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How to open the system information panel on windows 10 or 8

You can use Control Panel to change settings for Windows. These settings control nearly everything about how Windows looks and works, and you can use them to set up Windows so that it’s just right for you.

Open Control Panel

In the search box on the taskbar, type control panel, and then select Control Panel.

For Windows 8.1 / Windows RT 8.1

Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, tap Search (or if you’re using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search), enter Control Panel in the search box, and then tap or click Control Panel.

Click the Start button, and then click Control Panel.

Find Control Panel items

When you’re in Control Panel:

Use search. To find a setting you’re interested in or a task you want to perform, type a word or phrase in the search box. For example, type “sound” to find specific settings for your sound card, system sounds, and the volume icon on the taskbar.

Browse. You can explore Control Panel by selecting different categories (for example, System and Security, Programs, or Ease of Access), and viewing common tasks listed under each category. Or, under View by, click either Large icons or Small icons to view a list of all Control Panel items.

If you browse Control Panel by icons, you can quickly find an item in the list by typing the first letter of the item’s name. For example, to find Keyboard, type K, and the first Control Panel item beginning with the letter K—in this case, Keyboard—is selected in the list.

You can also use the arrow keys (Up Arrow, Down Arrow, Left Arrow, and Right Arrow) to scroll through the list of icons in Control Panel.

If you can’t find a setting in Control Panel, select the Start button > Settings . Many Control Panel features are now available in Settings .

Use Control Panel to access most of your Windows computer’s settings

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The Control Panel in Windows is a collection of applets, sort of like tiny programs, that can be used to configure various aspects of the operating system.

For example, one applet in Control Panel lets you configure the mouse pointer size (among other things), while another allows you to adjust all the sound-related settings.

Other applets can be used to change network settings, set up storage space, manage display settings, and much more. You can see what they all do in our list of Control Panel applets.

So, before you can make any of these changes to Windows, you’ll need to open the Control Panel. Fortunately, it’s super easy to do—at least in most versions of Windows.

Surprisingly, how you open Control Panel differs quite a bit between Windows versions. Below are steps for Windows 10, Windows 8, Windows 7, Windows Vista, and Windows XP.

Time Required: Opening Control Panel will probably only take a few seconds in most versions of Windows. It’ll take a lot less time once you know where it’s at.

Open Control Panel in Windows 10

Select the Start button.

Type Control Panel.

Not using a keyboard? Scroll to the bottom of the list of Start options and open the Windows System folder.

Select Control Panel from the list.

On most Windows 10 PCs, the Control Panel opens in the Category view, which sorts the applets into [presumably] logical categories. If you like, you can change the View by option to Large icons or Small icons to show all the applets individually.

Open Control Panel in Windows 8 or 8.1

Unfortunately, Microsoft made it especially difficult to access Control Panel in Windows 8. They made it a little easier in Windows 8.1, but it’s still far too complicated.

While on the Start screen, swipe up to switch to the Apps screen. With a mouse, select the downward-facing arrow icon to bring up the same screen.

Prior to the Windows 8.1 update, the Apps screen is accessible by swiping up from the bottom of the screen, or you can right-click anywhere and choose All apps.

If you’re using a keyboard, the WIN+X shortcut brings up the Power User Menu, which has a link to the Control Panel. In Windows 8.1, you can also right-click on the Start button to bring up this handy quick-access menu.

On the Apps screen, swipe or scroll to the right and find the Windows System category.

Select Control Panel.

Windows 8 will switch to the Desktop and open the Control Panel.

Like in most versions of Windows, the Category view is the default view for Control Panel in Windows 8, but we recommend changing it to the arguably easier to manage Small icons or Large icons view. Do that by selecting Category from the menu at the top of Control Panel, and then choosing an icon view.

Open Control Panel in Windows 7, Vista, or XP

Open the Start menu.

Select Control Panel from the list in the right margin.

Windows 7 or Vista: If you don’t see Control Panel listed, the link may have been disabled as part of a Start menu customization. Instead, type control in the search box at the bottom of the Start menu and then choose Control Panel when it appears in the list above.

Windows XP: If you don’t see a Control Panel option, your Start menu may be set to “classic” or the link may have been disabled as part of a customization. Try Start > Settings > Control Panel, or execute control from the Run box.

In all three versions of Windows, a grouped view is shown by default but the un-grouped view exposes all the individual applets, making them easier to find and use.

Other Ways to Open Control Panel Applets

As we mentioned a few times above, the control command will start Control Panel from any command line interface in Windows, including Command Prompt.

Additionally, each individual Control Panel applet can be opened via Command Prompt, which is really helpful if you’re building a script or need quick access to an applet. See Command Line Commands for Control Panel Applets for a complete list.

Another way to access Control Panel applets is by activate GodMode in Windows, which is a special folder that contains applets from Control Panel. It’s not Control Panel itself but instead an easy access folder of the tools found in the program.

To open the Nvidia Control Panel, right-click any free space on your Windows desktop, then select NVIDIA Control Panel.

In macOS, the Control Panel is called System Preferences. It can be found on the Dock and looks like a gray gear. You can also open it under Apple > System Preferences.

