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How to make text and icons bigger on your mac’s retina screen

Learn about the Retina display built into your Mac or external Apple display.

The pixel density of Retina displays is so high that your eyes can’t detect individual pixels at a normal viewing distance. This gives content incredible detail and dramatically improves your viewing experience.

Mac computers that have a Retina display

  • 16-inch MacBook Pro models introduced in 2021. Native resolution: 3456 x 2234 at 254 pixels per inch. Support for one billion colors.
  • 14-inch MacBook Pro models introduced in 2021. Native resolution: 3024 x 1964 at 254 pixels per inch. Support for one billion colors.
  • 16-inch MacBook Pro models introduced in 2019. Native resolution: 3072 x 1920 at 226 pixels per inch. Support for millions of colors.
  • 15-inch MacBook Pro models introduced in 2012 or later, except the MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2012). Native resolution: 2880 x 1800 at 220 pixels per inch. Support for millions of colors.
  • 13-inch MacBook Pro models introduced in late 2012 or later. Native resolution: 2560 x 1600 at 227 pixels per inch. Support for millions of colors.

MacBook Air models introduced in 2018 or later. Native resolution: 2560 x 1600 at 227 pixels per inch. Support for millions of colors.

MacBook models introduced in 2015 or later. Native resolution: 2304 x 1440 at 226 pixels per inch. Support for millions of colors.

  • 24-inch iMac models introduced in 2021. Native resolution: 4480 x 2520 at 218 pixels per inch. Support for one billion colors.
  • 27-inch iMac models introduced in 2014 or later. Native resolution: 5120 x 2880. Models introduced in 2014 and 2015 support millions of colors, and models introduced in 2017 or later support one billion colors.
  • 21.5-inch iMac models introduced in 2015 or later, except the iMac (21.5-inch, 2017) and iMac (21.5-inch, Late 2015). Native resolution: 4096 x 2304. The Retina model introduced in 2015 supports millions of colors, and models introduced in 2017 or later support one billion colors.

All iMac Pro models. Native resolution: 5120 x 2880. Support for one billion colors.

Apple external displays that have a Retina display

Apple Pro Display XDR. Native resolution: 6016 x 3384 at 218 pixels per inch. Support for one billion colors.

Apple Studio Display. Native resolution: 5120 x 2880 at 218 pixels per inch. Support for one billion colors.

Change the resolution of your display

Your Mac automatically chooses a default resolution that is optimal for your display. To change the resolution:

  1. Choose Apple menu  > System Preferences.
  2. Click Displays. If you have multiple displays connected, click Display Settings, then select your display.
  3. Select Scaled, then select any of the four or five scaled resolutions, depending on your Mac model. With scaled resolutions, text and objects can appear larger and more visible, or smaller to provide more space for windows and apps.

If you’re also using an external display

If you’re using an external display to extend your desktop, you can choose a preferred resolution for each display. To see additional resolutions for the external display, press and hold the Option key while selecting the Scaled button.

If you’re using an external display to mirror your built-in display, your Mac optimizes for whichever display is selected in the ”Optimize for” pop-up menu. Allow your Mac to choose the best resolution for that display, or select Scaled and choose a different resolution.

When mirroring your displays, you can optimize for the external display instead of your built-in display.

Using apps with a Retina display

If an app looks different than you expect on your Retina display or high-resolution external display, try opening the app in low-resolution mode:

  1. Quit the app.
  2. Open the Applications folder.
  3. Click the app once to select it, then choose Get Info from the File menu.
  4. From the Get Info window that opens, select the checkbox labeled ”Open in Low Resolution.”
  5. Close the Get Info window and open the app again.

Some apps that work best in low-resolution mode or that work only in low-resolution mode will have this mode already turned on, and in that case you might not be able to turn it off. The app developer might offer an update that includes support for the Retina display.

Using Boot Camp and Windows with a Retina display

  • Boot Camp supports resolutions up to 3840 x 2160.
  • When your Mac is using the Apple-supplied Windows Support Software, Windows starts up with the maximum dpi (pixels) it supports, which is 144 dpi, or 150-percent magnification. As a result, items on the display appear small, with a lot of space. You can use the Windows Display control panel item to adjust this setting in Windows.

Information about products not manufactured by Apple, or independent websites not controlled or tested by Apple, is provided without recommendation or endorsement. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to the selection, performance, or use of third-party websites or products. Apple makes no representations regarding third-party website accuracy or reliability. Contact the vendor for additional information.

Unfortunately I just learned that Apple is has already discontinued the 17″ MBP and Apple marketing has this quote:

But if you’re looking for a reason why Apple offed the 17-inch now, you need go no further than the 15-inch Retina display MacBook Pro. Not only does it offer the most cutting edge technology of any Apple laptop to date, but its 2880-by-1800 pixel display outstrips the 17-inch’s 1920-by-1200 resolution with room to spare

The numbers quotes are a larger pixel count than the 17 inch model allowed even with the hi-res display but I haven’t played with or seen a MB retina display in person yet. Can I set the pixels to “actual size” so that when I do web design I can have a browser set to normal scale but see a LOT of the web page – or for that matter, any app?

I like the idea of a Retina display but if I can’t set the display to show the pixels at “actual size” it seems like I am in fact still losing screen real estate even though there are “more pixels” if that makes sense.

6 Answers 6

Yes you can, but you probably will not choose to do so. When you really want to force the display into 2880×1800 you can easily configure it that way. Here are four of the better options available today to do what you ask:

That said, items like the menu bar with the Apple icon are extremely small at 2880×1800 and you don’t need the entire screen to at that high resolution for a properly build application to let the windows it controls have the full resolution. The scaling modes are pretty good, and you can always reduce your font sizes even while running at the doubled 1440×900 resolution. Most people will never need to set 2880×1800 since they really only care that the applications they use get the retina treatment and don’t need to force the rest of the UI to run with such a dense packing of pixels.

I like the idea of a Retina display but if I can’t set the display to show the pixels at “actual size” it seems like I am in fact still losing screen real estate even though there are “more pixels” if that makes sense.

Actually, no it doesn’t make sense. 😉 I’ll explain more below.

For what it’s worth, the highest default “More Space” option on the MacBook Pro Retina is labelled “looks like 1920×1200″ so you’re really not losing screen real estate from the 17” MacBook Pro.

Can I set the pixels to “actual size” so that when I do web design I can have a browser set to normal scale but see a LOT of the web page – or for that matter, any app?

Using such a high density screen at “native resolution” would make the menu bar so small as to be useless and the text miniscule. The retina screen gives you the same “real estate” as a 17″ but with sharper text and photos.

