. This pipe allows water from the cold-water feed to be shunted directly to the hot-water pipe without entering the water heater. Two different types of valve setups are commonly used to direct the flow of water.

Three-way Valve Setup

Three-way valve bypass kits are commercially available for RV use. A three-way valve is installed on both the hot and cold water lines. When both valves are positioned to direct the flow of water through the bypass, the water is prevented from entering the heater from either line. Moving both valves to the normal operational mode directs water through the heater and completely stops flow through the bypass line.

Three-valve Bypass

If you can’t find three-way valves, three regular on/off valves can perform the same function. Place one valve on the cold water line and one valve on the hot water line. Both valves should be placed between the heater and the bypass line. The third valve should be placed at the mid-point of the bypass line.

To bypass the heater, turn the valves on the hot and cold plumbing lines to the off position and open the valve on the bypass line. For normal operation, close the bypass valve and open the hot and cold valves.

Heater Protection

Turn off the water heater before turning off the water supply. If you drain the heater’s tank for the winter, turn on the water supply and run the plumbing long enough to remove all the air from the tank before restoring power or relighting the heater.

When compared to traditional camping, RV camping is positively luxurious. Not only do RV campers get to sleep in a comfortable bed every night, they can also have hot showers in their very own bathroom whenever they feel like it.

That said, before one can take those hot showers, they must learn how to properly use their RV water heater. Fortunately, this isn’t too difficult to do, and as long as you keep up with simple maintenance, the water heater for your RV should serve you well for years to come.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

RV Electric Water Heater vs RV Propane Water Heater

There are three types of RV water heaters with tanks: electric water heaters, propane water heaters, and combination heaters.

As you might guess, an electric water heater heats water using electricity. This works fairly well and is great for those who have electricity included in their camping fees and wish to conserve propane. That said, a water heater that is solely electric cannot be run while boondocking unless you have an inverter. Additionally, it is relatively easy to mess up an electric water heater by frying the heating element if you don’t know what you’re doing.

Propane RV water heaters are the best RV water heater option for those who enjoy dry camping and wish to conserve electricity. These appliances heat water using propane, which some people feel less comfortable with. That said, as long as the heater is used properly and the propane lines are well taken care of, you shouldn’t have any issues as all.

Obviously, a combination heater is ideal. This type of hot water heater for an RV allows the user to employ the electric heating element or the propane option based on what the circumstances call for. It is also possible to use both electricity and propane at the same time in order to heat the water more quickly.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Using a Traditional RV Hot Water Heater

Now it’s time to move onto how to start hot water in an RV. Let’s say you’re in your RV and you’re ready to use the water heater. If you’re working with a traditional water heater—the kind with a tank—there are some things you’ll want to note.

First, you’ll need to make sure your hot water tank has water in it. To do this, first ensure any bypass valves that could cut off the water supply to your tank are open instead of closed. Next fill your fresh water tank or hook your RV up to a city water connection. Open a hot tap and let the water run for a few seconds. Doing this will ensure you have water in your tank to heat.

Next, you’ll want to switch the water heater on. As mentioned before, you can choose to use both the propane and electric options together if you happen to have a heater with both. Doing so will cut down a bit on the time it takes to warm your water. That said, even with both types of heat going, you will need to wait at least 20 minutes to have a full tank of hot water. This wait time could increase should you happen to be in cold weather.

You can choose to leave your water heater on or switch it off between uses. However, it is important to note that leaving a propane heater running will empty your fuel tank pretty quickly. Additionally, leaving an electric heater on runs the risk of burning or frying an element should your tank somehow become empty.

Caring for an RV Hot Water Tank

Of course, once you figure out how to use it properly, you’ll want to make sure you take good care of your RV water heater tank. Maintenance on an RV water heater should be done every 6 to 12 months. Luckily, this is easy enough to do.

Begin by turning the heater off and giving the water inside plenty of time to cool off. When you’re certain it’s cool, remove the drain plug or the anode rod and let the tank drain completely, allowing any sediment and debris to drain out. If your tank has an anode rod rather than a simple plastic plug, take this opportunity to replace the rod. This helps prevent buildup in your tank. New anode rods can be found on Amazon, at Camping World, and anywhere else RV hot water heater parts can be found.

Another thing you should do to take care of your water heater tank is winterize your trailer each year before the weather turns freezing. This will keep your tank from cracking due to frozen water. Instructions on how to winterize can be found here.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Choosing an RV Tankless Water Heater

Don’t like the idea of waiting for water to heat up every time you want to shower or wash dishes? Prefer a constant stream of hot water? A tankless water heater for an RV might be the thing for you. This RV upgrade is becoming more and more popular, and once you experience the luxury of on-demand hot water, you’ll understand why.

Wondering what the best RV tankless water heater is? Well, the Camplux 5L Portable Propane Tankless Water Heater is well loved by many RV owners. Meanwhile, some would argue that the Girard 1GWHAF Tankless Water Heater or Precision Temp RV 550 is the best tankless water heater for an RV. Do your own research and decide which one will suit your needs and then learn to enjoy long hot showers even when you’re out in the middle of nowhere.

Clearly, there is a lot to think about when it comes to RV water heaters. Hopefully this article helped you get started using your water heater and gave you some ideas of upgrades you may want to make in the future. We hope you have a wonderful time camping with hot water, and a comfortable tiny home-on-wheels to boot!

RV DIY – How to Install a RV Water Heater By-Pass-Kit

A water heater by-pass kit can save you money in two ways. It saves from using an extra six or ten gallons of non-toxic RV antifreeze needed to fill the water heater tank when it’s time to winterize your RV, and it prevents costly damage like ruptured water lines or a ruptured water heater tank.

If water is left in the lines or tank they can freeze and expand, splitting the lines or tank. With a bypass kit you simply drain the water heater, put it in the by-pass mode and the antifreeze by-passes the tank and goes directly into the hot and cold water lines throughout the RV.

If your RV water heater does not have a bypass kit they are easy to install. The first step is to make sure any water supply coming into the RV is turned off; this includes the 12-volt water pump. Release any pressure on the water system by opening a hot and cold water faucet in the RV. Now you can drain the water heater. Caution: Never drain the water heater tank when it is hot or under pressure.

There are a couple of different types of bypass kits available. The bypass kit I use is from Valterra Products, and is a common type of kit. It includes two brass valves, a bypass hose and Teflon tape. When the water heater is installed in your RV there is a cold water supply line connected to the cold water inlet at the bottom of the tank, and a hot water line connected at the top where the hot water leaves the tank and goes out to the RV.

The first step to installing the bypass kit is to remove the hot and cold water lines and the existing fittings from the water heater tank. You may want to mark the water lines so there is no confusion when you reconnect them. Use the Teflon tape to wrap the male threads of the new brass fittings that will go into the water heater tank. Install the valves in the water tank and tighten them.

Note: Make sure male threads for the bypass water line are facing each other when they are tight, so you can install the bypass hose. These threads don’t require any Teflon tape. Install the water bypass hose and tighten the fittings one half turn past finger tight.

Re-install the fittings you removed earlier and reconnect the hot and cold water lines going to the tank. Fill the tank with water and pressurize the system to check it for leaks. Now when it’s time to winterize the RV you drain the water heater tank, turn the valves so they are in line with the hose and the tank is bypassed, saving you six or ten gallons of non-toxic RV antifreeze, and preventing any damage to the water heater tank.

The Water Heater Bypass is used when winterizing the water system. It is a series of valves or a single lever valve that allows the water flow to be shut off from the water heater and still be pumped to the rest of the hot water piping. This eliminates the need to fill the water heater tank with 6 gallons of winterizing antifreeze . the tank is bypassed and then drained of water. See How to Winterize Your RV in 7 Easy Steps for complete RV winterizing instructions – with pictures!

