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How to make your web browser stop asking you to save passwords

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times and Reader’s Digest, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

Browsers want to be helpful, so they always offer to save your passwords when you sign into websites. If you use a separate password manager like LastPass or 1Password—or if you just want to store your passwords in your own brain—you can make your browser stop asking you to save passwords.

Google Chrome

To find this setting in Chrome for desktop, click on Chrome’s menu > Settings. At the bottom of the Settings page, click the “Show advanced settings” link. Under Passwords and forms, uncheck “Offer to save passwords with Google Smart Lock for Passwords“.

You can click the “Manage passwords” button here to see what passwords Chrome remembers and delete them, if you like.

In Chrome for Android, iPhone, or iPad, click menu > Settings. Tap the “Save Passwords” option under Basics and set it to “Off”.

You’ll also see a list of saved passwords you can manage on this screen, if you have any passwords saved. Tap “Edit” to edit your list of saved passwords.

Mozilla Firefox

In Firefox, click menu > Options. Click the “Security” tab at the left side of the options page and uncheck “Remember logins for sites”.

You can click the “Saved Logins” button here to see what passwords Firefox has already saved and remove them from Firefox, if you like.

Apple Safari

In Safari on a Mac, click Safari > Preferences. Click the “AutoFill” tab at the top of the window and uncheck “User names and passwords”.

You can see which user names and passwords Safari already remembers by clicking the “Edit” button to the right of User names and passwords or clicking the “Passwords” icon at the top of Safari’s preferences window. You can remove saved passwords from this list, if you like.

On an iPhone or iPad, you’ll find this option in the main Settings app. Head to Settings > Safari > AutoFill. Disable the “Names and Passwords” option.

You can see what names and passwords Safari already remembers by heading to Settings > Safari > Passwords. You can also remove them from here, if you like.

Microsoft Edge

In Microsoft Edge on Windows 10, click menu > Settings. Scroll down to the bottom of the Settings pane and click the “View advanced settings” button. Scroll down to the “Privacy and services” section and set “Offer to save passwords” to “Off”.

You can click the “Manage my saved passwords” link here to see which passwords Edge already knows and remove them, if you like.

Internet Explorer

In Internet Explorer, click menu > Internet Options. Click the “Content” tab and then click the “Settings” button to the right of AutoComplete. Ensure the “User names and passwords on forms” option here is unchecked.

You can click the “Manage Passwords” button to see which user names and passwords Internet Explorer has already saved and remove them, if you like.

If you’re using anther web browser, you’ll find the option in a similar place. Head to your web browser’s options and look for an option named something like “save passwords”, “remember passwords”, or “autofill user names and passwords”.

That was a comment posted on my article How safe is it to let my browser save my passwords? where I essentially discouraged the use of browser built-in password saving features, in favor of utilities like Lastpass.

Fair enough. Let me show you how in Internet Explorer, Firefox and Google Chrome.

Disabling remembered passwords in Internet Explorer

In Internet Explorer, password saving is bundled in with the more general “AutoComplete” feature.

Click on the gear icon, or the Tools menu, and select Internet Options, and then click on the Content tab in the resulting dialog box

Click on the Settings button in the AutoComplete section:

Make sure that “User names and passwords on forms” is not checked.

To clear any previously remembered passwords click on Delete AutoComplete history…

Make sure that “Passwords” is checked and then click on Delete. That’ll return you to the prior settings dialog box where you can click on OK.

Disabling remembered passwords in FireFox

Open the Options dialog in Firefox either by clicking on the hamburger

Make sure that “Remember passwords for sites” is not checked.

To clear any previously remembered passwords click on Saved Passwords…

If you have saved passwords the Remove All button will be enabled. Click it, then click Close and OK to close the options dialog.

Firefox’s memory of your passwords has been cleared, and it should no longer try to remember more.

Disabling remembered passwords in Google Chrome

Open Chrome settings by clicking on its hamburger icon and then on Settings. At the bottom of the settings page click on Show advanced settings…

Scroll down to “Passwords and forms”:

Make sure that “Offer to save your web passwords” is not checked.

To clear any previously saved passwords click on the Managed saved passwords link.

While you can delete each password one at a time by clicking on the “x” to its right, it’s easiest to clear all by typing CTRL+A to select all of them, and then pressing Delete.

Click Done, and then close the Chrome options tab.

Google Chrome’s memory of your passwords has been cleared, and it should no longer try to remember more.

Remembering elsewhere

So if you’re not going to use your browser to save passwords, and since it’s important to use different, complex passwords everywhere, what’s a person to do?

My strong recommendation is LastPass, or any of several tools like it. Lastpass is designed for security and has several additional security options like timeout and Two-factor authentication

Do this

Subscribe to Confident Computing! Less frustration and more confidence, solutions, answers, and tips in your inbox every week.

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7 comments on “How Do I Disable Remembered Passwords in My Browser?”

The Firefox (V.29) ‘hamburger icon’ now opens to an ‘Additional tools and options’, help, synch, exit, and customization menu.
The ‘Tools’ instructions are still valid.

Khamosh Pathak is a freelance technology writer who specializes in tutorials. His work has also been published on Lifehacker, iPhoneHacks, Zapier’s blog, MakeUseOf, and Guiding Tech. Khamosh has nearly a decade of experience writing how-tos, features and technology guides on the internet. Read more.

