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How to open the registry editor on windows 10

This post submitted to MiniTool official website mainly teaches you how to open Windows 11 Registry Editor in multiple and easy-to-operate ways. Most of them are introduced by many other websites. Yet, we have them simplified and enable you to complete it within 3 clicks/steps!

What Is Windows Registry Editor?

Windows Registry is a hierarchical database that saves low-level settings for the Microsoft Windows operating system (OS) and apps that opt to use the registry, such as the kernel, services, device drivers, user interfaces, and Security Accounts Manager. The registry also allows access to counters for profiling system performance.

In other words, Windows Registry contains information, settings, options, as well as other values for programs and hardware installed on all versions of Windows, including the next-generation Windows 11. Next, let’s see how to open Windows 11 Registry Editor, an editor that enables you to edit all registries on your computer.

#1 Open Windows 11 Registry Editor by Windows Search

You can find and open most Windows applications in Windows Search including the Registry Editor. Click on the magnifier in the taskbar and input “registry editor” or “regedit” in the search column. It will display all the related programs on your computer. Among them, you will easily find the Registry Editor. Just click on it to open or click the Open option.

You are recommended to right-click on the best match and choose Run as administrator or just click on the Run as administrator option. This will open an elevated Registry Editor.

#2 Open Windows 11 Registry Editor from File Explorer

Open Windows 11 File Explorer, type “regedit” in its address bar, and press Enter to launch Windows Registry Editor.

#3 Open Windows 11 Registry Editor Through Run Box

Press Windows + R keys to trigger the Windows Run dialog. Then, type “regedit” into the column and click OK (or press Enter) to launch Windows 11 Registry Editor.

#4 Open Windows 11 Registry Editor via Command

You can also trigger the Editor of Windows 11 Registry through command orders. Both command platforms in Windows can help.

To open Windows 11 Registry Editor with CMD, firstly, launch the command prompt from Windows Search. Then, type “regedit” and press Enter to open Registry Editor.

To open Windows 11 Registry Editor with PowerShell, similarly, you need to launch PowerShell first. Next, input “regedit” and press Enter.

#5 Make It Easier to Open Windows 11 Registry Editor Often

If you need to open and use Registry Editor frequently, you can create a shortcut of it on your desktop. then, you can launch it by double-clicking its shortcut just like opening other computer programs.

Let’s see how to create a Registry Editor shortcut.

  1. Right-click on your desktop and select New > Shortcut.
  2. Then, type “regedit”, click Next, and click Finish.

Then, you can double-click the Registry Editor shortcut to open it.

Windows 11 Assistant Software Recommended

The new and powerful Windows 11 will bring you many benefits. At the same time, it will also bring you some unexpected damages such as data loss. Thus, it is strongly recommended that you back up your crucial files before or after upgrading to Win11 with a robust and reliable program like MiniTool ShadowMaker, which will assist you to protect your increasing data automatically on schedules!

Check the 5 ways for how to open Registry Editor Windows 10, and learn how to use Windows Registry Editor to edit registry.

We know the Windows system restore point contains the full registry backup, but Windows doesn’t create a system restore point every day, only if when installing important updates or drivers. How to do a registry backup without creating a system restore point?

Do you know that the Windows 10 system can automatic backup registry?

According to Microsoft, since Windows 10 version 1803, the RegIdleBackup (the Registry Idle Backup Task) no longer backs up the registry automatically. But we can re-enable this registry auto-backup feature by configuring the registry entry.

What does the RegIdleBackup back up?
This is very important to know, the RegIdleBackup does NOT back up the full registry. It backs up only system registry hives namely: DEFAULT, SAM, SECURITY, SOFTWARE, SYSTEM. It does NOT back up the user registry hives namely NTUSER.DAT and USRCLASS.DAT (located in each user profile).

If you want to do a full registry backup, you need a registry backup tool, like Wise Care 365, Wise Registry Cleaner. Please refer this page to learn How to backup the full Windows registry.

How to enable Windows 10 RegIdleBackup task
1. Press Win + R to open Run window, and type regedit (or regedit.exe) to start the Registry Editor

2. Go to the following key:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager\Configuration Manager
3. Create a DWORD (32-bit) value named EnablePeriodicBackup

4. Double-click EnablePeriodicBackup and set its data to 1

5. Exit the Registry Editor
6. Reboot system.

When does the RegIdleBackup automatic back up the registry?
When Windows Automatic Maintenance starts, it invokes the RegIdleBackup task which will back up registry hives to the RegBack folder. The registry backup is stored in the folder C:\Windows\System32\config\RegBack\

You may also run the Registry Idle Backup Task manually, open Task Scheduler, go to Task Scheduler Library – Microsoft – Windows – Registry, right-click on RegIdleBackup and choose Run to backup registry hives.

Now, you have the registry backup files. Next step, we will introduce How to restore the registry from the RegBack folder.

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Windows 11/10 users can right-click on any MSI file to get the Run as administrator option. However, if the Run as administrator option is missing for MSI files, you can fix the issue using this guide.

There are various MSI packages available from different resources that you can download and install an app as per your requirements. Many times, you might need to run the package with administrator privilege to install it correctly. However, there could be times when the Run as administrator option might not be visible in the context menu for MSI files. If the Run as administrator option is not working or missing for all the files, you have various options to follow. Nonetheless, if the Run as administrator option is missing only for MSI files, you do not need to follow all those solutions.