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times and Reader’s Digest, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

Microsoft says the classic “System” properties Control Panel has been removed from Windows 10. As of the October 2020 Update (20H2), there’s no way to access it—or is there? Here’s a hidden command that opens the System Control Panel.

To run the command, press Windows+R to open the Run dialog. Copy-paste the following command into the Run dialog and press Enter:

The System Control Panel will pop right up in all its former glory!

If you miss this page and wish it was easier to access, you can create a shortcut that opens it. On your desktop or in any folder, right-click and select New > Shortcut.

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In the “Type Location” box, enter the command and click “Next”:

Name the shortcut whatever you want—for example, “System.”

You now have a shortcut that opens the System Control Panel. To change its icon, right-click it, and select “Properties.” Click the “Shortcut” tab, click “Change Icon,” and choose whatever icon you like.

We tested this on Windows 10’s final October 2020 Update, also known as 20H2. Microsoft may remove the System pane completely from future versions of Windows 10. If so, this command will stop working.

Thanks to [email protected] on the NotebookReview forums for discovering this trick!

Lawrence Abrams
  • October 25, 2020
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With the release of Windows 10 20H2, Microsoft is now preventing access to the venerable SYSTEM control panel and is instead redirecting users to the newly updated ‘About’ settings page.

The SYSTEM control panel was first introduced in Windows NT 3.51 and Windows 95 and provides information about the installed version of Windows, the bit-type of the operating system, the computer name, workgroup, CPU, and memory.

As the control panel provides a lot of information about a computer, it is commonly used when troubleshooting a Windows PC or determining a computer’s basic information.

In July, BleepingComputer reported that Microsoft had updated their ‘About’ settings page to include most, but not all, of the information found in the SYSTEM page. At the time, Microsoft was also testing a hidden feature that would redirect a user to the About page when opening the SYSTEM control panel.

With Windows 10 20H2, Microsoft drove another nail into the control panel’s coffin and is now preventing users from accessing the SYSTEM control panel. Now, when a user tries to open it, they are brought to the About page instead.

With the testing of a modern Disk Management tool, refresh rate option, and a test that redirects the ‘Program and Features’ control panel to the ‘Apps & Features’ settings, we can see Microsoft’s gradual killing off of the Control Panel.

Ultimately, this is good because Windows 10 is a confusing mess of settings being located in different places. By organizing them under the Settings feature, it will make it easier to find a particular setting.

The good news for those who routinely use the SYSTEM control panel is that there is still a way to access it, which we describe below.

How to access SYSTEM in Windows 10 20H2

While Microsoft is redirecting the SYSTEM control panel, there is a way to access it via a specially crafted Windows shortcut.

To create a shortcut that opens the SYSTEM control panel, please follow these steps:

  1. Minimize all open applications and folders so that you see the Windows Desktop.
  2. Right-click on the Desktop and select New >Shortcut, as shown below.

A video illustrating how to make this shortcut in Windows 10 20H2 can be seen below.

This SYSTEM shortcut can also be launched directly from the Start Menu by searching for ‘SYSTEM’ and selecting the icon that appears under the Apps section.

In the current Windows 10 Insider preview builds (tested on Windows 10 20231), all other ways to access the SYSTEM control panel redirect to the new About page.

The Control Panel is a central location in Microsoft Windows where you can adjust your system settings. If you’re not sure how to open the Control Panel, select your version of Windows from the list below for instructions.

  • Windows 11
  • Windows 10
  • Windows 8 and 8.1
  • Windows Vista and 7
  • Windows 95, 98, ME, NT, and XP
  • Windows command line
  • Windows 3.x

How to open the Control Panel in Windows 11

In Windows 11, the Control Panel is largely superseded by the Settings app. To open the Settings app, open the Start Menu and click the Settings app, or press Windows key + I (hold down the Windows key and press “i”).

However, the traditional Control Panel is still available.

There are several ways to open the Control Panel in Windows 11.

From the Windows search bar

  1. Click the magnifying glass icon on the taskbar, next to the Start Menu button, to access the Windows search box.
  1. Type the word control in the Windows search box, and in the search results, select Control Panel.

From the Run box

The control command can open the Control Panel from the Windows Run box.

  1. Open the Run box by pressing Win+R (hold down the Windows key on your keyboard, then press the R key).
  2. Type control and press Enter .

As mentioned in the Windows command line section below, you can also run the control command from the Windows 11 Command Prompt.

How to open the Control Panel in Windows 10

In Windows 10, the Control Panel has largely been superseded by the Settings app. To open the Settings app, open the Start Menu and click the gear icon (), or press Windows key + I (hold down the Windows key and press “i”).

However, the traditional Control Panel is still available.

There are several ways to open the Control Panel in Windows 10.

From the Start Menu

  1. Open the Start Menu.
  2. Scroll down to W, click Windows System, then click Control Panel.

From the Cortana search bar

  1. The Cortana search bar is on the left side of the taskbar, next to Start Menu button. Click the search bar to place your cursor in this box.
  2. Type the word control. Cortana lists best matches above as you type. In this list, select Control Panel.

From the Run box

The control command can open the Control Panel from the Windows Run box.

  1. Open the Run box by pressing Win+R (hold down the Windows key on your keyboard, then press the R key).
  2. Type control and press Enter .