Microsoft Edge has a built-in password manager that offers to save all your passwords. When you log in to a new website, Edge will prompt you to save the login details. But this can get quite annoying. Here’s how to disable the pop-ups in Microsoft Edge.

If you’re planning to use a password manager, we recommend that you go with a dedicated password management service like LastPass or Bitwarden. These services are not browser-dependent and have strong native clients as well as browser extensions.

But before you do that, first, let’s disable the save login prompts from Microsoft Edge. The steps are different for Microsoft Edge for desktop, Android, iPhone, and iPad.

Turn off Save Login Pop-ups in Microsoft Edge for Desktop

To get started on your Windows 10 PC or Mac, click the three-dot menu button from the right side of the toolbar in Microsoft Edge.

Choose the “Settings” option.

This page will show the Microsoft account that is used to sync all the personal details (along with passwords).

Here, click the “Passwords” button.

Toggle on the “Offer to Save Passwords” option.

Microsoft Edge will no longer show the annoying save login pop-ups.

Turn off Save Login Pop-ups in Microsoft Edge for Android

When you log in to a new website on your Android smartphone or tablet, Microsoft Edge will prompt you to save the login details to your Microsoft account.

To disable this, first, open the Microsoft Edge browser on your Android device. Then, tap the three-dot menu icon from the bottom toolbar.

Here, choose the “Settings” option.

Go to the “Save Passwords” section.

Tap the toggle next to the “Save Passwords” option to disable the feature.

Turn off Save Login Pop-ups in Microsoft Edge for iPhone or iPad

The steps for disabling the save login pop-up are slightly different in the iPhone and iPad apps.

To get started, open the Microsoft Edge app on your iPhone or iPad, then tap the three-dot menu button from the bottom toolbar.

Choose the “Settings” option.

Navigate to the “Privacy and Security” option.

Scroll down and toggle off the “Offer to Save Passwords” option to disable the feature. Then, tap the “Done” button to save the setting.

Just started using Microsoft Edge? Here’s everything you need to know about Microsoft’s modern browser.

Last Updated on September 3, 2015 by admin Leave a Comment

Microsoft Edge, the web browser that made its debut with Windows 10, has claimed two percent of desktop browser market share in the past one month, but the number is not too bad considering that it’s been just a month since the release of Windows 10 and Edge.

Like its predecessor Internet Explorer and other browsers out there in the market, Microsoft Edge also supports saving web credentials, and the feature is turned on by default.

When you visit a website and enter your user account information in the log in form to sign in to the service, Edge offers you save the password in the browser so that the next time you visit the same website it can automatically fill your account info for you.

The Edge browser displays “Would you like to save your password for (website address)?” prompt when you enter username and password, and click next or sign in button. The browser saves the password for the website if you click the Yes button and will not do so if you click No.

If you let the Edge browser save the password, the next time when you visit the same website, Edge will automatically fill your account info for you.

While Edge doesn’t allow you set a master password to prevent others from easily accessing stored passwords unlike Chrome and Firefox, passwords stored in Edge are not easily viewable.

The problem with Edge or Internet Explorer is that there is no easy option to import or export passwords. Because of this, most users prefer using and saving web credentials in third-party browsers. Of course, once extensions support is added to Edge (the feature is expected before the end of this year), users will be able to import and export passwords to and from Edge browser.

If for some reason, you don’t want to save your web passwords in the Edge browser, you can configure the Edge browser to stop offering you to save passwords.

Stop Edge from asking to remember your passwords in Windows 10

To stop Edge from displaying save passwords prompt, you need to disable that feature by navigating to Edge’s advanced settings. Here is how to do it:

Step 1: Launch Edge browser, if it’s not already running.

Step 2: Click on the More options icon located top-right (see below picture) and then click Settings.

Step 3: Next, scroll down the settings pane, and then click View advanced settings.

Step 4: Lastly, under Offer to save passwords, turn off the option. That’s it!

Edge will no longer offer you save passwords. As you can see in the above picture, we haven’t turned off save form entries feature. If you don’t want the browser to remember what you enter in forms, you can turn it off here.

Are you using Edge as your primary browser in Windows 10?

  • Mac
  • iOS
  • Windows
  • Android
  • Safari

    To stop Safari from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Click the Safari menu and choose Preferences.
    2. Click the AutoFill icon.
    3. Turn off all the AutoFill web forms settings: “Using info from my contacts”, “User names and passwords”, “Credit cards”, and “Other forms”.

    Chrome

    To stop Chrome from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Click the Chrome menuВ В in the toolbar and choose Settings.
    2. Click Autofill > Passwords.
    3. Turn off “Offer to save passwords”.

    If you’ve saved passwords in Chrome, you can move them to 1Password to make sure they’re safe. Then you can delete your saved passwords from Chrome.

    Firefox

    To stop Firefox from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Click the Firefox menuВ В in the toolbar and choose Preferences.
    2. Click Privacy & Security.
    3. Turn off “Ask to save logins and passwords for websites”.

    Brave

    To stop Brave from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Click the Brave menuВ В in the toolbar and choose Settings.
    2. Click “Additional settings”, then click Auto-fill.
    3. Click Passwords.
    4. Turn off “Offer to save passwords”.