Run As Administrator option for MSI Files missing in Windows

If the Run As Administrator option for MSI Files is missing in Windows 11/10, follow these steps to fix the issue:

  1. Press Win+R to open the Run prompt.
  2. Type regedit and hit the Enter button.
  3. Click on the Yes option.
  4. Navigate to shell in HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT.
  5. Right-click on shell > New > Key.
  6. Name it as runas.
  7. Double-click on the Default parameter.
  8. Enter the Value data as Run as administrator.
  9. Right-click on runas > New > Key.
  10. Name it as command.
  11. Double-click on the Default parameter.
  12. Enter the Value data as msiexec /i “%1”.Reboot your computer.

To learn more about these steps, continue reading.

At first, you need to open the Registry Editor. For that, press Win+R to open the Run prompt. Then, type regedit, hit the Enter button, and click on the Yes button. Once the Registry Editor is opened, navigate to the following path:

Right-click on the shell key > select New > Key. Name it as runas.

While creating the key, it also creates a parameter called Default. You need to double-click on it to set the Value data. You need to enter Run as administrator as the value data.

Following that, right-click on the runas key > New > Key and name it as command.

Double-click on the Default parameter and set the Value data as msiexec /i “%1”.

Click the OK button and reboot your computer.

How do I run an MSI file as administrator?

To run an MSI file as an administrator, you need to right-click on the file and select the Run as administrator option from the context menu. For your information, it is the same as running any other file with administrator privilege. However, if you cannot find the Run as administrator option for MSI files, you need to follow the aforementioned guide.

Why is my Run as administrator not showing?

There could be various reasons why the Run as administrator option is not showing or appearing on your computer. If you get this problem for MSI files, you can fix it with the help of Registry Editor. A detailed guide is mentioned here, and it is suggested to follow it to get the job done.

Hope this guide helped.

Date: January 18, 2022 Tags: Administrator

The Windows Registry is a collection of settings that Windows and applications can use. It is a directory which stores settings and options for the operating system for Microsoft Windows. It contains information and settings for all the hardware, operating system software, most non-operating system software, users, preferences of the PC, etc.

The Registry consists of the following 5 Root Keys. Root Keys contain SubKeys. Subkeys may contain subkeys of their own too and contain at least one value, called its Default Value. A key with all its subkeys and values is called a Hive.

Each key has one of the Data Types – data types:

  • REG_SZ, REG_BINARY,
  • REG_DWORD,
  • REG_QWORD,
  • REG_MULTI_SZ or
  • REG_EXPAND_SZ.

In this post, we will show you how to create a Registry Key in Windows 10.

Before you begin, it is always a good idea to either back up the Registry or create a System Restore Point.

The Windows Registry is complex by architecture and built such that general consumers won’t understand. It is also advisable that you know the basics and do not modify it unless you know what you are doing.

The hierarchy of Windows Registry

To edit the Registry, we use the built-in Registry Editor or regedit. It displays a tree-like navigation structure. The topmost is your computer, followed by a list of folders, and subfolders. These folders are called KEYS, and there are five fixed set of folders under the Computer.

  1. HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT: Contains file extension association information which helps the computer understand what to do with a task when asked.
  2. HKEY_CURRENT_USER: It contains configuration information for Windows and software for the current user.
  3. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE: It stores the configuration for the software installed on the computer, and also for the Windows OS
  4. HKEY_USERS: Here you can find a user-specific configuration for all users on that computer.
  5. HKEY_CURRENT_CONFIG: Its a pointer to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE

These are the master keys as you cannot create a NEW KEY under Computer – but you can generate new keys under any of these master keys.

How to create a Registry Key in Windows 11/10

1] Using Registry Editor

Creating a Registry Key is easy. Right-click on any folder or white space and choose New. You can create a Key, String Value, Binary Value, DWORD Value (32-bit), QWORD value (64-bit), Multi-String Value or Expandable String Value. This method is useful when you plan to perform a minor change to fix a problem on your computer. It could be related to an application or on the OS level.

  • To edit an existing value, double-click on it to launch the editor.
  • To delete a key, right-click on it and select Delete.
  • You also have the option to Rename, Export, Copy, and set Permissions.

2] Using the Command Line

You can also use Command Line to manipulate registry keys along with tips, features and safety methods.

3] Use Notepad to create REG files

Right-click on any of the existing keys, and export it. Open that file in notepad, and it will help you understand how you can edit a key and its values. It is useful when you want to perform bulk editing, with backup in place.

Note the version declaration, followed by a blank line, then the path followed by rest in quotes, and a blank line again. Once the edit is complete, you can right-click, and choose to merge the file into the registry hive.

4] Third-Party Tools

If you find the default registry editor complex, you can use tools like RegCool, Registrar Registry Manager Lite, and Registry Commander. They offer features like Undo, Redo, permission management, tabbed window, import, export, favorites and so on.

3] Use Programming

If you are an application developer, you should use programming to manage your application settings in the registry. Here is an example, and it will vary depending on the language you use to develop the application.

Now that you know how to do it, we also recommend you to read what each of these means. It’s essential, and will only help you to make sure the changes you make are correct.

What makes a Registry Key?

If you imagine “Key” as a folder, the rest of them are different types of file types that store various kinds of values. So if you build an application, you can have a master folder, and then subfolders to separate one set from another. Here is a bit about each of them:

DWORD & QWORD: Double Word can store a 32-bit unit of data, while QWORD can store 64-bit of data.