Being prepared and having the right equipment for your RV is essential. From water heater bypass systems to water filters for the shower, it is always crucial to have all the necessary equipment and supplies.”

Three Valve System

Normal Flow Setting

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Three Valve System

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Two Valve System

Normal Flow Setting

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Two Valve System

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

One Valve System

Normal Flow Setting

Two Valve System

Normal Flow Setting

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

RV Maintenance

RV maintenance is a subject that every RV owner can relate to! These articles will help you “do-it-yourself” with confidence and with a logical place to start! Each catagory has a list of articles relating to that area. Enjoy! Read now!

RV Tips

RV tips to make your experience more enjoyable! Read more .

Used RV Parts

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There are several reasons to drain an RV water heater. This is routine maintenance that should be performed at least once a year. Other reasons are winterizing the RV, troubleshooting and taking the RV out of a winterized state. It is a simple task to perform and it does not take very long. Once you have emptied the water heater, you may want to consider flushing it before you refill it. If you have used RV antifreeze in your water system over the winter, then you must flush out the tank prior to refilling it.

Step 1

Turn off the water heater, LP gas and water pump. Turn off the city water supply if you are hooked up to it. Disconnect the hot water bypass and revert to a standard setup if you are taking the RV out of winterization.

Step 2

Run the hot water inside the RV until it runs cold. This is to ensure that the water inside the water heater is at a safe, workable temperature. Go to the outside of the RV and open the panel to the water heater.

Step 3

Open the pressure valve on the top of the water heater. Use an adjustable wrench to loosen the drain plug at the bottom of the water heater. Usually this plug is plastic. On Suburban brand water heaters, the plug is also an anodized rod. Remove the drain plug or rod. Water will start to run out.

Wait until no more water runs out of the hot water heater. When the tank is empty, replace the plug or install a new anodized rod. Close the pressure release valve. Rinse off the area with a garden hose to remove any debris that came out of the RV water heater. Close the panel door.

  • Turning on the city water and flushing the water heater for several minutes before replacing the drain plug will extend the life of your water heater as it will flush out more debris and scale.

Warning

  • The water in the water heater is under pressure and may be extremely hot. Be careful and let the water cool to a safe temperature before draining the RV water heater.

Items you will need

  • City water supply connection
  • 1 adjustable wrench
  • 1 garden hose
  • 1 new anodized rod (for Suburban hit water heaters)

This article was written by the It Still Works team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about It Still Works, contact us.

If the unit was winterized you need to get it ready for use by de-winterizing it. With the bypass for the water heater still in the bypass mode, connect up a hose to your city water connection.

  1. Turn the water on and run the taps in the coach until you have no more colouring of the antifreeze.
  2. Run all the taps, both hot and cold, flush the toilet, and if you have an exterior shower, run water through both hot and cold.
  3. Once the water runs clear for all taps then turn the bypass into the normal mode. This will allow you to fill the hot water tank.
  4. In order for the hot water tank to fill right up you will need to open a hot water tap until all the air finishes coming out and you have a steady stream of water.
  5. Fill the fresh water tank. As this is filling up, you can check inside cupboards, and exterior compartments where water lines run for any signs of leakage from the system.
  6. Now that the hot water tank is full of water, you can run it through the cycle on 120VAC and also with propane as a fuel.

If you have a towed vehicle, you need to hook it up and make sure that the hitch, etc. is all working properly.

Once you are hooked:

  1. Connect your trailer lights and verify that all lights work.
  2. On a motorized unit check all under hood fluid levels, before you start the engine.

NOTE: automatic transmission fluid level must be checked with the vehicle running and up to normal operating temperature. Also check the oil in the generator if the unit is equipped with one.

If the RV is equipped with slideout(s):

  1. Make sure that they all open and close fully and are sealed in both the open and closed positions. Check the leveling system/jacks that they retract fully and move back to a support position.
  2. If the unit has hydraulic slideouts or leveling systems, you need to make sure that the hydraulic fluid level is topped up. This can only be checked with all jacks and slideouts retracted.
  3. If your unit is equipped with awnings, you want to make sure they all open and close and the condition of the fabric is good. This includes all window awnings, slideout toppers, etc.

If equipped with a generator:

  1. Start it up and after it runs for a few minutes you can start turning on 120VAC equipment. You need to run it under at least a 50% load for 20 minutes or longer.
  2. Run the fridge on 120VAC and any other resistive (heater) type loads, an air conditioner is not a good load once an air conditioner comes up to speed its amperage requirement drops.

Check the air pressure in all tires:

  1. Tires need to be checked when they are cold and the pressure should be as recommended by the coach manufacturer.
  2. Check the tires for any tread deformities, uneven wear patterns, etc.

The best way for you to help make sure that you have a great RV season is to make sure you have tried all the systems. It is best to have a checklist that you can use for equipping the unit for your season of RVing. This will help to ensure you have everything that you require for your happy camping season.

Written by: Al Cohoe, Instructor RV Service Technician program Okanagan College

If you are looking for more info on getting the most enjoyment out of your RV, Check out our RV OWNERS’ LIFESTYLE SEMINARS

Sponsored by Okanagan College & RVDA of BC

Contents

RV Water Heater Bypass Systems The Water Heater Bypass is used when winterizing the water system. It is a series of valves or a single lever valve that allows the water flow to be shut off from the water heater and still be pumped to the rest of the hot water piping.

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How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

An RV water heater is one of the many features RV’s are equipped with to make your home-away-from-home comfortable and pleasant. Much like a residential water heater, an RV heater provides you with hot water, and although there are many similarities, there are also major differences.

We Have Done the Research for You

If you know how a RV water heater works and how to keep it maintained, you’ll be a step ahead when something isn’t functioning as it should. This guide will help you learn what to look for when you’re ready to purchase a new RV or if you are in the market for a new one, we have provided below the best RV tankless water heaters on the market.

How to Pick the Best RV Tankless Water Heater

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Basics of RV Tankless Water Heaters

Storage Capacity

There are 3 main storage systems available with RV water heaters. From small water heaters to tankless systems:

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Types of Fuel Available

RV water heaters have 3 primary fuel options:

Electric M​​ode

Your RV water heater can operate in electric mode if you have generator power or 120v shore electricity. However, a substantial draw of 12 amps of electricity is required. If power is limited, you may still want to use LP Gas Mode.

Another consideration is the shore power wiring. Some areas only provide 30A or less. In this scenario you may choose to switch to LP Gas Mode or turn off the water heater temporarily.

Liquid Propane (LP) Mode

Liquid propane water heaters have several different model types, with the main difference in the ignition system. There are 2 main types, the Manual Pilot Light and the more sophisticated Direct Spark Ignition. Let’s take a closer look at each system:

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Manual Pilot Light

The most basic model of RV water heater uses a manual pilot light. The pilot light will need to be manually lit whenever it is extinguished. If the light goes out unexpectedly, there is a safety feature designed to prevent the LP gas from flowing.

The pilot light will need to be lit once the RV reaches it’s destination as the flame will be blown out from the wind.

Direct Spark Ignition

The most common RV water heater is the Direct Spark Ignition (DSI) system. Without a pilot light, a signal is sent from the gas mode thermostat to the heater control circuit board. When the signal is received, the gas valve opens and the igniter is activated and produces a flame.

The flame is detected by a sensor which signals the water heater to turn on. However, if the sensor doesn’t detect a flame after 15 seconds the gas valve will close, and an indicator light will signal to the user that the heater failed to light.

DSI heaters are designed to operate when the RV is traveling, however, it’s important to note, that they will be using fuel during this time. Many owners prefer to wait until they reach their destination before turning on their water heater in order to save fuel.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Maintenance of a RV Water Heater Unit

RV water heaters are relatively easy to maintain, and most owners should be able of doing the work themselves or at least performing preventative water heater maintenance. However, there are many places dedicated to RV repair and maintenance willing to do the work if you prefer.