Don’t worry about using “all the pixels”. When we upgraded from dot-matrix printers to laser printers, we didn’t want the laser printer to print the text with the same exact pixel grid. You’d need a magnifying glass to read it. The paper is still 8.5×11″, just as the screen is still 15″. What’s important is the screen/printer is still rendering all the pixels, but with a similar text size, so your eye cannot discern the jagged steps of the letters at reading distance.

Anandtech has a nice gallery showing desktop “real estate” at the different scaling modes. I think the “more space” option gives a more than sufficiently large desktop.

As the title says, the icons in Eclipse are really small on my 2560×1600 laptop screen. I find that even turning down the resolution and plugging it into my 1080p monitor still results in the icons being tiny.

I found an answer that led to this site: https://github.com/davidglevy/eclipse-icon-enlarger but I have no idea how to use that. Could someone please help?

Thanks in advance

3 Answers 3

You can now choose to sort by Trending, which boosts votes that have happened recently, helping to surface more up-to-date answers.

Trending is based off of the highest score sort and falls back to it if no posts are trending.

The author posted instructions for his tool here. Basically, you have to run it from the command line and need to specify the Eclipse base directory. The tool will then iterate over all directories in order to double the size of all icons.

Syntax for usage is:

This has been fixed in the latest version of eclipse, Eclipse Neon:

SWT now automatically scales images on high-DPI monitors on Windows and Linux, similar to the Mac’s Retina support on OS X. In the absence of high-resolution images, SWT will auto-scale the available images to ensure that SWT-based applications like Eclipse are scaled proportionately to the resolution of the monitor.

For comparison, here’s how it looked in Mars without high-DPI support:

How Dare You Purchase A Display Which Ships With A Stand!

Users of Macs powered by the Apple M1 chip have been having some serious problems with external monitors, thanks to the shared DNA with iPad OS. Many non-Apple displays which are not 4K display blurry magnified text, or in some cases tiny icons and text as it attempts to display the native resolution without any scaling whatsoever. This is not just on 1440p displays either, ultrawide resolutions such as 5120×2160 and cannot be solved by lowering the resolution to try to make the text and icons larger.

The problem is that the system is not enabling Apple’s Retina high DPI mode on many non-Apple displays which results in the blurry text as well as often hiding some output resolutions. There is a solution now, thanks to István Tóth’s BetterDummy, which is open sourced and apparently MIT licensed. The program creates a virtual display in software which is then mirrored to your external monitor, fixing the lack of upscaling, blurry text and even allowing the creation of custom resolutions.

The Register interviewed István about his HiDPI fix and the development of BetterDummy if you are curious about the history of the fix, as well as getting your hands on it.

It took an open source programmer working in his spare time to come up with a workaround that doesn’t involve purchasing a hardware dongle to fix what is a macOS limitation.

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eddjedi

macrumors 6502a
  • Feb 4, 2016
  • #1
  • Due to work I need to run Windows as my main OS while in the office. As a long term Mac user I have finally convinced them to buy me a Mac to run Windows on, but the display is driving me crazy.

    I have a 2015 13″ Retina Macbook Pro, running Windows 10 natively with Bootcamp (not parallels etc.) I have this hooked up to an external 22″ monitor via HDMI, as the 13″ display is too small to develop on.

    The problem is I cannot get the Mac’s retina display and the monitor’s standard display to co-operate. I either get blurry apps on the Retina display, or scaling issues on the non-retina display (eg massive buttons or text.)

    I know Windows is a bit of a joke, but SURELY in 2016 it must support high DPI monitors? I’d love to blame this on some obscure app I’m using, but all I need to work is Chrome, RDP, and Office 365. But none of these apps play ball. Chrome looks blurry on the larger display, RDP opens up remote connections at Retina resolution (eg far too small to see what’s going on) and as above Office is pixelated on the retina display.

    Any advice on how I can sort this out? I’ve installed all Windows updates and tried updating Bootcamp, but I apparently already have the latest Bootcamp drivers. Can anybody recommend a decent third party display settings app? I’m close to going back to my old Lenovo notebook, which I REALLY don’t want to do as it weights about 5 times as much. But at least that looked OK while I was working on it.
    [doublepost=1454604622][/doublepost]Here’s a couple of examples – Notepad++ with tiny tabs, and Photoshop with massive UI. Forgot to mention above, I have obviously tried changing the display scaling settings to 100%/200% on each monitor, makes no difference even after logging out.

    There may be scenarios where you can’t see something on your Mac’s screen very well and having the ability to zoom in just a little bit closer to get a better look at something might be very useful.

    Fortunately, macOS comes with built-in zoom features that can be enabled by the user, and in this tutorial, we’ll walk you through how to get to them and talk about what you can do with them.

    Whether you see something very small in an image that you want to get a closer look at, or there’s some text on your screen that is just too small to see, you might find your Mac’s zoom feature to be an invaluable tool.

    As you age, your eyes aren’t going to get any better, and the ability to zoom in will get you a closer look at something without having to strain your eyes any more than you have to.

    Your Mac’s zoom feature packs a number of different keyboard shortcuts and even has more than one zoom mode, so we’ll talk a little about that in this post.

    How to enable zoom on your Mac

    To enable zoom on your Mac, you’ll need to go to your Accessibility settings. To do that, follow these steps:

    1) Launch the System Preferences app and open the Accessibility preferences pane.

    2) Now click on the Zoom option in the sidebar, and this will bring you to all of your Mac’s zoom options.

    3) Put a check mark in the Use keyboard shortcuts to zoom checkbox so that zoom becomes enabled on your Mac.

    4) You can click the Advanced button for additional options such as smooth images and following keyboard focus.

    Now that you have zoom enabled on your Mac, you’re free to try it out.

    Using zoom on your Mac

    There are a number of keyboard shortcuts you can use to play with zoom on your Mac. We’d suggest trying it out first on some kind of image on the web.

    Some of the keyboard shortcuts you’ll want to familiarize yourself with are:

    • Toggle zoom on and off: Option + Command + 8
    • Zoom in: Option + Command + =
    • Zoom out: Option + Command + –
    • Toggle smooth image loading: Option + Command + \

    For laughs, I chose to test the zoom feature on a where’s waldo image I found on Google and I zoomed right into where I found Waldo.

    There are also more than one zoom modes in macOS, and while I used fullscreen mode in the example above, which essentially just blows everything on on your entire Mac display, there’s also a picture-in-picture mode that works more like a magnifying glass, like this:

    No matter the zoom method you prefer, both will get you a closer look at anything you want to lay your eyes on without having to move your head any closer to your Mac’s display.