String Value (REG_SZ): It can store either a Unicode or an ANSI string, and contains a null at the end.

Multi-String value: When you want to store multiple numbers of String Value, you can use this. However, make sure to terminate it by an empty string (\0). Here is a simple example:

Note “\0” at the end marks the end of the first string, and the last \0 marks the end of the multi-string.

Expandable String Value: You can use this for Environment Variables using Unicode or ANSI string. The advantage here is that you can expand it unlike String and Multi-String value.

Binary Value: The simplest of all – it contains 0 and 1.

We hope that you find this post useful.

Brady Gavin has been immersed in technology for 15 years and has written over 150 detailed tutorials and explainers. He’s covered everything from Windows 10 registry hacks to Chrome browser tips. Brady has a diploma in Computer Science from Camosun College in Victoria, BC. Read more.

Windows and a lot of third-party applications store their settings in the registry. There are many options (particularly, those for Windows itself) that you can only change in the registry. Let’s open the Registry Editor so you can edit these!

What Is the Registry Editor?

The Windows registry is a hierarchical database that contains all the configurations and settings Windows uses. The Registry Editor is the application you use to view, edit, or even create different values in the database. For example, if you want to disable the lock screen on Windows 10 Home, you have to open the Registry Editor to do it.

You shouldn’t use the Registry Editor unless you know what you’re doing because you could corrupt your Windows operating system. However, if you find a registry hack on a trusted website, you’ll have to open the Registry Editor to make the change.

Warning: Registry Editor is a powerful tool, and misusing it could render your system unstable, or even inoperable. If you’ve never worked with the Registry Editor before, give this a read before you get started. And definitely back up the registry and your computer before you make any changes.

We also recommend you create a System Restore point before you make any edits. Then, if something goes wrong, you can always rollback your system.

Open Registry Editor from the Run Box

Press Windows+R to open the Run dialog box, type “regedit” in the text field, and then press Enter.

A User Account Control (UAC) dialog appears asking if you want Registry Editor admin privileges; Click “Yes” and Registry Editor opens.

Open Registry Editor via Command Prompt or PowerShell

You can also open Registry Editor from either Command Prompt or PowerShell. The command is the same for both apps, but we’re using PowerShell.

Open PowerShell, type “regedit,” and then hit Enter.

Click “Yes” when the UAC dialog appears and the Registry Editor will open.

Open Registry Editor from File Explorer

If you prefer, you can also open Registry Editor from the address bar in File Explorer. To do so, just open “File Explorer,” type “regedit” in the address bar, and then press Enter.

Click “Yes” in the UAC prompt, and the editor will open.

Open Registry Editor from the Start Menu Search

If you want to open Registry Editor from the Start menu, click either the Start menu or the Search icon, and then type “Registry Editor” in the text field.

In the search results that appear, click “Registry Editor” to trigger the UAC prompt and open the editor.

Click “Yes” when the prompt appears, and Registry Editor will open.

Open Registry Editor from a Shortcut

If you’d rather open Registry Editor from a shortcut, it’s easy to create one for your Desktop.

To do so, just right-click an empty spot on the Desktop. In the context menu, click New > Shortcut.

In the window that appears, type “regedit” in the text box, and then click “Next.”

Name the shortcut, and then click “Finish” to create it.

Your new shortcut for the Registry Editor will appear on the desktop. Double-click the icon and allow the app admin privileges from the UAC prompt to open it.

If you want, you can bypass the UAC prompt altogether when you open Registry Editor, or any other program that requires elevated privileges.

Now that you know how to open the Registry Editor, try out some of our favorite Registry hacks!

How to open Registry Editor in Windows 10? This post offers 5 ways with detailed instructions. Also learn how to edit Windows registry so as to fix Windows errors, disable or remove a program, etc. If you need a free data recovery program, partition manager, system backup and restore tool, MiniTool software has all.

If you need to open Windows Registry Editor (Regedit) to view or create registry keys, or edit/change registry values to make changes to Windows system, you can check the 5 ways below for how to open Registry Editor in Windows 10. It also introduces how to edit a registry value in Windows 10.

How to Open Registry Editor (Regedit) Windows 10 – 5 Ways

Way 1. Open Registry Editor via Run

  • The easiest way to open Registry Editor is via Run. You can press Windows + R at the same time to open Windows Run dialog.
  • Type regedit in Run box, and press Enter to open Windows Registry Editor.

Here are the 10 ways that let you open System Information on Windows 10 or 11. Easily view your Windows system information.

Way 2. Access Windows Registry with Search

You can also use Windows Search to enter into Windows Registry Editor.

  • You can click Start menu or the Cortana search box, or press Windows + S to open Windows search.
  • Type regedit in the search box, and click the top best-matched result regedit to open Windows Registry.

Way 3. Open Windows Registry Editor with Command Prompt

  • Press Windows + R, type cmd and hit Enter to open Command Prompt on Windows 10.
  • Then you can type regedit in Command Prompt window to open Registry Editor.

Way 4. Enter into Windows Registry Editor with PowerShell

  • You can press Windows + X, and choose Windows PowerShell to open it.
  • Type regedit in Windows PowerShell window to open Registry window in Windows 10.

Way 5. Create a Shortcut for Registry Editor for Fast Access

You can also create a keyboard shortcut or desktop shortcut for Windows Registry Editor if you need to frequently access Windows Registry. Check below how to create a desktop shortcut for Regedit.

