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How to protect your google drive on iphone and ipad with face id or touch id

Justin Duino is the Reviews Director at How-To Geek (and LifeSavvy Media as a whole). He has spent the last decade writing about Android, smartphones, and other mobile technology. In addition to his written work, he has also been a regular guest commentator on CBS News and BBC World News and Radio to discuss current events in the technology industry. Read more.

Storing important and or sensitive documents in Google Drive isn’t the most secure way to protect your data, but if you are, your iPhone and iPad can help keep everything safe. Here’s how to add a Face ID or Touch ID lock to the cloud storage’s mobile app.

Unfortunately, at the time of writing, Google doesn’t offer enhanced security options on its Drive app for Android or on the web. Enabling two-factor authentication on your Google account is your best bet for keeping people out of your cloud files.

Start by opening the “Drive” app on your iPhone or iPad. Use Apple’s built-in Spotlight Search if you can’t find it on your home screen.

Next, tap on the three-line hamburger menu icon.

From the slide-over menu that appears, select the “Settings” option.

Tap on the “Privacy Screen” button found in the middle of the screen.

You can now read more about the Privacy Screen feature. If it’s something that you’d like to enable, toggle on the “Privacy Screen” option.

Your iPhone or iPad will display a pop-up asking for you to give the Google Drive app permission to access Face ID or Touch ID on your device. Tap on the “OK” button to permit it.

The next time you exit and reopen the Google Drive app, you will see a screen similar to the one below. Authenticate using your face or your fingerprint to access the cloud storage application.

Now that the Privacy Screen setting is enabled, you will see several new options to customize the feature further.

By default, the Privacy Screen feature locks the Drive app the moment you lock your iPhone’s or iPad’s display or leave the app. If you want to add a time delay, tap on the option that corresponds to the “Delay” listing.

Here, you can choose from “Immediately,” “After 10 Seconds,” “After 1 Minute,” and “After 10 Minutes.” Choose one of the options and then tap on the Back arrow.

If you don’t trust Face ID or Touch ID to protect your files stored in Drive, you can require your phone or tablet’s lock screen passcode to enter the app.

Back in the “Privacy Screen” settings menu, tap on the blue “Open System Settings” link.

You will be taken to Drive’s section of your iPhone’s or iPad’s Settings menu. Here, you can toggle off permission to use Face ID or Touch ID.

With the security setting disabled, the next time you open the Google Drive app, it will require you to enter your device’s lock screen passcode.

Justin Duino is the Reviews Director at How-To Geek (and LifeSavvy Media as a whole). He has spent the last decade writing about Android, smartphones, and other mobile technology. In addition to his written work, he has also been a regular guest commentator on CBS News and BBC World News and Radio to discuss current events in the technology industry. Read more.

Storing important and or sensitive documents in Google Drive isn’t the most secure way to protect your data, but if you are, your iPhone and iPad can help keep everything safe. Here’s how to add a Face ID or Touch ID lock to the cloud storage’s mobile app.

Unfortunately, at the time of writing, Google doesn’t offer enhanced security options on its Drive app for Android or on the web. Enabling two-factor authentication on your Google account is your best bet for keeping people out of your cloud files.

Start by opening the “Drive” app on your iPhone or iPad. Use Apple’s built-in Spotlight Search if you can’t find it on your home screen.

Next, tap on the three-line hamburger menu icon.

From the slide-over menu that appears, select the “Settings” option.

Tap on the “Privacy Screen” button found in the middle of the screen.

You can now read more about the Privacy Screen feature. If it’s something that you’d like to enable, toggle on the “Privacy Screen” option.

Your iPhone or iPad will display a pop-up asking for you to give the Google Drive app permission to access Face ID or Touch ID on your device. Tap on the “OK” button to permit it.

The next time you exit and reopen the Google Drive app, you will see a screen similar to the one below. Authenticate using your face or your fingerprint to access the cloud storage application.

Now that the Privacy Screen setting is enabled, you will see several new options to customize the feature further.

By default, the Privacy Screen feature locks the Drive app the moment you lock your iPhone’s or iPad’s display or leave the app. If you want to add a time delay, tap on the option that corresponds to the “Delay” listing.

Here, you can choose from “Immediately,” “After 10 Seconds,” “After 1 Minute,” and “After 10 Minutes.” Choose one of the options and then tap on the Back arrow.

If you don’t trust Face ID or Touch ID to protect your files stored in Drive, you can require your phone or tablet’s lock screen passcode to enter the app.

Back in the “Privacy Screen” settings menu, tap on the blue “Open System Settings” link.

You will be taken to Drive’s section of your iPhone’s or iPad’s Settings menu. Here, you can toggle off permission to use Face ID or Touch ID.

With the security setting disabled, the next time you open the Google Drive app, it will require you to enter your device’s lock screen passcode.

Storing important or sensitive documents in Google Drive isn’t the safest way to protect your data, but if it is, your iPhone and iPad can help keep everything safe. Here’s how to add aFace ID or Touch ID lockto the cloud storage mobile app.

Unfortunately, at the time of this writing, Google does not offer enhanced security options in its Drive app forAndroidor inThe Web. Enabling two-factor authentication on your Google account is your best bet for keeping people out of your cloud files.

Start by opening the “Drive” app on youriPhoneeitheriPad. Use Apple’s built-in Spotlight search if you can’t find it on your home screen.

Next, tap on the three-line hamburger menu icon.