    Wrapping up

    Despite the clarity of Apple’s Retina displays, when it comes to wanting to get a closer look at something, the macOS zoom feature is a useful feature that more people really need to take advantage of.

    Useful for both text and images, those with bad eyes are going to find that this tool is a god-sent feature.

    Do you use zoom on your Mac? Share in the comments! Remember you can visit us on Twitter too!

    I årtier har folk med synsproblemer tilpasset deres systemopløsning for at gøre ting som tekst- og grænsefladeelementer større. Dette er en forfærdelig ide, fordi det forvrænger dybest set alt på skærmen. Hvis din Mac tilbyder en retina-skærm, giver Systemindstillinger en bedre måde.

    I stedet for at ændre systemets opløsning kan macOS tælle ting som interfaceelementer og tekst, hvilket gør det muligt for fotos og anden grafik stadig at udnytte displayets indfødte fuldt ud løsning. Det er lidt beslægtet med DPI-skaleringen på Windows 10, men meget mindre forvirrende.

    Sådan justeres din Macs displayskalering

    For at udforske disse indstillinger, gå til Systemindstillinger> Skærm.

    Under “Resolution” Marker “Skaleret” indstillingen. Du vil blive præsenteret med fire til fem valg afhængigt af skærmens størrelse.

    Jeg bruger en 13-tommers MacBook Pro med en opløsning på 2560 ved 1600 pixel. Jeg er præsenteret med fire muligheder, som alle “ligner” en hypotetisk opløsning på en tidligere generation af Mac. Standarden ser for eksempel “ligner” 1440 med 900 pixel, som du kan se ved at holde musemarkøren over indstillingen.

    De to valgmuligheder under standard “ligner” 1280 ved 800 og 1024 ved 640, som Jeg arbejder min vej ned. Alternativet over standardet “ligner” 1680 inden 1050.

    Disse tal er noget vilkårlig, fordi de er relateret til, hvordan tidligere generations Mac’er så på bestemte opløsninger. De præcise valg, der tilbydes, varierer afhængigt af din specifikke Mac-model. Og for at være klar, ændrer din systemopløsning faktisk ikke, hvis du vælger en anden indstilling: bare skalering af ting som tekst- og grænsefladeelementer ændres. Resultatet ligner ændret opløsning på ældre Mac’er, men uden de visuelle forvrængninger.

    Lurer du på, hvordan dette ser ud? Nå er her mit skrivebord indstillet til standardindstillingen, som “ligner” 1440 ved 900 pixel.

    Og her er det, når jeg vælger alternativet “Mere plads”, som “ligner” 1680 ved 1050 pixels:

    Som du kan se, tager browservinduet nu meget mindre plads på mit skrivebord, og menulinjen ser lidt mindre ud. Hvis du har et godt syn, kan denne indstilling gøre din Mac-skærm føles ret større, så du kan få flere ting på skærmen på en gang.

    Går den anden vej, her er en størrelse mindre end standard, som “ser ud som “1280 ved 800:

    Alt er lidt større, og browservinduet (som jeg ikke har ændret) tager nu det meste af skærmen op. Lad os gå et skridt videre, så displayet “ligner” 1024 ved 640 pixels:

    Browseren tager nu hele skærmen op, og menulinjen er nu freaking enorm. Jeg kunne aldrig arbejde sådan her, men en person med meget værre øjne end jeg kunne drage fordel af det.

    Igen ændrer ingen af ​​disse indstillinger faktisk displayets opløsning: alt de gør er, at ændre de relative størrelser af ting. > En note på eksterne skærme

    Jeg bruger en ekstern skærm på mit skrivebord, som jeg har haft i mange år. Når jeg leder til skærmbilledet Displays i Systemindstillinger med det viste display, åbner macOS to vinduer: en til min indbyggede skærm og en anden til min eksterne skærm. I mit tilfælde er det eksterne display ikke højdensitet, så jeg kan styre opløsningen.

    Så hvad sker der, når jeg trækker et vindue fra en højdensitetsdisplay til en lav densitet? Vinduet bevæger sig sømløst og gør justeringen i skalering, når du trækker den over. Dette er sandt uanset hvilken skaleringsindstilling du har valgt til din højdensitetsdisplay. Det ser ud til at være en lille ting, men tro mig: Dette er et vidunder af engineering.

    Det er også værd at bemærke, at din Mac vil “huske”, hvilken slags skalering du vil have på din nethinden, mens et bestemt eksternt display er tilsluttet, og når der ikke er tilsluttet ekstern skærm. Det er en subtil ting, men det kan være meget nyttigt.

    For eksempel kan jeg godt lide skaleringen på min MacBook Pro’s display for at blive indstillet til “Mere plads”, når det ikke er tilsluttet et eksternt display, så jeg har så meget plads til at arbejde med som muligt. Når jeg er ved mit skrivebord, står jeg dog lidt længere væk fra displayet. Dette kombineret med den minimale eksterns opløsning betyder, at Retina-displayet skaleres lidt, når den eksterne er tilsluttet.

    For at opnå dette indstiller jeg skaleringen til “Mere plads”, mens skærmen var ikke forbundet. Derefter sluttede jeg displayet og indstil skaleringen på det indbyggede display til “Standard”. Nu skal skaleringen automatisk skiftes, når jeg tilslutter eller afbryder det eksterne display.

    Ønsker du flere valg? Check Out Retina Display Menu

    Fem skalering valg er ikke meget mange, men efter min opfattelse vil det udvalgte udvalg sandsynligvis dække de fleste brugssager. Hvis du vil indstille ting mere præcist, skal du dog downloade Retina Display Menu, en gratis menulinjeapplikation, der lader dig indstille den relative opløsning til det, du vil have på din nethinden. For at installere skal du arbejde rundt Gatekeeper ved at højreklikke på og derefter klikke på “Åbn”. Når det er ved at køre, vises et menulinjeikon.

    Klik på dette, og du kan vælge en opløsning – det bedste Kampe til din skærm er markeret med en lynbolt. Du kan få nogle virkelig latterlige indstillinger til at gøre dette – for eksempel, hvordan ser MacBook Pro på fuld opløsning uden skalering:

    Browservinduet her er den samme størrelse som før, som reference, og menulinjen kan næppe være set. Dette er ikke praktisk overhovedet – teksten er næsten ikke læsbar – men hvis intet andet er det en god objekt-lektion om, hvorfor retina-displays har brug for skalering i første omgang.

