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How to make microsoft office’s spell check ignore urls

Lori Kaufman is a technology expert with 25 years of experience. She’s been a senior technical writer, worked as a programmer, and has even run her own multi-location business. Read more.

If you write documents containing a lot of URLs, it can get annoying when the spell check in Word questions almost every one. You can save yourself a bit of time and frustration by telling Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to ignore URLs in your documents when performing a spell check.

We’ll use Microsoft Word as an example, but the process is the same in each Office program. To ignore URLs when you run a spell check, click the “File” tab.

On the backstage screen, click “Options” in the list of items on the left.

The Word Options dialog box displays. Click “Proofing” in the list of items on the left.

In the “When correcting spelling in Microsoft Office programs” section, check the “Ignore Internet and file addresses” box.

NOTE: A file address is an address to a local file on your computer that starts with “file://”, for example, file:///C:/Users/Lori/Documents/Notes/Sample%20Notes.pdf.

Now, Word will ignore anything it recognizes as a website URL or file address when you run a spell check on a document.

Again, the “Ignore Internet and file addresses” option is also available in other Microsoft Office programs that have spell check available, such as Excel and PowerPoint. But turning it on in one Office program does not turn it on in the others, so you must turn it on in each program separately.

The proofing options in Office programs, such as Word or PowerPoint, include settings that you can apply to instruct the spelling checker to ignore certain types of words, including words written in capital letters, words that contain numbers, and words that are part of a URL (any web or file address). You can also specify whether the spelling checker flags repeated words.

You can find these settings in the Proofing dialog box of most Office programs. See Open the proofing options in your Office program below to learn how to access the proofing options in each Office program.

Note: Changes you make to these options apply to all Microsoft Office programs, regardless of the program you are using to change the option.

Open the proofing options in your Office program

All programs except Outlook:

Click File > Options > Proofing.

Click File > Options > Mail > Editor Options > Proofing.

What does each option mean?

Select this check box:

Ignore words in UPPERCASE

Ignore words in which all letters are uppercase. For example, if you select this option, the spelling checker does not flag ABC as a mistake.

Ignore words that contain numbers

Ignore words that contain numbers. For example, if you select this option, the spelling checker does not flag a1b2c3 as a mistake.

Ignore Internet and file addresses

Ignore words that are Internet and file addresses. Some examples of words that the spelling checker ignores when this option is selected are:

Flag repeated words

Alerts you to repeated words. For example, if you select this option, the spelling checker will flag beep beep as a mistake.

When I copy source code to a word document or email, it would be nice if spell check could ignore source code token.

Is there an option to ignore blocks of text?

4 Answers 4

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This one’s easy. Select the code you pasted, go to Tools -> Language (or in the latest version of Word, the equivalent on the ribbon) and select the checkbox “Don’t check.”

To only turn off spell check for blocks of text, create a style called “Code”.

Next, modify the style. In the Style editor, go to the Format sub-menu, then Language, then tick “Do not check spelling or grammar”.

Now, wherever you apply that style, Word will ignore spelling and grammar. Perfect for source code! While you’re editing the style, set a light-gray background, and set the font to Courier New.

This prevents you from having to set the language (and font, etc.) everywhere you have source code in your Word doc.

The final result looks like this:

Highlight the code/text in the document go to the Tools Menu>Language>Set Language. There will be a “Do not check spelling or grammar” checkbox

this will mark the area so that the spellchecker skips over it

This is my solution to word plastering my design docs with distracting red-underlines. It’s not exactly what you’re asking for, but you might find it sufficient.

Basically, one day I was thinking – “Why can’t word make the mispelling markings SUBTLE like IntelliJ does?”

Well, it can – just change the wavy underline color to light gray instead of red.

So much less distracting.

One other thing that the spell checker in IntelliJ does is detect camelcaps and treat each subword in a camel capped word as a separate word. So it considers myWordDocument spelled correctly, but flags myWerdDocument. Be nice if word did that!

This article describes the risks involved when a document that you are working on contains a link to a suspicious website or when you try to open a file from a suspicious website. Microsoft Office helps protect you from these risks with settings in the Trust Center. In Office 2013 and 2010, you can modify these settings.

Important: The option to modify these settings is not available in versions of Microsoft Office newer than 2013.

In Office, detection of suspicious links to websites is turned on by default. You can turn detection off so that you don’t get security alerts. But we do not recommend this.

In an Office program, click the File tab.

Click Trust Center, and then click Trust Center Settings.

Click Privacy Options.

Under Privacy Options, select or clear Check Microsoft Office documents that are from or link to suspicious Web sites check box.

The following image is an example of the Privacy Options area of the Trust Center.

It’s difficult to know if a link to a website is suspicious. However, security features in Office can prevent problems caused by clicking a link to a website that has malicious intent.

The following image is an example of an Outlook warning when a suspicious link is clicked.

