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How to make a christmas tree out of a bottle brush

Start drinking immediately.

Here’s an excuse (not that you needed one) to open another bottle of wine or two this weekend: You can make a Christmas tree out of wine bottles. It may sound kitschy, but the end result is seriously stunning. We’re for sure swapping our evergreens for vino this year. And if you can’t break the tradition of displaying a real or faux tree, why not show off both?

The end result of a DIY wine bottle tree looks daunting, but it’s not as complicated as it seems. Setting up a real Christmas tree and stand is much more of a hassle than this project. They only hitch is that you need a copious amount of wine bottles lying around your house, but that’s likely a challenge you’ll fully accept to get this job done. Plus, you can always buy empty wine bottles if you want. That way, they’ll all match!

What You’ll Need:

  • Empty wine bottles
  • Tiered bottle drying rack
  • Christmas string lights

How It’s Done:

Once you have all of the necessary supplies, start putting the tree together (while simultaneously sipping on a glass of wine, of course). Place your wine rack where you want your tree to go, and wrap the frame in string lights. It’s just like decorating a regular tree, except pine needles aren’t sticking you in the face every time you wrap the lights around.

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DIY bottle brush trees are prefect for a retro Christmas look. They’re so easy to make and it’s possible to make a whole forest of bottle brush trees for your mantle!

I’ve been making these colorful bottle brush trees for years. They have such a vintage charm to them and look great with DIY Christmas decor, like this tinsel wreath or retro tree topper.

They’re even cute enough to leave up in January for non-holiday specific Christmas decor.

This post contains affiliate links. By purchasing an item through an affiliate link, I earn a small commission at no extra cost to you.

DIY Bottle Brush Trees

Supplies Needed

  • Sisal bottle brush trees*
  • Bleach
  • Dye**
  • Plastic Cups for Dye
  • Wooden Blocks
  • Hot Glue Gun
  • Drill

*Bottle brush trees need to be made of sisal for the best results. Other materials won’t bleach or just fall apart in the bleach.

**Dye Alternatives for Coloring Bottle Brush Trees

In the past, I’ve had success using a few different things to dye trees. The color saturation varies, but these choices allow you a wider variety of color.

  • Food coloring
  • Watered down acrylic paint
  • Watered down chalk paint
  • Kool-aid

Bleaching the Bottle Brush Trees

You can use straight bleach for faster results. Just stand nearby and don’t leave them submerged for too long.

I’ve also noticed that a new batch of bleach and water works better than an older one that you’ve been using. If you’re not getting the white trees you want, dump the solution and try a new batch with more bleach.

  1. Fill a container with bleach and water.
  2. Submerge the trees.
  3. Remove them as they turn white.
  4. Rinse the bleach from the trees.
  5. Bigger trees will need to be turned to get full coverage.

How to Dye Bottle Brush Trees

  1. Fill containers with hot water.
  2. Add a few tablespoons of dye. Use more for a more vibrant color.
  3. If you’re using powder dye, mix the solution.
  4. Place the tree in the dye solution. For a pastel tree, only leave it in for a few seconds. For brighter trees, let them sit longer.
  5. Remove the trees and let them dry on paper towels.

Getting a Dip Dye Effect when Dyeing Bottle Brush Trees

  1. Dip the top of the tree into the dye solution for a few seconds.
  2. Remove the tree and dip it in the dye, right side up.
  3. Hold it in for a few seconds before pulling it up and letting the bottom sit for another few seconds.
  4. Let dry on paper towels.

How to Comb Your Bottle Brush Trees

Sometimes bleaching and dyeing bottle brush trees leaves them looking a little worse than wear. Some of mine were clumpy.

Luckily it’s pretty easy to fix.

  1. It’s easier to fix the trees while they’re still wet. Hot water makes it easy.
  2. Straighten the tree as needed by bending the main wire stem.
  3. Use a paint brush comb to comb the bristles.
  4. Try to remove any snow clumps.
  5. Comb until it’s fluffier.
  6. Let it dry and comb it some more if needed.

Making Wood Bases

I hate the look of the plastic bases, so I decided to give them an upgrade with wooden blocks.

The trees I bought also had fake snow clumps in them that turned into a gooey mess when wet.

  1. Remove the plastic bases from the bottom of the tree. Twisting slightly makes it easy to remove them.
  2. Drill holes into wooden blocks. They can be painted or stained as desired. You can even use wood slices for a natural look!
  3. It might be necessary to remove old glue or even trim unsightly bristles before gluing the trees to the wooden blocks.
  4. You’ll need a slightly bigger hole for the bigger trees.
  5. Use hot glue before you shove the wire into the hole.

Storing Bottle Brush Trees

There’s nothing sadder than a crush bottle brush tree, so take care while you store them.

I normally store mine in a plastic bag. They provide cushion for each other. A box is another good solution.

Don’t place anything heavy on them.

Store them in a temperate controlled environment. I haven’t had any yellow over time, but I’ve ruined other Christmas decor by storing it in a hot attic, so now I’m trying to be more careful.

Easy to make Christmas decorations for your home.

Haley Pierson-Cox

Haley Pierson-Cox from Red-Handled Scissors is a maker of crafts, a lover of cats, an avid swearing enthusiast, a cross-stitch book author, and a general purveyor of quirk. She’s also sometimes an irritable cartoon named Tiny Cranky Haley. https://www.redhandledscissors.com

By Haley Pierson-Cox

Haley Pierson-Cox

Haley Pierson-Cox from Red-Handled Scissors is a maker of crafts, a lover of cats, an avid swearing enthusiast, a cross-stitch book author, and a general purveyor of quirk. She’s also sometimes an irritable cartoon named Tiny Cranky Haley. https://www.redhandledscissors.com

@haleykscissors

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

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Love the look of colorful bottle brush trees but can’t find them locally? Don’t bother with bleach, dye, and paint—just raid your yarn stash! Transform yarn, twine, or even holiday garlands into your own custom handmade bottle brush trees with this fun tutorial from Virginia at Fynes Designs.

I was surprised to see how easy bottle brush tree-making could be!

Ready to give it a try? Click here to see how it’s done.

Laura from Dacian Moon Handmade will show you how to make this, in 4 easy steps.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Materials Needed

– bottle brush
– craft glue
– glitter
– glass or plastic colored pearls
– scissors
– paintbrush
– eraser
– a piece of paper

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Step 1

Place the piece of paper in front of you…

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

… take the bottle brush and give it a haircut.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

You should cut it in small steps until it looks like a tree.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Step 2

Take the eraser…

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

… and fix the tree in the middle of it. It should be a large eraser to support the tree. You can use polystyrene , wood or anything else strong enough to support your tree.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Step 3

Spread glitter on the paper…

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

…then apply glue on the tree, using the paintbrush…

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Before the glue is dry, roll your tree over the glitter.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Take care to have glitter on all sides.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

It will look like this.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Step 4

The final step is to add to it some globes, so put the glass / plastic pearls in the branches without glitter. They will stick in place because of the glue. I used a toothpick to place them in place.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Your little tree will make a wonderful decoration.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Isn’t this Bottle Brush Christmas Tree adorable? This Christmas Tree will make for a great table top decoration for Christmas. And, your child will love that they made this Christmas decoration themselves.