    For de fleste vil standardskaleringsfunktionerne virke. Men det betyder ikke at spille med et program som dette er ikke sjovt, så giv det et skud.

    Når du samler en ny computer (eller opgraderer en gammel), har bundkortet og CPU’en et par ekstra overvejelser at du skal huske på. For det første er de de mest restriktive dele at forbinde: kun en relativt få processorer passer til dit bundkorts specifikke stik type. Og for det andet vil bundkortudvælgelsen selv bestemme en masse af kernekapaciteten og retningen af ​​din pc-build.

    Facebook er begyndt at blive afgørende. Fra at logge ind på hjemmesider for at holde kontakten med gamle venner, er det bare blevet en del af hverdagen. Alle ser på dig sjovt, hvis du siger, at du ikke har en Facebook-konto. Mange mennesker vil imidlertid ikke have, at deres Facebook-konto nemt kan findes.

    Po celá desetiletí lidé se zrakovým problémem upravili systémové rozlišení tak, aby se věci jako text a prvky rozhraní zvýšily. To je strašný nápad, protože v podstatě zkresluje všechno na obrazovce. Pokud vaše Mac nabízí displej Retina, systémové předvolby nabízejí lepší způsob.

    Namísto změny rozlišení systému může makro měnit věci jako prvky rozhraní a text, což umožňuje fotografiím a jiné grafice plně využít nativní zobrazení rozlišení. Je to trochu podobná škálování DPI v systému Windows 10, ale mnohem méně matoucí.

    Jak upravit Mac OS Display Scaling

    Chcete-li prozkoumat tato nastavení, přejděte na System Preferences> Display. zaškrtněte volbu “Scaled”. V závislosti na velikosti obrazovky se zobrazí čtyři až pět možností.

    Používám 13-palcový MacBook Pro s rozlišením 2560 až 1600 pixelů. Jsem předložen se čtyřmi možnostmi, z nichž všechny “vypadají” jako hypotetické řešení na Macu předchozí generace. Výchozí hodnota například vypadá jako 1440 x 900 pixelů, kterou můžete vidět umístěním ukazatele myši nad volbou.

    Dvě možnosti pod výchozím “vypadají jako” 1280 x 800 a 1024 x 640 Dělal jsem svou cestu dolů. Možnost nad standardní “vypadá jako” 1680 do 1050.

    Tato čísla jsou poněkud libovolná, protože souvisí s tím, jak se Macy předchozí generace podívaly na konkrétní rozlišení. Přesná nabízená volba se bude lišit v závislosti na konkrétním modelu Mac. A aby bylo jasné, rozlišení vašeho systému se ve skutečnosti nezmění, pokud zvolíte jiné nastavení: změní se pouze změna velikosti textů a prvků rozhraní. Výsledkem je podobná změna rozlišení na starších počítačích Mac, ale bez vizuálních zkreslení.

    Zajímá vás, jak to vypadá? Tady je můj desktop nastaven na výchozí nastavení, které “vypadá jako” 1440 x 900 pixelů.

    A tady je to, když si vyberu volbu “Více místa”, která “vypadá” 1680 x 1050 pixelů:

    Jak vidíte, okno prohlížeče nyní na mém pracovním stole zaberá mnohem méně místa a panel nabídek vypadá poněkud menší. Pokud máte dobrý zrak, toto nastavení může váš displej Mac cítit trochu větší, což vám umožní mít více věcí na obrazovce najednou.

    Jděte opačným směrem, je zde jedna velikost menší než výchozí, která vypadá jako “1280 x 800:

    Všechno je trochu větší a okno prohlížeče (které jsem nezměnila) nyní přebírá většinu obrazovky. Pojďme ještě o krok dále, aby displej “vypadal” 1024 x 640 pixelů:

    Prohlížeč nyní zachycuje celou obrazovku a panel nabídek je nyní obrovský. Nikdy jsem nemohl takhle pracovat, ale někdo s mnohem horšími očima než já by mohl mít prospěch z toho.

    Ani jedno z těchto nastavení skutečně nezmění rozlišení displeje: vše, co dělají, je změnit relativní velikost věcí. > Poznámka k externím monitorům

    Používám externí monitor u svého stolu – jeden, který jsem měl už roky. Když se vydám na panel Displeje v System Preferences s připojeným displejem, systém macOS otevírá dvě okna: jedna pro vestavěný displej a druhá pro externí displej. V mém případě externí displej nemá vysokou hustotu, takže můžu řídit rozlišení.

    Tak co se stane, když přetáhím okno z displeje s vysokou hustotou na displej s nízkou hustotou? Okno se pohybuje bezproblémově a upravuje měřítko při přetahování. To platí bez ohledu na to, jakou měřítku jste zvolili pro zobrazení s vysokou hustotou. Vypadá to jako malá věc, ale věřte mi: to je zázrak inženýrství. Je také třeba poznamenat, že váš Mac si “zapamatuje”, jaký typ měřítka chcete na displeji Retina, zatímco je připojen konkrétní externí displej, a pokud není připojen žádný externí displej. Je to jemná věc, ale může být velmi užitečná.

    Například měřítko na displeji MacBooku Pro je nastaveno na “Více prostoru”, když není připojen k žádnému externímu displeji, takže mám co nejvíce prostoru pro práci s jakýmkoliv možným způsobem. Když jsem u svého stolu, ale stojím o něco daleko od displeje. Toto, v kombinaci s nižším rozlišením mé externí, znamená, že bych chtěl displej Retina trochu zvětšit, když je připojen externí.

    Pro dosažení tohoto cíle jsem nastavil měřítko na “Více prostoru”, zatímco displej byl Nepřipojený. Poté jsem připojil displej a nastavil měřítko na vestavěném displeji na “Default”. Nyní měří měřítko automaticky při připojení nebo odpojení externího displeje.

    Chcete další volby? Check Out Retina Display Menu

    Pět možností pro škálování není příliš mnoho, ačkoli podle mého názoru nabízený sortiment pravděpodobně pokrývá většinu případů použití. Chcete-li však přesněji nastavit věci, měli byste si stáhnout Retina Display Menu, bezplatnou aplikaci, která vám umožní nastavit relativní rozlišení na všechno, co chcete, na displeji Retina. Chcete-li nainstalovat, budete muset obejít Gatekeeper kliknutím pravým tlačítkem myši a klepnutím na tlačítko “Otevřít”. Jakmile je spuštěn, uvidíte ikonu na liště menu

    Klepněte na toto tlačítko a můžete zvolit jakékoliv rozlišení – nejlepší shody pro váš displej jsou označeny bleskem. Můžete si udělat opravdu směšné nastavení – například, když se MacBook Pro dívá na plné rozlišení bez škálování:

    Okno prohlížeče je tady stejné velikosti jako předtím, pro odkaz a panel nabídek sotva může být viděno. To není vůbec praktické – text je sotva čitelný – ale pokud nic jiného není dobré lekce předmětu, proč má Retina potřebovat škálování na prvním místě.