  • You can right-click the blank area on the desktop screen and click New –> Shortcut to open Create Shortcut
  • Type C:\Windows\regedit.exe in Create Shortcut window, and click Next.
  • Type a name for the shortcut like RegistryEditor and click Finish to create the shortcut. Next time you need to access Regedit Windows 10, you can click its desktop shortcut icon to quickly open it.

What to Pay Attention before Editing the Registry

Since Regedit has no Undo function, you should be careful to edit the registry to avoid causing irreversible problems to your computer. It’s highly advised that you back up the registry keys at first. You can also create a system restore point to make a backup of your computer OS, if needed, you can run a system restore to bring your computer back to life. Another tip is to edit one registry key at a time. Many registry edits require restarting computer to take effect. After you edit one registry, you should restart your computer and check if it takes effect before you make more changes to the registry. What’s more, you should only follow the reliable sources to edit registries.

How to Edit a Windows Registry Value

After you find the target registry key in Registry Editor window, you can double-click the name of the registry key, and change the value data of the registry key to make changes to the target registry.

Windows 10 repair, recovery, reboot, reinstall, restore solutions. Create Win 10 repair disk/recovery disk/USB drive/system image to repair Win 10 OS issues.

Detailed steps on opening Registry Editor in Windows 11, 10, 8, 7, Vista, and XP

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What to Know

  • Right-click or tap-and-hold the Start button and choose Run. Type regedit then press the Enter key. Registry Editor will open.
  • Learn how to safely add, change, or delete registry keys and values. Only make changes to the registry areas that you need to change.
  • It’s a good idea to back up the registry before you edit it.

All manual changes to the Windows Registry occur in Registry Editor, a tool included in all versions of Windows. Registry Editor lets you view, create, and modify the registry keys and registry values that make up the entire Windows Registry. There isn’t a shortcut for the tool in most versions of Windows, so the best way to open it is by executing it from a command line.

How to Open Registry Editor

Access Registry Editor by following this procedure:

In Windows 11, Windows 10, or Windows 8.1, right-click or tap-and-hold the Start button and then choose Run. Prior to Windows 8.1, the Run dialog box is most easily available from the Apps screen.

In Windows 7 or Windows Vista, select Start.

In Windows XP, select Start and then Run.

One quick way you can open the Run dialog box in any of these Windows versions is to use the keyboard shortcut Win+R.

In the search box or Run window, type the following, followed by Enter:

Depending on your version of Windows, and how it’s configured, you may see a User Account Control dialog box where you’ll need to confirm that you want to open Registry Editor.

Registry Editor will open.

If you’ve used Registry Editor before, it’ll open up to the same location you were working in last time. If that happens, and you don’t want to work with the keys or values at that location, just continue to minimize the registry keys until you’ve reached the top level, listing the various registry hives.

You can minimize or expand registry keys by selecting the small > icon next to the key. In Windows XP, the + icon is used instead.

You can now make whatever changes you need to make to the registry, which probably shouldn’t be done unless you’re versed in how to safely add, change, or delete registry keys and values. Make sure, whatever you do, that you only affect the narrow registry areas that you intend to.

Considering the significance of the registry on your Windows-based computer, we strongly recommend that you back up the registry, either the whole thing or even just the areas you’re working in, before you do anything.

More Help With Registry Editor

It’s important to know how to restore the Window’s Registry before using Registry Editor. This lets you add a REG file backup into the registry should something go wrong during editing.

Even though Registry Editor is open and ready to be used, it’s not always wise to make changes yourself, manually, especially if a program or automated service can do it for you. For example, if you’re using Registry Editor to clear up residual or junk registry entries, you shouldn’t do it yourself unless you’re very sure that you know what you’re doing. Instead, use a free registry cleaner if you want to clear out common registry junk automatically.

The same regedit command can be executed from Command Prompt. After opening Command Prompt, just type out the command and press Enter.

Although the circumstance would have to be rare, yet another way to launch this tool is from Task Manager. To do that, open Task Manager though Ctrl+Shift+Esc, go to File > Run new task, and type regedit, followed by OK.

You might open it that way if you can’t access the standard Run dialog box as described in Step 1 above, or if Explorer or Command Prompt won’t open for some reason.

If you find yourself opening this tool often, you can make a Registry Editor shortcut on your desktop. Right-click the desktop, go to New > Shortcut, type regedit, and press Next and then Finish. In some versions of Windows, you can drag the shortcut onto your taskbar for even quicker access.

Connecting to a remote Windows Registry is a bit different of a process than the one described above for a local registry. After opening a regular Registry Editor window, there’s an additional step to find the remote registry.

To disable network access to the Windows registry, press and hold the Windows key and press R to bring up the Run tool. Enter services.msc > OK to launch the Windows Service Manager. Double-click Remote Registry, select the General tab, and change Startup Type to Disabled.

The registry hives appear as folders on the left-hand side of the screen in the Windows Registry Editor when all other keys have been minimized. All keys that are considered hives begin with “HKEY” and are at the top of the registry hierarchy.

Registry Editor is an advanced tool that will help you to edit your Windows Registry. If you want to make any changes in your Windows Registry, then Registry Editor is the only thing that can help you. It will let you view, create, and modify the registry values and registry keys which make up the whole Windows Registry. But a lot of Windows 10 users face a problem while opening Registry Editor in Windows 10. But if you are reading this article, you can consider your problem solved. In this article, you will learn how to get to Registry Editor in Windows 10 and how you can access it easily. Keep reading till the end and you will have 5 solutions for 1 problem!