As mentioned in the Windows command line section below, you can also run the control command from the Windows 10 Command Prompt.

How to open the Control Panel in Windows 8 and 8.1

  1. Move the mouse to the bottom left corner of the screen and right-click.
  2. In the Power User Menu, select Control Panel.

If you are having trouble finding a specific icon, there is a search box in the top-right corner of the Control Panel window.

How to open the Control Panel in Windows Vista and 7

  1. On the Windows desktop screen, click Start.
  2. Click Control Panel on the right side of the Start Menu.
  3. You may see a window similar to the following image. You may also see the expanded version of the Control Panel, with icons for all the various utilities available.

Microsoft Windows 7 Control Panel

If you are having trouble finding a specific icon, there is a search box in the top-right corner of the Control Panel window.

How to open the Control Panel in Windows 95, 98, ME, NT, and XP

  1. Click Start.
  2. Click Settings, then Control Panel.
  3. You should see a window that resembles one of the following images.

Microsoft Windows XP Control Panel

Windows Classic View vs. Windows Category View

Windows XP introduced two different ways to display the Control Panel: Classic View and Category View. By default, Windows displays the Control Panel in Category View (shown above), listing icons under broad categories rather than each one individually. For example, clicking Appearance and Themes allows you to adjust the theme, background, screen saver, and screen resolution. You can switch between these two views by clicking the link in the top-left section of the Control Panel window.


Microsoft Windows 98 Control Panel

How to open the Control Panel from the Windows command line

You can use the control command to open the Control Panel, and many of the Control Panel icons through the command line.

How to open the Control Panel in Windows 3.x

In Microsoft Windows 3.x, you can open the Control Panel window through the Main folder in Program Manager.

You can use Control Panel to change settings for Windows. These settings control nearly everything about how Windows looks and works, and you can use them to set up Windows so that it’s just right for you.

Open Control Panel

In the search box on the taskbar, type control panel, and then select Control Panel.

For Windows 8.1 / Windows RT 8.1

Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, tap Search (or if you’re using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search), enter Control Panel in the search box, and then tap or click Control Panel.

Click the Start button, and then click Control Panel.

Find Control Panel items

When you’re in Control Panel:

Use search. To find a setting you’re interested in or a task you want to perform, type a word or phrase in the search box. For example, type “sound” to find specific settings for your sound card, system sounds, and the volume icon on the taskbar.

Browse. You can explore Control Panel by selecting different categories (for example, System and Security, Programs, or Ease of Access), and viewing common tasks listed under each category. Or, under View by, click either Large icons or Small icons to view a list of all Control Panel items.

If you browse Control Panel by icons, you can quickly find an item in the list by typing the first letter of the item’s name. For example, to find Keyboard, type K, and the first Control Panel item beginning with the letter K—in this case, Keyboard—is selected in the list.

You can also use the arrow keys (Up Arrow, Down Arrow, Left Arrow, and Right Arrow) to scroll through the list of icons in Control Panel.

If you can’t find a setting in Control Panel, select the Start button > Settings . Many Control Panel features are now available in Settings .

Walter Glenn is a former Editorial Director for How-To Geek and its sister sites. He has more than 30 years of experience in the computer industry and over 20 years as a technical writer and editor. He’s written hundreds of articles for How-To Geek and edited thousands. He’s authored or co-authored over 30 computer-related books in more than a dozen languages for publishers like Microsoft Press, O’Reilly, and Osborne/McGraw-Hill. He’s also written hundreds of white papers, articles, user manuals, and courseware over the years. Read more.

If you bought your PC from a vendor, you’ve likely seen the manufacturer information in the “System” window. But did you know you can change it—or even add it if you build your own PCs?

The “System” window on your PC has a lot of useful information, like your processor model, the amount of installed RAM, what version and edition of Windows you’re running (and don’t forget, you can get even more of this kind of stuff with the System Information tool if you need it). If you’re using a pre-built PC, the window also shows manufacturer information like the vendor, support number and web site, support hours, and even a logo. You can customize this information, if it’s changed since you bought your PC. Or, if you build your own PCs for family and friends, you can add your own information. All you have to do is take a quick dive into the Windows Registry.

Add Change Manufacturer Information by Editing the Registry Manually

To change the manufacturer information for your PC in any version of Windows, you just need to make a few edits in the Windows Registry.

Standard warning: Registry Editor is a powerful tool and misusing it can render your system unstable or even inoperable. This is a pretty simple hack and as long as you stick to the instructions, you shouldn’t have any problems. That said, if you’ve never worked with it before, consider reading about how to use the Registry Editor before you get started. And definitely back up the Registry (and your computer!) before making changes.

Open the Registry Editor by hitting Start and typing “regedit.” Press Enter to open Registry Editor and give it permission to make changes to your PC.

In the Registry Editor, use the left sidebar to navigate to the following key:

If your PC already has manufacturer information, you’ll see several string values in the OEMInformation key. If your PC doesn’t have these values, you’ll need to add them. You can add the following values:

  • Manufacturer
  • Model
  • SupportHours
  • SupportPhone
  • SupportURL
  • Logo

You don’t have to add all the values—just the ones you want to show up. To add a value, right-click the OEMInformation key and choose New > String Value. Name the new value using one of the names from the list and make sure it’s named exactly as shown, with no spaces.