    Microsoft Edge

    To stop Edge from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Click the Edge menuВ В in the toolbar and choose Settings.
    2. Click Passwords.
    3. Turn off “Offer to save passwords”.

    Safari

    To stop Safari from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Open Settings, then tap Passwords & Accounts.
    2. Tap AutoFill Passwords.
    3. Turn off iCloud Keychain.

    Firefox

    To stop Firefox from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Open Firefox, then tap the Firefox menu .
    2. Tap Logins & Passwords. If you don’t see it, tap Settings first.
    3. Turn off Save Logins.

    Chrome

    To stop Chrome from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Open Chrome, then tap the Chrome menu and choose Settings.
    2. Tap Passwords.
    3. Turn off Save Passwords.

    Microsoft Edge

    To stop Microsoft Edge from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Open Microsoft Edge, then tap and choose Settings.
    2. Tap Privacy, then turn off “Offer to save passwords”.

    Learn more

    To turn off the password manager in a different browser, check its documentation.

    Chrome

    To stop Chrome from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Click the Chrome menuВ В in the toolbar and choose Settings.
    2. Click Autofill > Passwords.
    3. Turn off “Offer to save passwords”.

    If you’ve saved passwords in Chrome, you can move them to 1Password to make sure they’re safe. Then you can delete your saved passwords from Chrome.

    Firefox

    To stop Firefox from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Click the Firefox menuВ В in the toolbar and choose Settings.
    2. Click Privacy & Security.
    3. Turn off “Remember logins and passwords for websites”.

    Microsoft Edge

    To stop Edge from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Click the Edge menuВ В in the toolbar and choose Settings.
    2. Click Passwords.
    3. Turn off “Offer to save passwords”.

    Brave

    To stop Brave from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Click the Brave menuВ В in the toolbar and choose Settings.
    2. Click “Additional settings”, then click Auto-fill.
    3. Click Passwords.
    4. Turn off “Offer to save passwords”.

    Internet Explorer

    To stop Internet Explorer from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Click the Settings menu and choose “Internet options”.
    2. Click the Content tab.
    3. In the AutoComplete section, click Settings.
    4. Turn off “Forms and Searches” and “User names and passwords on forms”, then click OK.

    Chrome

    To stop Chrome from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Open Chrome, then tapВ В В and choose Settings.
    2. Tap Passwords.
    3. Turn off “Save passwords”.

    Firefox

    To stop Firefox from asking to save your passwords:

    1. Open Firefox, then tapВ В В and choose Settings.
    2. Tap Privacy.
    3. Turn off “Remember logins”.

    Learn more

    To turn off the password manager in a different browser, check its documentation.

    Still need help?

    If this article didn’t answer your question, contact 1Password Support.

    Native password management is a standard practice in a web browser. Almost every web browser, including Google Chrome, Apple Safari, Microsoft Edge, Firefox, etc., allow users to opt for the built-in password manager to take care of login details. The issue arises when you are already using a third-party password manager such as 1Password or LastPass, and you no longer need that built-in password manager from Microsoft or Google. Here’s how to disable Google Chrome from asking to save passwords on the web and mobile.

    Every time you log in to a new website or update the password from an old website, Google Chrome will offer a pop-up to save or update the information. That’s fine for casual users. But those using a native password manager like Dashlane or Enpass might find the behavior irritating.

    It’s fairly easy to stop Google Chrome from asking to save passwords on the web and mobile. The steps for each platform are different though. Here, we will cover Windows/Mac, Android, and iPhone.

    Turn Off Save Password Pop-up in Chrome for Desktop

    In the screenshots below, we are using Google Chrome for Mac.

    Since both the Windows and Mac versions of Google Chrome carry the same interface, you can use the same method on the Google Chrome Windows app to disable the save password pop-up.

    Step 1: Open Google Chrome browser.

    Step 2: Click on the Google account profile picture in the upper right corner.

    Step 3: Select the Password icon. It will directly take you to the Passwords menu in the Autofill field.

    Step 4: Disable Offer to save passwords toggle.

    That’s it. Chrome will no longer ask you to use Chrome Password Manager to save confidential information.

    Turn Off Save Password Pop-Ups in Chrome for Android

    To keep a seamless password management experience across all the platforms, Google Chrome offers the same Save Password pop-up on Android and iPhone.

    Here’s how to disable the ‘Save password’ pop-up in Chrome for Android.

    Step 1: Open Google Chrome on Android.

    Step 2: Tap on the three-dot menu in the upper right corner.

    Step 3: Go to the Passwords section.

    Step 4: Disable Save passwords toggle.

    Chrome for Android will now stop asking you about saving usernames and passwords to your Google account.

    Turn Off Save Password Pop-Ups in Chrome for iPhone

    Unlike its Android counterpart, Google Chrome for iPhone uses a bottom navigation bar for better reachability. Go through the steps to disable save password pop-ups in Chrome for iPhone.

    Step 1: Open Google Chrome on iPhone.

    Step 2: Tap on the three-dot menu at the bottom.

    Step 3: Tap on Settings.

    Step 4: Tap on Passwords from the following menu.

    Step 5: Disable Save Passwords toggle from the Passwords menu and you are good to go without getting constant reminders from Google to save passwords.

    Get a Third-Party Password Manager

    While Chrome Password Manager works fine for casual users, power users should look elsewhere for their password management needs.