Way 1: Open Registry Editor via Run

To open Registry Editor in Windows 10 via Run, you won’t have to do a lot of hard work. It’s really easy and here is how to do it:

1. First, you need to right click on the lower left corner of the menu bar and a Quick Access Menu will turn up. Now, choose Run from the Quick Access Menu. You can also directly press the “Windows+R” button from your keyboard, to access Run menu.

2. In this box, type “regedit” and click “OK” button to access Registry Editor.

Way 2: Get into Registry via Start

It’s really easy to get into Registry Editor from the Start menu. Here is how to do it:

1. You need to click on the Windows “Start” button from the bottom left corner of your display.

2. Now type “regedit” in the search box and click on the “regedit” option from the search results.

3. In the end, click on “Yes” when User Account Control dialogue appears on the screen.

Note: This User Account Control dialogue may appear every time when you want to open Registry Editor. That means, it doesn’t matter which one of the 5 ways you use, this part is same every time. You will have to click on “Yes” button.

Way 3: Open Registry Editor Using Command Prompt

If you want to learn how to open Registry Editor on Windows 10 via Command Prompt, then this part is perfect for you. This way may seem a little tricky and scary but trust me, it’s a really easy way to open Registry Editor in Windows 10 via Command Prompt. Here is how to do it:

1. First you need to press “Windows+X” keys in your keyboard to open a menu and click on “Command Prompt” from that menu.

2. Now in the Command Prompt window, type “regedit” and press “Enter” button to open the Registry Editor.

Way 4: Access Registry Editor Using PowerShell

This way is almost similar to the Command Prompt way. Here is how to access Registry Editor in Windows 10 by using PowerShell:

1. Click on the Start button from the bottom left menu bar and type in “PowerShell” in the search box. Now click on “Windows PowerShell” from the search results. You can also just press “Windows+R” button in your keyboard to open the Run menu, type in “PowerShell” and press Enter.

2. Now type in “regedit” in the box and press “Enter”.

Way 5: Create a Registry Editor Shortcut on Desktop

Registry Editor is accessed when you need to tweak the settings of your Windows operating system. Maybe you need to access Registry Editor a lot of times, so how about we create a Registry Editor shortcut on desktop? If you don’t know how to get to Registry Editor on windows 10, this way is just for you. Here is how to do it:

1. First you need to right click on any empty area of your display and go to “New” and then click on “Shortcut”.

2. Now the Create Shortcut wizard will open in front of you. You will have to locate the item that you need to create shortcut of. In the box, type “%windir%\regedit.exe” and then click “Next” button.

3. You can give this shortcut any name of your choice and then click on the “Finish” button.

4. You will find a shortcut option in your desktop. You will need to double click on the shortcut to quickly open Registry Editor in Windows 10.

If you want to learn how to open Registry Editor in Windows 10, then this article is the best help you can get on the internet. This step by step guideline will make you an expert and you won’t be confused anymore. Also there is a great software recommendation for you guys. If you are facing problem with a corrupted registry in Windows 10, then you must use Windows Boot Genius to fix this issue. This great tool is a system optimizer that will allow you to easily perform diagnostics and fix common problems on any computer.

You use the Windows 10 Registry Editor if you want to manually make changes to the Windows 10 Registry . More specifically, it is a graphical user interface (GUI) which allows you view and edit the contents of Windows 10 registry such as configurations pertaining to hardware devices and all the applications installed. Now, you need to be very careful when making edits to the Windows registry as the slightest error can prove to be hazardous to the functionality of hardware devices, applications or the operating system per se.

So,Just To Be on the Safer Side: We have even covered how you can backup registry in Windows 10

How To Open Registry Editor In Windows 10

There is not just one but there are several ways to open the Registry Editor in Windows 10. Here we will discuss 5 simple ways to open the Registry Editor in Windows 10.

Method #1 : Using The Run Dialogue Box

This is the simplest method of all the methods using which you can open the Registry Editor in Windows 10. To access the Registry Editor in Windows 10 –

1. Press the Windows key + R button. A Run dialogue box will now pop up on your screen.

2. Type in regedit in the dialogue box and press enter.

3. You will receive a prompt or User Account Control dialogue box that says Do you want to allow this app to make changes to your device. Click on yes.

That’s it! Windows 10 Registry Editor will now be opened on your screen.

Method #2 : Use The Good Ole Search To Access The Windows 10 Registry Editor

Lock your eyes at the bottom left of your Windows 10 Taskbar. You’ll see a search bar that says Type here to search. So, type regedit in this search bar. You can either simply tap on the Registry Editor or choose one of the following options that would subsequently open towards the right.

Method #3 : How About A Shortcut To Make Your Life Simple

If you use the Windows 10 Registry Editor a lot, you might want to have it at a place from where you can instantly pick it up when needed. How about creating a shortcut? Yeah! Just like all the other important things in Windows 10, you can easily access Windows 10 Registry Editor via a simple shortcut.

Figuring out how to create a shortcut? Worry not! We’ll even sort that out for you –

1. Right click and hold on a blank area on your screen

2. Click on New and then click on Shortcut

3. In the dialogue box that appears type regedit and press enter

Congrats! You’ve just created a shortcut for Windows 10 Registry Editor. And, now you can use it swiftly anytime you want.