    Pro většinu lidí budou fungovat výchozí možnosti měřítka. Ale to neznamená, že hraní s aplikací, jako je tato, není zábavná, takže ji udělejte.

    Trh domácí virtuální reality může být daleko od dospělosti, ale dva hlavní hráči na straně PC jsou pevně založená: Oculus a jeho sluchátka Rift a platforma Vive od HTC, která je partnerem společnosti Valve. Jako herní konzole mají Oculus Rift i Vive vlastní sadu speciálních specifikací, systémových požadavků a exkluzivních her.

    Včera společnost Microsoft oznámila, že přináší Edge do iOS a zařízení Android, aby vytvořila bezproblémový zážitek mezi počítačem a vaším počítačem. telefon. Ale koho to zajímá? Tato bezproblémová zkušenost již existuje díky aplikaci Chrome, kterou již používáte pro vše, co je součástí vašeho počítače.

    dešimtmečius žmonėms, turintiems regėjimo sutrikimų, pakoregavo jų sistemos rezoliuciją, kad būtų padaryti daugiau kaip teksto ir sąsajos elementai. Tai baisi mintis, nes iš esmės iškraipo viską, kas yra jūsų ekrane. Jei jūsų “Mac” siūlo Retina ekraną, “System Preferences” yra geresnis būdas.

    “MacOS” vietoj to, kad pakeistų sistemos skiriamąją gebą, “MacOS” gali mąstyti tokius dalykus kaip sąsajos elementai ir tekstas, todėl nuotraukos ir kita grafika gali visapusiškai pasinaudoti ekrano gimtoji rezoliucija.

    Kaip pritaikyti savo “Mac” ekrano mastelį

    Norėdami išnagrinėti šiuos nustatymus, eikite į “Sistemos nustatymai”> “Ekranas”.

    “Rezoliucija” patikrinkite parinktį “Sumažinta”. Priklausomai nuo ekrano dydžio, jums bus pateiktos keturios iki penkios pasirinktys.

    Aš naudoju 13 colių “MacBook Pro”, kurio raiška yra 2560 x 1600 pikselių. Mane pateikiamos keturios parinktys, kurios visos “atrodo kaip” hipotetinė rezoliucija dėl ankstesnės kartos “Mac”. Pavyzdžiui, numatytoji vertė “atrodo” 1440 iki 900 pikselių, kurią galite pamatyti nukreipdami pelės žymeklį ant parinkties.

    Du variantai, esantys po numatytuoju mygtuku “atrodo”, yra 1280 x 800 ir 1024 x 640. Aš dirbu žemyn. Ši parinktis virš numatytosios “atrodo” 1680 iki 1050.

    Šie skaičiai yra šiek tiek savavališki, nes jie susiję su tuo, kaip ankstesnės kartos “Mac” ieškojo tam tikrų rezoliucijų. Tikslūs siūlomi pasirinkimai priklausys nuo jūsų konkretaus “Mac” modelio. Kad būtų aišku, jūsų sistemos rezoliucija iš tikrųjų nepasikeis, jei pasirenkate kitą nustatymą: tik keisis dalykų, pvz., Teksto ir sąsajos elementų, mastelio keitimas. Rezultatas yra panašus į kintančią skiriamąją gebą senesniuose “Mac” variantuose, tačiau be vaizdo iškraipymų.

    Ar jums įdomu, ką tai atrodo? Na, čia mano darbalaukyje nustatytas numatytasis nustatymas, kuris “atrodo” yra 1440 x 900 pikselių.

    Čia aš pasirinksiu parinktį “Daugiau erdvės”, kuri “atrodo” 1680 x 1050 pikselių:

    Kaip matote, naršyklės langas dabar mano kompiuteryje užima daug mažiau vietos, o meniu juosta atrodo kiek mažesnė. Jei turite gerą regėjimą, šis nustatymas gali parodyti, kad jūsų “Mac” ekranas tampa šiek tiek didesnis, todėl vienu metu galite ekrane matyti daugiau dalykų.

    Kitaip tariant, čia yra vienas mažesnis nei numatytasis dydis, kuris “atrodo” pvz., “1280 iki 800:

    Viskas yra šiek tiek didesnis, o naršyklės langas (kurio dydis nesikeičia) dabar užima daugumą ekrano. Eikime vienu žingsniu toliau, kad ekranas “atrodytų” 1024 x 640 pikselių:

    Dabar naršyklė užima visą ekraną, o meniu juosta dabar yra didžiulė. Aš niekada negalėčiau dirbti panašiai, bet kažkas, turintis daug blogesnių akių nei man, galėtų ja pasinaudoti.

    Vėlgi nė vienas iš šių nustatymų iš tikrųjų nekeičia ekrano skiriamosios gebos: viskas, ką jie daro, yra pakeisti santykinius dalykų dydžius.

    Pastaba apie išorinius monitorius

    Aš naudoju išorinį monitorių savo staliniame kompiuteryje, kurį turėjau daugelį metų. Kai persijungiau į skydelį “Displays”, esantį sistemos parinktyse sujungus šį ekraną, “macOS” atidaro du langus: vieną mano integruotam ekranui ir kitą – išoriniam ekranui. Mano atveju išorinis ekranas nėra didelio tankio, todėl galiu valdyti skiriamąją gebą.

    Taigi, kas atsitinka, kai vilkite langą iš didelio tankio ekrano į mažo tankio monitorių? Langas juda nuosekliai, pakeičia mastelį, kai jį vilkite. Tai yra tiesa, nepriklausomai nuo to, kokią mastelio parinktį pasirinkote savo didelio tankio ekrane. Tai atrodo kaip nedidelis dalykas, bet pasitikėk manimi: tai inžinerijos stebuklas.

    Taip pat verta paminėti, kad “Mac” “prisimins”, kokio dydžio norite matyti “Retina” ekrane, kai yra prijungtas tam tikras išorinis ekranas. ir kai nėra išorinio ekrano. Tai subtilus dalykas, bet gali būti labai naudingas.