Anode Rod

The anode rod in a RV water heater has the same function as your water heater at home. The sole function is to sacrifice itself in order to protect the steel tank from rust and corrosion. However, there are RV water heater tanks that are lined with glass and don’t require an anode rod.

As a general rule of thumb, the anode rod should be checked every year. Some RV owners prefer to change them annually regardless of their condition, but this isn’t necessary. Simply inspect it every 12 months and replace it as needed and you should be fine.

Flushing the Tank

Whenever the RV isn’t being used, the water heater tank should be drained. In addition, it should be flushed at least once a year. An inexpensive tank rinser wand will allow you to spray water deep into the tank to remove the sediment. Consistent tank flushing will extend the life of the RV water heater.

Last Updated: 25th January, 2020

Also, can you put a tankless hot water heater in an RV?

Location. While one of the benefits to a tankless water heater is that there is less storage space required, you still want to make sure you have chosen an area for it that can be easily connected You can install your tankless water heater to the outside of your house or RV as well.

Also, how much is a tankless water heater for an RV? The price for an RV tankless hot water heater costs approximately $1,000.00 – versus $800.00 for a 10-gallon standard hot water tank.

In respect to this, what is the best tankless water heater for an RV?

Best RV Tankless Water Heater Reviews

  1. Excel Tankless Gas Water Heater.
  2. Eccotemp FVI12-LP Liquid Propane Gas Tankless Water Heater.
  3. Camplux 5L Portable Propane Tankless Water Heater.
  4. Girard 2GWHAM On-Demand Tankless Water Heater.
  5. Suburban SW6DE RV Water Heater.
  6. Atwood GC6AA-10E RV Water Heater.

What is the downside of a tankless water heater?

Tankless water heaters produce an endless supply of hot water, take up less space, have a lower risk of leaking, are safer, and have a significantly longer lifespan on average. The main disadvantage of tankless water heaters is their upfront cost (unit and installation) is significantly higher than tank-style heaters.

How do you get anti-freeze out of water heater in a camper

Mechanic’s Assistant: Has your car been overheating? Have you noticed any leaks?

This is anti freeze in a camper water heater

Mechanic’s Assistant: What is the model/year of your RV?

Mechanic’s Assistant: Are you fixing your RV yourself? What have you tried so far?

Yes we are trying to fix ourself-we have not tried anything yet

Hi, I’m Robert. Welcome to JustAnswer. I’m reviewing your question now and will post back with your reply momentarily.

Please give me a few mins to type a response.

Normally the water heater is bypassed and you do not fill it with anti-freeze. Go to the back of the water heater and make sure the valves are in the proper position, many will have a hot, cold and bypass. The hot and cold should be open or valve handle with the pipe and the bypass closed or valve handle against the pipe. Sometimes you have to pull some drawers or a false panel to get at the valves. This would be directly opposite of the outside access panel.

IF you have the non toxic antifreeze in the water heater you can simply run the water through the faucets using the water pump after verifying your valve positions OR on the back of the water heater will be a large drain plug near the bottom, you can pull that out and drain the water heater, make sure you pull up on the brass pressure relief valve prior to removing the plug. Once the antifreeze is drained then put the plug back in you will need Teflon tape for the plug.

IF you have more questions or concerns please feel free to contact me.

IF you are satisfied with my efforts please feel free to select a STAR rating on the TOP of the page. … Robert

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Note: This procedure assumes you have a Suburban Water Heater. In Part 1, we drained the water heater and the fresh water tank.

Winterizing is much easier if you have a water heater bypass. If you don’t have one, we highly recommend adding one. It not only simplifies your life, it saves you the cost of an extra 6 gallons of antifreeze necessary to fill the water heater.

You can buy a bypass kit at Camping World (or other RV store) to install yourself or you can have a RV shop do it for you. If you bought a used camper, it is very likely a previous owner or the original dealer installed one. Find your water heater inside your Roadtrek (since you just drained and flushed it in Part 1, you know where inside to look for the rest of it). Ours has a handy door in front of it, but it is possible yours may require removing a few screws in a panel to reach it.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV The bypass kit in our Roadtrek – bypass off

A bypass kit is simple. It is an auxiliary pipe connecting the input and output sides of the water heater with valves that direct the water to flow through this pipe, bypassing the tank. Change the position of the valves as part of the winterizing process. The valves let you leave the water heater tank empty and still be able to flow antifreeze through the rest of the plumbing.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV Top Valve – Bypass On How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV Top Valve – Bypass Off

It doesn’t matter if you start at the top or bottom, but turn each valve so the water will flow into/out of the bypass line and not the tank. It is possible to have from 1 to 3 valves in a bypass kit, so check it carefully.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV Bottom Valve – Bypass On

Now turn the other valve. The handle is in line with the direction the water can flow. In this case it is parallel to the bypass line. That’s it. You have now bypassed the water heater and will not need to fill it with antifreeze for the winter.

You may worry about a little water left in the tank after draining and flushing. Any water left has plenty of room to expand if it freezes, so it is not a problem. You are now ready for Part 3.

Contents

Jan 07, 2016 · How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV. Bypassing your water heater allows you to drain the water from it without affecting the rest of the water system. Here are some tips on how to bypass your RVs water heater. Note the location of…

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RVFurther, I will have a summer valve and a rejoining tee to bypass the fan matrix … chose this option because I love hot water. I was trying to get as close as technically possible to a “real” shower …

The RV water heater has a water line at the bottom where the cold water goes in. On top of that line, there is a hot water line that feeds your pipes. If there is a middle pipe that connects these two lines, congratulations, you have just located the RV’s bypass valve.

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Jun 11, 2013 · RV How To Water Heater Bypass Stew oleson. loading… unsubscribe from Stew Oleson? … How To Flush A Hot Water Heater To Remove Sediment – Duration: 11:33. AmplifyDIY 372,360 views.

“Do-it -yourself” RV maintenance may come naturally for seasoned RVers, but for new owners and weekend warriors, it can be quite the task. The purpose of our new segment, “Keystone DIY How-Tos,” is designed to ease your stress and provide the best, safest and the most efficient DIY tips and tricks straight from the source. We want you to enjoy all of your adventures and simplify the processes in-between. Let us take you step by step through the best way to winterize your RV (steps may vary depending on your RV type).

Materials

Blow-out plug adapter that fits your city water fill

RV Marine-grade anti-freeze (DO NOT USE automotive anti-freeze. The glycerin/alcohol-based RV and anti-freeze is non-toxic while automotive anti-freeze is not)

If your RV does not have a convenience center, you will also likely need a screwdriver or screw gun

Quick Steps (see video below for an in-depth breakdown)

1. Drain water heater located on the outside of RV, typically near the outside wall of kitchen or bathroom.

2. Find your low-point drains, usually found near the water heater under your unit. Open both drains completely.

3. Turn on all faucets, both hot and cold, including; tub, sinks, showers (indoor and outdoor).

4. Locate the fresh water tank drain on the outside of the unit. This could look like a valve or just a cap covering the drain, open the drain.

5. Re-trace step 3, close all open faucets.

6. Locate and open the city water connection, this is located next to your fresh water-fill access.

7. Connect compressor to city water access and turn on. Open each faucet one at a time, run until empty, then close the tap before moving on to the next.

8. With the system clear of water, remove the air compressor and head to the water heater’s bypass valve (locations vary). Most fifth wheels and some travel trailers have a convenience center that includes a winterization bypass, otherwise it will be connected directly to your water pump or on the back of the water heater.

TIP: To locate the water pump and bypass valve, turn on your water pump and listen for the “hum” of the motor. If it is located behind a panel, you may have to unscrew the panel to gain access to the system.