By: Mindy McIntosh-Shetter

21 December, 2010

Bottle trees have a vivid past that intertwines cultures and beliefs from Africa and the southern United States. The original purpose of bottle trees was to capture evil spirits inside the glass. Today, bottle trees are viewed more as landscape art than spirit traps. A bottle tree must have a trunk, which can be a fence post or a dead tree. Branches of the bottle tree can be made from branches left on the tree or made from a material such as rebar. Regardless of what the branches are made of, make sure they are strong enough to hold the weight of the bottles.

Select a 6-foot-tall dead tree in the yard as the trunk for the bottle tree.

  • Bottle trees have a vivid past that intertwines cultures and beliefs from Africa and the southern United States.
  • Branches of the bottle tree can be made from branches left on the tree or made from a material such as rebar.

Remove all of the branches using a chainsaw and pruning shears. Drill one 7/16-inch hole 2 inches deep in the top of the tree.

Starting on the north side of the tree, drill nine holes 8 inches apart and 2 inches deep, at a 45-degree angle going up the tree.

Continue to drill holes on the other sides of the tree. When completed, push rebar into each hole.

Slide wine bottles over each rebar branch in your chosen pattern.

Make An Outdoor Wine Bottle Tree

Collect wine bottles in the color or colors you want for your wine bottle tree. Soak the labels off the empty wine bottles in hot, soapy water. Rinse and dry them completely. Dig a hole 12 inches in diameter and 24 inches deep in your yard with a posthole digger in a spot where the wine bottle tree will get direct sunlight. Stand a heavy wooden post in the middle of the hole. Use a post that is pressure treated or naturally resistant to rot, and is tall enough to extend out of the ground about 6 feet, or to the height you desire. Drill pilot holes in all sides of the post at a downward 45-degree angle at least 6 inches apart and 1 and ½ inches deep. Make the hole pattern symmetrical or not, depending on the pattern you want to hang the wine bottles.

  • Remove all of the branches using a chainsaw and pruning shears.
  • Dig a hole 12 inches in diameter and 24 inches deep in your yard with a posthole digger in a spot where the wine bottle tree will get direct sunlight.

Use bottles in different colors for an informal look, or choose bottles in the same color for a more formal display. Different types of bottles can be used for this tree. Examples of bottle types include beer bottles, vinegar bottles, colored water bottles and perfume bottles. For a more natural look, use rebar in different sizes and lengths. This will allow different types of bottles to be displayed on the same tree.

Christmas is officially on its way, which means it’s time to decorate! Fill your home with holiday spirit by making these DIY bottlebrush trees.

We love finding fun uses for everyday objects almost as much as we love Christmas. This DIY project, for example, transforms a utilitarian dryer vent brush into multiple mini trees.

To make a set of trees, all you need is the brush, some basic crafting tools, and tiny beads to serve as ornaments. Since there’s a good chance you already have most of the supplies on hand, this project is also affordable. Get started by gathering up the materials, queuing up some Christmas tunes, and getting in the holiday spirit!

What You Need

  • Dryer vent brush
  • Tin snips
  • Scissors
  • Hot-glue gun and glue sticks
  • Doll heads in various sizes
  • Clamp
  • Drill and drill bit
  • Tweezers
  • Rubber cement
  • Beads
  • Glitter

Step 1: Cut Brush to Size

Use tin snips to cut the dryer vent brush into 3-4 sections. The size of your sections depends on how big you want your finished trees to be. The smaller your trees, the more you can make from a single dryer vent brush.

Step 2: Shape Brush Sections

Trim the bristles on each cut section of the brush with scissors. Cut closely around the wire at one end to create the trunk. Then trim the bristles of of the remaining section to form a cone shape—wide at the bottom and narrow at the top.

Step 3: Create Top and Base

Heat up your hot glue gun. Place a small dab of glue on the top and base of the tree to prevent the bristles from falling out. As it dries, place a wood doll head in a clamp. Drill a hole the size of the tree’s wire trunk into the wood doll head. Hot glue the tree trunk into the hole.

Editor’s Tip: If you can’t find wood doll heads, you can also use wood beads as the base. However, you will need to saw off a portion to make one side flat. Wood cubes would also work as a base.

Step 4: Decorate the Tree

Use tweezers and rubber cement to attach small beads as ornaments to the tree. Let the glue dry, then brush the surface of the tree lightly with rubber cement. Sprinkle glitter over each tree.

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Bottle trees originated in the southeastern United States as crossovers from African cultures and sometimes were called spirit trees. Traditionally, empty bottles were inverted on the ends of a dead tree’s limbs. The most common bottle used was the cobalt blue Milk of Magnesia bottle. The idea of the bottle tree was to bring good luck to the home by trapping so-called evil spirits inside the bottles before they could enter the house. Today, bottle trees are garden decorations and wine bottles are used. Commercially available metal bottle tree frames can be purchased or you can make your own from construction materials.

Collect wine bottles in the color or colors you want for your wine bottle tree. Soak the labels off the empty wine bottles in hot, soapy water. Rinse and dry them completely.

Dig a hole 12 inches in diameter and 24 inches deep in your yard with a posthole digger in a spot where the wine bottle tree will get direct sunlight. Direct sunlight, especially shafts of light that filter through a treetop, striking the wine bottles will illuminate the tree and make it stand out from the rest of the garden.

Stand a heavy wooden post in the middle of the hole. Use a post that is pressure treated or naturally resistant to rot, and is tall enough to extend out of the ground about 6 feet, or to the height you desire. Pour premixed concrete around the post to fill the hole level with the ground. Use a carpenter’s level to make sure the post is straight and allow the concrete to set.

Drill pilot holes in all sides of the post at a downward 45-degree angle at least 6 inches apart and 1 and ½ inches deep. Make the hole pattern symmetrical or not, depending on the pattern you want to hang the wine bottles. Screw an 8- or 10-inch galvanized lag bolt into each pilot hole to a depth of 2 inches.

Hang an empty wine bottle upside down on each bolt on the post to create your wine tree.

Drill one or more additional holes in the top of the post and use an unusual larger bottle or a grouping of smaller bottles for this position.