    Pvz., Man patinka, kad mano “MacBook Pro” ekrano mastelis būtų nustatytas kaip “Daugiau vietos”, kai jis nėra prijungtas prie jokio išorinio ekrano, todėl aš turiu kiek įmanoma daugiau galimybių dirbti. Tačiau kai buvau prie mano stalo, aš stoviu šiek tiek atgal nuo ekrano. Tai, kartu su mažesniu išoriniu skiriamuoju skyreliu, reiškia, kad norint, kad “Retina” ekranas būtų šiek tiek padidintas, kai prijungtas išorinis įrenginys.

    Norėdami tai pasiekti, nustatydama mastelį nustatydamas “daugiau vietos”, ekranas buvo nustatytas neprisijungęs. Tada aš prijungiau ekraną ir įvesiu mastelį į mano vidinį ekraną į “Numatytasis”. Dabar mastelio keitimas automatiškai įsijungia, kai prijungu arba atjungiu išorinį ekraną.

    Norite Daugiau pasirinkimų? Patikrinkite tinklainės ekrano meniu

    Penki mastelio pasirinkimai nėra labai daug, tačiau, mano nuomone, siūlomų asortimentų greičiausiai bus daugiausia naudojimo atvejų. Tačiau jei norite tiksliau nustatyti dalykus, turėtumėte atsisiųsti “Tinklo ekrano meniu” – laisvą meniu juostos programą, kuria galite nustatyti santykinę raišką, ką norite, savo “Retina” ekrane. Norėdami įdiegti, turėsite dirbti aplink “Gatekeeper” dešiniuoju pelės mygtuku spustelėję, tada spustelėdami “Atidaryti”. Kai tai bus pradėta ir veikia, pamatysite meniu juostos piktogramą.

    Paspauskite ir galėsite pasirinkti bet kokią rezoliuciją – geriausią jūsų ekrano atitikmenys pažymėti žaibo varžtais. Tai galite padaryti, pavyzdžiui, štai kaip mano “MacBook Pro” žiūri į pilną raišką be mastelio:

    Naršyklės langas yra tokio paties dydžio kaip ir anksčiau, ir meniu juosta vargu ar gali būti matė. Tai nėra praktiška visame tekste, vos lengvai skaitoma, bet jei nieko, tai nėra geras dalykas pamoka, kodėl “Retina” ekranai pirmiausia reikalauja mastelio.

    Daugumai žmonių bus naudojamos numatytosios mastelio parinktys. Bet tai nereiškia, kad žaisti su tokia programa, kaip tai nėra įdomu, todėl šaudyti.

    Prieš skaitmeninės fotografijos augimą, viskas buvo daug mažiau standartizuota. Šiais laikais ne iš smartfonių turite tris pagrindinius fotoaparatų gamintojus (“Canon”, “Nikon” ir “Sony”) ir du pagrindinius fotoaparatų dydžius: APS-C pasėlių jutikliai ir pilno rėmo jutikliai. Kiti senesni variantai, tokie kaip vidutinio formato, grįžo į tas vietas, kuriose jie specializuojasi.

    “Windows 10” kūrėjų atnaujinimas, kurį galite gauti rankiniu būdu, jei jis dar nebaigtas, su juo susieja naują “Žaidimų režimas”, kuriame daugiausia dėmesio skiriama žaidimų programų našumui pagerinti. Žaidimų spaudoje daug kalbama apie žaidimų režimą, tačiau vis tiek girdėjome gana nedaug informacijos iš pačios “Microsoft” – galbūt dėl ​​to, kad ši funkcija nėra gana akivaizdus palaima žaidėjams, kad pavadinimas reiškia.

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    Announced last week, Avatron’s popular utility Air Display, a $9.99 app that can turn any iOS device into an external display for a Mac or PC, has been updated today to include support for two major new features and technical achievements: HiDPI mode and Retina graphics. Meant to be enjoyed on the new iPad’s Retina display, Air Display 1.6 requires the installation of a desktop application that will handle the wireless connection between Lion and the iOS app.

    Once installed, Air Display Connect on the Mac will allow you to easily select the device you want to turn into an external monitor. For the new iPad’s display (and Retina iOS devices in general, but of course the app gives its best results on the iPad), Avatron has enabled support for high resolutions, although an option is present to render items at non-Retina resolutions as well. The Retina display’s tightly packed pixels have also allowed Avatron to use HiDPI mode – a hidden feature of Lion which draws element on screen at double the size – in a meaningful and gorgeous-looking way.

    Because HiDPI mode simply produces large images on a “non-Retina” device (by drawing larger elements on screen, HiDPI would need a high-resolution display to make sure an application window’s physical size isn’t comically large), Avatron thought that the iPad’s 2048×1536 pixels would make sense for such implementation. And indeed, once active, Air Display’s HiDPI mode on a Retina iPad makes for a beautiful experience to look at (and surprisingly decent in terms of performances on my not-so-amazing home network): pixels are crisp, text is insanely legible, large windows from an iMac’s main display become smaller, but sharper when migrated to Air Display.

    In my tests, I noticed the app wouldn’t display super high-res graphics only when dragging windows around with the mouse, but I assume that’s also related to the connection refreshing the external, wireless display (in this version, frame rate and image quality have also been improved – I didn’t notice any visible lag or compression going on, possibly thanks to the app’s multiple optimizations in this area). When windows are still, you’ll be able to appreciate Air Display HiDPI on Retina is all its glory. New features aside, Air Display keeps its existing set of functionalities intact, letting you easily move windows around, activate touch input in the app’s Settings, and writing directly from the iPad if necessary through iOS’ soft keyboard.

    At $9.99, Air Display 1.6 delivers an incredible image quality on the third-generation iPad, and I recommend you check it out if you own a Retina iPad and have been looking for a way to leverage the device’s display for Mac OS X Lion’s HiDPI mode.

    Update: In my tests, I have noticed that in order to enable and disable HiDPI mode Air Display installs a “helper” tool that requires a log out when you decide to activate or deactivate HiDPI. It is my basic understanding – though I still have to contact Avatron about this – that Air Display can enable HiDPI mode on the iPad’s Retina display alone, leaving a Mac’s default resolution unchanged. When moving windows between the iPad’s HiDPI display and my Mac’s non-HiDPI screen (set at 1920×1080 pixels), I noticed the app had to “resize” the windows that were enlarged for HiDPI to fit the regular screen. I have included a series of screenshots below, and I’ll update this post with official details from Avatron regarding the behavior of “Retina resolutions” and “HiDPI” settings.