8a. After locating the bypass valve, turn it to “on” or “winterize.”

9. Connect your anti-freeze bottle to the pump and turn it on. Some pumps are fitted with a fill tube that you can place inside the anti-freeze bottle, otherwise, you’ll need to supply your own. While the pump is running, go around to each faucet (and toilet) again, and open until you see pink anti-freeze come out.

9a. If you have a residential refrigerator with an ice maker you will need to run anti-freeze through that too. When you’ve completed steps 1-9, with the pumps still running to maintain pressure, run your ice maker through a couple cycles to ensure the anti-freeze makes it through.

TIP: It can being tricky to know when the anti-freeze has made it to the ice maker. The built-in filters in most refrigerators will pull the pink color out of the anti-freeze, so the only way to know for sure if the liquid has made it through the system is to taste it. The liquid in the ice tray should have a sweet and bitter taste. Non-toxic RV/Marine anti-freeze is perfectly safe.

Click HERE to explore more Keystone how-to videos

If the temperatures stay below freezing where you live, you have two options when storing your RV for winter. Either store it in a climate controlled building. Or winterize the water system to prevent damage from freezing water. If you chose to winterize your RV getting it ready to go again in the spring isn’t tough. Although it’s non-toxic you don’t want to drink that pink RV antifreeze. Follow this simple De-Winterize RV Checklist and you will be ready to go in no time.

De-Winterize RV Checklist

If you removed your water heater drain plug for winter. Wrap the threads with Teflon tape and re-install the drain plug.

Connect a drinking water hose to your tank fill and add about ½ a tank of fresh water. While it’s filling open your hot and cold low point drains.

Turn on your RV water pump. Let water drain from the low point drains until the water runs clear. Then close the low point drains. This will flush most of the antifreeze from your system.

Connect the hose to your city water connection.

Now, move to the fixtures. Open each sink, shower and toilet one at a time. Start with the fixture closest to the city water connection. Run the cold and hot separately to make sure both are flushed.

Don’t forget your outdoor shower and outdoor kitchen sink if equipped.

If you have a clothes washer follow the manufactures recommendation for de-winterizing it. This usually involves running an express or quick cycle.

Now you have remove all the antifreeze from the system. Next locate your hot water tank bypass valve and switch it back to normal operation. This could be 1, 2 or 3 valves depending on your manufacturer. These valves are typically located on the back of the hot water tank. Some higher-end models have a valve located in a water panel near the city water connection. How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

This completes the de-winterizing process. Next you should sanitize your water system before your first trip.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RVSTEP 1

To properly winterize your recreational vehicle, you must first drain the entire system.

  • Drain fresh water holding tank (remove the drain plug or open the tank drain valve) (after draining close valve or re-install plug)
  • Drain waste water holding tanks (grey, galley and black water*) – must be done at dump station if not already done
  • Drain hot water tank (remove the plug or anode on the outside of the water heater and leave until after step 4)
  • Drain water filter (if applicable) and dispose of cartridge, re-install empty cartridge holder to prepare for running antifreeze.

STEP 2

You then will have to bypass the hot water heater tank (most RV’s have a permanent bypass located on or close to the water heater, inside the trailer, with which you turn the valve(s) to the bypass position.)

  • The lower hose going to the water heater is the cold water supply hose. A valve and handle may be found on this line.
    • If the handle is perpendicular with the line, it shuts off water flow in that direction.
    • If the handle is parallel with the line, it allows water to flow in that direction
  • The upper hose is the hot water line from the water heater to all hot taps in the RV.
    • If the handle is parallel with the line, it allows water to flow in that direction
    • If the handle is perpendicular with the line, it shuts off water flow in that direction.
      • Some upper hoses have one way valves that will not allow water to go back into the water heater from the top.
  • The hose between the upper and lower line is the “bypass line”, it has the same type valve and handle as the other lines and must be perpendicular ( closed ) during regular use to force the water through the water heater.
    • This Bypass valve must be open when winterizing to allow the water to bypass the heater.

*Some RVs only have 1 valve needed to bypass the water heater. It is usually located at the lower connection of the cold supply line and the bypass line. This valve must be turned to divert the water into the bypass line when winterizing.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

STEP 3

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RVThirdly you will have to pump non-toxic antifreeze through the water lines in order to guarantee that the water has been removed. The smallest amount of moisture can damage a toilet valve, a plastic faucet or other plumbing fixture. Use the 12 volt water pump to pump the antifreeze through the plumbing system. (A winterizing pump conversion kit is available to make this step easier). If your trailer does not already have one you can disconnect the water line from the from the fresh water tank and put it, or another short length hose from the suction side of the pump, directly into the 4L bottle of antifreeze. This will use a smaller amount of antifreeze versus pouring it directly into the fresh water tank. With all faucets closed, turn the pump on, watch the antifreeze level in the bottle go down and the pump should automatically shut off after 10 seconds or less. Keep an eye on the antifreeze level through step 4 and change bottles when needed.

Starting at the furthest tap and antifreeze should come out of the:

  • Kitchen taps (hot and cold) (do each individually until antifreeze comes out rich pink in color and then shut off)
  • Bathroom taps (hot and cold)
  • Bathroom tub taps and shower-head (hot and cold)
  • Toilet
  • Outside shower (hot and cold)
  • City water inlet*

*BEFORE doing city water inlet, shut off the pump and relieve the pressure using a faucet, then make sure antifreeze comes out of the city water entry (from outside, insert your finger into inlet, which releases the check valve) [you may have to remove the screen to push the valve] Ensure each drain trap fills with antifreeze as you are doing each faucet. A small amount should also go in the waste tanks to keep the slide valves from being damaged. (Don’t forget the shower drain)

*Note* washing machines, dishwashers, and ice-makers will require specialized winter care – see the appropriate manufacture’s winterizing guide.

ONCE WINTERIZING HAS BEEN COMPLETED

  • Return water heater bypass and pump conversion valves to the normal use position
  • Put the plug or anode rod (replace if badly corroded) back in hot water heater.
  • Close the gate valves on the waste tanks.
  • Wipe out the sinks and the shower and/or tub.

PREPARING FOR STORAGE

  • Remove any batteries (12 volt main battery, smoke detector, radio, etc.) and store above freezing in your garage or basement.
  • Cover the windows on the inside to stop sun from fading drapery, cushions, etc. (Use solid material, i.e. tin foil or similar)
  • Cover any exterior vents (furnace, fridge, water heater etc.) to prevent snow from blowing in.
  • Ensure the tire valve stems are not at the bottom of the rim (mid winter thaws can damage the stem when refreezing)
  • Cover the tires with a light reflective material (proper storage covers are preferred) to stop the sun from damaging the tires.
  • Put steel wool in any small hole or opening in underbelly to help stop mice etc. from entering the trailer.
  • Lubricate the main door locks and luggage door locks.
  • Inspect exterior sealants and touch ups as necessary.
  • Clean and wax exterior.
  • Use a chemical dehumidifier.
  • Leave roof vents open ¼”. (a little more if max air covers are installed)
  • Remove or retract all stabilizers so the trailer is only supported by its wheels and the front end jack.

To Find Out More information Check Out This Video from Prime Time Manufacturing on Winterizing your RV.

Winterizing your RV – whether it’s for a travel trailer, fifth wheel, or motorhome – can be a chore. But it’s necessary for prolonging the life of your camper and protecting your investment. In this post, we’ll cover how to winterize the plumbing in your RV.

Pro Tip: Read your owner’s manual before you get started for model-specific RV winterizing instructions. Some newer models have built-in winterizing controls, so not all steps may apply to your RV.