These mini trees are absolutely adorable!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

It doesn’t take a massive Christmas tree to complete your holiday decor. These bottle brush trees might be tiny, but they bring plenty of festivity!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Pastel-colored decorations add a subtle yet stunning addition to your Christmas decor.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

This retro shadow box—complete with a mini camper!—would make for the cutest homemade Christmas

Get the tutorial at Hey Let’s Make Stuff.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

On top of an antique table (purchased at the Country Living Fair!), a reclaimed soda crate gathers a miniature forest of snow-dusted bottle brush evergreens.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Loose sprigs of greenery in sap buckets, toy deer, and bottlebrush trees create a playfully whimsical tablescape.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Blogger Alison Faulkner used her bottlebrush tree collection in two ways: to create simple mantel decor and to adorn her Christmas wreath.

Get the tutorial at The Alison Show.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Add some Christmas shine to your home’s shelving by placing colorful bottlebrush trees throughout empty spaces.

Get the tutorial at Fynes Designs.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Craft this winter wonderland by letting your bottlebrush trees soak in bleach and hot water for about 30 minutes. Don’t forget to add the snow and a touch of glitter!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Designer Virginia Fynes placed an array of Christmas decor on top of wood slice to create a focal point on her dining room table.

Get the tutorial at Fynes Designs.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Scatter Christmas lights throughout an array of bottlebrush trees to create a glowing, magical entryway.

Get the tutorial at Paige Knudsen.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Use these “snow-covered pines” as elegant place cards at your Christmas dinner.

Get the tutorial at Somerset Place.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Though we love the pop of pink on this cake, you can dye bottlebrush trees any shade to add a splash of color to your Christmas dessert.

Get the tutorial at The Proper Blog.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Look closely: A forest of flocked bottlebrush trees take the place of a tree skirt on this Christmas tree.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

It’s safe to say we’ve never seen a more adorable place card than this cute VW bus.

Get the tutorial at Decor and The Dog.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Elegant and classy, this metallic centerpiece can be made with bells, beads, and bottlebrush trees.

Get the tutorial at Fynes Designs.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Add some holiday decor to your kitchen hutch with metallic blue and silver ornaments and white bottlebrush Christmas trees.

Get the tutorial at Fynes Designs.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Make this Christmas colorful and bright by adding different shades of pink and green bottlebrush trees to your dining table.

Get the tutorial at Coco + Kelley.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Here’s one Yuletide idea that’s definitely worth its salt: Turn under-a-dollar shakers into mini winter wonderlands by nesting toy evergreens and deer atop iodized “drifts.”

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Fill empty tea cups and dishes with snowy bottlebrush trees for understated holiday decor.

Get the tutorial Everyday Home Blog.

This vintage-inspired wreath, complete with miniature ice skaters and frosted bottle brush trees, will captivate people of all ages with its old-school charm and detail.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Whimsical Bottlebrush Wreath

This vintage inspired bottle brush wreath, complete with miniature ice skaters, with will captivate guests of all ages with its old school charm and detail.

Photo by: Flynnside Out Productions

Flynnside Out Productions

Related To:

Materials

  • 12″ foam wreath
  • fabric strips (in desired pattern)
  • bottle brush trees and bushes
  • scaled miniature ice-skating figurines
  • 1 1/2″-thick ribbon
  • scissors
  • hot glue gun
  • hot glue sticks

Cut Fabric Strips

Cut fabric into several 2 1/2-inch-wide strips.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Cut Fabric Strips

Using scissors, cut fabric into several 2.5 inch wide strips.

Photo by: Flynnside Out Productions

Flynnside Out Productions

Wrap Wreath in Fabric

Dab glue onto the back of the wreath and secure the edge of the fabric to the foam (Image 1). Begin wrapping the fabric strips around the wreath (Image 2). Repeat, securing with glue periodically, until the wreath is completely covered by fabric.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Flynnside Out Productions

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Flynnside Out Productions

Wrap Wreath in Fabric

Photo By: Flynnside Out Productions

Wrap Wreath in Fabric

Photo By: Flynnside Out Productions

Add Trees

Remove the bases of the bottle brush trees and bushes so that the wire is exposed (Image 1). Insert the wire into the wreath (Image 2), then bend the wire so that the tree is flat against the wreath, securing with glue as needed (Image 3). Repeat with more trees until you get a landscape effect on either side of the wreath (Image 4).

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Here are a few pics I found on the ol’ internet of bottle trees at the Antique Rose Emporium:

Upon closer inspection of the Antique Rose Emporium bottle trees you will notice that the these bottle trees are real cedar trees, and the bottles are simply placed on a dead branch.

The roses are pretty and smell yummy, but as a kid I remember the Antique Rose Emporium for the bottle trees, funky art, and this picture of a potted archway.

Who decided sticking bottles on trees was a good idea?

It turns out the idea of a bottle tree has been around since glass bottles were invented. According to this site, that was in 1600 BC in Egypt and Mesopotamia. As the story goes, people believed the whir of the wind through a bottle was the sound of spirits trapped inside. (Remember Aladdin?) Naturally, the next step is to put a cap on the bottle trapping the bad spirits inside, which of course, were then destroyed by the light of a sunny day (who knew vampires used to be so small :). So, people kept bottles by their entryways to protect their home from evil spirits, and the bottle tree was born.

I actually bought my mom a bottle brush tree for Mother’s Day a few years ago, thinking that would suffice her bottle tree fixation. Although the tree I got her did not look like this…

It was about 1/20th the size with only 5 twiggy limbs. The tree had a tragic soccer ball to the head (branches) and never recovered. My mom decided a real tree could not live in that spot and thought a steel tree would be perfect. (There have a been a few broken bottles, but those are fairly easily replaced!) My family thinks our backyard is a soccer field.

Here was my mom’s inspiration tree. This tree was created by a Mississippi artist named Stepahnie Dwyer.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

And here is the DIY bottle tree beauty in our backyard…

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

*That brick wall is used as a soccer goal. You can see why the tree needs to be super sturdy!

A close up of her carefully crafted branches:

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

My mom and her bottle tree…

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

My mom’s tree is about 10 feet tall and holds 60 bottles. She estimates that it cost about $300 for materials. $150 for the metal and $150 for the colored bottles. The clear and green ones are just old wine bottles she collected from friends. You can buy vintage glass bottles on Amazon for $2.95 each. Here is an orange glass bottle ,turquoise bottle, and a purple bottle. $300 sounds expensive, but honestly, this style of bottle tree is hard to even find for sale. I have a feeling that shipping would be tricky since this sucker doesn’t come in pieces. Here is a super, simple bottle tree from Amazon. It only holds 10 bottles, but still keeps those spirit away and gives off the glow!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Or here is a really easy DIY version that could easily be made with a fence post or the tree kit purchased for $69.95.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Bottle brush Christmas trees are very cool for easily adding a holiday feel to the space or piece and cost very little – they can be widely incorporated into Christmas décor and won’t break the bank. We’ve gathered some easy and cool crafts you can make for these holidays and all of the include bottle brush trees. Let’s begin!