Method #4 : Access Windows 10 Registry Via Command Prompt

Command prompt can get you your Registry Editor in a jiffy and it is as simple as 1-2-3. Don’t believe us. Here’s how you can open Windows 10 Registry Editor in 3 simple steps –

1. Type cmd in the Run dialogue box and press enter

2. Type regedit where you see the cursor blinking and press enter

3. Click on yes when you see the User Account Control prompt

What Else Can The Command Prompt Do For Me ?

Command Prompt can be a portal to utmost awesomeness.You could use Command Prompt like a pro for doing several things like –

Method #5 : Using The File Explorer To Open Windows 10 Registry Editor

Imagine you are working with your files and documents and suddenly find a need to open the Registry Editor. You wouldn’t like taking your eyes off the file explorer, lose track of whatever you are doing and then head on to the other ways to open the Registry Editor. Instead, use the file explorer itself to open the Registry Editor.

1. Open the File manager on your computer

2. Click on a free space in the address bar on the top just below the menus

3. Type regedit in the address bar and press enter

There You Have It Folks !

Whether you are juggling with Windows errors or you want to make changes to installed programs, drivers or even operating systems, Windows 10 Registry Editor could be your doorway to do that. But, again we’d like to reinstate that exercise a lot of caution since Windows Registry is a critical domain. Having said that, we hope that the post is helpful.

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By: Waseem Patwegar

Windows computers come with a built-in tool that can be used to make changes to Registry Files. You can find below different methods to Open Registry Editor in Windows 10 & 11.

What Is Windows Registry?

Windows Registry is a Database in Windows operating system, designed to store Settings, Options and other information for most of the Apps, Software Programs and Hardware components installed on the computer.

The Values, Settings and Information stored in the Registry is constantly accessed by Windows Operating system, Apps and Programs running on the computer.

Hence, changes made to Registry Files can have an immediate or delayed (after restart) impact on overall operation of the computer, Apps and Software programs linked to the modified registry files.

Note: Windows Registry Files are stored in “RegBack” Folder, which is located at C:\Windows\System32\config\RegBack . If Registry is not being backed up, you will find all entries in this folder having 0 Kb size.

How to Edit Registry in Windows 10 & 11?

All versions of Windows operating system (going back to Windows 95) come with a Free Built-in Registry Editing Tool that can be used to make changes to Registry Files.

This built-in Registry Editing tool can be used to View, Edit and Create New Registry Files, in order to Change, Enable, Disable or influence the functioning of Software Programs installed on the computer.

However, you need to be aware that any mistake made, while editing registry files can impact the proper functioning of your computer and it can even make your device inaccessible.

Hence, the Registry Editing Tool should only be used by experienced and advanced users to troubleshoot problems, change or influence the functining of a Windows computer..

1. Open Registry Editor Using Run Command

An easy way to open Registry Editor on a Windows computer is by running the “regedit” command.

Right-click on the Start button and click on Run . In the Run Command window, type regedit and click on OK .

This will immediately take you to Registry Editor screen, from where you can navigate to any location in Windows Registry.

Note: If you like using Keyboard Shortcuts, you can press Windows + R keys to launch the Run Command.

2. Open Registry Editor Using Windows Search

Perhaps the easiest way to open Registry Editor in Windows 10 and 11 is by using the Windows Search function.

Type Registry Editor in Windows Search Box and click on Registry Editor App in the search results.

This will immediately launch the Registry Editing screen on your computer.

3. Open Registry Editor Using Command Prompt or PowerShell

You can also open Registry Editor using either Command Prompt or the PowerShell utility on your computer.

Right-click on the Start button and select PowerShell (Admin) option. In PowerShell window, type regedit and press the enter key.

The same command can be used in Command Prompt to open Registry Editor.

We show you how to use Regedit in Windows 10 to safely modify the windows registry, export keys, and import backups.

We have various guides that make use of the Windows registry editor (Regedit), from disabling the recent files list to enabling/disabling prefetch. Windows 10 Regedit makes some improvements over previous versions, but it’s still a mysterious and scary tool to many. We’re going to show you how to use the Windows Registry Editor safely so you can customize various aspects of your PC.

What is the Windows registry?

The Windows registry sounds complex, but it’s just a database in its base form. It stores all of the low-level settings for the operating system – ones that aren’t available via the usual settings menus because Microsoft prefers you not to change them. Installed programs, the Start Menu, and more all have registry entries in a standardized form for easy understanding and editing if required.

Registry data is stored in ‘Trees’, a hierarchical structure that makes for easier organization and navigation. Much like the Windows file system, it can have folders (known as keys) and subfolders. Its file name, the data within the key, is called a value.

Though many will remember the warnings in Windows XP that “making incorrect changes can damage your system”, Microsoft has evolved a lot since then. With so many recovery and backup tools available, using the Windows registry editor isn’t quite so dangerous, especially if you follow some basic principles.

How to edit the Windows 10 registry safely

There are a few things to keep in mind when using Windows 10 Regedit to ensure you don’t cause damage to your OS. The first is to always make a backup, either via a System Restore point or Regedit’s export function for the specific key you’re going to change.

You should never perform registry edits that aren’t from a trusted source. Random comments on the internet could be trying to damage your PC, or may just have no effect. You shouldn’t be changing the registry unless you know exactly what the change will result in.