When you have the values added that want (or if they were already present), double-click each value to open its properties window, type the information you want displayed into the “Value data” box, and then click “OK.” If you’re replacing information, you may want to write down the information you’re removing so that you can put things back the way they were if the need arises.

If you’re adding a logo, just type the full path to the image you want to use. Alternatively, if the value already exists and you want to use the current path, you can leave the value at its default, which is typically:

Then all you have to do is replace that file with a picture of your own that’s named the same. To replace the file, you’ll need to have administrative privileges on the PC since it’s in a system folder. For the best results, you’ll want to use a small logo picture—around 100×100 pixels.

When you’ve added the information you want, you can close Registry Editor. The changes will take place immediately, so no need to restart your PC. All the information you entered should now show up in the “System” window.

If you ever want to remove the the changes, just go back to the OEMInformation key and delete all the values except for the (Default) value. If you want to restore information that was previously there, you’ll need to change each value to put the old information back.

Download Our One-Click Registry Hacks

If you don’t feel like diving into the Registry yourself, we’ve created some registry hacks you can use. The “Add Manufacturer Information” hack adds all of the values you’ll need. The “Remove Manufacturer Information” hack removes those values. Both hacks are included in the following ZIP file.

Of course, since we don’t know what information you want to add, you’ll have to edit these hacks a bit before you use them. After downloading and unzipping them, right-click the “Add Manufacturer Information” hack and choose the “Edit” command from the context menu.

This opens the hack in notepad. Replace the information in the hack with the information you want to use. For example, you’d want to replace “Manufacturer_Name” with the actual name you want to use. Just make sure you leave the quotes in place. And if there are bits of information you don’t want included—like, say, a support phone number—you can just delete that entire line.

When you’re done making edits, save the file and then double-click it to apply it to your Registry.

Yes, modifying the hack is almost as much work as just going into the Registry yourself, but if you’d like to create manufacturer information that you can quickly add to multiple PCs, this hack will save you a good bit of time.

These hacks are really just the OEMInformation key, stripped down to the values we talked about in the previous section and then exported to a .REG file. Running the hacks just modifies the value. And if you enjoy fiddling with the Registry, it’s worth taking the time to learn how to make your own Registry hacks.

This post provides 8 ways for how to open Windows Services in Windows 10, and how to troubleshoot services.msc not opening in Windows 10 problem. MiniTool software also provides free data recovery software, system backup and restore tool, and hard drive partition manager to help you tackle your computer issues.

Windows built-in Service Manager app lists all the services installed by system, drivers and apps. Sometimes you may need to open Windows Services application to start, disable or stop some services. Below we introduces 8 ways to access Windows Services, and how to troubleshoot services.msc not opening Windows 10 issue.

Part 1. How to Open Windows Services Windows 10 – 8 Ways

You can easily access Windows Services in Windows 10 with several ways.

Way 1. How to Open Windows Services from Run

Press Windows + R, type services.msc in Run dialog, and hit Enter key to open it.

Here are the 10 ways that let you open System Information on Windows 10 or 11. Easily view your Windows system information.

Way 2. Access Windows Services with Search

Click Start or the Cortana Search Box, type services, and click the best-matched result to open Windows Services application.

Way 3. Find Windows Services App from Start Menu

Click Start menu, scroll down the list to find Windows Administrative Tools to expand it. Click Services to open it.

Way 4. How to Open Services.msc in Control Panel

Open Control Panel in Windows 10, click System and Security in Control Panel window, and click Administrative Tools. Find Services shortcut in the list and double-click it to open it.

Way 5. How to Open Services.msc from Command Prompt

Press Windows + R, type cmd, and hit Enter to open Command Prompt in Windows 10. Then type the Windows Services command line services.msc and hit Enter to open it.

Way 6. Start Services in Windows 10 with PowerShell

Press Windows + X and choose Windows PowerShell to open PowerShell. Type Windows Services command services.msc in PowerShell window, and hit Enter to open Windows Services.

Way 7. Enable Windows Services from Computer Management

Open Computer Management in Windows 10. Click Services and Applications from the left pane to expand it. Click Services to open it.

Way 8. Create a Shortcut for Windows Services

To quickly access Windows Services application, you can create a desktop shortcut for Windows Services app.

Right-click the black space of computer desktop screen, and click New -> Shortcut. In Create Shortcut window, you can input services.msc, and click Next. Type a name for the shortcut and click Finish to create a shortcut for Windows Services.

Then when you want to open Windows Services, you can double-click its desktop shortcut icon to quickly access it.

Quick Video Guide:

Part 2. Troubleshoot Services.msc Not Opening Windows 10

However, sometimes if you encounter services.msc not opening Windows 10 error. You can check the 3 fixes below to solve this problem.

Fix 1. Check the Startup Type of Services

If some Windows Services fail to start, you can follow the ways above to open Windows Services, and find the specific service in the list. Right-click the service and choose Properties. Check if its startup type is set to Disabled, if so, change its startup type, and click Start button to see if it can start.

