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How to put the new new twitter content pane back on the left

New to Python and Spyder. How do I reposition the panes in Spyder. I had them set with the editor in the upper left, the object inspector in the upper right, and the ipython console in the lower left. Somehow I messed it up, and can’t figure out how to reposition them. Have crawled all over the web, but no joy.

6 Answers 6

You can now choose to sort by Trending, which boosts votes that have happened recently, helping to surface more up-to-date answers.

Trending is based off of the highest score sort and falls back to it if no posts are trending.

In the Spyder 4.0+ version, go to View menu, unselect “lock panes and toolbars” then you can drag the top area of each pane and move them freely.

Other answers are correct that you can recover past arrangements of the panes via the View/Window layouts menu, but if you want to actually create a new layout, that’s another matter.

The fact is, it’s pretty easy, once you know how. To move Help to the same pane that File explorer is in (in the picture below), the steps are:

  1. Find Help in the same pane that Variable explorer is in, and click its tab to bring it to the front
  2. Click the multiple windows icon in the upper right corner of the Help pane (see where the red arrows point?)
  3. Help will detach from the rest of the window and you can now click & drag it to whatever pane – whether already existing or new – that you want to put it in

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My sidebar has disappeared. How do I get my sidebar back?

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My sidebar has disappeared. I can’t get it back by sliding the margin to the left back and forth. I cannot find the answer in the HELP section. I need to be able to switch back and forth between SENT and INBOX etc.

Chosen solution

So the Folder Pane is there but only showing the Inbox?

Try this to see if the other folders appear.

All Replies (5)

From the Menu Bar select View-Layout-Folder Pane

No Menu Bar? Press the alt key or F10 to make it appear.

This did not restore my menu bar at the side of my screen. I need to get the one that allows you to go to your inbox, sent mail, etc. P

The Folder Pane is exactly what you are describing. If you have confirmed that the option I described above is checked and the folder pane is still not showing move your mouse to the left margin of the window and when it turns into a double headed arrow, click and drag to the right.

Still does not show up! I went to View and to Folder Pane, and I tried to click it, but it would not highlight or change. Then I went to the Pane itself, and tried to move it with arrows–NOTHING! The inbox shows up on the pane, but nothing else. NUTS.

Chosen Solution

So the Folder Pane is there but only showing the Inbox?

Try this to see if the other folders appear.

New to Python and Spyder. How do I reposition the panes in Spyder. I had them set with the editor in the upper left, the object inspector in the upper right, and the ipython console in the lower left. Somehow I messed it up, and can’t figure out how to reposition them. Have crawled all over the web, but no joy.

6 Answers 6

You can now choose to sort by Trending, which boosts votes that have happened recently, helping to surface more up-to-date answers.

Trending is based off of the highest score sort and falls back to it if no posts are trending.

In the Spyder 4.0+ version, go to View menu, unselect “lock panes and toolbars” then you can drag the top area of each pane and move them freely.

Other answers are correct that you can recover past arrangements of the panes via the View/Window layouts menu, but if you want to actually create a new layout, that’s another matter.

The fact is, it’s pretty easy, once you know how. To move Help to the same pane that File explorer is in (in the picture below), the steps are:

  1. Find Help in the same pane that Variable explorer is in, and click its tab to bring it to the front
  2. Click the multiple windows icon in the upper right corner of the Help pane (see where the red arrows point?)
  3. Help will detach from the rest of the window and you can now click & drag it to whatever pane – whether already existing or new – that you want to put it in

Windows 11 introduces a new, centered Taskbar, complete with icons that are grouped in the center of your screen, rather than the familiar left-hand corner—a key complaint in our Windows 11 review. That includes the Start menu button. If this feels weird, here’s how to move your Start menu and Taskbar icons back to where they were in the days of Windows 10.

Why put the Start menu back in the left corner? Muscle memory. By now, you’re probably used to the familiar way of dragging your mouse cursor down to the left-hand corner and clicking the Start menu icon to launch an application. With the Windows 11 layout, you can’t unconsciously do this. In fact, as more icons add themselves to your Windows 11 Taskbar, the Start menu slides farther and farther to the left.

The default layout for the Windows 11 Taskbar is to put all icons in the center.

What this means is that you’ll consciously have to hunt down the Start icon, rather than simply dragging your mouse to the corner. It’s the PC equivalent of hunting for the TV remote.

Fortunately, there’s an easy fix. And when you slide the Taskbar icons over to the left, you’ll find that the Start menu opens up in the left-hand corner, too.

1. Right-click the Windows 11 taskbar, in the blank space that other icons aren’t occupying. You’ll see one option, for Taskbar Settings.