In the sliding menu that appears, select the “Settings” option.

Tap the “Privacy Screen” button in the middle of the screen.

You can now read more about the privacy screen feature. If it’s something you’d like to enable, turn on the “Privacy Screen” option.

Your iPhone or iPad will display a pop-up asking you to give the Google Drive app permission to access Face ID or Touch ID on your device. Tap the “OK” button to allow it.

The next time you exit and reopen the Google Drive app, you’ll see a screen similar to the one below. Authenticate with your face or fingerprint to access the cloud storage app.

Now that the Privacy Screen setting is enabled, you’ll see several new options to further customize the feature.

By default, the privacy screen feature locks the Drive app the moment you lock your iPhone or iPad screen or leave the app. If you want to add a time delay, tap the option that corresponds to the “Delay” list.

Here, you can choose between “Immediately”, “After 10 seconds”, “After 1 minute” and “After 10 minutes”. Choose one of the options, and then tap the Back arrow.

If you don’t trust Face ID or Touch ID to protect your files stored in Drive, you can require your phone or tablet’s lock screen password to access the app.

Back in the “Privacy Screen” settings menu, tap the blue “Open system settings” link.

You’ll be taken to the Drive section of your iPhone or iPad’s settings menu. Here, you can disable the permission to use Face ID or Touch ID.

With security settings disabled, the next time you open the Google Drive app, you’ll be required to enter your device’s lock screen passcode.

How to organize your Google Drive

To protect backups of your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch on your computer, you can use password protection and encryption.

Encrypt your backups

Check if your backups are encrypted

Turn off backup encryption

When you encrypt the backup for your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch

The “Encrypt local backup” option in the Finder or iTunes locks and encodes your information. Encrypted backups can include information that unencrypted backups don’t:

  • Your saved passwords
  • Wi-Fi settings
  • Website history
  • Health data
  • Call history

Encrypted backups don’t include Face ID, Touch ID, or device passcode data.

Your backup isn’t encrypted by default. To encrypt a backup in the Finder or iTunes for the first time, turn on the password-protected “Encrypt local backup” option. Backups for your device will automatically be encrypted from then on. You can also make a backup in iCloud, which automatically encrypts your information every time.

Encrypt your backups

  1. On a Mac with macOS Catalina 10.15 or later, open the Finder. On a Mac with macOS Mojave 10.14 or earlier, or on a PC, open iTunes.
  2. Connect your device to your computer with the included USB cable. Then locate your device on your computer.
  3. From the General tab or the Summary tab, select “Encrypt local backup” under the Backups section.
  4. When asked, make a password. Create one that you’ll remember or write it down and store it safely, because there’s no way to use your backup without this password. If you forgot your password, learn what to do.

After you confirm your password, your backup will start and immediately overwrite and encrypt your previous backups. When the process completes, make sure that your encrypted backup finished successfully:

  1. On a Mac with macOS Catalina 10.15 or later, open the Finder, click the General tab, then click Manage Backups. You should see a list of your backups. On a Mac with macOS Mojave 10.14 or earlier, or on a PC with iTunes, from the menu bar at the top of the iTunes window, choose Edit > Preferences, then click the Devices tab.
  2. You should see a lock next to your device’s name and the date and time that the backup was created.
  3. Click OK to close the backup window.

Check to see if your backups are encrypted

If you’ve set up the Finder or iTunes to encrypt your backups, the “Encrypt local backup” checkbox in the General or Summary tab is checked.

You can also see whether a specific backup is encrypted:

  1. On a Mac with macOS Catalina 10.15 or later, open the Finder, click the General tab, then click Manage Backups. You should see a list of your backups. On a Mac with macOS Mojave 10.14 or earlier, or on a PC with iTunes, from the menu bar at the top of the iTunes window, choose Edit > Preferences, then click the Devices tab.
  2. Look for a lock next to the backup. If you see a lock , the backup is encrypted.
  3. Click OK to close the backup window.

Turn off backup encryption

To turn off backup encryption, uncheck the “Encrypt local backup” checkbox in the Finder or iTunes and enter the password. If you can’t remember your password, you have two options:

Learn more

  • Learn what to do if you forgot the password for your encrypted backup.
  • Learn the difference between iCloud and iTunes backups.

Information about products not manufactured by Apple, or independent websites not controlled or tested by Apple, is provided without recommendation or endorsement. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to the selection, performance, or use of third-party websites or products. Apple makes no representations regarding third-party website accuracy or reliability. Contact the vendor for additional information.

Learn if iPhone encryption is right for you

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What to Know

  • To enable iPhone encryption, open Settings, tap Face ID & Passcode, and make sure passcode is enabled.
  • Data protection is enabled should be displayed at the bottom of the Face ID & Passcode screen.
  • iPhone’s data encryption does not prevent authorities from accessing your backup on Apple’s servers.

This guide will walk you through the steps for how to enable data encryption on your iPhone. It’ll explain what iPhone data is encrypted once this iOS security feature is enabled and will also include some tips on how to enhance your smartphone’s privacy and security even further.

How to Enable Data Encryption on iPhone

Your iPhone’s data encryption setting is likely already turned on if you have either a passcode or Face ID enabled for unlocking your mobile and logging into apps. Here’s how you can check to see if your data is protected and what to do if it isn’t.

Scroll down and select Face ID & Passcode.

Enter the passcode you set up when you initially got your iPhone.