Homograph attack, or spoofed websites

Options in the Trust Center can help protect you from malicious intent, such as a homograph attack, which are web addresses that use alphabet characters from different languages. The web address appears legitimate but could open a site that has malicious intent.

For example, the following web address looks legitimate, but what you cannot see is that the letter i in microsoft.com is a Cyrillic character from the Ukrainian alphabet: www.microsoft.com

How to respond to the alert message

An alert message appears when you click a link to a website that uses a potentially spoofed domain name. You can choose to visit the site, or you can click No on the alert message, which is what we recommend.

More safety and online-fraud information

Minimize the risk of cyberbullying, help children use social networking sites more safely, and use parental controls in Microsoft products to help keep your family safer online: Microsoft Online Safety.

If you know that a particular website is trustworthy, you can disable the alerts by adding the website to your Trusted Sites zone in Internet Explorer. Trusted sites can be on your organization’s intranet, or sites that you learned about from trusted sources.

In Internet Explorer, on the Tools menu, click Internet Options.

On the Security tab, click Trusted sites, and then click Sites.

In the Add this Web site to the zone box, type or select the address of the website, and then click Add.

Note: If you want Internet Explorer to verify that the server for each website in this zone is secure before you connect to any websites in this zone, select the Require server verification (https:) for all sites in this zone check box.

Note: By default, no websites are assigned to the Trusted Sites zone, and the security level for the Trusted Sites zone is set to Low.

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Four ways to skip text while spell-checking a Word document

Four ways to skip text while spell-checking a Word document

When you want to skip text while running Word’s Spelling & Grammar feature, one of these methods should do the trick.

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Most of us use Word’s Spelling & Grammar feature a lot. Checking normal text is easy and uneventful. But if your document contains numerous instances of text that isn’t in Word’s dictionary, the process can be slow and tedious. You can sigh through it all and click Ignore Once, Ignore All into oblivion. Or you can reduce unnecessary stops using one of the four methods I’ll show you in this article.

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I’m using Word 2016 (desktop) on a Windows 10 64-bit system. You won’t need a demonstration file. Spelling & Grammar is available in the browser version to run a basic spell-check, but none of these methods for skipping text will work.

1: Skip email addresses and URLs

Word is flexible enough to interpret email addresses and URLs correctly, but they won’t be in Word’s dictionary. Consequently, Word will stop at each one. If that’s as annoying to you as it is to me, you can disable this behavior as follows:

  1. Click the File tab and choose Options.
  2. Select Proofing in the left pane.
  3. In the When Correcting Spelling In Microsoft Office Programs section, check the Ignore Internet And File Addresses option (Figure A).
  4. Click OK.

Figure A

Select this option to bypass email addresses and URLs in your spell-checks.

This change affects all Office documents, not just the current Word document.

SEE: 20 pro tips to make Windows 10 work the way you want (TechRepublic PDF)

2: Skip styles

You can accomplish the same thing by telling Word to skip specifically styled text. Now, you can use this setting to ignore custom styles, but many users don’t realize that they can also exploit Word’s built-in styles in this way. To demonstrate, let’s tell Word to ignore its built-in style for code, HTML Code.

With the document open, click the Home tab and the click the dialog launcher for the Styles group. Then, choose Modify from the HTML Code style’s dropdown list (Figure B).

Figure B

Modify the style.

If you can’t find HTML Code in the list, you can display it by clicking Manage Styles (the bottom-right button in the Styles pane). Choose All styles from the Select Styles To Show dropdown and Alphabetical from the Select How List Is Sorted dropdown. Click OK and you should find the style in the updated list.

In the resulting dialog, choose Language from the Format dropdown (Figure C). Finally, check the Do Not Check Spelling Or Grammar option (Figure D) and click OK twice.

Figure C

The option is part of the Language feature.

Figure D

Check this option to ignore styled text.

Again, this is an application-level setting, so all your Office documents will also skip the built-in style. I find this method useful for skipping code listings. You might find it useful for skipping medical, mathematical, and scientific terms.

SEE: Windows 10 spotlight: Prepare, repair, and recover (Tech Pro Research)

3: Skip selected text

Methods 1 and 2 and helpful, but they’re permanent. If you want a temporary solution, you can select the text outright, as follows:

  1. Select the text or blocks of text that you want to skip.
  2. Click the Review tab.
  3. In the Language group, choose Set Proofing Language from the Language dropdown (Figure E).
  4. Check the Do Not Check Spelling Or Grammar option.
  5. Click OK.

Figure E

This option ignores selected text.

Use this method to mark blocks of text when you know you’ll run several edits. Remember to unmark the text if you later decide to include it in an edit.

SEE: Ultimate All-Level Excel Bootcamp (TechRepublic Academy)

4: Select and ignore

Selecting multiple instances of text to ignore is almost as tedious as dismissing each during the spell-check. Fortunately, Word will find and select them for you, based on similar formatting. In some respects, this route is the same as using a custom or built-in style. However, it’s temporary, and if you’re working with foreign data, the document might not have a style.