Fix 2. Start Windows 10 in Safe Mode

If Windows Services won’t start, you can restart your computer to see if it can start. If restarting computer doesn’t fix this issue, you can start Windows 10 into Safe Mode to see if the Services app can start.

Fix 3. RUN SFC (System File Checker) to Repair Corrupt System Files

You can open and run Command Prompt as Administrator. Click Start, type cmd and right-click Command Prompt to choose Run as Administrator.

Then you can type sfc /scannow in Command Prompt window, and hit Enter to let SFC scan and repair Windows 10 corrupt system files.

Then you can check if the Windows Services application can start.

Easy 3 steps to fast recover my files/data for free with best free file recovery software. 23 FAQs for how to recover my files and lost data are included.

Conclusion

You can choose one of the 8 ways to easily open Windows Services in Windows 10 to view all running services in system, and start, stop or disable some services.

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About The Author

Alisa is a professional English editor with 4-year experience. She loves writing and focuses on sharing detailed solutions and thoughts for computer problems, data recovery & backup, digital gadgets, tech news, etc. Through her articles, users can always easily get related problems solved and find what they want. In spare time, she likes basketball, badminton, tennis, cycling, running, and singing. She is very funny and energetic in life, and always brings friends lots of laughs.

If you are wondering how to open Control Panel in Windows 10/8/7? This post provides 10 ways, incl. Control Panel Windows 10 shortcut, open Control Panel with command/cmd, etc. If you suffer data loss in your Windows 10 computer or other storage devices, MiniTool software can help you easily recover lost data for free.

What Is Control Panel?

Before learning how to use the 10 ways to open Control Panel Windows 10/8/7, let’s first have a brief review of what Control Panel is.

The Control Panel is a Windows component that allows users to access, view and change most of the Windows computer’s settings. It consists of a pack of applets. You can open Control Panel in Windows 10/8/7 to remove hardware or software, control Windows user accounts, repair Windows 10 issues and control almost everything about how your Windows computer works or looks.

To find and open Control Panel in Windows 10/8/7 computer, you can use the following 10 ways.

>> Video Guide:

Way 1. Open Control Panel Windows 10 with Search Box

You can click the search box at the taskbar of Windows 10, and type control panel. Choose the top best matched result Control Panel app to open it in Windows 10.

Way 2. Open Control Panel Windows 10/8/7 from Start Menu

You can click Start, type control panel, and select the top result Control Panel app from the list to open it.

If you want to pin Control Panel to the taskbar or to Start menu, you can right-click Control Panel and choose Pin to Start or Pin to taskbar. Then next time if you need to access Control Panel to change some settings, you can easily open it from taskbar or Start menu.

To open Control Panel Windows 7, you can click Start menu and select Control Panel from the list in the right column. You can also click Start and type control panel in the search box and click Control Panel shortcut to open it.

To open Control Panel Windows 8/8.1, you can switch to the Start screen and type control panel in the search box, tap Control Panel to open it.

Check the guide for Microsoft/Windows Defender download, install, uninstall, reinstall on Windows 10/11. Also learn how to fix can’t open Windows Defender.

Way 3. Open Control Panel Windows 10/8/7 via Run

You can press Windows + R keys on the keyboard to open Windows Run dialog, and type Control Panel in Run, click OK to open Control Panel in Windows 10/8/7.

Way 4. Find Control Panel in Windows 10 from Start Menu

Click Start and scroll down the list to find Windows System category and expand it. Select Control Panel to open it.

Way 5. Open Control Panel Windows 10 from Quick Access Menu

You can press Windows + X keys on the keyboard, or right-click Start, and select Control Panel from the list. Some Windows 10 computer systems have Settings instead of control panel.

Guide for Windows Malicious Software Removal Tool 64-bit/32-bit download for Windows 10/11. Use the MSRT tool to prevent your computer from prevalent malware.

Way 6. Open Control Panel Windows 10 through Cortana

In Windows 10, you can also get into Control Panel windows though talking to Cortana. You can awake Windows 10 Cortana by saying “Hey Cortana” or “Hello Cortana”. And then you can say “Launch Control Panel” to Cortana. It will open Control Panel window for you.

Way 7. Open Control Panel Windows 10 with Command Prompt

You can press Windows + R keys on the keyboard to open Windows Run. Type cmd and click OK to open Command Prompt in Windows 10. Then type control panel in Command Prompt window and hit Enter key to open Control Panel with command prompt (cmd).

Way 8. Open Control Panel Windows 10 with PowerShell

Right-click Start and click Windows PowerShell to open it. Type control panel and hit Enter to open it.

Way 9. Open Control Panel Windows 10 with Shortcut

Some Windows 10 system has a default Control Panel shortcut on the desktop screen. You can double-click Control Panel shortcut icon to open it.

If you don’t find a shortcut icon of Control Panel, you can create a shortcut for Windows 10 Control Panel for easier use.

  • Right-click a blank area on the desktop, and click New -> Shortcut to open Create Shortcut window.
  • Type %windir%\system32\control.exe in the box and click Next.
  • Type a name like Control Panel and click Finish to create the shortcut for Control Panel.

Way 10. Open Control Panel Windows 10 with Task Manager

  • Press Ctrl+ Shift + Esc keys on the keyboard at the same time to open Windows Task Manager.
  • Click File -> Run new task.
  • Type control panel and press Enter to open Control Panel window.