2. Clicking that will open the generic Windows 11 Settings menu, specifically Personalization > Taskbar. Scroll down to the bottom and click Taskbar behaviors.

3. Under the first entry, Taskbar alignment, click the only other option, Left. This will automatically slide all of the Taskbar icons to the left, approximating the organization that accompanied Windows 10. That’s all you need to do.

Simply scroll down the Taskbar page until you can find the alignment option. Click the “Taskbar behaviors” dropdown menu to reveal the alignment options.

Unfortunately, Windows 11 doesn’t allow you to do some things that Windows 10 allowed you to do, such as physically move the Taskbar to the top, bottom or sides of the screen. You also can’t widen or narrow it. Feel free to play around with the other options within the Settings, however, to tweak Windows 11’s taskbar further.

Check out our Windows 11 superguide, where you can find all of our tips, tricks, FAQs and more.

Sometimes you might want to increase the amount space in the Microsoft Outlook window for viewing messages, calendars, or tasks. At other times, you might need easy access to all your mail folders, or you might want to switch quickly between different views such as Calendar and Contacts. The Outlook Navigation Pane provides flexibility with several different views and options that help you to work as efficiently as possible.

Completely hide the Navigation Pane to increase the space in your Outlook window.

Minimize the Navigation Pane, so that with a single click you can open and close the pane to access your folders and different views.

Leave the Navigation Pane minimized and still access the Folder List and other panes within it.

What do you want to do?

Turn on or off the Navigation Pane

For Outlook 2010, On the View menu, in the Layout group, click Navigation Pane.

For Outlook 2007,On the View menu, point to Navigation Pane, and then click Normal or Minimized.

Click Normal, Minimized, or Off.

Minimize or expand the Navigation Pane

You can free more space in the Outlook window by minimizing the Navigation Pane. The slim profile of the minimized Navigation Pane makes a larger viewing area available in your Outlook window, while still providing quick access to the folders and files that you use most often. And you can still view your Folder List in a Folder List pane that opens from the minimized Navigation Pane.

There are several ways to minimize and expand the Navigation Pane. Choose the one that best fits your working style.

To minimize the expanded Navigation Pane, click the arrow in the upper corner. To expand the minimized Navigation Pane, click the arrow at the top.

This arrow is also available in the Navigation Pane header in other views, such as Contacts and Calendar.

On the View tab, in the Layout group, click Navigation Pane, and then click Normal or Minimized.

Point to the edge of the expanded Navigation Pane. When the pointer becomes a , double-click to minimize. Repeat the same action over the edge of the minimized Navigation Pane to expand it.

Point to the edge of the expanded Navigation Pane. When the pointer becomes a , drag it toward the edge until the Navigation Pane is collapsed into the minimized version. Drag the edge of the minimized Navigation Pane to expand again.

When the minimized Navigation Pane is expanded, it appears the same width as before it was minimized.

If you exit Outlook with the Navigation Pane minimized, it will be minimized when you restart Outlook.

Open the Folder List pane in the minimized Navigation Pane

With the Navigation Pane minimized, you have a larger viewing and working area available in your Outlook window, while maintaining easy access to your entire Mail Folder List with a single click. Opening only the Folder List allows you to keep the Navigation Pane minimized while you work, rather than expanding the Navigation Pane each time you need to access a folder. You can also perform an Instant Search from the Folder List.

On the minimized Navigation Pane, click the Navigation Pane folder button.

Note: Clicking a folder button in the minimized Navigation Pane opens that folder’s content in the Outlook message list.

Since you are using headings, you can re-organize your document quickly. Drag sections instead of cut and paste.

The Navigation Pane

Click View > Navigation Pane and to turn on the Navigation Pane. Only words that have a Heading setting will appear here. Click and hold to move them around, all text will move under that setting will also move.

Instant Table of Contents (TOC)

Click References > Table of Contents to turn your Headings into an instant table of contents. See the training courses below for more ways to format your TOC.

Want more?

Another thing that you can do and this started with Word 2010 is the Navigation Pane.

Let’s go show you that.

You go the VIEW tab and click Navigation Pane box.

And on the left hand side of your document, all those headings appear.

Again, just headings appear.

Anything else that you style in a different type of style won’t appear, just headings will appear.

And this is actually kind of your document laid out.

Now, let’s say your teacher, who’s an astronomy teacher, who’s also an English teacher, wants the planets in alphabetical order.

One, you should question that. But two, okay.

If I had to do that on my regular document, I would have to take ‘Mercury’ and I would have to take this whole thing, and make sure I have all the correct.

If it goes on, I have to cut it, and then I figure out where to put it and scroll down my document, and find the right place and then paste it.

And you do that for a long document and you pick up extra spaces and all that, or here I put it in the wrong place.