To demonstrate this quick trick, let’s use Word’s Select feature to find similar formatted text and then mark those selected instances to ignore:

  1. Select any instance of the formatted text you want to ignore.
  2. Click the Home menu and then choose Select All Text With Similar Formatting (No Data) from the Select dropdown in the Editing group (Figure F). Word identifies the two similar instances of Normal with red font and selects them both. Don’t do anything else–you don’t want to undo the current selection.
  3. Click the Review tab.
  4. In the Language group, click Language and choose Set Proofing Language.
  5. In the resulting dialog, check the Do Not Check Spelling Or Grammar option.
  6. Click OK.

Subsequent spell-check tasks will ignore all Normal text that’s directly formatted with a red font. This method applies only to the current document. But if you save the document with this setting intact, Word will remember it. You must uncheck the setting before Word will evaluate the marked text for spelling and grammar errors.

Figure F

Select text with similar formatting.

Nothing’s perfect

None of these methods is a silver bullet. For instance, you might have noticed that I didn’t use Hyperlink-styled text with methods #2 or #4. That’s because Word is inconsistent in how it formats hyperlinks. If you type an address or URL, Word automatically hyperlinks it, but it doesn’t apply the built-in Hyperlink style. Surprise! Word uses the built-in style if:

  • You apply the style manually.
  • You create a hyperlink using Link in the Links group on the Insert tab.
  • You insert a Hyperlink field (part of Quick Parts in the Text group on the Insert tab).

For better or worse, if you type the address and allow Word to format it, Word recognizes the hyperlink and the text works as a hyperlink, but the style remains Normal.

You’ll also find inconsistencies when working with foreign data. For example, I routinely open PDF files in Word to run a quick edit. These files are full of PDF-specific stuff that throws spell-check into fits. I use the Select feature to find them (as formatted text or objects) and then mark them. Sometimes it works perfectly; sometimes Word still stops at instances of text I know I’ve marked. The incompatibility between the two formats is the cause. Word does the best it can, and something is better than nothing.

The proofing options in Office programs, such as Word or PowerPoint, include settings that you can apply to instruct the spelling checker to ignore certain types of words, including words written in capital letters, words that contain numbers, and words that are part of a URL (any web or file address). You can also specify whether the spelling checker flags repeated words.

You can find these settings in the Proofing dialog box of most Office programs. See Open the proofing options in your Office program below to learn how to access the proofing options in each Office program.

Note: Changes you make to these options apply to all Microsoft Office programs, regardless of the program you are using to change the option.

Open the proofing options in your Office program

All programs except Outlook:

Click File > Options > Proofing.

Click File > Options > Mail > Editor Options > Proofing.

What does each option mean?

Select this check box:

Ignore words in UPPERCASE

Ignore words in which all letters are uppercase. For example, if you select this option, the spelling checker does not flag ABC as a mistake.

Ignore words that contain numbers

Ignore words that contain numbers. For example, if you select this option, the spelling checker does not flag a1b2c3 as a mistake.

Ignore Internet and file addresses

Ignore words that are Internet and file addresses. Some examples of words that the spelling checker ignores when this option is selected are:

Flag repeated words

Alerts you to repeated words. For example, if you select this option, the spelling checker will flag beep beep as a mistake.

Spelling mistakes in published documents, personal letters, and work emails can be embarrassing. At worst, your audience may question your expertise or interpret your mistakes as disrespectful. Of course you might have simply made a typo while typing too fast or you just overlooked errors when proofreading. To avoid these mistakes, you can set Word to automatically flag misspelled words and even suggest corrections.

  1. Turning spell check on and off in Word
  2. Accepting suggested corrections
  3. Checking spelling and grammar manually
  4. Enabling automatic spell checking in older versions of Word

Turning spell check on and off in Word

If spell check is turned on, Word marks misspelled words with a wavy red line and flags grammatical errors with a wavy blue line. This way, you can quickly correct misspelled words. However, these highlighted errors can be distracting when you’re writing. For this reason, Word gives you the option of disabling spell check while you type. When it’s time to proofread your work, you can turn on spell check in Word and show the flagged errors. That way you’ll see any spelling mistakes at a glance and can easily correct them.

  1. For spell check to work in Word, you have to set the rightediting language. Select the text (the quickest way to do this is to use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl + A) and then click the language selection box in the status bar.

The status bar shows the language of the text.

  1. Select the desired language.

You can set the language of the text manually.

3. Do not rely on the option for detecting the language automatically. This feature often causes errors if the text contains words in other languages. Turn off “Detect language automatically” and click “OK”.

4. Open the “File” tab. Select “Options” and open the “Proofing” group.

5. To turn the Word spelling checker on or off, check or uncheck the boxes for “Check spelling as you type” and “Mark grammar errors as you type”.

You can turn the automatic spelling checker on or off at any time.