    Chrome Password Manager doesn’t have native apps for iPhone and Android. So, you can’t enjoy those auto-fill tricks to fill in login details on the go.

    Unlike 1Password, Enpass, or LastPass, Google’s password management lacks multi-vault support. After a while, it becomes messy with hundreds of entries. You are better off using a password manager app with multiple vaults for better organization.

    Chrome’s native password manager doesn’t support two-factor authentication. However, dedicated password managers will offer that.

    There is no way to access saved passwords from other browsers such as Safari or Microsoft Edge. You will have to go through a lengthy import/export trick to move passwords between browsers.

    Google’s password management doesn’t let you generate strong passwords. That means the chances of reusing old and weaker passwords are high.

    You can easily replace Chrome’s default password manager with a dedicated service such as 1Password to secure your login credentials.

    In the screenshot below, you can see the 1Password extension for Google Chrome in action. From the 1Password settings, you can go to the Autofill tab and enable the toggle for Offer to fill and save passwords.

    After you do that, 1Password will ask you to save passwords whenever you try to log in to a new website or update passwords from an old website.

    Stop Google Chrome from Asking to Save Passwords

    If you don’t plan to use Google Chrome for storing login and password details, it’s recommended to turn off those annoying pop-ups asking to save passwords on mobile and web. Also, we would advise going with a native password manager solution for a better and more secure experience across all the platforms.

    Next up: Google Chrome sync paused is a headache as it stops syncing data across devices. Read the post below to learn how to troubleshoot the issue.

    Last updated on 07 February, 2022

    The above article may contain affiliate links which help support Guiding Tech. However, it does not affect our editorial integrity. The content remains unbiased and authentic.

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    DID YOU KNOW

    You can view your special Google Doodle on your birthday.

    Microsoft Edge comes with a lot of features, including a password manager. Whenever you’re logging in a site, Microsoft Edge will ask if you want to save password in the browser. If you don’t want Microsoft Edge to bother with saving passwords, you can turn it off and use a third-party password manager.

    You might find it convenient to save passwords in Edge and sync it across devices. However, this prompt can be annoying. We will show you how to disable Edge browser’s annoying ‘save password’ prompt in this post.

    Disable Microsoft Edge’s Save Password Prompt

    Whenever you are signing in to a website or web app for the first time, Microsoft Edge will display Save password pop-up:

    However, if you click on the Never button, then Edge won’t ask you to save the password just for that site. So if you visit the site again, you won’t get a prompt. However, getting the prompt every time you visit a site where you to need log in can be tiring.

    Here are steps to disable the same.

    Step 1: Click on the three-dot menu icon in Microsoft Edge and select Settings.

    Step 2: Click on Passwords option on the right-hand side.

    Step 3: Disable the toggle next to ‘Offer to save passwords’ and that’s it.

    Edge won’t prompt you to save passwords after that.

    You may choose to disable other password-related features too but that’s not necessary to disable the password prompts in the Edge browser.

    Scroll a little more and you shall notice a list of sites for which Edge has been trained to ‘Never save’ passwords. Every time you click on the Never button or visit a site for which you don’t save the password in Edge, the URL of the site is added to this list.

    Why You Should Use Third-Party Password Managers

    So, one can either manage passwords on Edge on a site-by-site basis or turn it off completely for all sites. It depends on whether or not you use a third-party password manager.

    There could be several reasons why using an external password manager is better than what Microsoft Edge offers.

    While Edge browser is available on all platforms like Windows, macOS, Android, and iOS, the password manager only works inside the browser app. You can’t use it on desktop apps or mobile apps that work independently of the browser. On the other hand, password managers like LastPass and Bitwarden work everywhere as they don’t depend on a browser to save passwords and fill login forms. They offer dedicated apps for all platforms.

    These password managers also offer additional features that you won’t find in browser-based password managers. Some common features are notes, templates for storing different details like credit cards, identity cards, and so on, folders to categorize passwords by niche, the ability to share password/s with trusted friends and family members, and even more.

    The primary purpose of a browser is to allow users to surf the web. A password manager is an add-on, something that materialized as an after-thought. On the other hand, Password managers were purpose-built to fill a specific niche or gap and hence were always miles ahead in terms of usability, features, and accessibility.

    Are Third-Party Password Managers Free

    Third-party password managers offer a limited free plan. However, for advanced features, you have to pay to upgrade. We have covered several password managers like Dashlane, Bitwarden, LastPass, 1Password, and even more.

    Bitwarden is open-source and the free version is pretty good. It offers all the necessary features that you could need in the free plan itself. And the premium plan is affordable.

    Dashlane doubles as a VPN provider, so you get a solid password manager with VPN protection for the price of one. There are others, as we mentioned before, but you can begin your search here.

    Where’s My Manager

    There are as many reasons to choose a third-party password manager over Microsoft Edge’s version as there are password managers themselves. Choose one that suits your needs and is within your budget. Don’t fall for shiny new features that you don’t want or even understand. It is equally important to read about the company’s history with security and privacy because you will be trusting them with crucial information. You don’t want that to fall into the wrong hands.

    Pro Tip: Critical information and passwords like bank details, payment processors, etc. can be noted down in a physical diary or a device that is off the grid. It can’t be hacked if it is offline. Just make sure you keep it dry and safe.