Check to make sure the Turn Passcode Off option is showing. This means your passcode is currently enabled and your iPhone’s data encryption is active when it’s locked.

If you see Turn Passcode On, this means you haven’t set up a passcode or the one you have made has been disabled. If this is the case, tap Turn Passcode On to activate it or set up an iPhone passcode.

Scroll down to the bottom of the page. If you see the Data protection is enabled message, this means your iPhone’s data is being protected and is now more difficult for attackers to access.

If you don’t see this message, double-check to make sure that your passcode is enabled. You may find it inconvenient at times to use a passcode but it’s required for the iPhone’s data encryption process to work properly.

Does iPhone Have Encryption?

Yes. Apple’s iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad smart devices all support basic built-in encryption while a passcode is enabled. Macs also support their own form of data encryption.

The encryption on Apple’s iOS and iPadOS devices, such as the iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad, is called Data Protection. Mac data encryption is referred to as FileVault.

What Does It Mean to Encrypt Your iPhone?

When an iPhone is locked and a passcode is enabled, the majority of your personal data and Apple account information is encrypted. This encryption makes it harder for malicious individuals and groups to access your smartphone’s information whether they’re physically near your or are attempting to hack your iPhone through the internet, a cellular network, or a Bluetooth connection.

Unlocking your iPhone with either your passcode or Face ID decrypts your iPhone’s data, so you, or anyone you give your phone to while it’s unlocked, can access it.

What Data Does iPhone Encryption Protect?

When an iPhone’s data protection setting is enabled, the following type of information and activity is encrypted:

  • Saved passwords and usernames.
  • Wi-Fi internet settings and preferences.
  • Safari web browsing history.
  • Health data.
  • Phone and iMessage history.
  • Photos and videos.
  • Contacts, notes, reminders, and other Apple app data.

While the added protection provided should give you extra peace of mind, it’s important to understand this encrypted data isn’t completely private when it’s backed up to Apple’s servers via iCloud. Apple initially planned to fully encrypt all user backups to help protect user privacy but they eventually backtracked on this after receiving pressure from the FBI.

iPhone data saved to the cloud as part of an iCloud backup can still be accessed by authorities.

This means, while your iPhone’s encryption does protect its local data from direct attacks, authorities can still gain access to any encrypted files or activity that you’ve synced to your iCloud account during a backup if required for an investigation.

Does iPhone Data Protection Protect Everything?

Most data associated with first-party Apple apps and services is protected when data protection is enabled but this doesn’t include information and files associated with third-party apps.

For example, having iPhone data protection enabled will not protect your Facebook account from hackers if you use a weak password for it and don’t have two-factor authentication (2FA) enabled. Encryption also won’t protect any communications you’ve made via a third-party messaging app if their servers are hacked.

Enabling encryption on your iPhone is just one step you should take when it comes to protecting your personal data.

There are several effective ways to improve your security when using your iPhone. Here are some quick tips to get you started.

  • Switch to a messaging app with end-to-end encryption such as Telegram or Signal.
  • Use a web browser app with a strong focus on privacy like Brave.
  • Enable 2FA on as many accounts and apps as you can.
  • Never use the same password for more than one account and always make it a strong one.
  • Keep your iPhone apps and operating system up-to-date.

Apple services like iMessage and FaceTime have built-in end-to-end encryption so that messages can only be seen by you and the recipient. Be sure to set up a passcode for your iPhone so that no one can access your messages if they get ahold of your phone.

If you forget the password for your iPhone backup, there’s no way to access your data, but you can make a new backup with a new password. On your device, go to Settings > General > Reset > Reset All Settings and enter your passcode. Then, create a new backup with a password you’ll remember.

Go to Settings > Mail > Accounts > select the account you want to encrypt > select the email address > Advanced. Then you can choose Sign or Encrypt by Default but for either option to work, you must set up a certificate before these options can be enabled.

First, enable Find My iPhone. In a web browser, log in to iCloud and select All Devices, choose your device, then select Erase iPhone to remotely wipe your iPhone.

The steps for encrypting an iPad are the same as setting up encryption on an iPhone since they both use the same operating system (iOS). That said, features may differ depending on which version of iOS your device is running.

If you’re wondering how to put a password on your apps, Face ID is a great way to go.

* This post is part of iPhone Life‘s Tip of the Day newsletter. Sign Up. *

Face ID can be used to unlock apps on the iPhone. For example, when I open my Day One journaling app, Face ID quickly identifies me and lets me in. This saves me from needing to enter the passcode. For easier logins, let’s learn how to put Face ID on apps.

Why You’ll Love This Tip

  • Save time by using Face ID instead of entering a passcode.
  • Avoid having to remember a unique passcode each time you log in to a secure app.

How to Add Face Id to Apps

Whether or not Face ID works with an app depends on the app’s developers and what they’ve programmed the app to be able to do. Fortunately, using the steps below you can easily see which of your installed apps work with Face ID, and enable Face ID for each app if you choose to. Keep in mind that you’ll need to make sure you have Face ID enabled prior to using these steps! Here’s how to set up Face ID for apps on iPhone:

  1. Open the Settings app.

Select Face ID & Passcode.

  • Enter your iPhone passcode.
  • Select Other Apps.

    Green toggles show you which apps have Face ID enabled.

    A gray toggle means Face ID is disabled. Tap the toggle to enable Face ID for that app.