This is a very creative and cool holiday sign for the holidays, it’s a Christmas tree sign composed fully of bottle brush trees in various colors. The idea is very simple and very cool, it will fit both indoors and outdoors and it will be a nice alternative to a usual Christmas tree. Go for bolder colors to make your Christmas tree super cool!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

DIY colorful bottle brush Christmas tree sign (via www.deliciousanddiy.com)

Make an easy holiday centerpiece using bottle brush trees! This one is composed of a wooden tray, some faux snow, colorful bottle brush trees, a toy ornament and candles in candleholders. You can actually make the whole scene very fast, in a couple of minutes, and if you don’t like the elements, just swap them for different ones.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

DIY quick colorful Christmas centerpiece with bottle brush trees (via blissmakes.com)

If you need catchy and creative Christmas tree ornaments, these are right what you want! These ornaments are made of toy cars and bottle brush trees, and they feel very chic and retro-like. These ornaments can also become cool gifts for the holidays, get inspired!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

DIY Christmas tree and truck ornament (via thethingsshemakes.blogspot.com)

Here’s another cool and cute Christmas ornament idea – a bottle brush tree in a jar with faux snow. This is a very simple idea to realize and you’ll make them fast and as many as you need. These can be also nice Christmas gifts if you’ve forgotten to buy some.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

DIY Christmas tree in a bottle ornament (via inspirationsbyd.blogspot.com)

This wreath looks very wintry and very cozy – it’s a white wreath with little bottle brush trees – what can be more natural than that? Go for neutral trees and a plaid ribbon and you’ll make a very cool Christmas decoration for your front door. Besides, making it isn’t difficult at all and won’t take much time. Merry Christmas!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

DIY Christmas wreath with bottle brush trees (via aprettylifeinthesuburbs.com)

Make cool colorful gift toppers for Christmas to make your gifts stand out. Top your gifts with bold bows and add tiny bottle brush trees with ornaments on them to make the gift cooler. Rock bold and bright shades or go for traditional red, green and white and enjoy!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

DIY bottle brush Christmas gift topper (via www.vitaminihandmade.com)

Make cool holiday snow globes with bottle brush trees! These jars contain bottle brush trees and faux snow, so they look super natural and cool, you may also add other items like houses, snowmen and other stuff. Get inspired!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

DIY bottle brush snow globes for Christmas (via www.acasarella.net)

I’m head over heels about this bold Christmas wreath! It looks frosty, fresh and bold! It’s a chic white snowflake wreath decorated with colorful bottle brush trees done with colorful pompoms. Making it won’t take much time and its effect is cool – it’s so snowy!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

DIY snowflake Christmas wreath with bottle brush trees (via designimprovised.com)

If you want to add a touch of vintage to your holiday décor, make cool bottle brush Christmas trees attached to spools and styled with mini ornaments. The bottle brush trees are styled with faux snow and mini ornaments and look very festive and cute.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

DIY bottle brush Christmas trees on spools (via www.petscribbles.com)

The last but not least craft is bottle brush photo holders for the holidays – you may rock them after, too, and give them as gifts. These colorful bottle brush trees contain wire holders where you can place your pics, take a look at the tutorial and make them!

Today I’m sharing how I gave an inexpensive fake Christmas tree a totally new look with Sno Flock Powder; learn how to flock a Christmas Tree.

You know those projects that you put off because you just aren’t quite sure how it’s going to go? Like, it looks easy and all but for some reason you’re aren’t confident that it’s going to work out that perfectly when you try it? Well this was definitely one of the projects.

I ordered this Sno Flock powder last year, but for some reason I kept putting it off and putting it off, and before I knew it I’d avoiding flocking all holiday season long…

But this year I decided it was time. And if it was a fail, then who cares, right? And guess what?! It was WAY easier and quicker and SO MUCH BETTER then I could have possibly hoped!

I absolutely love how it turned out – and it does not flake off the way you might think it would. I’m so excited about how cute this little tree is. In fact, I started decorating it tonight, and I’m already looking for something else around here that I can flock…

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Today is the first of the Seasonal Simplicity Christmas Series hops! I can hardly believe that we are already in November that sharing holiday projects. But I just know that you are going to love what my friends have come up with to share with you today….check it out at the bottom of this post!

We’ve had this store bought flocked Christmas tree for a couple of years now. I love decorating it each Christmas season, and it has always made me wish that more of our trees had a flocked effect. I just love the light feel of the “snow covered” flocked branches….

So… this little guy was on a fabulous sale last holiday season, and because it was such a great price I figured it was the perfect piece to experiment on with my flocking powder. I mean, he was pretty scraggly and sad looking, so why not give it a go?

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

All you need for this project is a water spray bottle, a sieve, and this Sno Flock Powder. I used about half a bag for this smallish tree, but I went fairly light. If I had wanted to flock it more heavily, I probably would have used the whole bag for a smaller sized tree (it’s about a six footer).

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

I fluffed the branches first, after the tree came out of his hiding box. Then I separated the tree into the three sections it came in. I flocked the top section inside the house, so that I could take some better pics for you, and then flocked the bottom two sections out in the garage. Finally, I put it all together in the stand in order to dry and left it out in the garage for a couple of days.

Start by thoroughly spraying down your branches with the water bottle (working in sections, and turning the tree as you go).

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Then sprinkle the flocking powder over the tree, as heavily as you wish, knowing you can always add more later. You sprinkle it over the tree using the sieve.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Go back right after the sieve sprinkling and spray it all down with the water bottle again. It is this final spray down that actually activates the Sno Flock and gets it working.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Once it dries, it’s amazing how well adhered it is! (In fact, as I decorated it this evening it was way less messy then my store bought flocked tree is!). I love the airy dusting of snow over the whole tree, with some thicker sections throughout. Such a light and pretty effect!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Quite a difference, right?

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

You should definitely try your own! I think I’ll be flocking some wreaths, soon, too… and maybe even more. I’m ready to order some more Sno Flock to carry me through the rest of the holiday season.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

If you give it a try, I’d love to hear how it comes out! I’ll be back soon to share a few pics of this cute little newly-flocked tree all dressed for the holidays.

As I mentioned, today is the first of the Seasonal Simplicity Christmas Series hops! You’re going to love what my friends have come up with to share with you today….How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

So I have fallen in love with bottle brush trees. I have started collecting them the last few years. Picking them up here and there and adding to my collection.

But I wanted more.

I was having a hard time finding anything but the dark green ones they sell by the bagful to use with your Christmas village. So I bought a bag of those for $10.00 as they were 50% off at Michaels and decided to try some DIY Bottle Brush Christmas Trees.

I didn’t want dark green trees though. I wanted more of a vintage look to the trees so a friend told me you could bleach them so I decided to give it a try. Guess what?! It works.