If spell check is not working, meaning Word is not marking any mistakes or is flagging errors incorrectly, there can be several causes. In most cases, you can quickly resolve the issue. In another article, we present troubleshooting strategies you can use if spell checker is not working in Word.

Accepting suggested corrections

If you turned off AutoCorrect while writing and want to go back and check your spelling in Word, you can turn this feature on by selecting the checkboxes for the options you want to use. However, this feature, especially the grammar check, is more of a helpful aid than a real check. It often misinterprets certain word combinations as errors and does not always detect grammatical errors. For this reason, it’s best not to rely on the automatic proofing tools.

If you right-click a word highlighted with red or blue lines, Word displays a context menu with suggestions that you can apply with a single click. However, if more than two letters are incorrect or mixed up in a word, Word can no longer predict which word you originally intended to use.

Checking spelling and grammar manually

When you click the spell check icon in the status bar, a sidebar appears on the right for correcting spelling and grammar.

The spell check icon is located next to the language selection box.

This sidebar automatically shows the next error based on the location of your cursor and suggests corrections. You can click on “Ignore” to accept the incorrectly flagged Word. Word will then no longer flag it as an error.

Suggested corrections as well as grammar rules are displayed in the sidebar.

The grammar check feature is especially useful because Word points out stylistic issues andgrammar rules that can help you avoid mistakes in the future.

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Easily go from pen and paper to digital inking with Word – included in all Microsoft 365 packages!

Enabling automatic spell checking in older versions of Word

The last few versions of Word have an icon showing the status of the spelling checker in the status bar at the bottom of the window. In current versions of Word, you can right-click this icon to display a context menu for customizing the status bar. In older versions of Word, this context menu contained the options “Hide spelling errors” and “Hide grammar errors” and also provided direct access to spell check settings.

Microsoft 365 is a server-based office solution that includes Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. The advantage of Microsoft 365 is that all updates are downloaded automatically. The solution is ideal for home users, freelancers or small businesses.

See our other articles on Microsoft Word for more useful information and helpful tips:

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Text in foreign languages sometimes requires special characters. The letters assigned to the different keys also differ between some languages. Therefore, many users who wish to write in a foreign language find it more convenient to change the keyboard language. Windows 10 keyboard shortcuts enable you to switch quickly between languages. We will show you how to change the keyboard language in.

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How do you change the language in Microsoft Word? You can set different languages for the user interface and the spell check in Microsoft Word regardless of the language of your Windows operating system. This is especially useful when working with documents in other languages. In this article, you’ll learn how to change the display and editing language in Word.

Just posting to share how I have manage to disable spell check on word 2010/2013 for students taking exams. Mods, if the topic isn’t in the right thread feel free to move it.

I have never find any topic anywhere so far that managed to help me completely disable spell check on Word 2010/2013 so here is how you can do it.

1 – You need to install office 2010/2013 GPO Template on your server. You will need to use AdminTemplates_32.exe or AdminTemplates_64.exe not according to your server but according to what version of Office you installed on your clients !

Extract the .exe in a folder.

Copy the .admx files to %systemroot%\PolicyDefinitions and copy the .adml files from the en-us to %systemroot%\PolicyDefinitions\en-us.
If you do not copy the .adml files you will get an error once you open the group policy templates !

2 – I want spell check to be disable only for a group of user so my policy is user based.
Create a new GPO and follow and copy the settings from the attached files.
I used IDs to disable user shortcuts and disable some buttons on the UI.

3 – After all this, my GPO was working but Word could still pick up any spelling mistake. There is a registry key that is being activated per user on the machine.
[HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Shared Tools\Proofing Tools\1.0\Office]
“WordSpellingOptions”=dword:0

If dword=5 then spell check is still enable even if your GPO is disabling spell check !

To get around this, like your probably see on my GPO I am creating the registry key when users logon. The key was already present for some users so I also Update the key for some of them !

When an other user logs on, spell check is enable, the registry key only apply by user

To make things easier, I already included the key in the zip file attached.

Last edited 4th March 2015 at 11:38 AM .

Lori Kaufman is a technology expert with 25 years of experience. She’s been a senior technical writer, worked as a programmer, and has even run her own multi-location business. Read more.

In addition to the standard spell checking tool, Word, PowerPoint, and Outlook can also check spelling and grammar as you type, indicating errors using colored, squiggly lines under the text. However, if all the squiggly lines are too distracting, you can turn one or both of these features off.

Say you’re working on a document that contains a lot of industry-specific jargon, abbreviations, or highly-specialized words. Word will mark all these with red, squiggly lines even though they are not technically misspelled. If you’re writing legal documents, Word might question the grammar of some of the really long, complicated sentences generally used when writing “legalese”, and you may not want to see all the green, squiggly lines in your document.

We’ll show you how to disable the automatic spelling and grammar check options in Word, PowerPoint, and Outlook, as well as how to disable the spelling and grammar check only for certain paragraphs, if you don’t want to disable these features for the whole document.