    Now, when you go to open an enabled app, you’ll be able to sign in using your Face ID instead of entering a password or passcode each time. And remember, you can always learn how to uninstall apps on an iPhone. Learn how to set up mask Face ID for convenient iPhone unlocking.

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    Conner Carey

    Conner Carey’s writing can be found at conpoet.com. She is currently writing a book, creating lots of content, and writing poetry via @conpoet on Instagram. She lives in an RV full-time with her mom, Jan and dog, Jodi as they slow-travel around the country.

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    在 Google 云端硬盘中存储重要和/或敏感文档并不是保护数据的最安全方法,但如果是,您的 iPhone 和 iPad 可以帮助确保一切安全。 以下是如何添加 面容 ID 或触控 ID 锁定 到云存储的移动应用程序。

    不幸的是,在撰写本文时,Google 并未在其云端硬盘应用中提供增强的安全选项 安卓 或开 网络. 在您的 Google 帐户上启用双重身份验证是让人们远离您的云文件的最佳选择。

    首先打开您的“云端硬盘”应用程序 苹果手机 或者 iPad. 如果您在主屏幕上找不到它,请使用 Apple 的内置 Spotlight Search。

    您的 iPhone 或 iPad 将显示一个弹出窗口,要求您授予 Google Drive 应用程序访问您设备上的 Face ID 或 Touch ID 的权限。 点击“确定”按钮以允许它。

    下次退出并重新打开 Google Drive 应用程序时,您将看到类似于下图的屏幕。 使用您的面部或指纹进行身份验证以访问云存储应用程序。

    默认情况下,当您锁定 iPhone 或 iPad 的显示屏或离开应用程序时,隐私屏幕功能会锁定 Drive 应用程序。 如果要添加时间延迟,请点击与“延迟”列表对应的选项。

    在这里,您可以选择“立即”、“10 秒后”、“1 分钟后”和“10 分钟后”。 选择其中一个选项,然后点击后退箭头。

    如果您不信任 Face ID 或 Touch ID 来保护您存储在云端硬盘中的文件,您可以要求您的手机或平板电脑的锁屏密码才能进入应用程序。

    您将被带到 iPhone 或 iPad 设置菜单的云端硬盘部分。 在这里,您可以关闭使用 Face ID 或 Touch ID 的权限。

    禁用安全设置后,下次打开 Google Drive 应用程序时,它会要求您输入设备的锁屏密码。

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    Afraid someone might be able to access your phone and get to your files and pictures? Add an extra layer of security with these apps.

    You’ve probably secured your iPhone or iPad with a passcode as well as Touch ID or Face ID. But you’re still concerned that the wrong people could gain access to your photos, videos, files, and other personal information. What can you do?

    A host of Apple App Store apps can lock access to certain private data within a virtual vault—shielding your photos, videos, and other sensitive files with a password, PIN, or another security measure.

    First, you’ll want to make sure you’re already protecting your iPhone or iPad with a passcode. Next, enable Touch ID or Face ID on your supported iOS device. All set? Great, those are your first lines of defense. Now, let’s check out some apps that can further guard your personal data.

    Photo Vault

    Photo Vault (Opens in a new window) is designed to protect your photos and videos. You first devise a numeric master password to protect your content before creating one or more albums to secure selected photos and videos. You then import individual items into that secure album from your device’s library, your camera, or your computer. You can download a photo online through a built-in browser, sort your imported photos and videos, search for specific ones by name, and view a slideshow.

    You can also delete, move, and copy photos and videos in your secure vault, as well as view and access protected photos and videos from your computer via Wi-Fi or a USB connection. And you can back up your secure data to iCloud. Finally, you can further secure your content by choosing a folder password, a gesture password, and Touch ID or Face ID.

    The basic app is free; an ad-free version with unlimited storage costs $2.99.

    Locker

    With Locker (Opens in a new window) , you can secure photos, videos, notes, files and apps. You first create a PIN to secure your storage (though I was also able to use Face ID on my iPhone X). You can then add an existing photo or video from your library or snap and store a new one. Some devices also allow you to choose specific apps to hide so no one else can see them on the Home screen.

    The non-premium flavor of Locker limits you to hiding or securing just three apps, three photos, and three videos. It also omits secure storage for notes and files as well as cloud storage. At $1.99 a month or $9.99 for lifetime use, the premium edition lets you hide an unlimited number of photos, videos, apps, notes, and files, and kicks in secure cloud storage.

    Secret Photos KYMS

    This app can hide and encrypt various data, including photos, videos, documents, contacts, tasks, and passwords. Using Secret Photos (Opens in a new window) , you first create a PIN and then get prompted to devise an alphanumeric password for an extra level of security.

    Once you’re in the app, you can choose which type of content to protect. You can add photos and videos from your library, camera, and iTunes. You can add passwords and sensitive information, browse the web securely, and replace the alphanumeric password with Touch ID or Face ID.

    The free version offers secure storage for certain data such as photos, videos, and passwords. At $1.99, the paid edition lets you import existing contacts, create a private to-do list, securely store your credit card and other cards, record and encrypt audio recordings, and scan and secure any type of paper document.

    Private Photo Vault

    Private Photo Vault (Opens in a new window) is another app designed to safeguard your photos and videos within a secure vault. Your first task is to create a passcode to protect your content. You’re then presented with a main album that you select to start importing your photos from your library or camera.

    You can create additional albums for more photos and videos, browse photos on the web via a built-in browser, and then download them to one of your albums. At the Settings screen, you can change your passcode and opt to use Touch ID or Face ID instead of the code.