Winterizing your RV’s water system means removing as much liquid as possible from the pipes and adding RV anti-freeze to prevent any remaining water from becoming frozen. It’s very important to take time to winterize the water system properly because any water remaining in the pipes can freeze and cause damage if the temperature falls below freezing.

How to Winterize Your RV’s Plumbing

Drain Your RV’s Water System

To begin, drain and flush the black and gray water tanks at a dump station. Clean the black water tank with a wand attachment at the end of a hose.

Next, drain the fresh water tank. This will remove water that could potentially cause your pipes to freeze and burst, and it saves you from getting sprayed when you open the drains or unscrew the plug on your water heater. Drain all water from the system at the low point drains. Refer to your owner’s manual if you need help locating the low point drains.

Now, make sure the water heater tank has had time to cool before you attempt to drain it.With no water connected to the RV and the 12-Volt water pump in the “off” position, open a hot water faucet to relieve any pressure in the lines. Make sure the RV is not plugged into 110 volts and turn off the 110 volt electric switch to the water heater, if so equipped. Drain your water heater tank and leave the drain plug open.

This is a good time to clean the inside of the tank with a wand attachment at the end of a hose. While you’re at it, check the anode rod to make sure it’s in good condition. Replace if corroded.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RVThe anode rod on the left shows corrosion and should be replaced to protect your water heater.

Open all the hot and cold water faucets and flush the toilet to help get remaining water out of the system. If your RV has an exterior sink or hose, be sure to drain that, too. Some people opt to blow compressed air into their pipes after completing the steps above to help remove more water. However, blowing compressed air into the lines may cause them to become loose, split, or burst. Be cautious and never use more than 40 psi when blowing out the lines. You can also use your RV’s water pump to help remove water from the system, but make sure to turn the pump off as soon as the lines are drained; otherwise, you’ll risk damaging the pump.

Recap the drains and close the faucets when complete.

Connect Anti-freeze to Your RV’s Water System

Now, it’s time for the second part of winterizing your RV’s water system: adding RV anti-freeze. Always be sure to use RV-specific anti-freeze and never use automotive anti-freeze in your RV’s water system.

If you have a water filter, remove it and install a filter bypass kit. This will prevent the anti-freeze from ruining the filter. You’ll also want to bypass the water heater so you don’t waste gallons of anti-freeze (the anti-freeze will fill the water heater tank before it goes through your lines). If your RV doesn’t have a water heater bypass kit, you can purchase one from your local parts store.

There are a few different ways to add anti-freeze:

  • Option one: Find the water pump and disconnect the suction side of the pump. Install a hose with fitting onto the pump, and insert the other end of the hose into a jug of RV anti-freeze.
  • Option two: Install a T-bypass valve in the water line between the fresh water tank and the pump. Run a hose from this valve into your jug of RV anti-freeze. This accomplishes the same as the first method, but without having to adjust the water pump.
  • Option three: Use an anti-freeze hand pump kit to do the same task. Drop the pump into your jug of RV anti-freeze and connect its hose into the city water inlet of your RV.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RVAlways use RV-grade anti-freeze when winterizing your RV.

Once you’ve chosen a method and connected the anti-freeze, turn on the pump and run the anti-freeze through the lines to winterize your RV’s plumbing. We recommend starting with the highest points (shower heads) and working your way down. Start with the shower closest to the pump, and turn on the hot and cold faucets until the bright pink anti-freeze flows through the line.

Repeat this process for sinks, hoses, and toilets. Flush the toilet until anti-freeze runs through the bowl. Don’t forget to do any exterior hoses and sinks. Depending on your RV’s water system, this may take 2-3 gallons of anti-freeze. Switch out the jugs as needed.

Add Anti-freeze to Drains, Seals, and Water Heater

After pumping water through the system, pour a small cup (about 4 ounces) of anti-freeze down each drain. Pour a few ounces of anti-freeze in the toilet and flush it into the holding tank. This will prevent any remaining water from freezing.

Add RV anti-freeze to sink drains when winterizing.

If you have an on-demand water heater, refer to the owners’ operation manual for specific directions on winterization procedures. Then, add RV anti-freeze to the water heater. Turn the bypass valve back to the normal position or reconnect the lines on the back of the water heater. Pump about a half-gallon of anti-freeze into the water heater. If your water heater has an electric heating element, make sure it is turned to the “off” position. This will protect the element if the RV is plugged in while in storage.

Add about an ounce of RV anti-freeze into the city water inlet to protect the check valve. Add a few ounces of RV anti-freeze to the black and gray tanks to winterize their check valves.

Last Steps

Check your owner’s manual for specific winterizing instructions for icemakers and washing machines, if applicable to your RV.

Finally, wipe down all sinks, tubs, and showers thoroughly to remove any excess anti-freeze in the basins because RV anti-freeze can stain.

Whew! Your have successfully winterized your RV’s plumbing! But, there’s more to do. Take a short break before you check out part two of our RV Winterization series. In the next post, we’ll cover a list of items to clean before your RV goes into storage.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Rv Water Heater bypass Valve Diagram

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The Water Heater Bypass is used when winterizing the water system. It is a series of valves or a single lever valve that allows the water flow to be shut off from the water heater and still be pumped to the rest of the hot water piping. This eliminates the need to fill the water heater tank with 6 gallons of winterizing antifreeze . the tank is bypassed and then drained of water. See How to Winterize Your RV in 7 Easy Steps for complete RV winterizing instructions – with pictures!

Being prepared and having the right equipment for your RV is essential. From water heater bypass systems to water filters for the shower, it is always crucial to have all the necessary equipment and supplies.”

Three Valve System

Normal Flow Setting

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Three Valve System

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Two Valve System

Normal Flow Setting

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Two Valve System

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

One Valve System

Normal Flow Setting

Two Valve System

Normal Flow Setting

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

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How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Winterizing Your RV

Settling in for a Long Winter’s Nap

For those of you who are not full-time RVers, the summer wind will have come and gone, and the brisk air of fall will be upon you. Which can mean only one thing, winter is right around the corner. It’s now time to winterize your RV so that it is protected from the elements and will be ready to ride again come next spring.

When it comes to winterizing your RV there are a few things that are needed, so let’s start there.

You will need the following items:

  • A basic set of hand tools
  • Two to Four Gallons of NON-Toxic RV Antifreeze
  • If possible your Owner’s Manual is always a great thing to have at the ready
  • Water Heater Bypass Kit
  • Water Pump Converter Kit/Clear Tubing

Step 1. RV Water System

  • Consult your Owner’s Manual if possible and follow instructions specific to your RV
  • Remove and bypass any inline water filters
  • Drain and Flush the Freshwater Holding Tank
  • Drain and Flush the Grey and Black water Holding Tanks (Flush King is an excellent product for cleaning these tanks)
  • Lubricate valves with WD-40
  • After making sure that the Hot Water Heater is no longer under pressure or hot, remove the drain plug and open the pressure relief valve to drain the Hot water Heater fully
  • Turn on all hot and cold faucets including any outside showers and flush the toilets until you are confident that all water is out of the plumbing system
  • Use the Water Pump to force any excess water from the low point drain lines, STOP once drained
  • Close all faucets and recap all drains
  • Bypass the Hot Water Heater if you don’t already have a Hot Water Bypass installed (This will prevent wasting RV Antifreeze)
  • Connect clear tubing to inlet side of water pump and the other end to RV Antifreeze
  • Pressurize the system by turning on the Water Pump
  • Replacing the Antifreeze container as needed and beginning with the closest faucet open the hot then cold valves until RV Antifreeze appears
  • Repeat the process going from the next closest faucets until you finish at the farthest (Don’t forget any outside showers or valves
  • Flush all Toilets until antifreeze comes out
  • Shut off the Water Pump and open a faucet to release pressure
  • Pour a cup of RV Antifreeze down each drain, and a few cups into the toilet/s and in the toilet tank/s, finish by flushing into the holding tank
  • Should your RV Hot Water Heater have an electric element be sure to turn it off

30440 South Fraser Way,
Abbotsford, BC

Winterizing 101: How To Not Burst Your Pipes

The biggest mistake you can make is either not winterizing your RV or leaving it to the last minute – and by then it’s too late! If you don’t winterize, your RV’s waterlines will freeze when the weather turns cold, after which they will expand and then burst.