Don’t make multiple changes to the registry at once. If there are multiple methods and the first doesn’t work, roll it back before you try another. Taking it step-by-step means that if something goes wrong, you’ll know the culprit immediately. Finally, familiarize yourself with the various data types and root keys for a better understanding. More education means fewer mistakes:

Data Type Description
REG_DWORD A Double word can hold up to 32 bits but is usually displayed in decimal or hexadecimal value. They’re used primarily as 1 (for enabled) and 0 (for disabled).
REG_BINARY Binary data in any form, usually in hexadecimal notation.
REG_SZ A string, eg. a sequence of characters. Usually text.
Keys Description Abbreviation
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE System-related info HKLM
HKEY_CURRENT_USER Data related to the logged-in account HKCU
HKEY_USERS Information regarding all accounts HKU
HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT File association and COM registration HKCR
HKEY_CURRENT_CONFIG Machine profile information HKCC

With that covered, we can move into the Windows registry tutorial, including how to navigate, create keys and values, and make a backup.

How to Use Regedit in Windows 10

Time needed: 5 minutes.

The Windows registry editor interface is quite easy to navigate once you know where everything is.

Press the Windows key and type “registry” click the “Registry Editor” search result.

Navigate to a key via the search bar

In the registry editor search bar, paste the directory of the key you’d wish to edit or navigate to it using the folder structure. We’re going to be using the Activation Broker key as an example in this tutorial. Paste Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\ActivationBroker to follow along.

Search for a key, value, or data

If you don’t know the location of a key, value, or data, you can use Windows 10 regedit’s in-built find function. Press “Edit > Find…” or use the hotkey “CTRL + F”. Search for whatever you want to find, in our case the Windows Defender key. Press “Find Next”. If you’re looking for something with two words, you can tick “Match whole string only” for better results.

You can press F3 to move through the different results until you find Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows Defender .

Open the registry value editor

Double-click any entry in the Windows Defender key/folder to see the value and the options for editing. For example, double-clicking the “IsServiceRunning” DWORD will allow you to edit the value data, in Hexadecimal or Decimal. Entering zero would toggle the entry off. Examine each type in the table above. Don’t make any changes for now and click “Cancel”.

Create a new Key or Value

You can create a new key or value by right-clicking in the blank space and selecting “New > Key” or one of the aforementioned value options. If it’s a key, you’ll want to name it correctly. For values, you should consult a guide.

Export / Import a key for outside use

At times you may require a way to quickly make registry changes on another PC or perform it again after a reinstall. You can export a registry key by clicking on it and pressing “File > Export” in the top bar and import it from there via “File > Import”.

Name the file something memorable (in our case, DisableAntiSpyware), tick “Selected branch”, and press “Save”. Conveniently, this is also how you make a backup. You can also tick “All” if you want to back up your entire registry.

Import/ Merge a registry key directly from a .reg-file

Exporting a registry key saves the entire folder, not just changes to a specific value. As a result, when you restore a registry key, you merge/ add to the existing keys. Essentially, anything extra you added to the registry in the meantime will not be removed. For this reason, a system restore point can be a better backup solution.

To merge, either double-click the previously saved .reg file or right-click and hit “Merge”. It’s best to get into the habit of the latter to better avoid mistakes.

The Registry Editor is a somewhat overlooked Windows tool. With that you can edit the registry to customize Windows in many ways. For example, this TechJunkie guide told you how you can add new software and website shortcuts to Windows 10’s desktop context menu with the Registry Editor. The Registry Editor isn’t packed with lots of options, but you can add a number of alternative third-party registry editors to Windows 10.

The Registrar Registry Manager Editor

First, you could add Registrar Registry Manager to Windows 10. This is a registry editor that has a freeware Home Edition and a pro version. Open this Softpedia page and click Download to save the setup wizard. Add the software to Windows 10 with the setup wizard, and open its window as below.

The Registrar Registry Manager window has not one, but two toolbars on it. This means it packs in quite a few more options than what you’ll find in the Windows 10 Registry Editor. You can browse the registry much the same as in the default Registry Editor by opening the root keys on the left pane and then editing them by right-clicking their corresponding registry entries on the right.

However, the Registrar Registry Manager also includes an address bar at the top. This means that you can jump straight to a registry key by entering it in the address bar. For example, try entering ‘HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows’ in the address bar and press Return. That will then open the Windows subkey in the editor window.

Tabs are another thing Registrar Registry Manager includes that you won’t find in the Registry Editor. As such, you can open registry keys in multiple tabs. Right-click a registry key and then select Open in new window to open a separate tab as shown in the screenshot directly below. Thus, you can effectively open multiple registry keys in the same window with those tabs. Right-click a tab and select Close tab to close it.

Furthermore, Registrar Registry Manager also includes bookmark options, which can come in handy. So you can save registry keys to the Bookmark Editor for quicker access. To bookmark a registry key, select it and then press the Bookmark button on the toolbar below the address bars. That will open the window below from which you can enter the registry key bookmark details. Press Apply and OK to save the bookmark and close window.

Then press the Bookmarks button on the top toolbar. That opens a Bookmarks tab which includes all your saved registry keys. Click a key there to open it in the editor window.

Those are just some of the handy options in Registrar Registry Manager. It also has handy Advanced Compare, File reference, defrag and Registry backup and restore tools on its toolbar and Tools menu.

Aezay Registry Commander

Aezay Registry Commander is another good alternative to the Registry Editor. This displays the registry keys as folders within the same window. As such, it does not include a left pane to browse the keys with. You can add it to Windows 10 from its Softpedia page much the same as Registrar Registry Manager Editor.