    The basic version is free. For $4.99, the pro edition kicks in unlimited photo albums, removes all ads, throws in a pattern lock option, and lets you wirelessly transfer photos.

    Secret Calculator

    Secret Calculator (Opens in a new window) is a $1.99 app that disguises itself as a working calculator. Hidden behind it are your secure albums and files. You first create a passcode, then enter it followed by the percent symbol each time you want to unlock the app. Touch ID is also an option for signing in.

    The app offers predefined photo albums, though you can create your own albums as well, and all photos can be sorted by date. Simply select an album and then add the photos you want to protect. You can import photos from your library, your camera, clipboard, iTunes, and another device via Wi-Fi.

    Best Secret Folder

    Best Secret Folder (Opens in a new window) offers a few twists on the traditional vault, at least if you opt for the paid version. As usual, you start by creating a passcode to protect your content. You’re then taken to an image of a vault where you can create albums to securely store your photos, videos, and notes. You can add photos and videos, either from your library or by snapping them with your camera, then copy, share, export, rename, delete, and move your content.

    The free edition restricts you to 25 photos and 11 videos (though you can watch ads to bump up that limit) and excludes some of the app’s cooler features. For $14.99 per year (with a free 7-day trial), you can snag a premium edition, which grants you unlimited storage, removes all ads, supports Face ID, can display a dummy startup screen, and will snap a photo of someone who tries to access the app without the right passcode.

    Photo, Video and Music Player

    Eightythree Technology

    Designed for iPad

      • 4.7 • 1.7K Ratings
      • Free
      • Offers In-App Purchases

    Screenshots

    Description

    — Special promotion price 50% off! —
    Grab it now before the price goes up!

    You can now use your iOS device as a portable Wireless Flash Drive. Introducing Phone Drive – File Manager.

    Phone Drive allows you to store, view and manage local or cloud files on your iPhone or iPad. You can connect to Phone Drive from any Mac or PC over the WiFi network and transfer files by drag & drop files straight from the Finder or Windows Explorer.

    Now you can connect to multiple cloud accounts to manage your cloud drives in a single application with the ability to download, upload, view and stream video or music directly.

    Phone Drive features document viewer, PDF reader, music player, image viewer, voice recorder, text editor, file manager and support most of the file operations: like delete, move, copy, email, share, zip, unzip and more.

    *** KEY FEATURES ***
    – SUPPORT CLOUD STORAGE:
    Support multiple link to Dropbox, Google Drive, OneDrive, iCloud Drive, Box and Yandex Disk storage accounts.
    *required additional in app purchase.

    – PDF READER:
    Support fast PDF reader with thumbnails and bookmarks features.

    – MULTIMEDIA PLAYER:
    An ability to in app create your own audio playlist with repeat, shuffle, background playback and remote control from multitask as well as direct video and music streaming from cloud storage.

    – DOCUMENT READER:
    Support MS Office, iWork, Text & HTML

    – HTTP/FTP PASSWORD PROTECTED:
    Files transfer between PC/Mac with password protected.

    – FILE OPERATION:
    Move, Copy, Rename, Delete, Zip, Unzip, UnRAR, Create File and Folder.

    – FILE SHARING:
    File sharing with other iPhone/iPad devices via Bluetooth or Wi-Fi connection with automatic search of nearest available devices around you.

    – EASY FILE UPLOAD:
    Drag and drop files upload via your PC/Mac web browser or USB via iTunes.

    – TEXT EDITOR:
    Built-in text editor that allows you to edit your text files or source codes on your iOS device.

    – IMPORT/ FILES CREATION:
    An ability to create text files, image captures, video records, voice recordings and import pictures from photo library.

    – PASSCODE LOCK:
    An ability to protect your files from viewing by others.
    Option for use your fingerprint to unlock Phone Drive with TouchID and Face ID support.

    – UNIVERSALITY:
    This app is developed for both iPhone and iPad, you need to purchase only once.

    *** AUDIO PLAYER ***
    – Able to in app create audio playlist.
    – Plays all MP3 files from a folder as a playlist.
    – Repeats and shuffles songs.
    – Supports background audio playback.
    – Supports Audio Remote Control from multitask.
    – Cloud storage music streaming.
    – Build in visualiser and equaliser controller.

    *** VIEWABLE FORMATS ***
    – Audio (WAV, MP3, M4A, CAF, AIF, AIFF, AAC)
    – Images (JPG, PNG, GIF, BMP, TIF, TIFF, ICO)
    – Movies (MP4, MOV, MPV, M4V)
    – iWorks (Pages, numbers, and Keynote)
    – Microsoft Office (Word, Excel and PowerPoint)
    – RTF (Rich Text Format)
    – RTFD (TextEdit with embedded images)
    – PDF Documents
    – Plain text
    – Source code
    – HTML web pages
    – Web archives

    Are you or your child addicted to your iPhone? Want to limit the amount of time you spend staring at the screen? Fortunately, iOS comes with the ability to lock apps on your iPhone with a passcode to limit access to them. That is, you can set a specific time frame after which your phone will automatically block access to the app until you enter the passcode.

    This is done through the Screen Time feature and is great for parental control. However, there are also third-party options that provide even more control without requiring a password. Here’s a detailed guide that covers it all.