Winterizing your RV is cheap; repairing it is not. It’s easier – and cheaper – to winterize your own RV than you might think. Here’s how.

Step 1: Drain the system

Drain your black water and then your grey water at a sani-dump station; this order is important because the grey water will wash out the black water. Next, drain your cold and hot water lines; only a little trickle of water will come out. Be sure to put the plugs back on after draining, or your antifreeze will drain out as well.

Next, drain your hot water heater. Open up the hot tap in the kitchen or the relief valve on the water heater itself. This will alleviate pressure.

The two leading brands of hot water heater are Atwood and Suburban. For an Atwood heater, you’ll need a 7/8” socket with an extension. For a Suburban, you’ll need to remove the anode rod with a 1” 1/16 socket. Let the water drain out.

Step 2: Bypass your hot water heater

There’s no need to add antifreeze to the hot water heater, fresh water tank, or grey and black water holding tanks. They’re already drained, so there’s plenty of room for any remaining liquid that might freeze. In the waterlines themselves, though, there’s no room to expand.

Your heater has a water line in the bottom, which is where the cold water goes in. A hot water line comes out on the top and fills the hot water pipes. A bypass pipe connect those two water lines and prevents antifreeze from entering the water heater.

Most units have this bypass already installed – usually a one-, two- or three-bypass valve system. With a three-valve system, turn the valves on the cold and hot water lines perpendicular to the line itself. Next, turn the valve on the bypass so it’s parallel to the bypass line; water can now bypass the tank and flow freely from the cold line to the hot line.

For a two-valve system, turn both valves to that they’re perpendicular to the cold and hot water lines, and parallel to the bypass line.

With a one-valve system, all you need to do is close the valve so that it appears perpendicular to the cold water line.

If your RV doesn’t have a bypass system built in, you’ll need to buy a temporary bypass kit. Come into your local Fraserway parts department to figure out what you need.

If you have a water filter, you’ll need to bypass that too. Sometimes it’s as simple as removing the filter from its container and re-attaching the container, and sometimes you’ll need to put in a bypass. Again, our parts department can help.

Step 3: Connect antifreeze to the water pump

You’ll need to set up a temporary water pump bypass to get the antifreeze into your plumbing system. Have a few towels handy in case of spillage, and then disconnect the water pump from the fresh water tank on the water pump side. Attach the temporary bypass to the pump side, then place the other end into a jug of RV antifreeze. In total, you’ll probably need two jugs of antifreeze. Make sure it’s non-toxic RV plumbing antifreeze, which is specifically designed for the plumbing system.

Step 4: Run all water outlets

Make sure the outside drain plug and all water taps are closed, and then turn on the water pump. Run everything individually. Start with the hot tap in the kitchen and let it run until you see antifreeze. Do the same with the cold tap. Run the hot and cold taps in the bathroom sink, then run the hot and cold lines in the tub; make sure you run the shower head until you see antifreeze. Similarly, flush the toilet until you see antifreeze. Pour a cup full of antifreeze down all of the drains. If you have an outside shower or taps, make sure you run them on the hot and cold side until you see antifreeze. Finally, turn off your water pump.

Step 5: Fill check-valve line

The check-valve line is where you hook up your RV to city water. Make sure your water pump is in the off position. Remove the screen attached to your city water hookup. Push in on the check valve inside and hold it down until you see some antifreeze trickle back down that line.

If your RV has a washing machine or an icemaker, you’ll have to winterize those items as well. Give us a call or come into your local Fraserway dealership for more help with this step.

Finally, go back to the water pump and reconnect it. A lot of people forget to connect it again, and when they hook up their water in the spring and flood their floor, they’re left with subsequent water damage.

With that, you’re fully winterized for freezing temperatures!

If those steps were easy and straight-forward, then great! If they sound complicated, remember that you can always bring your RV into your local Fraserway service department.

Winterizing your RV – whether it’s for a travel trailer, fifth wheel, or motorhome – can be a chore. But it’s necessary for prolonging the life of your camper and protecting your investment. In this post, we’ll cover how to winterize the plumbing in your RV.

Pro Tip: Read your owner’s manual before you get started for model-specific RV winterizing instructions. Some newer models have built-in winterizing controls, so not all steps may apply to your RV.

Winterizing your RV’s water system means removing as much liquid as possible from the pipes and adding RV anti-freeze to prevent any remaining water from becoming frozen. It’s very important to take time to winterize the water system properly because any water remaining in the pipes can freeze and cause damage if the temperature falls below freezing.

How to Winterize Your RV’s Plumbing

Drain Your RV’s Water System

To begin, drain and flush the black and gray water tanks at a dump station. Clean the black water tank with a wand attachment at the end of a hose.

Next, drain the fresh water tank. This will remove water that could potentially cause your pipes to freeze and burst, and it saves you from getting sprayed when you open the drains or unscrew the plug on your water heater. Drain all water from the system at the low point drains. Refer to your owner’s manual if you need help locating the low point drains.

Now, make sure the water heater tank has had time to cool before you attempt to drain it.With no water connected to the RV and the 12-Volt water pump in the “off” position, open a hot water faucet to relieve any pressure in the lines. Make sure the RV is not plugged into 110 volts and turn off the 110 volt electric switch to the water heater, if so equipped. Drain your water heater tank and leave the drain plug open.

This is a good time to clean the inside of the tank with a wand attachment at the end of a hose. While you’re at it, check the anode rod to make sure it’s in good condition. Replace if corroded.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RVThe anode rod on the left shows corrosion and should be replaced to protect your water heater.

Open all the hot and cold water faucets and flush the toilet to help get remaining water out of the system. If your RV has an exterior sink or hose, be sure to drain that, too. Some people opt to blow compressed air into their pipes after completing the steps above to help remove more water. However, blowing compressed air into the lines may cause them to become loose, split, or burst. Be cautious and never use more than 40 psi when blowing out the lines. You can also use your RV’s water pump to help remove water from the system, but make sure to turn the pump off as soon as the lines are drained; otherwise, you’ll risk damaging the pump.

Recap the drains and close the faucets when complete.

Connect Anti-freeze to Your RV’s Water System

Now, it’s time for the second part of winterizing your RV’s water system: adding RV anti-freeze. Always be sure to use RV-specific anti-freeze and never use automotive anti-freeze in your RV’s water system.

If you have a water filter, remove it and install a filter bypass kit. This will prevent the anti-freeze from ruining the filter. You’ll also want to bypass the water heater so you don’t waste gallons of anti-freeze (the anti-freeze will fill the water heater tank before it goes through your lines). If your RV doesn’t have a water heater bypass kit, you can purchase one from your local parts store.

There are a few different ways to add anti-freeze:

  • Option one: Find the water pump and disconnect the suction side of the pump. Install a hose with fitting onto the pump, and insert the other end of the hose into a jug of RV anti-freeze.
  • Option two: Install a T-bypass valve in the water line between the fresh water tank and the pump. Run a hose from this valve into your jug of RV anti-freeze. This accomplishes the same as the first method, but without having to adjust the water pump.
  • Option three: Use an anti-freeze hand pump kit to do the same task. Drop the pump into your jug of RV anti-freeze and connect its hose into the city water inlet of your RV.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RVAlways use RV-grade anti-freeze when winterizing your RV.