    Next up: Looking for the best password manager for your team or large business? We compare the business plans of 1Password, Dashlane, and LastPass.

    Last updated on 07 February, 2022

    The above article may contain affiliate links which help support Guiding Tech. However, it does not affect our editorial integrity. The content remains unbiased and authentic.

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    The modern version of browsers is capable of storing your online account username and password in a local file for future use. These browsers can autofill the username and passwords every time you visit the same site once you allow your browser to store the password.

    Even if you forgot the passwords of this online account, there is no need to reset or change the password. You can get your password and other saved information easily from this saved location of your browser. The location of the saved password and username varies on the different browsers like IE, Chrome, Safari, and Firefox.

    There is a privacy concern for auto saving your passwords in your browser and easy and convenient solution while you visit your online account to login account. But anybody using your computer can open your browser and see the passwords you saved.

    Sometimes it may raise some privacy concern especially when you share your computer with your friends or even with your family members. If you are a person concerned about saved passwords and privacy, better you can stop the password auto saving features on your browser.

    Most of the browsers have different settings to stop auto-saving of your data. We listed out the steps to stop auto-saving of most used browsers includes IE, Chrome, Safari, and Firefox.

    Stop Auto Saving Password in Google Chrome

    In your Chrome browser, see the control panel button on right top. Click on Chrome Control Panel Button > Settings (chrome://settings/) > Show advanced settings… > Passwords and forms > Offer to save your web passwords

    See the checkbox named as “Offer to save your web passwords” and uncheck and save the settings to stop Auto Saving password by your Chrome browser.

    Stop Auto Saving Password in Mozilla Firefox

    In Firefox browser, you can see the control button on right top corner. Click on Firefox Control Panel Button > Options > Security > Passwords > Remember passwords for sites (Uncheck)

    See the checkbox named as “Remember passwords for sites” and uncheck and save the settings to stop Auto Saving password by your Firefox browser.

    Stop Auto Saving Password in Internet Explorer

    First, you have to find out the internet button. Click on Internet Explorer Setting Button > Internet Options > Content > AutoComplete > Settings > Usernames and passwords on forms (Uncheck)

    See the checkbox named as “User names and passwords on forms” and uncheck and save the settings to stop Auto Saving password by your Internet Explorer browser.

    Stop Auto Saving Password in Safari

    These steps are based on the MAC OS for Safari browser. On MAC top menu, click on Safari > Preferences > Autofill >

    You can see a check box for Usernames and passwords. Uncheck this box restart your browser. Safari browser no longer saves your data for your online accounts.

    Auto saving of your username and password is easy and convenient. No need to remember your credentials for your online accounts. Better to stop password auto-saving feature on your browser if you are concern about your privacy and data protection.

    Disclosure: Mashtips is supported by its audience. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

    By default, the Lansweeper web console presents you with a gray and orange login screen. On this screen, you can either log in with the built-in administrator or with a Windows user account and password. You can log in with a Windows user that exists locally on your Lansweeper server, a Windows user in your Lansweeper server’s domain or a Windows user in a trusted domain. If you enable authentication in your web server settings, the gray and orange login screen disappears and the login process is handled by your web browser instead. You can have your web browser automatically log you in as your current Windows user or have it present a login prompt.

    Whether your browser starts prompting you for a username and password depends on the web browser itself. Some browsers will by default prompt for credentials. Others will by default automatically log into the console as the currently logged on Windows user, a process that is often referred to as Single Sign-On or SSO. To enable or disable web browser login prompts, you will need to make changes to your browser configuration. This article contains configuration instructions for:

    Managing login prompts in Internet Explorer

    To enable or disable login prompts in Internet Explorer, do the following:

      Check which web server your Lansweeper web console is using by browsing to the following section of the console: Configuration\Website Settings

    Managing login prompts in Mozilla Firefox

    To enable or disable login prompts in Mozilla Firefox, do the following:

      Check which web server your Lansweeper web console is using by browsing to the following section of the console: Configuration\Website Settings

    Managing login prompts in Google Chrome

    To enable or disable login prompts in Google Chrome, do the following:

      Check which web server your Lansweeper web console is using by browsing to the following section of the console: Configuration\Website Settings

    I use IE11, Chrome, and Firefox on my Win 10 Pro workstation. Whenever I go to log into Office 365 using IE11 to manage it, IE11 shows the “Pick an account” window with my name, email address, and “Connected to Windows” in it. All I have to do is to click it, and it will log in without my entering my password. I **DO NOT** want it to remember my password, but I cannot figure out where it is storing it. I see no way to stop the “Keep me signed in” feature, which is what I believe causes this behavior. Both Chrome and Firefox make me enter my password as I want them to do.

    Credential Manager has no stored Web Credentials. Under Windows Credentials, there are a bunch in the Generic section, but I don’t know which one would be tied to IE.

    Clearing IE history and passwords, and resetting IE to defaults does not clear the prompt.

    Does anyone know how to stop the above behavior?

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    Enter to win a

    I ran into something similar once. I cleared credential manager and this still happened. I believe I had to clear an account in the Account settings in Windows 10 itself that was applying a microsoft account everywhere. It was under like Email or App Accounts, or maybe Access Work or School. Might be that.