    How to lock an app on iPhone or iPad with a passcode

    Before moving forward, make sure you’ve disallowed all apps:

    • Go to SettingsScreen TimeAlways Allowed. The allowed apps section has four applications by default. These are Phone, Messages, FaceTime, and Maps.
    • Tap the red () icon towards the left of the apps, followed by Remove that slides through the right.
      Note: Ensure that you’ve enabled Screen Time and a Screen Time passcode is set. You can’t remove the Phone app from this section.
    • Tap How to lock all apps on iPhone or iPad with a passcode
    1. Launch Settings from your iPhone’s Home Screen and tap Screen Time.

  • Tap App Limits followed by Add Limit.
  • Enter your screen time passcode, if asked.

  • Now, select All Apps & Categories.
  • Tap Next at the top right.

  • Choose the desired time limit. Next, turn on the option for Block at End of Limit.
  • Finally, tap Add.

    Lock apps on iPhone using guided access

    1. Open Settings → Tap Accessibility.
    2. Scroll down and tap Guided Access.

    Toggle on Guided Access and hit Passcode Settings.

  • Tap Set Guided Access Passcode and enter the desired 4-digit passcode to enable it.
  • Optional: You can also enable Touch ID/Face ID as a way to end guided access.

    How to start a guided access session

    1. Open any app.
    2. Next, ask Siri ‘turn on Guided Access.’ Or, press the Home button/Side button three times.
    3. Tap Guided Access if you see a slide-up menu.

    Optional: To restrict parts of your screen from working, use your finger to make a circle or any closed shape. Use the dots on the gray selected portion to achieve the desired result. Tap the cross (x) button if you want to remove it. When Guided Access is in action, this selected area will not register any touch and will stay grayed out.

    Optional: Tap Options at the bottom left to choose the features you want to make available. (Motion, Keyboards, and Touch are enabled by default. But you can disable them.) Similarly, if you enable the Side Button, it’ll allow you to lock the device during Guided Access. If you toggle on Volume Buttons, it’ll let you change the volume from the Guided Access screen. You get the idea, right?

    Finally, tap Start located at the top right corner to begin Guided Access.

    How to end Guided Access?

    There are two ways to do this.

      Press the Home button/Side button three times. Next, enter your Guided Access passcode. Finally, tap End at the top left.

  • Did you enable the Touch ID/Face ID option during the initial steps? If so, another way to end Guided Access is by using these. On iPhones with Touch ID, press it twice and confirm with your fingerprint. On iPhones with Face ID, hold the device in front of your face and press the Side button twice.
  • Note: If you ever get stuck in Guided Access mode, force restart your iPhone to come out of this.

    How to lock apps on iPhone without a password using mSpy

    mSpy is a nifty parental control app that can help you lock apps on a device that you’re monitoring, such as your child’s phone.

    It’s useful to block children’s access to distracting social media and messaging apps. Plus, it’s super easy to set up and comes with a range of other features such as geo-tracking a phone, monitoring calls and messages, etc. Here’s how to use mSpy to lock access to apps on your child’s phone:

    1. Sign up for a mSpy account.
    2. Download the mSpy Lite app on your iPhone.
    3. Follow the on-screen instructions to link a device to monitor.

  • Once you’ve linked your child’s device, open a browser on your computer and log into your account on mSpy.com.
  • On the topleft, select your child’s device.

    Scroll down and select Block Applications.

  • From here, you can select which apps to block, such as WhatsApp, Snapchat, Instagram, etc.
  • Your child won’t be able to access the blocked apps. You can change this at any time you wish.

    Price: $21.00 per month for a monthly plan or $5.00 per month for an annual plan

    That sums up the most common ways to lock apps on your iPhone using a passcode. Besides these, you can also use Touch ID or Face ID to Lock compatible apps like WhatsApp, Dropbox, etc.

    If you have any questions, let me know in the comments below. I’ll be happy to help.

    You may also enjoy reading the below posts:

    Benj Edwards is an Associate Editor for How-To Geek. For over 15 years, he has written about technology and tech history for sites such as The Atlantic, Fast Company, PCMag, PCWorld, Macworld, Ars Technica, and Wired. In 2005, he created Vintage Computing and Gaming, a blog devoted to tech history. He also created The Culture of Tech podcast and regularly contributes to the Retronauts retrogaming podcast. Read more.

    Sometimes, you need to protect your iPhone or iPad photos from prying eyes that might also have access to your device. Unfortunately, Apple doesn’t provide an obvious, secure way to do this. However, there’s a work-around thanks to the Notes app.

    How Does It Work?

    You probably already know about the “Hidden Photos” folder in the Photos app on iPhone and iPad. In iOS 14 and iPadOS 14, you can hide that folder, as well. However, images hidden in the Photos app aren’t password-protected. There are other ways you can hide private photos on your Apple device, but they often involve third-party apps.

    We’ll show you how to use the Notes app (which is on every iPhone and iPad) and a feature first introduced in iOS 9.3 to secure certain photos on your device. First, you’ll have to insert your photos into a note, and then, you can lock them behind a password, .

    How to Password Protect Photos Using Notes

    If the photos you’d like to lock behind a password aren’t already on your iPhone or iPad, move them there. Next, open the Notes app and tap the New Note icon (the pencil and paper) to create a new note.

    On the first line of the new note, type some text that won’t attract too much attention. This will appear in the list of notes, even after you lock it.

    Tap the Add Photo icon (the camera) in the toolbar. On an iPad, you’ll find this at the top. On an iPhone, it’ll either be above the on-screen keyboard or at the bottom of the screen.