I put together a mixture of 80%bleach and 20%water in a bowl. I then added in the trees and waited.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle BrushLet them sit for several minutes and they will magically turn into this!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Use your metal tongs to remove them from the bleach and then rinse under water.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle BrushYou can pull them out before they turn totally white if you like. I did that on a few of them.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Your bleach mixture will get dirty and sludgie as you go. If you are doing a lot you may need to change your mixture out part way through. The dirtier the mixture gets the longer it will take for the trees to bleach out.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

For the bigger trees you may have to get creative with your container.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

I love my little forest of bottle brush trees.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

I love the vintagey look of the creamy white trees but if you want a more colorful forest get out some spray paint and paint away or even use Rit dye. You even add little beads or jewels to them to dress them up.

I decided to use them to dress up my mantel in the family room.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Let’s just say the lighting is less than favorable in my family room even on a sunny day so please excuse the mediocre photos.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

I love my little forest.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

I can’t wait until my paperwhites and hyacinth bulbs fill in the space on both ends of my mantel

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Also, loving my new joy frame! Thanks to Pinterest for that one. I found the cute heart shaped wreath at Cost Plus World Market!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

I got a little sidelined with my holiday decorating due to Jim’s emergency eye surgery and decorating for the church Christmas party this week but I’ll be back the first of next week with a complete tour of my holiday decor for you!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Here’s a fun craft project for Christmas: How to make sisal bottle brush trees – from scratch! In this tutorial I’m using green sisal fiber, some floral wire, and a couple clothespins to make some woodsy rustic bottle brush trees for holiday decorating.

The sisal fiber is available here, and you can get floral wire just about anywhere. I tried a few different gauges of wire, and liked 20 gauge the best. It’s thin enough that it’s still easy to twist, but sturdy enough to keep my trees straight and upright. I’m sure you could use different types combs to brush out the fibers. I just happened to have an old pet flea comb with metal teeth that worked wonderfully, as the teeth are very close together, and could withstand some vigorous brushing.

You can use lots of different items for tree trunks: wooden discs, branch slices, old knobs or ornaments, thimbles, etc, etc! Have fun creating something unique.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Supplies:

  • Green sisal fiber found here (I was able to make about a dozen 4-6″ trees with one bag)
  • 20 gauge green floral wire
  • Wire cutters
  • 2 wooden clothespins
  • Sturdy comb
  • Scissors
  • Branch slice or other items to use as trunks
  • White glue, glue brush

Step 1: Unspool about 2 feet of floral wire, and bend it in half. Insert a wooden clothespin at the halfway point, and twist the wires together 3 or 4 times to secure the clothespin in the wire. Allow about 8 inches of space, and then twist the wires together again, another 3 or 4 times. Now, insert the second clothespin, and twist the ends of the wire together to secure. Cut off any excess wire.
Step 2: Unfold some sisal fiber, and pull away a long piece. Pull the fibers to straighten and align them. You can work in small batches, pulling out straight bits of fiber, and then stacking them to make a uniform pile. Once you have a long, straight handful, fold it a few times so that it’s about 4 inches wide, and cut off the folds so you are left with a stack of 4-inch long fibers.
Step 3: Insert the bundle of fibers between the two wires. Spread the fibers out evenly between the clothespins, leaving about 1/2 inch of open wire at either end. The thickness of fiber is ideally about 1/2 inch. Thicker piles of fiber are harder to work with, but make trees that are more dense. It may be easier to experiment with thinner piles, and then work up to thicker trees.
Press the wires together to help hold the fibers in place so you can lift up your contraption to twist it.
Step 4: Begin twisting the clothespins in opposite directions. After about 8-10 twists, stop to fluff the fiber so that it doesn’t tangle. Use a comb to gently tease out any tangles and free clumped fibers. Be a little ginger with the tree at this point, as the fibers are not fully secured yet by the twisted wire.
After a little combing, add a few more twists, and then comb again.
After about 15-20 twists, check to see how secure the fibers are. If you can tug them without them coming out, you’re done twisting. Use wire snips to cut the wires, leaving a little wire tail at either end to hold onto.
Step 5: Now, hold onto the wire end, and give the tree a good raking with the comb in both directions. You want to remove any loose bits, even out the form, and straighten all of the fibers. Lots of fiber will come out. Once you have a uniform and tidy cylinder of fiber, snip off one of the wire tails. This will be the top of the tree.
Step 6: Use scissors to begin forming the cone shape of the tree. Start at the bottom with the scissors angled toward the top of the tree. Cut diagonally, and turn the tree a little with every snip. It’s like cutting hair- go easy, and make small changes rather than drastic chops.
Once you have the basic shape defined, give the tree another good brushing to reveal loose strands. Then cut again to refine the shape.
Step 7: Shorten the wire tail, and glue it into the wooden trunk or your chosen base.

We love this! All you need is a water bottle and some Holiday decor.

Ever wanted your hair to look just like a Christmas tree? Whether or not the answer to that question is “YES!” or “Um, not really,” there’s a tutorial out there to help give your tresses some serious Christmas spirit.

In the 2015 video “Christmas Tree Hair” (which has since been excerpted on Pretty52’s Facebook page), a pair of jokers named Bridget Pugliese and Carter Thomas give you a simple DIY to literally turn your hair into a Christmas tree.

All you need is an empty water bottle and some Christmas decor—namely lights (battery-operated, of course), ribbon, ornaments, and bells.

It will really only work if your hair is long enough to cover a water bottle, of course. Basically you just put that water bottle on top of your head, secure it, cover it with your hair and proceed to decorate the resulting tree shape made out of your hair. It’s an uber-easy way to bring some humorous festivity to a Christmas event.

Pugliese and Thomas, both actors, clearly present this hairstyle as a bit tongue-in-cheek during the video. The how-to is real, of course, but we definitely get a vibe that they’re not entirely serious. But hey, they’re having fun! And so you will you if you try this look!

While Christmas tree hair may be a little over the top for, say, an office holiday party, it could be just right to get some laughs out of family and friends at a less formal gathering. I’m betting this would be absolutely perfect for an ugly Christmas sweater party or pub crawl. And for kids, this is would be a big hit for a crazy hair day at school!

If you want to take it a step further, YouTuber Maddison Bush added some green hair paint to her version. Very … Grinch-y!

Do you think you could pull off Christmas tree hair? Have you ever tried before?

Add holiday cheer to your front door with this DIY Christmas wreath made to look like a tree. The secret to its shape? Brass rings and zip ties! See how easy it is to make.

Use inexpensive brass rings to create a modern Christmas tree-shape wreath for your front door. This easy holiday decorating project is super simple and creates a wow-worthy statement for instant Christmas curb appeal. Use fresh evergreens for a natural look, or substitute faux greenery for a longer-lasting DIY Christmas wreath. Follow the steps below to make your own holiday wreath now.