Let’s start with Word and PowerPoint (the process is a bit different for Outlook, so we’ll cover that below). Open an existing file or a new file. Then, click the “File” tab.

On the backstage screen, click “Options” in the list of items on the left.

On the Word Options (or PowerPoint Options) dialog box, click “Proofing” in the list of items on the left.

To disable the automatic spell check, click the “Check spelling as you type” check box. Click the “Mark grammar errors as you type” check box in Word (or the “Hide spelling and grammar errors” check box in PowerPoint) to disable the automatic grammar check. When the options are disabled, the check boxes are empty. Click “OK” to accept the changes and close the Options dialog box.

In Outlook, click the “File” tab from either the main Outlook window or from a message window and click “Options” in the list of items on the resulting screen. The “Outlook Options” dialog box displays. If you opened this dialog box from a message window, the Mail screen will be active. Otherwise, click “Mail” in the list of items on the left to activate the Mail screen.

In the Compose messages section, click “Editor Options”.

On the Editor Options dialog box, click the “Check spelling as you type” check box and the “Mark grammar errors as you type” check box to disable the spelling check and the grammar check, respectively. Click “OK” to accept the changes and close the Editor Options dialog box.

You are returned to the Outlook Options dialog box. Click “OK” to close it.

Now, the errors in your document, presentation, or email message are not called out with the squiggly lines. However, the errors are still there. To find them, you need to manually run the spell and grammar check by pressing “F7”.

If you only want to turn off the spelling check and grammar check for certain paragraphs, not the whole document, presentation, or email message, you can do this in Word, PowerPoint, and Outlook (the process is the similar in all three programs). This may be useful if only part of your document has a lot of jargon, abbreviations, or highly-specialized words, and you want the rest of the document checked automatically.

NOTE: In Outlook, make sure a message window is open.

First, select the text you don’t want checked for spelling and grammar. Use the “Ctrl” key to select multiple non-contiguous paragraphs. Then, click the “Review” tab.

In the Language section, click the “Language” button and select “Set Proofing Language” from the drop-down menu.

On the Language dialog box, select the “Do not check spelling or grammar” check box so there is a check mark in the box. Click “OK”.

Notice that the selected paragraph in the image below still contains errors, but they are not underlined. However, the errors in the second paragraph are.

Word also checks for formatting inconsistencies and marks those with blue, squiggly underlines. You can turn this feature off as well. However, the automatic spelling, grammar, and formatting checking tools can make it easier to make sure your writing is at least mostly free of errors.

To check spelling for any text on your worksheet, click Review > Spelling.

Tip: You can also press F7.

Here are some things that happen when you use the spelling checker:

If you select a single cell for spell check, Excel checks the entire worksheet, including the comments, page headers, footers and graphics.

If you select multiple cells, Excel checks spelling only for those cells.

To spell check words in a formula bar, select the words.

Note: Excel doesn’t check spelling in cells that contain formulas.

Correct spelling as you type

Both AutoComplete and AutoCorrect can help fix typing errors on the go.

AutoComplete, on by default, helps to maintain accuracy as you type by matching entries in other cells and does not check individual words in a cell, AutoComplete can be handy when creating formulas.

AutoCorrect fixes errors in a formula’s text, worksheet control, text box, and chart labels. Here’s how to use it:

Click File > Options.

Under the Proofing category, click AutoCorrect Options, and check the most likely typing errors.

Note: You can’t use AutoCorrect for text in a dialog box.

Additional resources

You can also check out Research, Thesaurus and Translate for more help with spelling and language.

On the Review tab, click Spelling or press F7 on the keyboard.

Note: The Spelling dialog box will not open if no spelling errors are detected, or if the word you are trying to add already exists in the dictionary.

Do any of the following.

Change the word

Under Suggestions, click the word that you want to use, and then click Change.

Change every occurrence of this word in this document

Under Suggestions, click the word that you want to use, and then click Change All.

Ignore this word and move on to the next misspelled word

Ignore every occurrence of this word in this document and move on to the next misspelled word

Click Ignore All.

Correct spelling as you type

You can use the AutoCorrect feature to correct typos and misspelled words. For more information, see Add, edit, or turn off automatic corrections.

To check spelling for any text on your worksheet, click Review > Proofing > Spelling.

Here are some things that happen when you use the spelling checker:

If you select a single cell for spell check, Excel checks the entire worksheet, including the comments, page headers, footers and graphics.

If you select multiple cells, Excel checks spelling only for those cells.

Note: Excel doesn’t check spelling in cells that contain formulas, but you can spell check words in the formula – just select the words in the formula bar.

Need more help?

You can always ask an expert in the Excel Tech Community or get support in the Answers community.

We don’t allow questions about general computing hardware and software on Stack Overflow. You can edit the question so it’s on-topic for Stack Overflow.

Closed 4 years ago .

Is there a good way to have MS Word 2010 spellcheck ignore variable names in technical documents (e.g.: like words with underscores)?

I shouldn’t have to load a data dictionary to accomplish this, or add these words to a dictionary in MS Word.