    In the menu that appears, tap “Choose Photo or Video.”

    On the following screen, tap the thumbnail of each photo you want to add (a checkmark will indicate they’re selected). When you’re done, tap “Add.”

    Notes will insert the photos you selected into the note file. To lock the note, tap the Ellipsis icon (the three dots in a circle).

    In the window that appears, tap “Lock.”

    If you’ve previously set a Notes password, you’ll be asked to type it; after you do so, tap “OK.”

    Haven’t set a password? No problem! Notes will ask you to create one. Just remember, you’ll have to use this password to view all locked notes. If you’ve enabled the Notes app to sync to iCloud, this same password will also apply to other Apple devices signed into iCloud.

    Type a password and a hint. If your device supports it, you’ll also have the option to lock Notes using Touch or Face ID. After you’ve typed your info and made your selections, tap “Done.”

    Notes will confirm the lock has been added, but don’t walk away yet! This only enables the lock setting—you’ll still have to lock the note itself to make it secure.

    To do so, open the note, and then tap the Padlock icon in the toolbar.

    You’ll then see a confirmation that says “This note is locked.” If you want to double-check, just tap “View Note.”

    When Notes asks for your password, type it, and then tap “OK.”

    You’ll then see all the photos you added to the secure note.

    Make sure you also visit the Photos app and delete the images you just password-protected. After that, you’ll need to visit the “Recently Deleted” folder in Photos and delete them there, as well.

    How Secure Are Locked iPhone or iPad Notes?

    Locked notes on an iPhone or iPad are encrypted to the extent that it would be difficult to extract them, even with forensic tools. It’s not ironclad state-security-level encryption, though. One research firm recently discovered some weaknesses in the Notes app. These could allow a determined attacker with unrestricted access to your device to guess the partial contents of a locked note.

    These circumstances are rare, but there might also be other undiscovered bugs in Notes that could potentially compromise a note’s security.

    For casual privacy purposes, however, locked notes are secure enough for most people to prevent opportunistic snooping. Just make sure you don’t create a password that’s easy to guess!

    Google is testing a new feature for its Google Chrome app for iOS, which will let Incognito tabs be locked with either Face ID or Touch ID on an iPhone or iPad.

    As highlighted by 9to5Google, the latest Chrome beta will blur Incognito tabs in the Chrome app until confirmed with the ‌iPhone‌’s biometric authentication.

    The feature can be enabled by going to Settings > Privacy > Lock Incognito tabs when you close Chrome. There’s a similar option in the Google Search app that confirms identity with ‌Face ID‌ or ‌Touch ID‌ when returning to an incognito search session after 15 minutes, and there’s also a privacy lock built into Google Drive.

    Google has not updated the Chrome app for iOS since November as it is delaying new versions of most of its apps at the current time. It’s not clear when the new feature might launch in the release version of Chrome, but Chrome 89 is expected to launch next month.

    The Incognito tab locking feature is limited to beta testers at the current time, and according to 9to5Google, not all beta users are able to access the locking option as there is a server-side element involved.

    Top Rated Comments

    Geez. then maybe this post is not for you guys. I’m not sure why the need of fanboys to go and attack the competition. I also use Safari but that sounds like a nice feature.

    Yeah, Nah, no thanks, I’ll stick with the best browser in the world SAFARI. ?

    No thanks. Safari is safe, fast, and transparent. no need for
    chrome.

    Cloud Storage Encryption

    Skymatic GmbH

      • 4.5 • 69 Ratings
      • Free
      • Offers In-App Purchases

    Screenshots

    Description

    With Cryptomator, the key to your data is in your hands. Cryptomator encrypts your data quickly and easily. Afterwards you upload them protected to your favorite cloud service.

    Cryptomator is a simple tool for digital self-defense. It allows you to protect your cloud data by yourself and independently.

    • Simply create a vault and assign a password
    • No additional account or configuration needed
    • Unlock vaults with Face ID / Touch ID
    • Fully integrated into the Files app

    Cryptomator is compatible with the most commonly used cloud storages and available for all major operating systems.

    • Compatible with iCloud Drive, Dropbox, Google Drive, OneDrive, pCloud, and WebDAV-based cloud storage services
    • Create vaults in any location via other File Providers (third-party apps must support this)
    • Access your vaults on all your mobile devices and computers

    You don’t have to trust Cryptomator blindly, because it is open source software. For you as a user, this means that everyone can see the code: https://github.com/cryptomator/ios

    • File content and filename encryption with AES and 256 bit key length
    • Vault password is secured with scrypt for enhanced brute-force resistance
    • Crypto implementation is publicly documented

    Cryptomator received the CeBIT Innovation Award 2016 for Usable Security and Privacy. We’re proud to provide security and privacy for hundreds of thousands of Cryptomator users.

    Join the Cryptomator Community and participate in the conversations with other Cryptomator users: https://community.cryptomator.org

    • Follow us on Twitter @Cryptomator
    • Like us on Facebook /Cryptomator

    Terms of Use: https://www.apple.com/legal/internet-services/itunes/dev/stdeula/

    What’s New

    – Added Shortcuts integration, which allows you to create automations like “auto photo upload” (#56, #114, #222)
    – Improved vault format 8 compatibility (#198, cryptolib-swift#9)

    Make sure to check out our Shortcuts Guide, which you can find in the settings of Cryptomator.