Verdict

These are the 10 ways to help you open Control Panel in Windows 10. Some ways can be also applied to open Control Panel in Windows 8/7.

Learn how to download and install Bluestacks 5 for Windows 11/10/8/7. Use this top free Android app player to run Android games and apps on your PC.

System Properties is a place to go if you want to check the specifications of your Windows 10 computer. Here, you can check some information regarding your computer like Windows edition, the installed RAM, processor model to system type. System Properties itself is not a new feature. It is available on all Windows versions.

There are several ways to open System Properties in Windows. The most majority of Windows 10 users might access System Properties via Control Panel since it’s the most common way.

Following are 5 ways to open the System Properties in Windows 10.

1. Via File Explorer

When you are working with File Explorer and suddenly there is something you want to check on System Properties, you don’t need to take a switch from File Explorer since you can open System Properties via Windows default file manager. Right-click This Computer icon on the left panel of File Explorer and select Properties and you are there.

In addition to in File Explorer, you can also right-click the This PC icon on desktop.

2. Via Search

You can also open Windows Properties via Windows Search on the taskbar. Simply type “system” on the search box and select System.

3. Via Control Panel

The most majority of Windows 10 users might will go to Control Panel every time they need to access System Properties. Actually, accessing System Properties via Control Panel is a bit time-consuming since you have to perform some clicks.

To open Control Panel, click the start menu and select Windows System folder. You can find Control Panel launcher here.

Click System and Security on the Control Panel window.

On the System and Security window, click System to access the System Properties.

4. Via Windows Settings

You can also open System Properties via Windows Settings. First off, open Windows Settings by clicking the gear icon on the start menu panel.

Type “about” on the available search box on the Settings window and select About your PC.

Scroll down to the Related settings section and click System info.

5. Via shortcut

This is the quickest way to open System Properties in Windows 10. No matter window you are working with, simply press Windows+Pause/Break keys and boom! You are there on the System Properties window.

Different ways to open Classic System properties in Windows 10!

Microsoft has removed the Classic System Properties page from the newer version of Windows 10 (Windows 10 20J2 October 2020 update). So, if you are using the latest version of Windows 10, then you might be unable to access the classic system properties of Windows, which was available in the previous Windows version.

Even if you try to access the System Properties page from the Control Panel, Windows 10 now redirects you to the modern About Page section. Well, Microsoft has indeed removed the classic system properties page in the Control Panel, but that doesn’t mean that it’s completely gone.

Steps to Open Classic System Properties in Windows 10

Users who are using the latest version of Windows 10 can still access the Classic System Properties page. Below, we have shared a few best methods to open the Classic System Properties page in Windows 10 20H2 October 2020 Update. Let’s check out.

1. Using the Keyboard Shortcut

Windows 10 allows you to use a Keyboard shortcut to launch the System properties page. You don’t really need to open the Control Panel to access the System Window. Just press the Windows Key + Pause/Break button simultaneously to open the System Window.

2. From the Desktop Icon

Well, if you have the ‘This PC’ shortcut on your desktop, then right-click on it and select ‘Properties.’ If you have been using Windows 10 for a while, then the chances are that you might already know about this feature. If your desktop doesn’t have the ‘This PC’ shortcut, then head to the Settings > Personalization > Themes > Desktop icon settings. There select the ‘Computer’ and click on the ‘Ok’ button.

3. Using the RUN dialog box

There’s another easy way to open the classic system properties page on Windows 10. Just open the Run Dialog box and enter the command given below to open the system page in the latest version of Windows 10.

control /name Microsoft.System

4. Using a Desktop Shortcut

In this method, we will be creating a desktop shortcut to open the classic System properties page. Follow some of the simple steps given below.

Step 1. Right-click on the Desktop and select New > Shortcut.

Step 2. On the Create Shortcut window, enter the path given below and click on ‘Next.’

explorer.exe shell.

Step 3. In the final step, type a name for the new shortcut. Name it something like ‘System Properties,’ or ‘Classic System,’ etc.

Step 4. Now on the desktop, double click on the new shortcut file to open the Classic System page.

That’s it! You are done. This is how you can access the classic system page via a desktop shortcut.

So, this article is all about how to open the System window in the latest version of Windows 10. I hope this article helped you! Please share it with your friends also. If you have any doubts related to this, let us know in the comment box below.

If you don’t know what IIS is and how to check its version on your device, this post is very useful. At the beginning, it will introduce IIS to you clearly. And after that, several useful methods for checking IIS version on a Windows 10, Windows 8, or Windows 7 computer will be listed.

MiniTool provides software to help you check disk and system easily.

What Is IIS

IIS is the acronym of Internet Information Services; Microsoft created this extensible web server for Windows NT family users. Running on Windows systems, the IIS is used to serve requested HTML pages or files. IIS gives support to FTP, FTPS, HTTP, HTTP/2, HTTPS, SMTP, and NNTP. The IIS is available on most Windows operating systems (Windows XP Home edition is not included) and it becomes an integral part of the Windows NT family ever since the Windows NT 4.0 was released.