I tried creating a style “code”, but it changed the font to all bold, or to not-bold, which was not what I wanted.

3 Answers 3

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You can force Word-Spell-Checker to omit certain text by defining a Character Style with (only) property “Do not check spelling or grammar”, and apply that style to any text you want Spelling checker to omit. To do this follow the steps below:

    Select any character that has no special formatting (e.g. it has style as Normal or body text)

On the Review ribbon -> Language -> Set Proofing Language

In the dialog, check the box for “Do not check spelling or grammar” and click OK.

On the Home ribbon -> (in Styles group) click More drop down (Quick Styles gallery) -> Create a Style

In the dialog, give a sensible name (e.g. NoSpellingCheck) -> click Modify (button)

In the dialog, o change the “Style type” to “Character”, o check the “New documents based on this template” (option at the bottom) and o verify that the definitions (below the preview) include “Do not check spelling or grammar” and “Based on: Default Paragraph Font”. Click OK.

When you exit Word, you may be prompted to save changes to the Normal.dotm template, select “Yes”, and that’s it.

Now, whenever you have text that you want the spell checker to omit, apply the “NoSpellingChecker” style you created and it will be ignored by Word’s spell checker, without affecting the appearance of your text.

Marshall is a writer with experience in the data storage industry. He worked at Synology, and most recently as CMO and technical staff writer at StorageReview. He’s currently an API/Software Technical Writer based in Tokyo, Japan, runs VGKAMI and ITEnterpriser, and spends what little free time he has learning Japanese. Read more.

You may already be familiar with Microsoft Word’s built-in spelling and grammar checker, flagging incorrect spelling and (sometimes) bad grammar. If you’re reviewing a document that’s riddled with errors, you can use these keyboard shortcuts to speed up the process.

Table of Contents

  • What the Spelling and Grammar Checker Can and Can’t Do
  • Using the Spelling and Grammar Checker With a Keyboard Shortcut

What the Spelling and Grammar Checker Can and Can’t Do

Word’s spelling and grammar checker is enabled by default. When a word is misspelled, Word flags it with a wavy, red underline. When there’s incorrect grammar or formatting, Word flags it with two blue underlines.

In the above example, Word detected two spaces between “John” and “ate,” so it flagged it as a grammar issue. It also detected “eaten” was misspelled as “aten,” so it flagged that as a spelling error.

These are the basics that Word checks for by default. However, you can make Word’s spelling and grammar checker work harder by enabling some additional features in its Settings menu (File > Options > Proofing > Settings). For example, you can have Word check for passive voice, split infinitives, superfluous expressions, and so on.

So what can’t Word’s spelling and grammar checker do? As comprehensive as it may seem, it often fails when it comes to noticing the incorrect usage of a properly spelled word. For example, “The bare ate the fish.”

In this case, Word failed to catch the incorrect usage of “bare.” That said, you can count on Word to detect a lot of issues in a document, but you can’t rely on it 100%. As a matter of good practice, always re-review your document before sending it out.

Using the Spelling and Grammar Checker Keyboard Shortcut

In Word, you can use the Alt+F7 keyboard shortcut to jump straight to the first error behind where the cursor currently is in the document. So, if you want to start with the first error, you’ll need to place your cursor at the beginning of the document, or in front of the first error.

When you press Alt+F7, Word highlights the spelling or grammar error and gives you the option to either correct or ignore the issue. Press the up or down arrow keys to highlight the desired option, and then press Enter to select it.

Note that you can only highlight spelling and grammar suggestions with your arrow keys. If you want to ignore the suggestion, you must click that option with your mouse.

Spelling errors generally have more suggested corrections to choose from.

You can also ignore the spelling error, just as you would with the grammar error. The only difference is, with spelling, you can choose to (1) ignore every instance of that same error, or (2) just the specific error (even if it also exists elsewhere in the document).

In addition, you can also add that word to the dictionary. When you do this, Word will no longer flag the word as an error. This is useful if the word happens to be a part of an in-house style guide or something similar.

Click the three dots to the right of “Ignore All” and then click “Add to Dictionary” from the drop-down menu.

When you’re ready to move on to the next error, just press Alt+F7 again. Continue doing this until all of the issues within the document have been checked.

Word’s grammar and spell checker is very useful for reviewing the content within a document, but it can be quite distracting when it’s throwing back errors while you’re writing. If it’s too distracting for you, you can turn it off as you type.

By Melanie Pinola published 15 April 16

Microsoft Word can helpfully correct or point out spelling errors and other errors as you type. But when you’ve purposely typed a word a certain way, those squiggly red lines and autocorrections are just annoying. Adjust Word’s autocorrection settings and spellcheck dictionary to avoid this frustration for your most commonly typed words.

With the steps below, you’ll add exceptions to Word’s autocorrection rules so it won’t automatically change specific words you type based on rules like always capitalizing the first word of a sentence. You’ll also add words to the custom dictionary so Word will stop flagging them as misspelled.