    20 Replies

    Are you on a domain that syncs with Azure and setup for Single Sign On?

    I don’t know how to tell you what IE is looking for but you’ve got two O365 credentials in there, outlook.office365.com and OneDrive. And you can just blow them all out to be sure, there’s no downside other than some annoyance at logging back in again.

    Try this for a Favorite in IE. It’s a force logout command that I’ve had to use sometimes in IE to make it completely, well, log out.

    And you’ve gone through this page:

    I ran into something similar once. I cleared credential manager and this still happened. I believe I had to clear an account in the Account settings in Windows 10 itself that was applying a microsoft account everywhere. It was under like Email or App Accounts, or maybe Access Work or School. Might be that.

    If you don’t mind clearing all your stored passwords in IE11 you can open the browser.

    Then to the “Delete” button.

    On the Delete Browsing History page remove all the check marks and add one only to “Passwords”.

    Activate “Delete” when don then all passwords stored in IE11 should be gone.

    From the “Pick an account” page, where your email address is listed in your screen shot, you should see 3 vertical dots. Click on that and click “Forget”. Then next time you sign in O365 will ask if you want to remember this account to make sign in easier. Select “No”.

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    Are you on a domain that syncs with Azure and setup for Single Sign On?

    Win 2012 domain, but no Azure or SSO.

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    If you don’t mind clearing all your stored passwords in IE11 you can open the browser.

    Then to the “Delete” button.

    On the Delete Browsing History page remove all the check marks and add one only to “Passwords”.

    Activate “Delete” when don then all passwords stored in IE11 should be gone.

    I have already done that per my “Clearing IE history and passwords, and resetting IE to defaults does not clear the prompt” comment. I don’t even have IE set to remember passwords in the first place! I hardly ever use IE, but opened it today so I could log into Office 365 with my account while using Chrome to do another account. that’s when I noticed the behavior.

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    From the “Pick an account” page, where your email address is listed in your screen shot, you should see 3 vertical dots. Click on that and click “Forget”. Then next time you sign in O365 will ask if you want to remember this account to make sign in easier. Select “No”.

    Three vertical dots WHERE? What you see in that screen grab is all I see. I don’t see any dots.

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    I cleared all of Credential Manager, re-did my clearing of IE cache/history/passwords, and rebooted. When I logged in, I got an immediate message about an account problem, but I ignored it. Then I got a login prompt for OneDrive, so I logged into it. When I opened IE and went to https://login.microsoftonline.com, it had only my email address listed, and the three dots, so I clicked the dots and then clicked on Forget.

    Then I opened Word, and it complained of an account problem when I clicked my name in the upper-right corner. I signed in, closed Word, opened IE again, and went to https://login.microsoftonline.com and the dirty SOB IE logged in WITHOUT EVEN SHOWING the prompt at all. I logged out of it, then closed and reopened IE, went back to https://login.microsoftonline.com, and it had the same prompt as shown in my original post’s image.

    So, it’s hijacking my MS account used for the Office 365 applications, but I don’t know where to kill that hijacking.

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    Strong passwords can be the difference between keeping an account safe and sound, and being open to attack.

    Password managers can keep you safe, but since they create complicated strings of alphanumeric and special characters — and fill them in for you most of the time — using them can mean you usually don’t know what they are.

    If you save passwords using your web browser, you’re probably in a similar boat. It’s all well and good to save time this way, but if you need to log in to your email or bank account on another device, you’re out of luck. Tap or click here to learn why you should stop memorizing passwords.

    Or you think you’re out of luck. The truth is there’s a way to see hidden passwords in any browser. Here’s how to find and protect them, since hackers can use this trick, too.

    To reveal a hidden password …

    When autofill or your password manager insert your password on your behalf, it usually shows up as dots or asterisks. This lets you how many characters your password is, but doesn’t reveal what they are.

    Tech news that matters to you, daily

    Privacy, security, the latest trends and the info you need to live your best digital life.

    To actually see the characters on any web browser, just do the following:

    1. Right click on the area where your password is filled in.
    2. Click “Inspect Element” or “Inspect” in the menu.
    3. You’ll see coding for the site. Find the line that starts with “input type=password”; you can type CTRL + F, and put in “password” to make finding this easier for yourself.
    4. Double click to make the code text editable, and change the word “password” in the code to “text”. Hit the Enter key on your keyboard.
    5. Your password should now be revealed in the password box area.

    Different browsers have different layouts for Inspect/Inspect Element, but they all work basically the same way, which is why this trick is so universal. Once you reveal your password, you can type it into other devices as needed, or you can write them down elsewhere so you don’t have to resort to this trick very often.

    But how do you keep your passwords safe if they’re this easy to access on your web browser? Are they safe with autofill?

    How to protect your passwords from this hack

    Here’s the good news: Hackers can’t usually use this trick unless they physically have your computer. But if your computer is stolen, anyone could access your important and sensitive accounts.

    For this reason, one of the most important things you can do is put a password on your computer. Tap or click here to learn how to make a safe password.

    Yes, you’ll delay accessing your computer by a few seconds every time it goes to sleep or you power it back on, but it’ll make it a lot harder for a thief or hacker to get into your web browser and find any autofill passwords stored there.