Supplies Needed

  • Evergreen sprigs
  • 18 6″ brass rings
  • Hot-glue gun and glue sticks
  • Thin twigs
  • Green zip ties
  • Green floral wire
  • Red satin ribbon
  • Scissors

How to Make a Tree-Shape Christmas Wreath

The great thing about this Christmas wreath project is that you can adapt it to fit the size of the space where you want to hang it. Use the design to decorate a door or even the side of your home. Simply add more rings or adjust the number of rings per row in the tree to make it work for you.

Step 1: Add Greenery to Rings

Snip lengths of evergreen sprigs and wrap around a brass ring. Use floral wire to attach the evergreen to ring. Repeat until you have 18 completed rings or enough to make your tree as wide or tall as desired.

Step 2: Arrange Rings in Tree Shape

Arrange the rings in a pyramid formation. To make our tree tall, we added two rows of three rings to the center of our pyramid formation, rather than a perfect 5-4-3-2-1 triangle formation. Once you’ve finalized your layout, join the adjacent rings together with green zip ties. Cut off the extra tails of the zip ties and adjust the evergreens to hide the plastic as much as possible.

Step 3: Create the Tree Trunk

To make a trunk for the tree, cut twigs to the same length and hot glue together side by side. For our trunk, we cut about 10 pieces of stick to about 4 inches long. Once dry, glue the trunk to the back of the middle bottom ring. Let it dry completely before hanging.

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How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

The bottle tree in my garden adds light, color and a mystical feeling to all the flowers.

Doreen G. Howard

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When Greg Grant, then a Texas A&M University Extension agent, told me about bottle trees and their origins nearly two decades ago, they transfixed me with their beauty, simplicity and ancient past.

I lived in Texas near the Louisiana border, at the time, where bottle trees were occasionally found in rural areas.

Now bottle trees are everywhere, from Houston mansions to gardens in Vermont and California. I created one in the perennial bed under my kitchen window and love to gaze upon it amongst the orange and yellow lilies and other perennials, as I wash dishes or cook.

The Bottle Tree Expert

Grant’s good friend Felder Rushing, who lives in the Mississippi Delta, researched the bottle tree migration from Africa with the slave trade to the old South. His book, Bottle trees, and website are packed with history, legend, and gorgeous photos.

When African slaves arrived in the U.S., they created bottle trees from dead trees or large limbs next to their quarters and adorned them with glass bottles scavenged from garbage piles. Blue bottles were coveted, because they repelled evil and trapped night spirits to be destroyed by the rising sun. Many Milk of Magnesia bottles ended up on trees!

Bottle trees, often referred to as “poor man’s stained glass,” can also be made from wooden posts with large nails, welded metal rods, or bottles simply stuck on the tines of an upended pitch fork, Rushing says. You can use any color bottle, but blue ones are considered the best, because of their centuries-old association with ghosts and spirits.

A Mississippi Delta homestead with a bottle tree shot by Felder Rushing.

The first natural bottle tree Grant (now curator of Steven F. Austin State University’s arboretum) saw was between Nacogdoches and Crockett, TX at an old home site. “I’ve always loved glass, junk, and art, so was immediately mesmerized with what it might be. I’ve been hooked ever since. I’m not a drinker but come from a long line of them. It’s my little part of carrying on a family tradition of staring into the yard and seeing pretty colors as the end result of empty bottles.”

Greg Grant’s garden in East Texas as shot by Greg.

How to Make Your Own Bottle Tree

Now that I live in the frigid north with sub-freezing winters, constructing a bottle tree was a bit of a challenge. There were no dead trees near the kitchen door, and I had cold temperatures to consider. A tree made of welded rebar would weather any temperature. I purchased one for under $20 and drove its tip into the ground before the soil froze.

Gathering the right bottles was more of a challenge than I thought. Like Grant, I’m not much of a drinker and didn’t have cache of colored bottles. So, I asked all my friends and family to save blue wine, whiskey or other bottles for me. Boy, did I get an interesting array! Cobalt blue glass, from long-neck wine bottles to round vodka bottles to short, stubby beer bottles, soon showed up on my doorstep. There were enough to complete several tree, so I could be picky about the esthetics.

My rebar bottle tree this year. Credit: Doreen G. Howard

Bottles go on the iron rod tree in early May after the chance of nights in the 20’s disappears. And, they are removed and stored in the basement just before Halloween. I wish I could have their beauty in the garden year-round like those in warmer climates, but I’m grateful for the ancient legend-based splendor they bring me during gardening season!

Do you have a bottle tree in your backyard?

Today I’m sharing how I gave an inexpensive fake Christmas tree a totally new look with Sno Flock Powder; learn how to flock a Christmas Tree.

You know those projects that you put off because you just aren’t quite sure how it’s going to go? Like, it looks easy and all but for some reason you’re aren’t confident that it’s going to work out that perfectly when you try it? Well this was definitely one of the projects.

I ordered this Sno Flock powder last year, but for some reason I kept putting it off and putting it off, and before I knew it I’d avoiding flocking all holiday season long…

But this year I decided it was time. And if it was a fail, then who cares, right? And guess what?! It was WAY easier and quicker and SO MUCH BETTER then I could have possibly hoped!

I absolutely love how it turned out – and it does not flake off the way you might think it would. I’m so excited about how cute this little tree is. In fact, I started decorating it tonight, and I’m already looking for something else around here that I can flock…

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Today is the first of the Seasonal Simplicity Christmas Series hops! I can hardly believe that we are already in November that sharing holiday projects. But I just know that you are going to love what my friends have come up with to share with you today….check it out at the bottom of this post!

We’ve had this store bought flocked Christmas tree for a couple of years now. I love decorating it each Christmas season, and it has always made me wish that more of our trees had a flocked effect. I just love the light feel of the “snow covered” flocked branches….

So… this little guy was on a fabulous sale last holiday season, and because it was such a great price I figured it was the perfect piece to experiment on with my flocking powder. I mean, he was pretty scraggly and sad looking, so why not give it a go?

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

All you need for this project is a water spray bottle, a sieve, and this Sno Flock Powder. I used about half a bag for this smallish tree, but I went fairly light. If I had wanted to flock it more heavily, I probably would have used the whole bag for a smaller sized tree (it’s about a six footer).

I fluffed the branches first, after the tree came out of his hiding box. Then I separated the tree into the three sections it came in. I flocked the top section inside the house, so that I could take some better pics for you, and then flocked the bottom two sections out in the garage. Finally, I put it all together in the stand in order to dry and left it out in the garage for a couple of days.

Start by thoroughly spraying down your branches with the water bottle (working in sections, and turning the tree as you go).

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Then sprinkle the flocking powder over the tree, as heavily as you wish, knowing you can always add more later. You sprinkle it over the tree using the sieve.

Go back right after the sieve sprinkling and spray it all down with the water bottle again. It is this final spray down that actually activates the Sno Flock and gets it working.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Once it dries, it’s amazing how well adhered it is! (In fact, as I decorated it this evening it was way less messy then my store bought flocked tree is!). I love the airy dusting of snow over the whole tree, with some thicker sections throughout. Such a light and pretty effect!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Quite a difference, right?