How to Add Exceptions to Word’s Auto-Correction Rules

1. Click File then Options in the left menu.

2. Click Proofing in the Word options window.

3. Click the AutoCorrect Options button.

4. Click the Exceptions button. You can also uncheck any of the auto-correction defaults here, such as always capitalizing the first letter of a word in a table cell.

5. Click the tab of the type of auto-correction you want to add an exception to. For example, if you work for a company that always writes its name in lowercase, click the First Letter tab so Word won’t capitalize it when you write the company name at the start of a sentence. The Initial Caps tab will stop Word from correcting words with two capital letters at the beginning. Use the “Other Corrections” tab for all other words.

6. Add the word you don’t want corrected and click OK.

How to Add Words to the Custom Dictionary

1. Click on the Custom Dictionary button in the Word options window.

2. Select CUSTOM.DIC then click the Edit Word List button.

3. Add each word you don’t want marked as misspelled and click OK.

4. Click OK to close the Word options window.

You can also turn off spellcheck and grammar check altogether in the Word options menu, but proceed at your own risk!

Like many modern apps, Microsoft Word will, by default, check your spelling and grammar as you type. Microsoft Word alerts you to misspelled words and possible grammatical errors by underlining them in red and blue, respectively. This real-time spell checking can be helpful for correcting mistakes as you make them, but some users find the spelling and grammar alerts distracting and would rather focus on their words and crafting their story instead of nitpicking over minor spelling errors. For users interested more in the big picture than the technical details, here’s how you can turn off real-time spell checking in Microsoft Word, while still having the ability to perform a spell check manually as needed.

To turn off real-time spell check in Microsoft Word 2010 and newer, launch Word and head to File > Options > Proofing.

In the Proofing section of Word’s Options, find the section labeled “When correcting spelling and grammar in Word” and, within this section uncheck the following boxes:

  • Check spelling as you type
  • Mark grammar errors as you type

Click OK to save your changes and close the Options window. Now, head back to your document (or open or create a document) and you’ll see that existing errors in spelling or grammar are no longer marked with the red and blue underlines. You can also test that your change was successful by typing an intentionally misspelled word. If all went well, you should see no markings on your misspelled test word.

As you can see from Word’s options, real-time spelling and grammar checking are separate options, so you could also choose to disable only one of these functions. For example, many users find Word’s spell checker to be quite helpful, but notice that the grammar checker is often incorrect when it flags a word or phrase for review. In this case, turning off only the real-time grammar checker is a good compromise.

How to Perform a Manual Spell Check in Word

Just because you’ve disabled real-time spell checking in Word doesn’t mean that you don’t care about catching typos and other misspelled words. The good news is that real-time spelling and grammar checks are only an extension of Word’s underlying spell check capabilities, and you can manually trigger a spell check of your entire document, or even a selected portion of your document, at any time. In fact, for the benefit of younger Word users, this manual check was how word processors originally functioned before the introduction of real-time spell checking.
To run a manual spell check in Word, first make sure your document is open and active, and then click on the Review tab in Word’s toolbar or ribbon. Find the Spelling & Grammar button, located by default on the left side of the ribbon and click on it. Alternatively, you can press F7 on your keyboard.

A new sidebar will appear listing the first detected misspelled word. You can choose to ignore it, browse Word’s suggestions for the correct spelling, or, if you know the spelling you used is correct, add it to your local Office dictionary. Once you make a choice for the first word, the spell checker will move on to the next misspelled word, and so on until you reach the end of your document.
If you only want to perform a manual spell check on a specific section of your document, simply highlight the desired text first, and then click the Spelling & Grammar button or press F7. With this method, Word’s spell checker will only look for misspelled words within your selected text, although it will offer to optionally scan the rest of the document once you reach the end of your selected text.
By turning off real-time spelling and grammar checking in Word, you can focus on your words first, while turning spell checking into a dedicated, secondary step in the process. Just don’t forget to manually run Word’s spell checker before you finalize and share your document, especially if you’re accustomed to other applications which offer real-time spell checking. Of course, if you decide in the future that you want to re-enable real-time spelling and grammar checking, you can always head back to File > Options > Proofing and check the corresponding boxes.

Before you deliver a translation, you are supposed to check its spelling (and grammar).

memoQ uses either Microsoft Word’s spelling and grammar checker, or Hunspell, an open-source spell checker. To use Word’s spelling and grammar, you need to have Word installed on your computer – together with the language pack for your memoQ project’s target language.

Normally, memoQ will underline supposed spelling errors with red, and grammar problems with blue. To correct an error, right-click the underlined word or sentence, and choose a suggestion from the menu – or edit the text manually.

You need the Spell checking window only if you want to go through all spelling and grammar warnings in one go. You should do this before delivering the translation.

Set up spell checking first: To do that, open Options , and choose the Spelling and grammar item in the list.