    If you have to bring your laptop out in public, make sure it stays with you at all times, or if you do leave it, that it’s left with someone you trust. Bring your laptop bag with you everywhere and double check you have it before exiting and entering different locations.

    What if you have a desktop and you’re pretty confident someone won’t steal it? We’d still encourage password-protecting the computer and even to install a lock on the door to the room. Store your laptop in a consistent place and make that space lockable, too. The harder your computer is to access, the safer it is.

    Now, you may be thinking another way to overcome this issue is to just not use autofill. We’d still encourage the use of a password manager with that feature, as the passwords they create are some of the safest you’ll find, and they’re incredibly convenient.

    But yes, you can also just memorize passwords and input them manually every time to make it more difficult for thieves to access your information. If you like to write down your passwords, and autofill makes you nervous, make sure you secure the place where you keep your passwords list.

    Put them in a notebook, where thieves or hackers would have to flip through and hunt for them. Consider writing them in a plain notebook, rather than one designed to hold passwords, which are easy to fill in but devastating should a home invader see it.

    Also consider keeping the written passwords away from your computer to make finding them a little extra difficult. Tap or click here to learn about passwords that are actually against the law in certain states.

    Removing a Password from a Browser’s Saved Password List

    Saving your Kerberos password in your Web browser’s saved password list can expose the data it protects to anyone else who uses your computer, and possibly to others on the Internet.

    Web Login detects the use of saved passwords and prevents them from being used to log in to Boston University websites. To gain access to Web Login-protected sites, you must first remove the password from your browser’s saved password list, using the instructions below.

    Mozilla Firefox

    Windows

    1. Click the menu button and choose Preferences.
    2. Switch to the Security tab.
    3. Click on Saved Logins….

    To eliminate all existing saved passwords, click Remove all. To eliminate specific saved passwords, locate the site within the Site column and click on it once to highlight it in blue. Then click the Remove button below. You can also remove all saved passwords by clicking the Remove All button. If you wish, deselect the option to Remember logins for sites. This will prevent passwords from being saved in the future. In older versions of Firefox, this option is in the Privacy tab instead of Security.

    Mac OS X

    1. In the menu bar, open the Firefox menu.
    2. Select Preferences.
    3. Switch to the Security tab.
    4. Click on Saved Passwords.

    To eliminate all existing saved passwords, click Remove all. To eliminate specific saved passwords, click View Saved Passwords and delete just those associated with weblogin.bu.edu. If you wish, deselect the option to Remember passwords. This will prevent passwords from being saved in the future. In older versions of Firefox, this option is in the Privacy tab instead of Security.

    Internet Explorer

    To delete individual passwords:

    1. Open the Tools menu.
    2. Select Internet Options.
    3. Click Content.
    4. Under AutoComplete, click Settings.
    5. Click on Manage Passwords
    6. Click on the Web Credentials Manager
    7. Click on the drop down arrow by the web site you want to remove the password.
    8. Click on Remove.

    To delete all saved passwords:

    1. Open the Tools menu.
    2. Select Internet Options.
    3. Click Content.
    4. Under AutoComplete, click Settings.
    5. Click Delete AutoComplete history…

    To prevent AutoComplete in the future, make sure AutoComplete is deselected for User names and passwords on forms, and then click on OK.

    Chrome

    1. Open the Chrome menu using the button on the far right of the browser toolbar.
    2. Choose the Settings menu option (highlighted in blue).
    3. Click the Show advanced settings… link located at the bottom of the page.
    4. In the “Passwords and forms” section, click the Manage passwords link.

    • In the Passwords dialog that appears, hover over the site whose password you’d like to remove and click the X that appears.

    More information on managing website passwords in Chrome can be found in the Google Help pages.

    Top web browsers, such as Chrome, Firefox, Opera, and Microsoft Edge, offer you the ability to keep your passwords to streamline your web browsing experience. Of course,you don’t want anyone else to have access to your passwords. So if you want to remove all the stored passwords from your browser all you have to do is type “chrome://settings/passwords”. From there you’ll see the “show” option, which unveil all of the hidden passwords on your browser.

    Justin Schuh, Google Chrome security tech head , addressed this topic directly. According to Schuh, if a hacker gets past the OS login page, they could easily find your passwords plus other private info saved on your browser. If you’re at all concerned about that there is a very easy way to remove the passwords you’ve stored on Chrome.

    1. Press the wrench icon in the top right corner.
    2. Click the “Clear browsing data” button.
    3. Uncheck everything except passwords.

    If you want to make sure Chrome never remembers your passwords then click on the wrench icon again, and select “Options”. Select “Personal Stuff”, Finally click on “never save passwords”.

    Other Web Browsers.

    1. Go to Tools.
    2. Then go to Options.
    3. Click the Security tab.
    4. Uncheck “Remember passwords for websites”.

    Internet Explorer:

    1. Again go to Tools.
    2. Internet Options.
    3. Find the Content tab.
    4. Locate Autocomplete.
    5. Uncheck “User names and passwords on forms”.
    6. Also, uncheck “Prompt me to save passwords”.

    How to clear existing saved data in Firefox and Internet Explorer:

    1. Go back to Tools.
    2. Find Clear Private Data.
    3. Check “Saved Passwords”.

    Internet Explorer:

    1. You need to navigate Tools.
    2. Find Internet Options.
    3. Go to the Content tab.
    4. The to Autocomplete.
    5. Then delete autocomplete history.