You should definitely try your own! I think I’ll be flocking some wreaths, soon, too… and maybe even more. I’m ready to order some more Sno Flock to carry me through the rest of the holiday season.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

If you give it a try, I’d love to hear how it comes out! I’ll be back soon to share a few pics of this cute little newly-flocked tree all dressed for the holidays.

As I mentioned, today is the first of the Seasonal Simplicity Christmas Series hops! You’re going to love what my friends have come up with to share with you today….

I found clear ornaments at the Dollar Tree a few weeks ago and had so many ideas how to fill them! I finally settled on making a DIY snow globe. I found cute little bottle brush trees at Michael’s for 60% off so naturally I bought them in every color and size. I don’t foresee getting snow in south Texas anytime soon, so this snow globe is as close as we are going to get to winter. This ornament took all of 5 minutes to make and was a pretty and elegant addition to our Christmas tree.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle BrushHow to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Clear Ornament (with a large opening!)

Step 1: Ensure that your bottle brush tree will fit through the opening on your ornament.

Step 2: Apply hot glue to the bottom of the bottle brush tree. I used hot glue since it dries so quickly!

Step 3: While the glue is hot, drop through the opening in the top of the ornament.

Step 4: After the tree is adhered, pour in the fake snow!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle BrushHow to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

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How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

There is such a thing as a Christmas tree worm, but it isn’t the evergreen-eating pest its name might imply. It lives in tropical oceans, not tannenbaums, embedding itself in coral reefs and growing bizarre, colorful structures that sort of resemble a Whoville Christmas tree — hence the name.

Those Seussian plumes are how the worm breathes and eats. A Christmas tree worm makes its home inside a coral reef, burrowing down to create a tube where it might live for up to 40 years. Its “Christmas trees” extend out from the reef, often providing the only obvious sign of the worm’s presence. Each worm has two trees, composed of feathery tentacles known as radioles that are part of its highly adapted respiratory system. In addition to serving as external gills, they’re also covered with hairlike cilia that help the filter-feeding worm trap plankton and pass the food down to its mouth.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Despite their variety of colors — including red, orange, yellow and blue — Christmas tree worms all belong to one species, Spirobranchus giganteus. They’re widely distributed in Earth’s tropical and subtropical seas, especially the Caribbean and the Indo-Pacific, where they live most of their lives anchored into coral reefs, hiding inside tubes they build with calcium carbonate taken from surrounding seawater. They prefer shallow water, typically living at depths between 10 and 100 feet.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Christmas tree worms only grow to about 1.5 inches, but they’re a common sight for divers thanks to their vivid colors and shallow habitats. They’re also known for being skittish, quickly retracting into their tubes when they sense movement in the water. They can seal themselves in using an operculum, a specialized body structure that opens and closes like a door. The worms slowly re-emerge about a minute later, making sure the coast is clear before fully extending their plumes, also known as crowns. To see what that looks like, check out this video of Christmas tree worms in the Philippines:

Christmas tree worms are polychaetes, a class of mostly aquatic worms that have colonized virtually every corner of the ocean, including the frigid abyssal plain and the steamy waters around hydrothermal vents. Some are mobile, but most burrow or build tubes — ranging from dainty, 1-inch wisps like Christmas tree worms to the nightmarish bobbit worm, a seabed-dwelling goliath that can grow nearly 10 feet long. Polychaetes are among the planet’s most common marine animals, and they also account for more than 8,000 of the roughly 9,000 annelid worm species known to science.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

There are male and female Christmas tree worms, which reproduce sexually by releasing their sperm and eggs into the water. The eggs are then fertilized as they drift with the currents, eventually developing into larvae that settle on coral heads, burrow inside and construct tubes of their own. Many tube-building polychaete worms are also capable of reproducing asexually through a process known as paratomy.

As a species, S. giganteus seems to be doing pretty well. Its populations are stable with no major threats, other than local pollution or being taken from the wild by coral collectors. But as with many sea creatures, ocean acidification and warming could soon change that. Both problems are now deepening due to climate change, and both can threaten the coral reefs on which Christmas tree worms grow. And beyond that, acidification may endanger the worms more directly by reducing calcium carbonate minerals in seawater. Those minerals are a key ingredient in not just the calcareous tubes of Christmas tree worms, but also the shells of oysters, clams, sea urchins and countless other marine animals.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

For now, however, there’s no sign Christmas tree worms are struggling. And while they would be dwarfed by an actual Christmas tree, their natural beauty offers a priceless gift for anyone who meets them in their element. That can set a good example for our overall relationship with the sea, illustrating how to enjoy the experience of its riches without needing to own them. As Dr. Seuss famously wrote, “maybe Christmas doesn’t come from a store. Maybe Christmas, perhaps, means a little bit more.”

In that spirit, here are a few more glimpses of Christmas tree worms in their natural habitat. Thanks to their relatively sedentary lifestyle, they’re always home for the holidays.

All activities should be supervised by an adult. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use. This post may contain affiliate links. Read our disclosure policy here.

Christmas is just around the corner and what better way to get into the spirit with your kids than by starting some Christmas crafts with this Snow Globe Christmas sensory bottle! I’ve got lots of fun new crafts and tips lined up for the holiday season this year! This DIY Snow Globe Christmas Sensory Bottle is literally so much fun and you can make whatever twist on it you’d like to make them yourself! The best part is about this homemade sensory bottle craft is that it also doubles as Christmas decor! I have put my Christmas sensory bottle on our kitchen table.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

OK let’s get started on how we made these Snow Globe Christmas Sensory Bottles. The key to these glitter sensory bottles of course is the glitter! So first you need to find some great supplies of things you’d want to put into this homemade sensory bottle. We found some puff balls, glitter, fabric snowflakes and foam balls.

Supplies You’ll Need to Make Your Christmas Sensory Bottle

–Plastic Snow Globe – I found mine at Michaels and it was not expensive!

–Tinsel Pom Poms and/or craft foam balls

–Glycerin (Optional – this will make the silver glitter not fall so quickly, but don’t use too much or it will stick to the bottom)

-Other assorted glitter – snowmen, lettering, snowflakes, etc

-Anything else you find that would be fun inside the bottle!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Directions

  1. Fill the snow globe 3/4 of the way up with water.
  2. Add in a bit of glycerin if using (optional)
  3. Drop in whatever supplies you have gathered.
  4. Put in LOTS of tiny glitter – that will give it the ‘snow globe’ effect
  5. Hot glue around the cap of the snow globe to ensure your little ones can’t open the snow globe when playing with it

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

That’s it! You can make lots of different colored versions of these homemade glitter sensory bottles. I personally really liked the blue and silver DIY Snow Globe but red & silver, red & green or pink and silver would be really fun Christmas colors too!