Check IIS Version on Your Windows 10/8/7 PC

The IIS has many versions (IIS 6, IIS 7, IIS 7.5, IIS 8, IIS 8.5, and IIS 10), so how can you check IIS version on your PC? There are several ways available for even ordinary users. The following steps are executed on a Windows 10 PC.

How to check IIS version via Control Panel?

  1. Click on the bottom-left Windows button.
  2. Look through the apps and programs to find Windows System folder.
  3. Click to expand Windows System and choose Control Panel.
  4. Choose to view by Large/Small icons.
  5. Select the Administrative Tools option from the window.
  6. Double click on the Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager to open it.
  7. Click Help from the menu bar.
  8. Choose About Internet Information Services from the drop-down list.
  9. The version information will be displayed in the pop-up window.
  10. Please click OK and close the Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager when you have finished checking the IIS version.

How to check IIS version through the Run box?

  1. Right click on the Windows button at bottom left.
  2. Choose Run from the WinX menu (how to solve WinX menu not working issue).
  3. Type inetmgr into the textbox and press Enter on your keyboard (you can also type %SystemRoot%\system32\inetsrv\InetMgr.exe instead and press Enter).
  4. The Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager window will appear.
  5. Go to Help ->About Internet Information Services to find IIS version.

How to check IIS version from Registry Editor?

  1. Open Run dialog box with the steps mentioned above (or by pressing Windows + R).
  2. Type regedit into the textbox and hit Enter.
  3. Click Yes in User Account Control window (please skip this step if you didn’t see it).
  4. Copy and paste this into the address bar of Registry Editor: Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\InetStp.
  5. Look for the VersionString value in the right panel.
  6. Double click on this value to check IIS version.

How to check IIS version by using Command Prompt?

  1. Press Windows + S to open the search box.
  2. Type cmd into the textbox.
  3. Right click on Command Prompt and choose Run as administrator.
  4. Click Yes in the User Account Control window.
  5. Type or copy and paste this command: %SystemRoot%\system32\inetsrv\InetMgr.exe.
  6. Press Enter and the Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager window will appear.
  7. Go to Help ->About Internet Information Services to view IIS version.

How to check IIS version by using Windows PowerShell?

  1. Press Windows + X.
  2. Choose Windows PowerShell (Admin).
  3. Click Yes in the User Account Control window.
  4. Copy & paste this command: [System.Diagnostics.FileVersionInfo]::GetVersionInfo(“C:\Windows\system32\notepad.exe”).FileVersion. Hit Enter to check IIS version directly.
  5. You can also type Get-ItemProperty -Path registry::HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\InetStp\ | Select-Object and hit Enter.

Another way to find IIS version is to search in C:\Windows\System32\InetMgr directory.

Enable IIS

The IIS is not active by default, so you may need to enable it on your computer manually sometimes.

How to enable IIS?

  1. Open the WinX menu and choose the first option – Apps and Features.
  2. Look for Related settings section in the right panel.
  3. Click Programs and Features under it.
  4. Click Turn Windows features on or off in the left sidebar.
  5. Look through the Windows features and check Internet Information Services.
  6. Click OK and wait.
  7. Windows will search for the required files and apply changes for you automatically.
  8. Click Close when you see the message – Windows completed the requested changes.

The steps to check IIS version in other systems are similar.

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About The Author

Sarah has been working as an editor at MiniTool since she graduated from university. Sarah aims at helping users with their computer problems such as disk errors and data loss. She feels a sense of accomplishment to see that users get their issues fixed relying on her articles. Besides, she likes to make friends and listen to music after work.

Matt Klein has nearly two decades of technical writing experience. He’s covered Windows, Android, macOS, Microsoft Office, and everything in between. He’s even written a book, The How-To Geek Guide to Windows 8. Read more.

With the old Windows Start menu, you could add the Control Panel as a menu or a drop-down list. With Windows 8 or Windows 10, you can pin the Control Panel to the Start Screen and taskbar but first you need to know where it is.

One of the chief complaints about Windows 8 (or any new version of Microsoft’s operating system) is “where did such-and-such go?” With Windows 8, when MS removed the Start button and Start Menu, it threw a lot of people for a loop. Because the Start Menu was like an old familiar hang out; one of those places that no matter how it changed over the years, it was a fairly reliable place to find stuff whether it was your Documents folder, Devices, Printers, the ability to search your programs and files, and of course, the Control Panel.

There are about four ways (so far) to access the Control Panel in Windows 8 or 10.

Finding the Control Panel Using Windows 10

If you’re using Windows 10, you can simply search the Start Menu for “Control Panel” and it will show right up in the list. You can either click to open it, or you could right-click and Pin to Start or Pin to taskbar for easier access the next time.

If you choose to Pin to Start, you’ll see it on the right-hand side of the Start Menu.

For Windows 8, Method 1: Search for It

If you are using Windows 8, it introduces a “Charms” bar accessible from the top or bottom right “hot corner”. Simply drag the mouse pointer to either corner until the five Charms appear along the right edge of the screen. Drag the mouse pointer and click on Search (you can access the Search charm through the keyboard shortcut Windows logo + Q).

The search pane will pop out and from there you can type Control Panel and select it from the results to the left. Alternatively, you can simply begin typing from the Start Screen.