    Ratings and Reviews

    Can’t say enough good things

    I’m extremely grateful for the work the Cryptomator team does for making files in cloud storage private and secure and at a very affordable price. Everything only gets better with this new app with Files integration. The app makes your end-to-end encrypted files feel native and a part of iOS/iPadOS rather than being confined to a separate app. With the new app, I can much more conveniently edit/update files without going through so many steps. FaceID integration is great too.

    I know I probably sound like a total fanboy right now, but as a privacy advocate and for how great Cryptomator is, the compliments are well-deserved. This app is easily worth the money. Keep up the great work Cryptomator team, and thank you for the great app!

    Very buggy and lost files.

    I wanted to like this app and support what they are doing, but I don’t know if I can trust it to keep my backup of my files. I get error messages saying I can’t change my password when trying to change my vault password in iCloud. Also when trying to create a folder within a vault it gives two errors saying “You can’t use a name that ends with a space. Please choose another name.” And duplicates items already in the vault into an new untitled folder which is very strange. So far it has not convinced me of being a reliable encryption app for my iPhone. I have paid for the full version also. I just copied documents to a vault in iCloud and wanted to move it to another vault in iCloud and now it gives me an error message “The file doesn’t exist. The file “example” couldn’t be copied because it either doesn’t exist or the folder it is being copied to doesn’t exist. Then I go look at the folder I just copied and no files are in there with the message “Content Unavailable The folder contents could not be displayed because of an unknown error. Try Again” so where are my files!? What’s the use of encryption if you cannot trust it to backup files correctly in the first place.

    Any feedback on how to change my iCloud vault password I’m still getting the error even after restarting my phone: Error
    Operation cannot be performed
    because other background
    operations for this vault have to
    finish first. Please try again later.

    Developer Response ,

    Thank you for your feedback! That sounds like a serious issue and we‘re looking into it. It seems like that there is indeed a bug with folder creation that we‘ll fix as soon as possible with an update. In the meantime, try to lock and then unlock the vault again. If you‘re still experiencing data loss, please reach out to [email protected]

    Perfect.

    This app fills the niche that it sets out to fill perfectly. Absolutely ideal to make secure use of a cloud service you’re already paying for. Only suggestion I have is a way for the secure folder to automatically lock after x amount of time. But I’m not sure if that’s something iOS lets you do so I’m not going to ding it.

    App Privacy

    The developer, Skymatic GmbH , indicated that the app’s privacy practices may include handling of data as described below. For more information, see the developer’s privacy policy.

    Data Not Collected

    The developer does not collect any data from this app.

    Privacy practices may vary, for example, based on the features you use or your age. Learn More

    Information

    English, Arabic, Bengali, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Dutch, French, German, Greek, Hindi, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Norwegian Bokmål, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Russian, Simplified Chinese, Slovak, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Traditional Chinese, Turkish

    By Charlie Sorrel • 1:00 pm, January 16, 2019

    • How-To
    • Top stories

    A barrier, blocking things. That’s a genuine light-leak FYI.
    Photo: Charlie Sorrel/Cult of Mac

    You know how iOS’ accessibility features often prove handy for all users? Like Live Listen, which lets you turn your AirPods into remote listening devices? Or a combo of settings that resurrects an iPhone with a broken screen?

    The same is true for Screen Time. This feature tracks how long you spend using apps every day, and can help you limit that time. But you can also use Screen Time to password-protect any app on your iPhone or iPad.

    Password protection for iOS apps

    Plenty of apps in the App Store offer password protection, requiring that you enter a code before you can open them. Sometimes these are legit apps like the Day One journaling app. And sometimes they’re photo apps that allow you to keep “private” pictures under lock and key.

    But you don’t need those. Or rather, you don’t need their special locks. You can easily make your own.

    How to password-protect apps using Screen Time

    First, head to Settings > Screen Time, and enable it if you haven’t already. It’s worth having it running, if only to get an idea of your overall app usage and how much time you really spend in Twitter and Instagram.

    Apple’s great Screen Time support page will help you find your way around the feature. But for now, just make sure you’ve enabled Screen Time and set a passcode. To do so, just tap Turn on Screen Time and choose whether you’re using your device or a child’s device. Then tap Add Screen Time Passcode (or whatever it actually says — mine’s already set).

    Enable app limits to lock apps

    Then, it’s time to enable an app limit. You can set time limits for apps. The idea here is that you can set a minimum limit, and have the lock kick in almost immediately. This is not ideal — the minimum limit is one minute, so you’re unprotected until you’ve used the app for at least that long.

    Here’s where you add a time limit to your app.
    Photo: Cult of Mac

    To add an app time limit, tap in the bar graph showing the day’s usage so far. This takes you to a detail view listing all the apps you’ve recently used. Find your chosen app in the list, and tap it. You’ll see the screen above. Tap Add Limit, then enter your Screen Time pass code. Then use the dials to pick a one-minute limit, and make sure Block at End of Limit is checked. Tap Add.

    That’s it. After a minute of use, the app will lock. Its home-screen icon will be grayed-out, and if you try to use it, you’ll see this:

    Time limits lock apps.
    Photo: Cult of Mac

    To unlock the app, tap Ask For More Time, and enter your passcode.

    More options

    This is one way to approach limits. You can also use Screen Time to lock all apps, and whitelist the ones you want to allow at all times. That’s detailed in this Reddit thread, where I got the idea for our version. Either way, it’s an extra layer of protection when you hand your iPhone or iPad to your kids.