    Update #2: HiDPI mode needs to be manually enabled in the Display preferences even if Air Display is set to “on”. As also noted by Wayne Sang, only some Apple apps and system resources/controls seem to take advantage of HiDPI mode right now. Below, two examples of Apple apps running HiDPI mode, versus non-optimized apps (Chrome and Rdio).

    So if you’re going to use Air Display in HiDPI mode, keep in mind that only Apple apps have been updated to take advantage of it for now. Otherwise you might want to use Air Display in Retina mode, but with HiDPI off, to have a 2048×1536 pixels external display.

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    He can also be found on his two other podcasts on Relay FM – Connected and Remaster.

    I have an older iMac, without a true retina display. I want to be able to scale the user interface like the retina macs do, but I can’t seem to find a way to do that.

    Does anyone know a way to trick the computer into thinking it has a retina display, so the options are available in the Display PrefPane? That, or some utility that might let me access those settings.

    Note, I’m not really talking about HiDPI mode, I’ve done that, it only has the option of pixel doubling. I want the variable scaling that is available on true retina displays.

    I’m running mountain lion on a 2.5 GHz i5 iMac, about 1.5 years old.

    Edit 9 years later: This question seems to confuse people into thinking it’s about screen resolution, but it’s only about interface scaling. I’m pretty convinced by now it’s not easily possible, but answers talking about resolution are missing the point.

    5 Answers 5

    I don’t see how this would be possible, its a hardware limitation.

    The 15in Retina comes with a resolution of: 2880×1800 but the resolution is set to 1440×900 by default and has its pixels doubled.

    That is why when you do doubling of pixels you get a smaller resolution because there is only so many pixels on the screen in which everything can be displayed.

    The Retina mac’s scale the UI by removing the pixel doubling. The screen it self has a high densit of pixels, meaning that a particular window can take up a smaller area by filling in those pixels.

    However with a 1080p there are far fewer pixels/lower density and it is not physically possible to scale things to fit.

    Theoretically it is possible but would require real time rendering of everything which would take time + processor usage. As compared to the Retina which has a hardware solution.

    It is not the best explanation but I hope it delivers the point. –EDIT

    UI is designed based on pixels, so a button is placed on a form and it dimensioned to take up say 100 pixels wide and 20 pixels high. On a lower resolution screen it will look much bigger because of the density of pixels, as compared to a higher resolution where the user has the option to allow the UI to take up single pixels so its small or more than 1 pixel so it looks big.

    So with that 100 x 20 pixel button, on a 19in screen: At a resolution of 100 x 20 it would take up the whole screen because there are only 100 pixels for the UI to be able to fill up horizontally and 20 vertically. If you had a higher resolution screen the UI is able to take up less space because of the higher pixel density. So the same monitor with a resolution of 400 x 80 will have the button take up a quarter of the screen, and if you allow it to double its pixel then the button will take up 200 x 40 pixels, looking bigger but better/more crisp because of the extra pixels.

    That is why higher resolution screens have smaller UI, because the pixels are super close together and theres a lot of them allowing us to decide how we want it scaled, ie. how many pixels we allow for each designed pixel.

    When Developers design UI they set anchors on everything, that is why when you change the size of the form it dynamically adjust the size of the buttons, boxes etc.

    When I say hardware rendering I mean the pixels are placed per pixels or simply multiplied by the current ratio. So at full resolution 1 pixel is 1 pixel on the screen. At a different resolution 1 pixel might be allocated 2 pixels.

    Make precise pixel measurements and magnify portions of your screen.

    Pixel Tools overview

    Features:

    • Tracks the mouse and magnifies the region of interest (1x – 64x).
    • Measures the distance in pixels between two points on the screen (Width, Height, and Straight Line Distance). Y Coordinates can be measured Cocoa style (positive Y is up) or traditional style (positive Y is down).
    • Gives the RGB or HSB numerical value of the color under the mouse (Hex 00-FF, Float 0.00-1.00, or Integer 0-255).
    • Allows precise positioning of the mouse cursor using the arrow keys. Hold the shift key to move 5 points at a time.
    • Set the foreground or background color in Photoshop or the fill or stroke color in Illustrator with a keyboard shortcut. Works with Photoshop CS 1 and Illustrator CS 1 and higher. No setup necessary.
    • Every function has a keyboard shortcut so it’s quick to access.
    • Keyboard shortcuts have global equivalents so that they can be used even when the app is not frontmost. For example, to set the measurement origin you can use the space-bar when the app is frontmost, and when it’s in the background you use Control-Option-Command-Space-Bar to do the same thing. Global keyboard shortcuts can also be disabled.
    • Allows setting the main window to float in front of all other windows for easy access (default), or setting it to behave like a normal window so that it can layer behind the frontmost app. This is great if you want to keep Pixel Tools open all of the time, but don’t want it obstructing your view when trying to read your mail.
    • Allows you to hide controls and rulers so that the window can be sized to have a very small footprint, yet still be completely usable. Pixel Tools is designed to see underneath itself, making it so that even when it covers part of the app that you are measuring, it still works. Both of these features are particularly important for users on small screens.
    • Allows locking the mouse position to focus on a particular area on the screen. You might use this to change the color format settings without affecting what the app is focused on.
    • Allows locking the screen updates so that you can measure transient or animated effects. For example, you might use this to measure the distance on an item that has a mouse-over effect. With updates locked, the mouse-over will remain on, while you measure.
    • Works with any number of monitors, of any size, and any layout.
    • Enhanced for your Mac’s Retina display. Get the color values for each sub-point pixel using the arrow keys.
    • Designed to maximize your Mac’s battery life. Pixel Tools will only display updates when needed and, on Mac OS X 10.9 or higher, won’t update when obscured by other windows.
    • Optimized memory usage – keep your RAM for other apps.
    • Very small executable, so the app launches very quickly.

    Measure distances and colors

    Save The Machine

      • 3.7 • 6 Ratings
      • $4.99

    Screenshots

    Description

    The ideal companion for designers and anyone that needs to make pixel precise measurements, get the numeric value of a color, or magnify a portion of any screen.