Windows 8 – Method 2: The Ribbon aka Windows Explorer

In Windows 7, you can open Windows Explorer click on Computer and then Open Control Panel on the toolbar.

In Windows 8 or 10, you can also click on Open Control Panel but the toolbar has been replaced by the Ribbon as found in Office 2010.

Windows 8 – Method 3: More Charms – Settings

Access the Charms bar once more. Drag the mouse pointer to and click on Settings. The Settings pane will pop out and you can then choose Control Panel.

Note: To this settings option is only available from the desktop Charms setting.

Method 4: The Easiest Way – Right-click the Start “Button”

Last and perhaps the easiest way, right-click on what was formerly known as the Start button in the bottom left corner (now a hot corner), which allows you to switch between the Desktop and Start Screen. Right clicking brings up a context menu with wide array of options. The Control Panel is the fifth from the bottom.

And there you have it, four sure ways to access the Control Panel in Windows 8 Preview Release. Of course, some of these could change before it is released to manufacturers. We’ll be sure to keep you apprised of any of these changes if or when they happen.

Do you have an another way of opening the Windows 8 Control Panel? What is your preferred method? Let us know in the comments.

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How to access the traditional Control Panel lost in the Windows 10 Creators Update

How to access the traditional Control Panel lost in the Windows 10 Creators Update

Microsoft is phasing out the traditional Control Panel with the Windows 10 Creators Update, but with a few tweaks you can still access it. Mark Kaelin explains how.

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Microsoft has been slowly and methodically rolling out the Windows 10 Creators Update to customers throughout 2017. If you are one of the lucky ones to receive the update already, you have likely noticed more than a few changes to how Windows 10 looks and works. Some of the changes are good, some are a little annoying.

One of the changes Microsoft implemented in the Windows 10 Creators Update that I don’t like is the removal of the traditional Control Panel from the Win+X menu–that’s the menu you see displayed when you right-click the Start button from the Desktop interface (Figure A). Microsoft is migrating the interface for configuring the operating system to the new Settings screen, but some of us, especially IT pros who have been doing this for a long time, prefer the old Control Panel interface.

Figure A

Fortunately, the old Control Panel is still available; it is just lurking in the background. We can bring it back to the forefront with a few clicks, tweaks, and tricks, and this tutorial will show you how they work.

SEE: 20 pro tips to make Windows 10 work the way you want (TechRepublic PDF)

First, what you can’t do

The commands for the Win+X menu are located in this file folder, as shown in Figure B:

Figure B

But you can’t just add a shortcut to the Control Panel executable to one of those Group folders and expect to see it show up in the Win+X menu. The special links within the Win+X menu system are protected with a special hash calculation, which greatly complicates any attempt to edit its contents.

To add the Control Panel back to the Win+X menu you will have to use a link with the hash already included. In general, that means acquiring a link from a version of Windows that is not the Creators Update. It is possible with the help of a third-party app, but it is complicated, convoluted, and not really necessary.

If you want to go through the process, you can check out this website for the details. But before you do, I have some simple solutions that might work better for you.

SEE: Windows 10 power tips: Secret shortcuts to your favorite settings (Tech Pro Research)

Now, what you can and should do

For those of us who want to keep things simple, here are a couple of ways to access the traditional Control Panel in Microsoft Windows 10 Creators Update.

1. Search for it

If you just want to access the control panel occasionally and not add more icons to your desktop, the simplest way to access the Control Panel is by typing control panel in the Cortana search box. Control Panel should be the first entry in the search results (Figure C). You can left-click the link to start the app or right-click it and add the link to the Start Menu or to your Taskbar for easy future access.

Figure C

Adding the Control Panel to the Start Menu is handy if you are using a touch screen interface. Adding it to the Taskbar works well if you find yourself accessing configuration settings on a regular basis.

2. Add to Desktop

There are two ways to add the Control Panel to your Desktop. The first way is fairly obvious: Right-click an empty area on your Desktop and create a new shortcut that points to the Control Panel executable located here:

But you can also add the Control Panel icon to your Desktop through the Personalization screen. Right-click the Start button to open the Win+X menu and click the Settings menu item. Click the Personalization icon to open the next screen and drill down to the Themes screen. Scroll down until you see the Desktop Icon Settings item under the Related Settings area and click it. A dialog box will pop open and you can check the Control Panel radio button to add that link to your Desktop (Figure D). Click OK and the icon will be added as a primary system link on your Desktop.

Figure D

Registry hack

There is an obscure Windows system registry hack you can use to add the Control Panel to the Desktop right-click menu, but it is bit complicated and is best suited for a separate article. We’ll share that trick with you next week.

Also read…

  • Microsoft Universal Windows Platform Expert Bundle (TechRepublic Academy)
  • Windows 10 Creators Update: The smart person’s guide (TechRepublic)
  • Windows 10 Creators Update: Here’s what to look out for (TechRepublic)
  • How to get the Windows 10 Creators Update without the wait (TechRepublic)
  • Windows 10: Microsoft races to fix a ton of bugs for October’s Fall Creators Update (ZDNet)

Your thoughts

Do you miss having the traditional Control Panel readily available from the Win+X menu? Share your thoughts and opinions with your peers at TechRepublic in the discussion thread below.