    If your heart sinks every time your favourite Web service has its passwords hacked, protect your growing list of log-ins wiith LastPass.

    David Gilson has always revelled in tech and started writing about it in 2009. He covers the smartphone world and is rather partial to a spot of BASH scripting. David is a freelance writer and is not an employee of CNET.

    Who can recall the countless website passwords we’re asked to stuff into our overspilling brain boxes? And how do we make sure they don’t fall into the hands of rogues? One answer is to turn to password manager LastPass — a service that creates a secure ID on your computer that will remember your passwords and effortlessly log you into your favourite sites.

    Each Web account we hold stores data we’ve entered about ourselves and it all has to be protected. In this guide, we’ll look at why you should be using a better password protection strategy, reasons to trust LastPass, how to install it and how to use it.

    Password security should be on everyone’s mind, whether you’re nervous about the effects of Heartbleed, reported hacking attacks, or if you’re using common sense on the Internet.

    It’s no longer as simple as coming up with a clever password. These days it’s best to take extra precautions.

    How LastPass looks after your passwords

    Like most Web sites, LastPass uses hashing algorithms to process your account details and authenticate you. However, hashing algorithms aren’t completely bulletproof , especially when applied poorly.

    LastPass stores a hash of your email address and master password on your computer (not its servers), which it uses as an encryption key to encode your log-in details for other sites (with a 256-bit AES cypher), before storing them on its servers.

    The company doesn’t want to know any of your details or your encryption key, so it creates a unique ID token for you by hashing your password and local encryption key together. That ID token is then hashed with a random number when you create your account, which is — finally — how it authenticates your account.

    Assuming this has won your trust, let’s get down to business.

    Installing LastPass on your desktop and browsers

    Whether you’re a Linux, Windows, or OS X user, there’s a desktop download available for you. Just download the installer for your operating system and follow the instructions.

    The first option you’ll be presented with is which browser plug-ins to install — Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, and Safari are all supported.

    If your browser isn’t listed, you can use LastPass’ bookmarklets (see below). The following options ask whether you want to replace the password manager in each of the browsers you’ve opted to add a plug-in to.

    The install interface is simple and clean.

    Screenshot by Eric Franklin/CNET

    Next, you’ll be asked to create, or log in to, a LastPass account, after which you then import passwords from your desktop browsers. Once you’ve imported any saved passwords, it will even offer to cover your tracks by removing all those passwords from your various browser password caches.

    Screenshot by Eric Franklin/CNET

    Bookmarklets for browsers that don’t support plug-ins

    If your browser doesn’t support plug-ins, you can install bookmarklets that will retrieve your log-in details for you instead.

    Sign in and click ‘bookmarklets’ in the left-hand column of your Vault page. This will launch a pop-up box with three links you can drag onto your bookmark bar.

    Firstly, ‘LastPass Login!’ gives you a one-click log-in for most Web sites (the JavaScript bookmarklet won’t work properly with some Web sites). Secondly, ‘Lastpass Fill!’ fills in log-in forms without logging you in. And finally, ‘LastPass Fill Forms!’ actually fills in Web forms such as your contact and payment details with info you’ve stored in your account.

    Plenty of clear useful instructions.

    Screenshot by Eric Franklin/CNET

    Mobile devices

    Use of mobile apps for LastPass is one of the few features that require a premium account — which is actually quite cheap. Priced at just one US dollar per month, the cost should be trivial to most people. There is a mobile application for just about every mobile platform you can think of — Android, iOS, Windows Phone 7, Symbian, BlackBerry, and even webOS.

    LastPass for mobile requires a premium account.

    The mobile apps not only provide access to all of your account data, but also feature a built-in browser that can automatically log you into your Web accounts. This circumvents having your sensitive accounts, like with banks, saved in your default browser’s history.

    If you’re using a mobile device that doesn’t have an app, there’s also m.lastpass.com, where you can view your account data and install bookmarklets in your mobile browser.

    Using LastPass on the desktop

    After installing the plug-in on your desktop browser, you’ll notice pop-up toolbars offering to remember or fill in your log-in details as you visit Web sites. Via this toolbar, you can set whether LastPass will fill in the username and password fields on a per-site basis. Clicking the options button in the LastPass toolbar allows you to set more preferences, such as auto-log-in, and adding the site to your favourites list.

    The plug-in is smart enough to know when you’re changing your password too. By clicking the ‘Generate’ button, you’ll be given a new random password, which LastPass will submit to the Web site in question for you, and update your password database.

    This is the real value in using LastPass. It makes changing your passwords easy and gives you the auto-log-in ability so you never need to remember your passwords again.

    As you explore the LastPass settings, you’ll find that you can even store various profiles for filling in forms that contain your contact and credit card details.

    Making LastPass even more secure

    If using a simple username and password isn’t good enough or you, LastPass offers a range of methods to make authenticating yourself even more secure — if you’re a premium user. You can create a set of One Time Passwords (OTPs), which is a list of passwords where each expires after being used once. Taking OTPs a step further, you can combine them with multifactor authentication via your smart phone with Google Authenticator, via a YubiKey device, running Sesame on any USB drive, or even a printed grid of characters.

    If you’re looking to get really hardcore about protecting your passwords.