Spell check runs grammar, too: If Microsoft Word is on your computer, and it has the grammar checker for your target language, memoQ will show grammar problems in the same window – unless you turn it off in the Options window ( Spelling and Grammar pane, Grammar tab).

How to get here

  1. Open a project.
  2. Open a document for editing.
  3. On the Translation ribbon, click Spelling/Grammar . Or, press F7 .

The Spell checking window opens. It keeps you waiting until it finds the first spelling error.

What can you do?

Check spelling

Go through the spelling errors in the document, and decide what to do about each.

memoQ shows spelling errors in red, and grammar problems in green. Grammar problems will show only if Microsoft Word is on the computer, and it has the grammar checker for your target language.

When memoQ stops at an error, choose one of the following:

  • Correct the error just this once: From the Suggestions list, choose a suggestion, or type the correction in the Replacement box. Click Correct .
  • Correct the error everywhere in the document: From the Suggestions list, choose a suggestion, or type the correction in the Replacement box. Click Change all .
  • Ignore the error just this once: Click Skip .
  • Ignore the same error everywhere in the document: Click Skip All .
  • Tell memoQ that this is not a spelling error: Click Add . memoQ will add this to an ignore list.

If you start spell checking in the middle of a document, memoQ will start over at the end. To turn this off, clear the Wrap around check box.

Normally, memoQ does not check locked rows: To check them, check the Check locked rows check box.

Not all languages: There is no spell checking in Japanese, Chinese, Korean. Also, for Vietnamese and Thai, spell checking is not supported. For these languages, use the grammar checker.

You can set up the spell checker and change the spell checking settings in the Spell checking window. To do that, click the Options tab. The settings are the same as in Spelling and Grammar in Options . (You cannot choose the language because this window works for the current target language.) To learn more: See Help about the Spelling and grammar pane of Options .

When you click Add to tell memoQ that a word is correct, memoQ adds it to an ignore list. To do this, you need an ignore list first.

Ignore lists are resources that you can manage and edit in the Resource console , too.

To manage ignore lists in the Spell checking window, click the Ignore lists tab.

  • To create a new ignore list: Click New . The Create new ignore list window opens.
  • To edit an ignore list: On the left, select the ignore list. Click Edit . The Edit ignore list window opens.
  • To tell memoQ where to add new words in the project: From the In the current project, add new words to drop-down box, choose the ignore list you want to use.

Check grammar

After spell checking finishes, the Grammar checking window opens:

memoQ shows spelling errors in red, and grammar problems in green. Grammar problems will show only if Microsoft Word is on the computer, and it has the grammar checker for your target language.

When memoQ stops at an error, choose one of the following:

  • Correct the error just this once: From the Suggestions/rules list, choose a suggestion, or type the correction in the Replacement box. Click Correct .
  • To mark this finding correct and continue: Click the Ignore once button,
  • To leave this finding marked as an error and continue: Click the Skip button,

When you finish

To return to the translation editor: Click Close .

This article contains information about how to modify the registry. Make sure to back up the registry before you modify it. Make sure that you know how to restore the registry if a problem occurs. For more information about how to back up, restore, and modify the registry, see Windows registry information for advanced users.

Introduction

This article describes how to customize the color of the spelling and grammar checker underlines in Microsoft Word 2007 and later. These underlines indicate the following items:

  • Spelling errors
  • Grammar errors
  • Contextual spelling errors
  • Smart tags

More Information

Serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly by using Registry Editor or by using another method. These problems might require that you reinstall your operating system. Microsoft cannot guarantee that these problems can be solved. Modify the registry at your own risk.

To change the color of the wavy underline that indicates spelling errors, follow these steps:

Click Start, click Run, type regedit, and then click OK.

Locate and then click the following registry subkey:

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Shared Tools\Proofing Tools

If the SpellingWavyUnderlineColor entry exists, go to step 6.

If the SpellingWavyUnderlineColor entry does not exist, go to step 4.

On the Edit menu, point to New, and then click DWORD Value.

In the right pane, type SpellingWavyUnderlineColor. This is the name of the new entry.

In the right pane, double-click SpellingWavyUnderlineColor.

In the Edit DWORD Value dialog box, click Hexadecimal.

In the Value data box, type the hexadecimal number that represents the color that you want to use, and then click OK.

Repeat steps 3 to 8 to change the underline color for other proofing tools. Use the registry entry that corresponds to the underline color of the proofing tool that you want to change instead of the SpellingWavyUnderlineColor registry entry, as follows:

  • To change the color of the wavy underline that indicates grammar errors, use the GrammarWavyUnderlineColor registry entry.
  • To change the color of the wavy underline that indicates contextual spelling errors, use the ContextualSpellingWavyUnderlineColor registry entry.
  • To change the color of the dotted underline that indicates smart tags, use the SmartTagUnderlineColor registry entry.

Exit Registry Editor, and then restart your computer.

The registry uses eight-digit hexadecimal values to define colors. The values for some common colors are indicated in the following table.