Once you’ve chosen a method and connected the anti-freeze, turn on the pump and run the anti-freeze through the lines to winterize your RV’s plumbing. We recommend starting with the highest points (shower heads) and working your way down. Start with the shower closest to the pump, and turn on the hot and cold faucets until the bright pink anti-freeze flows through the line.

Repeat this process for sinks, hoses, and toilets. Flush the toilet until anti-freeze runs through the bowl. Don’t forget to do any exterior hoses and sinks. Depending on your RV’s water system, this may take 2-3 gallons of anti-freeze. Switch out the jugs as needed.

Add Anti-freeze to Drains, Seals, and Water Heater

After pumping water through the system, pour a small cup (about 4 ounces) of anti-freeze down each drain. Pour a few ounces of anti-freeze in the toilet and flush it into the holding tank. This will prevent any remaining water from freezing.

Add RV anti-freeze to sink drains when winterizing.

If you have an on-demand water heater, refer to the owners’ operation manual for specific directions on winterization procedures. Then, add RV anti-freeze to the water heater. Turn the bypass valve back to the normal position or reconnect the lines on the back of the water heater. Pump about a half-gallon of anti-freeze into the water heater. If your water heater has an electric heating element, make sure it is turned to the “off” position. This will protect the element if the RV is plugged in while in storage.

Add about an ounce of RV anti-freeze into the city water inlet to protect the check valve. Add a few ounces of RV anti-freeze to the black and gray tanks to winterize their check valves.

Last Steps

Check your owner’s manual for specific winterizing instructions for icemakers and washing machines, if applicable to your RV.

Finally, wipe down all sinks, tubs, and showers thoroughly to remove any excess anti-freeze in the basins because RV anti-freeze can stain.

Whew! Your have successfully winterized your RV’s plumbing! But, there’s more to do. Take a short break before you check out part two of our RV Winterization series. In the next post, we’ll cover a list of items to clean before your RV goes into storage.

Contents

The RV water heater has a water line at the bottom where the cold water goes in. On top of that line, there is a hot water line that feeds your pipes.

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13/03/2019 · Bypassing your water heater allows you to drain the water from it without affecting the rest of the water system. Here are some tips on how to bypass your rvs water heater. note the location of the water heater access door on the exterior…

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25/09/2017 · Your Rv Water heater has a Bypass that is used for winterizing your rv, if you are wondering what each valve is then take a look at the video i have created.

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How to Operate the Propane Refrigerator in a Camper

How Does a Winegard RV Antenna Booster Work?

RVs have two types of hot water heating systems. The most common is a water tank that is heated by propane. Systems found in newer, high-end RVs are tankless. Tankless systems provide continuous hot water and their capacity is limited only by the amount of water available to the RV. The RV hot water heater should be tested fully prior to heading out on a camping trip.

Items you will need

RV with water heater

Full propane tanks

Fully charged RV battery

Access to shore electrical power

RV owner’s manual

Using an RV Water Heater

Connect the RV to a city or campsite water supply. Verify that the hot water heater is off. Check to see that the RV water heater tank is full. Turn on a hot water faucet and let the water run until there is no sputtering. If no water runs out, fill the hot water heater tank before proceeding.

Turn on the propane tanks and make sure that the water heater is connected to the LP system.

Plug the RV into a shore electrical system (a house outlet or campground hookup).

Turn on the RV water heater. Newer RVs have electronic starters that are turned on by a switch in the RV main control panel. Older models may have a manual pilot light or starter. To start a manual system, open the access panel to the water heater and turn on the unit. This is usually done with a push-button starter. Higher-end motorhomes may not have a water heater. Instead they have an on-demand hot water system that does not require a hot water tank. This type of unit turns on with a switch located in the RV main control panel.

Wait for the water heater to bring the water up to the proper temperature before using it. RV water heaters are smaller than those for household use. The average RV water heater does not exceed 30 gallons, therefore the water heats up quickly.

Wherever your RV adventures lead.

This article is also available in French

Depending on where you live in Canada, you may either be enjoying early blossoms or still digging out from piles of snow. Regardless of your current situation, RV season isn’t far off, and it’s time to start thinking of getting your RV ready for the upcoming season.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

De-winterizing is an important task of reversing the winterizing process you went through in the fall, and getting your RV back in working order. You do not want to leave this to the last minute. Rushing to get it done the day before you’re set to leave can leave you frustrated and unable to travel if you run into problems. We recommend de-winterizing your RV as soon as your area’s climate allows, or at least three to four weeks before your scheduled departure.

If you don’t want to take this project on yourself, you can visit your local RV Care dealer to have it done for you. Many offer great spring specials to take advantage of.

When you’re ready to get started, here are the basic steps:

1. Flush the water system

a. Close all taps, drain valves and install all drain plugs, taking care not to forget the water heater drain plug as well.

b. Switch the water heater and/or water pump bypass valves to the summer position.

c. Hook up your city water connection and turn on the supply, or fill your fresh water tank and start the water pump.

d. Open all taps, one at a time, starting with the fixture the farthest away from your fresh water tank. Run the water until all the antifreeze has been flushed through, and the water is running clear.

Alternate route

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RVIf you own an air compressor, you can use it to expedite the process of flushing the water system. After step (b) above, use your air compressor to blow the antifreeze out of the water system. This takes teamwork, with one person operating the air compressor at the city water hookup, and the second person opening and closing taps. To avoid damaging your waterlines, you must set the pressure of the air compressor so that it does not exceed 50/60 PSI. Once this is done and the antifreeze is displaced, proceed with step (c), which will now take less time and water.

2. Perform a pressure test

Once your water system is flushed, perform a pressure test to check for leaks. Large leaks should already be visible by this time, but the test may reveal any small, unseen leaks.

3. Sanitize your water system

RV water systems can be a source of mould and bacteria, so it is important to sanitize your water system before use. Fresh water sanitizing procedures and products are readily available at your local RV Care dealer.

Extra recommended steps:

1. Clean out your water heater

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RVWhile de-winterizing, this is the perfect time to clean out mineral deposits from your water heater. Since you can’t see it building up, it’s an easy task to forget! Pick a water heater Rinse Wand for this task, the hose attachment is inserted through the drain opening, and allows you to pressure wash the inside of your heater. You’ll be surprised at the amount of build-up that comes out.

2. Improve the taste of your water

To rid your water system of any unpleasant taste, add a fresh water additive. These can be found at your local RV Care dealer.

Keep in mind that if your RV is equipped with some of the more sophisticated water system components (such as icemakers, water dispensers, washing machines, dishwashers, etc.) there may be additional, more complicated processes required. If you are uncertain of the correct procedures, your local RV Care Dealer will be happy to provide additional information or perform the procedure for you.

As you de-winterize, this is also a great time to do a visual inspection, checking for any visible damage incurred over the winter. Stay tuned for more information about prepping your RV for the summer season, including how to perform a Spring Inspection and why we recommend taking a pre-season road trip!

What everyone needs to know about their RV water heater! Especially for new RVers! This must know tip will keep you on the road and your water flowing nice and fresh.

We have been in business for many years and one of the main things we fix every year during the spring is water heaters. (One after another) If you don’t want to be one of the newbies that makes the huge yet simple mistake and end up spending hundreds of dollars on replacing a water heater you are going to want to read the rest of this.

Our goal is to keep you next to running water not in it. RVs are supposed to be parked by rivers not have rivers flowing in them.

I want to emphasize the importance of draining your water heater. I would recommend you draining it every time you’re done camping if you are going to let the RV sit for more than two weeks before your next trip. I would also empty your fresh water tanks as well. If you let the water sit in the hot water heater tank or the fresh water tank for too long it will start to stink real badly! The hot water heater tank will smell especially bad because of the hot water, it will start to smell like sulfur. If you have ever been to a hot spring then you will know the smell.
Also, if you get into a good habit of draining your tanks when the fall comes it will be as easy as one, two, and three to drain and get your RV winterized.