    Pixel Tools does the following:
    1. Tracks the mouse and magnifies the region of interest (1x – 64x).
    2. Measures the distance in pixels between two points on the screen (Width, Height, and Straight Line Distance). Y Coordinates can be measured Cocoa style (positive Y is up) or traditional style (positive Y is down).
    3. Gives the RGB or HSB numerical value of the color under the mouse (Hex 00-FF, Float 0.000-1.000, or Integer 0-255).
    4. Allows precise positioning of the mouse cursor using the arrow keys. Hold the shift key to move 5 points at a time.
    5. Every function has a keyboard shortcut so it’s quick to access.
    6. Keyboard shortcuts have global equivalents so that they can be used even when the app is not frontmost. For example, to set the measurement origin you can use the space-bar when the app is frontmost, and when it’s in the background you use Control-Option-Command-Space-Bar to do the same thing. Global keyboard shortcuts can also be disabled.
    7. Allows setting the main window to float in front of all other windows for easy access (default), or setting it to behave like a normal window so that it can layer behind the frontmost app. This is great if you want to keep Pixel Tools open all of the time, but don’t want it obstructing your view when trying to read your mail.
    8. Allows you to hide controls and rulers so that the window can be sized to have a very small footprint, yet still be completely usable. Pixel Tools is designed to see underneath itself, making it so that even when it covers part of the app that you are measuring, it still works. Both of these features are particularly important for users on small screens.
    9. Allows locking the mouse position to focus on a particular area on the screen. You might use this to change the color format settings without affecting what the app is focused on.
    10. Allows locking the screen updates so that you can measure transient or animated effects. For example, you might use this to measure the distance on an item that has a mouse-over effect. With updates locked, the mouse-over will remain on, while you measure.
    11. Works with any number of monitors, of any size, and any layout. Works well in full screen split view as one of the 2 windows.
    12. Enhanced for your Mac’s Retina display. Get the color values for each sub-point pixel using the arrow keys.
    13. Designed to maximize your Mac’s battery life. Pixel Tools will only display updates when needed and, on Mac OS X 10.9 or higher, won’t update when obscured by other windows.
    14. Optimized memory usage – keep your RAM for other apps.
    15. Very small executable, so the app launches very quickly.
    16. Works great in light or dark appearance mode.

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    Sarah Hamilton

    macrumors regular
    • Oct 20, 2021
  • #1
  • joevt

    Contributor
    • Oct 20, 2021
  • #2
  • Sarah Hamilton

    macrumors regular
    • Oct 20, 2021
  • #3
  • joevt

    Contributor
    • Oct 20, 2021
  • #4
  • QHD or 2K is 2560×1440. That’s less pixels than 4K. 4K is better and is much less expensive than 5K or 6K. You only want QHD for gaming with higher refresh rates.

    You’re not downscaling to 2560×1440 on the 4K display (or not upscaling 2560×1440 to 4K). You’re downscaling from 5K to 4K. There’s a difference. The Mac’s Retina or HiDPI or “Looks like” modes draw objects and text twice as high and twice as tall as they would be on a QHD screen – everything has 4 times as many pixels so they are smoother and have more detail.

    I like 4K just fine. None of those pesky 5K/6K connection issues (requiring Thunderbolt or DSC).

    Fishrrman

    macrumors Penryn
    • Oct 21, 2021
  • #5
  • People DO NOT buy 27″ and 32″ 4k displays to use them a “full 4k” (pixel-for-pixel) with Macs.
    (perhaps a few do, but a VERY few)

    People DO buy 27″ and 32″ 4k displays to use them in “HiDPI” mode, yielding working resolutions of either 1080p or 1440p.

    When you connect the 4k display to the Mac (using the proper cable), the displays preference pane should offer you the options of 1080p (looks like 1920×1080) or 1440p (looks like 2560×1440).

    Amethyst1

    macrumors 604
    • Oct 21, 2021
  • #6
  • Most people buy 27″ and 32″ 4K displays to yield working resolutions of either 2560×1440 or 3008×1692.

    magicMac

    macrumors 6502a
    • Oct 21, 2021
  • #7
  • Sarah Hamilton

    macrumors regular
    • Oct 21, 2021
  • #8
  • QHD or 2K is 2560×1440. That’s less pixels than 4K. 4K is better and is much less expensive than 5K or 6K. You only want QHD for gaming with higher refresh rates.

    You’re not downscaling to 2560×1440 on the 4K display (or not upscaling 2560×1440 to 4K). You’re downscaling from 5K to 4K. There’s a difference. The Mac’s Retina or HiDPI or “Looks like” modes draw objects and text twice as high and twice as tall as they would be on a QHD screen – everything has 4 times as many pixels so they are smoother and have more detail.

    I like 4K just fine. None of those pesky 5K/6K connection issues (requiring Thunderbolt or DSC).

    Sarah Hamilton

    macrumors regular
    • Oct 21, 2021
  • #9
  • People DO NOT buy 27″ and 32″ 4k displays to use them a “full 4k” (pixel-for-pixel) with Macs.
    (perhaps a few do, but a VERY few)

    People DO buy 27″ and 32″ 4k displays to use them in “HiDPI” mode, yielding working resolutions of either 1080p or 1440p.

    When you connect the 4k display to the Mac (using the proper cable), the displays preference pane should offer you the options of 1080p (looks like 1920×1080) or 1440p (looks like 2560×1440).

    joevt

    Contributor
    • Oct 21, 2021
  • #10
  • There might be a performance drop but no one has done benchmarks because the drop is not noticeable or the drop in visual quality is not worth the performance increase. If you’re gaming then you might want to choose the display’s native resolution for best quality/performance or a lower resolution (not HiDPI mode) for better performance. For a 4K display, a game should performance the same using “Looks like 1920×1080” or 3840×2160 native.

    HiDPI modes are chosen by macOS, not the display. For a 4K display, the default modes will be HiDPI. You can get non-HiDPI modes by holding the option key and clicking “Scaled” in the Displays preferences panel, then selecting “Show low resolution modes”.

    SwitchResX can also show all the HiDPI and non-HiDPI modes in a list.

    Sarah Hamilton

    macrumors regular
    • Oct 21, 2021
  • #11
  • There might be a performance drop but no one has done benchmarks because the drop is not noticeable or the drop in visual quality is not worth the performance increase. If you’re gaming then you might want to choose the display’s native resolution for best quality/performance or a lower resolution (not HiDPI mode) for better performance. For a 4K display, a game should performance the same using “Looks like 1920×1080” or 3840×2160 native.

    HiDPI modes are chosen by macOS, not the display. For a 4K display, the default modes will be HiDPI. You can get non-HiDPI modes by holding the option key and clicking “Scaled” in the Displays preferences panel, then selecting “Show low resolution modes”.

    SwitchResX can also show all the HiDPI and non-HiDPI modes in a list.

    I won’t be gaming, just some programming, general surfing and watching youtube here and. there but a lot of photoshop.

    So is it better to get a 4k display and then select 2560×1440 mode or get a 2k display and work off 2560×1440 native?