When you’ve opened the Aezay Registry Commander window above, you can browse through the registry by clicking the folders. You can jump back by clicking the up arrow at the top of the folders.

The missing left pane doesn’t greatly enhance the navigation, but its Jump to key option comes in handy. For example, suppose you’re going to restore the former clock in Windows 10 as covered in this post. For that you could press the Ctrl + G hotkey to open the window below. Then input ‘HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\ImmersiveShell’ in that text box and press OK. That will open the UseActionCenterExperience key you need to edit.

Visually this registry editor is some departure from the Windows 10 one, and it includes plenty of customization options. You can click Options > Configuration to open the window shown directly below. Then click the Visual tab to further customize the background color and fonts on the window. If you select Change font, you can choose a variety of alternative fonts and text formatting options for the Aezay Registry Commander window. Click Apply and OK to save selected settings.

Plus you can save registry key bookmarks in Aezay Registry Commander. Right-click a registry folder and select Bookmark from the context menu to save the registry key to User Bookmarks. Then press F9 to open the User Bookmarks at the bottom of the window as below.

The RegmagiK Editor

RegmagiK is another registry editor compatible with Windows 10. Its UI is a much closer match to the Registry Editor in Windows 10 than the Aezay Registry Commander window. However, it still includes a good number of enhancements; and you can save its Zip to Windows 10 from this Softpedia page. As it’s a portable application, you can open its window below from the compressed Zip.

The RegimagiK address bar enhances the editor’s navigation. There you can type in the registry key paths to find them more quickly. Alternatively, you could select Go > To Key to open a Go to text box that works the same as the address bar. You can also jump back and forth through the registry with the Back and Forward buttons on the toolbar.

RegimagiK also includes the invaluable bookmark option to save registry keys with for quicker access. Select a key in the window and press the New Bookmarks button on the toolbar. That opens a window where you can enter a title for the bookmark and save it. Then click Bookmarks on the menu bar and select the bookmarked registry key from the menu.

This software also enables you to add registry key shortcuts to the desktop. To do so, left-click a registry key in the window and drag it onto the desktop. Then open the registry key in RegimagiK by clicking its shortcut. Note that you’ll need to extract the software’s Zip file and select to open the shortcut with RegimagiK .

Those are just three of the more notable Registry Editor alternatives you can add to Windows 10. All of them have more extensive options and settings than the default editor. So if you’re going to edit the registry to customize Windows 10, you should check them out.

Windows and a lot of third-party applications store their settings in the registry. There are many options (particularly, those for Windows itself) that you can only change in the registry. Let’s open the Registry Editor so you can edit these!

What Is the Registry Editor?

The Windows registry is a hierarchical database that contains all the configurations and settings Windows uses. The Registry Editor is the application you use to view, edit, or even create different values in the database. For example, if you want to disable the lock screen on Windows 10 Home, you have to open the Registry Editor to do it.

You shouldn’t use the Registry Editor unless you know what you’re doing because you could corrupt your Windows operating system. However, if you find a registry hack on a trusted website, you’ll have to open the Registry Editor to make the change.

Warning: Registry Editor is a powerful tool, and misusing it could render your system unstable, or even inoperable. If you’ve never worked with the Registry Editor before, give this a read before you get started. And definitely back up the registry and your computer before you make any changes.

How to Backup and Restore the Windows Registry

We also recommend you create a System Restore point before you make any edits. Then, if something goes wrong, you can always rollback your system.

Open Registry Editor from the Run Box

Press Windows+R to open the Run dialog box, type “regedit” in the text field, and then press Enter.

A User Account Control (UAC) dialog appears asking if you want Registry Editor admin privileges; Click “Yes” and Registry Editor opens.

Open Registry Editor via Command Prompt or PowerShell

You can also open Registry Editor from either Command Prompt or PowerShell. The command is the same for both apps, but we’re using PowerShell.

Open PowerShell, type “regedit,” and then hit Enter.

Click “Yes” when the UAC dialog appears and the Registry Editor will open.

Open Registry Editor from File Explorer

If you prefer, you can also open Registry Editor from the address bar in File Explorer. To do so, just open “File Explorer,” type “regedit” in the address bar, and then press Enter.

Click “Yes” in the UAC prompt, and the editor will open.

Open Registry Editor from the Start Menu Search

If you want to open Registry Editor from the Start menu, click either the Start menu or the Search icon, and then type “Registry Editor” in the text field.

In the search results that appear, click “Registry Editor” to trigger the UAC prompt and open the editor.

Click “Yes” when the prompt appears, and Registry Editor will open.

Open Registry Editor from a Shortcut

If you’d rather open Registry Editor from a shortcut, it’s easy to create one for your Desktop.

To do so, just right-click an empty spot on the Desktop. In the context menu, click New > Shortcut.

In the window that appears, type “regedit” in the text box, and then click “Next.”

Name the shortcut, and then click “Finish” to create it.

Your new shortcut for the Registry Editor will appear on the desktop. Double-click the icon and allow the app admin privileges from the UAC prompt to open it.

If you want, you can bypass the UAC prompt altogether when you open Registry Editor, or any other program that requires elevated privileges.

Create Administrator Mode Shortcuts Without UAC Prompts in Windows 10

Now that you know how to open the Registry Editor, try out some of our favorite Registry hacks!