Now for the sad but true story that happened to one of our customers. This guy went out and bought an RV last year from some dealer. (Not us) He used his trailer all last summer for some fun camping trips. Sadly, he wasn’t told to drain his water tanks or even winterize his unit. This spring he decided to hook up his RV and get it ready for camping. He hooked up the water and noticed some leaks. He brought it to us so we could check it out for him. We found that almost every tank he had in his RV was leaking! Even his water lines where leaking. To make a long story short, he is now ready to go back camping this summer. Unfortunately, it all came at a price and after having to spend $8,000.00 to get it all leak free he will now forever remember to drain and winterize his RV.

I hope that you will not have to learn the same lesson and will either winterize your unit or take it into your local dealer. For some local dealers check out the link below:
http://gorving.com/where-to-find/dealers

So if you want to save some major headaches and money get into the habit of draining your tanks. Below is a picture of a water heater from the outside with the cover off. at the very bottom of this blog I am going to show you a video of how to drain your water heater.

Check out the picture below to see the water heater that we removed out of the RV that we had to fix.

As I already said above, you will also want to empty the fresh water tank and water lines. There is usually a valve under the RV somewhere that you will need to open. Sometimes they are on an easy valve system that you can turn. Other times it is a cap that you have to unscrew. Sometimes if you are lucky there is a sign on the outside that says low point drains as you can see in the picture below.

Other times you just have to crawl under your RV and look. Take a look at the pictures below so you can get an ideas of what you are looking for.

Remember that not all RVs are the same and sometimes the values to open will be up in a compartment and even inside under some cabinets. Typically they are near your fresh water tank or your water pump.

Now please check out the video below so you can see how to drain your water heater and never have to replace it. I hope you enjoy it and come back for more tips and tricks.

I hope this was helpful. If you have anymore questions feel free to ask on our website under the contact us page. I put the link below: https://www.rvsofamerica.com/contact

Once again, thanks for reading and I hope you have a wonderful day!
Camp onward…

Tout comme votre chauffe-eau résidentiel, votre chauffe-eau pour VR a besoin d’une protection contre la rouille. Cette protection est normalement assurée par une anode en magnésium déjà installée dans le réservoir. Cependant, cette anode nécessite un certain entretien.

Presque tous les réservoirs d’eau chaude ont la protection cathodique installé pour protéger le réservoir contre la corrosion. Pour le chauffe-eau RV, une anode en magnésium sera utilisée comme protection sacrificielle. Le magnésium étant un métal plus actif que celui utilisé pour fabriquer le chauffe-eau, le magnésium se sacrifiera pour protéger le réservoir.

Cependant, une fois l’anode de magnésium complètement consommée, la corrosion attaquera alors directement le chauffe-eau et affectera sa durée de vie. Lorsque vous utilisez ce type de protection cathodique, vous devez effectuer une maintenance au moins une fois par an et vérifier l’anode. Un bon entretien vous assurera d’avoir une température d’eau optimale et une bonne pression d’eau toute l’année.

Une protection cathodique plus efficace est maintenant disponible pour les chauffe-eau pour VR

En 2020, Corro-Protec a adapté son anode alimentée utilisée dans les chauffe-eau résidentiels pour lui permettre d’être installé dans les réservoirs de VR. Contrairement aux anodes en magnésium, les anodes motorisées ne nécessitent aucun entretien et sont conçues pour fournir une protection contre la corrosion pendant plus de 20 ans.

Cette protection est assurée par un redresseur de courant qui envoie de l’énergie à travers une tige d’anode en titane. Cette anode fournit alors les électrons nécessaires au réservoir pour arrêter complètement la corrosion. Plus, Anodes alimentées par Corro-Protec RV limiter la croissance des bactéries qui causent odeurs d’œufs pourris dans l’eau chaude et ne nécessitent aucun entretien.

How to Bypass the Water Heater of Your RV

Chaque année, lors de l’entretien de votre VR, vous devriez prendre quelques minutes supplémentaires pour vérifier l’état de l’anode en magnésium. Cette anode est située au bas du réservoir d’eau chaude et est également souvent utilisée comme drain pour vider le chauffe-eau RV. Lorsque vous avez les bons outils, l’anode se dévisse facilement et il suffit de tirer dessus pour la retirer du réservoir.

L’anode en magnésium doit être remplacée lorsqu’elle a perdu environ 50% de sa masse d’origine. Si vous négligez cette vérification et que l’anode en magnésium n’est plus efficace, la durée de vie de votre réservoir en sera affectée.

Les fabricants de chauffe-eau pour VR mentionnent également qu’il est très important de vide le réservoir lorsque vous n’utilisez pas votre VR, car l’eau avec des niveaux élevés de fer et / ou de sulfate est très corrosive et réduira considérablement la durée de vie de l’anode.

Si vous recherchez une solution à long terme nécessitant moins d’entretien, Tige d’anode motorisée Corro-Protec RV est ce dont vous avez besoin. Ces anodes sont en titane et envoient un courant continu dans l’eau pour arrêter la corrosion. L’installation ne prend que quelques minutes et l’anode alimente directement le câblage existant de votre VR.

L’odeur de soufre est présente dans de nombreuses maisons en Amérique du Nord et peut également être un problème récurrent pour les campeurs. Cette odeur nauséabonde est souvent très prononcée et difficile à ignorer. Deux causes principales peuvent expliquer la présence d’odeurs dans votre chauffe-eau de VR:

Bactéries réductrices de sulfates dans votre chauffe-eau RV

Cette bactérie est la cause # 1 des odeurs de soufre dans les chauffe-eau pour VR. Cette bactérie se trouve dans l’eau et se développe normalement lorsque l’eau est chauffée dans un réservoir en métal. Il existe deux façons de tuer cette bactérie et d’arrêter les problèmes d’odeurs.

• Installez une anode à courant imposé

La première méthode consiste à installer un anode de courant impressionné. Le courant envoyé à travers l’anode dans l’eau tue immédiatement les bactéries, ce qui arrête le odeur de soufre dans l’eau chaude. Les anodes à courant impressionnant sont faciles à installer, ont un rendement élevé et sont généralement conçues pour durer plusieurs années.

Traitement à l’eau de javel

La deuxième solution consiste à effectuer un traitement à l’eau de javel dans le chauffe-eau RV. Cependant, cela n’éliminera les odeurs que pendant quelques jours et ce nettoyage est généralement plus long et complexe.

Réaction avec l’anode en magnésium

Dans certains cas, l’odeur de soufre est causée par de l’eau à forte teneur en magnésium entrant en contact avec l’anode d’origine déjà présente dans votre chauffe-eau. Si le problème d’odeur provient de la réaction entre l’anode de magnésium et votre eau, plusieurs options s’offrent à vous. Cependant, il est important de savoir que toutes ces options ne sont pas bonnes à long terme.

• Retirez l’anode en magnésium

Ce problème pourrait être résolu en retirant l’anode de magnésium du réservoir. Cependant, cela est très dangereux pour le chauffe-eau, car il sera alors privé de sa seule protection contre la rouille. Cela vous obligerait à changer votre réservoir après seulement quelques années.

• Installer une anode à courant imposé

Encore une fois, l’installation d’un Anode alimentée par chauffe-eau Corro-Protec RV est la solution idéale à ces problèmes car, en plus d’éliminer cette odeur d’oeuf pourri, ces anodes sont en titane insoluble, ce qui limite leurs débris. De plus, cette technologie ne nécessite aucun entretien et est valable pendant de nombreuses années. Corro-Protec, Les anodes sont faciles à installer et résoudront vos problèmes d’odeurs en quelques heures seulement.