What else can you do with your DIY Snow Globe?

This DIY Snow Globe also doubles as a relaxing calming bottle for your kids. That’s really what the sensory bottles purpose for – to give your little one something to look at as the glitter falls inside the snow globe. You can use this as a good distraction tool during tantrums or just as a fun activity during the day. One fun activity I like to do with my toddler is ask him to find something inside the sensory bottle. Can you find the snowman? Can you find 3 snowflakes? Make it a game! Also just having them shake it up and make all the ingredients float is just as fun too! And of course having them MAKE the sensory bottle themselves is also a great activity.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Have you made a DIY snow globe before? I would love to see it!

Looking for more fun Christmas Crafts?

Make these easy and memorable Salt Dough Handprint Ornaments!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

Or these cute and easy Popsicle Stick Snowflake Ornaments!

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

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posted by The Best Ideas for Kids on November 3, 2016

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

About the Author

Kim is the author of the kids craft book, Fun & Easy Crafting with Recycled Materials. She is a mom of two that loves to share easy crafts, activities and recipes for kids.

How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

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5 comments on “Christmas Sensory Bottle”

I love these fantastic frosty sensory bottle ornaments! In Direction #2 you say “add in a bit of glycerin” but “a bit” could vary so much. What ratio to 1 cup water?
(For example:
10 drops? 3 teaspoons? 5 Tbsp.?)

Depending on your size of bottle but a tablespoon should do the trick. If it’s not “slow” enough of a fall for you, then you can test adding a little bit more. 🙂

When it comes to the holidays I tend to go overboard with my planning of activities to do, and this blog just does it for me. I really like the snow globe idea and the detailed descriptions you give. This definitely helps when trying to find activities that are inclusive and interactive for the kids. Thanks for this wonderful idea.

So glad you like it Grace and hope you have fun!!

I am gathering supplies for valentines day snowglobes, I think would be cute, thank you

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How to Make a Christmas Tree Out of a Bottle Brush

beaded holiday tree makes a unique decoration

Create this unique beaded tree for the holidays.

Materials and Tools:

To bead the tree:

5 hanks, size 11″ green beads
60 yards copper coated wire, 24 gauge, green
11 re-sealable bags (to store branches in separate layers)

To assemble the tree:

3 stem wires, 16 gauge
green floral tape
1 pound non-drying modeling clay
industrial strength multi-purpose adhesive
7″ round brown paper mâché box, painted

To decorate the tree:

1 strand of miniature lights (20 lights)
star for the top of the tree
tree skirt
miniature packages or toys to put under your tree

Decorations for the tree:

use single large beads
make seed bead candy canes
make seed bead candles (try bugle beads)
purchase miniature decorations already made (1/2″ in size or less)

Steps:

The Christmas tree is made in a series of layers. There are 11 layers to the tree. All the branches are made in the same manner.

Layer 1: 3 loops—make 4 branches—1 branch requires 3.5″ of beads
Layer 2: 5 loops—make 4 branches—1 branch requires 6″ of beads
Layer 3: 7 loops—make 4 branches—1 branch requires 8.5″ of beads
Layer 4: 9 loops—make 4 branches—1 branch requires 11″ of beads
Layer 5: 11 loops—make 5 branches—1 branch requires 13.5″ of beads
Layer 6: 13 loops—make 5 branches—1 branch requires 16″ of beads
Layer 7: 13 loops—make 6 branches—1 branch requires 16″ of beads
Layer 8: 15 loops—make 6 branches—1 branch requires 18.5″ of beads
Layer 9: 17 loops—make 6 branches—1 branch requires 21.0″ of beads
Layer 10A: 15 loops—make 4 branches—1 branch requires 18.5″ of beads
Layer 10B: 17 loops—make 4 branches—1 branch requires 21″ of beads
Layer 11A: 19 loops—make 4 branches—1 branch requires 23.5″ of beads
Layer 11B: 21 loops—make 4 branches—1 branch requires 26″ of beads

Make the Branches

1. Leave approximately 2″ of wire before the first loop. Make a loop with 16 beads. Twist the loop two half-turns to secure. Press the sides of the loop together to make it an oval rather than a circle.

2. There are 6 beads between every loop. Every loop is made of 16 beads. Therefore, push 22 beads up to the first loop. Make the second loop leaving 6 beads between the 2 loops. Again, press the sides of the loop together to make an oval. Do not leave any bare wire showing between the loops.

3. Continue making the required number of loops in each layer. After all the loops have been made, leave 2″ of wire and cut from the spool.

4. Fold the series of loops in half and twist the two end wires together directly underneath the beads. You will always have one loop at the top and pairs of matching loops along the sides.

5. Twist the beaded wires once between each of the loops including the loop at the top. Flatten out the branch.

6. Angle all the loops in the branch toward the top loop. This will help to make it look like needles on a branch.

7. Accumulate all the branches for each layer in a separate re-sealable bag. Label each bag with the layer number.

Assemble the Tree

1. Wrap each of the three stem wires with floral tape. Cut each stem wire to a length of 11″. Put all three wrapped wires together and wrap again with floral tape to from the tree trunk.

2. Attach a star or tree top ornament to the top of the tree trunk. If you would like to make a natural tree, with no decorations or no star, attach on of the four branches from layer one to the top of the stem wire. If you prefer to have a star or other ornament on the top, you can discard on of the four branches and replace it with the star or ornament.

3. Using floral tape, attach each of the three remaining branches from layer one, one at a time. Bend the branch at a right angle to the stem and place the stem flat against the tree trunk and tape. Circle the branches around the trunk of the tree. Attach them at the very end of the tree trunk.

4. Attach the second layer of branches. Leave approximately 1/4″ between the first and second layer. Add the branches one at a time, circling around the tree trunk.

5. Attach the branches of layer 3. Leave approximately 1/4″ between the second and third layer. Add the branches one at a time, circling around the tree trunk. Try to place the branches in the spaces created by the layer above it. This will give you a well rounded tree.

6. Attach the branches of layer 4. Leave approximately 3/8″ between the third and fourth layer. Add the branches one at a time, circling around the tree trunk. The tree trunk will become thicker as you descend down the tree.

7. Attach layers 5 through 11 in the same manner. Leave approximately 1/2″ between each layer. Add the branches one at a time, circling around the tree trunk.

8. Layers 10 and 11 consist of two different size branches in each layer. Alternate branch A and branch B within each layer. The staggered sizes will make the tree look more real. Set aside your assemble tree and prepare the base of the tree.

9. Cut a hole in the lid of your box large enough to fit the trunk.

10. Glue the floral clay to the inside bottom of your prepared box with the industrial adhesive.

11. Insert the trunk through the hole of the lid and push the trunk into the floral clay. Close the lid and let the glue dry overnight before you begin to decorate the tree.

12. Decorate the tree and the area under the tree.