It can get pretty cumbersome very quickly, cutting and pasting to reorganize your document.

Let’s look over at the Navigation Pane. And what I can do here is I can drag sections.

Okay, so let’s do this in alphabetical order.

‘Earth’ is first, then ‘Jupiter’. I am just going to click on it, and then unclick when I have it.

All the moons of ‘Jupiter’ also appear in this order, so I can quickly make this alphabetized.

‘Neptune’, ‘Saturn’ goes above ‘Venus’. U, V, Venus is last. But before ‘The Dwarf’ planets.

And there I have quickly organized my document alphabetically and the whole document is changed on the side.

Now, let me go up to the Table of Contents. The Table of Contents does not update automatically like a live preview.

You have to tell it to update it. It is really easy, though. I am just going to click on the Table of Contents.

You can also do this in the ribbon, and you can click Update Table. You can Update just the page numbers. Let’s do that.

And now you can see, Mercury is on Page 4, Saturn is on Page 6.

But I am going to update the whole Table of Contents even in the order.

So Update Table, Update entire table, and now the planets are in alphabetical order, and the Table of Contents is in that order.

So, with Styles, you can change the look of your document quickly, and it is uniform.

You can get an instant Table of Contents and you can organize your document through the Navigation Pane, and change things around very simply.

Those are three of the big benefits of using Styles.

In Outlook 2016, there is this huge gray bar at the bottom which lists (in a very big font) Mail, Calendar, People, Tasks, etc… to switch to their corresponding folder.

In previous versions of Outlook, they were listed as icons within the pane on the left which also displays all your folders.

I liked this configuration better as this was a lot smaller and therefor allows for more space to display the message list and also gives me a larger Reading Pane area.

Is there any way to put it back there and gain back some of this wasted space?

Depending on your screen’s resolution and whether or not you are using a touch screen, Outlook 2013 and Outlook 2016 could indeed by default show you a large navigation strip at the bottom as shown below.

If you don’t like this, you can easily turn it back into the icon based navigation as it was in Outlook 2010 and previous.

The new word based navigation bar instead of a small icon based navigation.

Navigation Options

To turn this word based navigation back into an icon based navigation, click on the 3 dots (…) at the right-end of the Navigation and choose Navigation Options… or use View-> Folder Pane-> Options to bring up the same dialog.

In the Navigation Options dialog, enable the option: Compact Navigation.

The Navigation Bar will now collapse into the Folder Pane and will only show the icons:

The blue colored icon indicates which Navigation is currently active.

Note 1: The amount of icons that you see depends on what you have configured for the “Maximum number of visible items” in the Navigation Options, but also on the width of the Folder Pane itself.

Note 2: Placing the icons in a (mixed) vertical position like it was possible in Outlook 2010 and previous is no longer possible in Outlook 2013 and Outlook 2016.
(see example on the right)
Placing the icons vertical requires you to minimize the Folder Pane altogether via:
View-> Folder Pane-> Minimized

Note 3: For more tips about dealing with the design changes made in Outlook 2013 see the guide: 36 Short questions and tips for Outlook 2013.
Many of these design changes also apply to Outlook 2016. For additional changes being made in Outlook 2016 see: New and Changed in Outlook 2016
.

Use it to adjust margins, tabs, and more

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What to Know

  • In Print Layout: On the View tab, select Print Layout. Choose the Ruler check box to display the rulers.
  • In Draft Layout: On the View tab, select Draft. Choose the Rulercheck box to display the rulers.
  • With the rulers enabled in the print or draft layout, you can change the margins and tabs.

This article explains how to show the rulers in Microsoft Word in the print layout or draft view. It includes information on things you can do using the rulers in a document.

How to Show the Ruler in Word

Word has a ruler feature that enables you to do reasonably accurate layout work right within a Word document. If you want to set a tab, or see how big your text box or headline will be when you print a document, you can use the ruler to measure where on the page you want those elements to fall and see how big they will be when printed.

If you don’t see the ruler while working on a document, it’s probably turned off. Here’s how to show the ruler in Word.

If you want a ruler that appears horizontally and vertically, first make sure you’re working in the Print Layout view. With your document open, select Print Layout on the View tab.

Select the Ruler check box. In the Ribbon, it’s located at the top of the column that also contains Gridlines and Navigation Pain.

The ruler will appear above your document, as well as vertically on the left side in the Print Layout.

With the rule enabled, you can use tabs and margins, measure the size and placement of text boxes, and more in the Print Layout view.

To turn the ruler off, uncheck the Ruler check box.

How to Display the Microsoft Ruler in the Draft Layout in Word

If you prefer to work in the Draft layout, rather than the Print layout, the ruler works similarly in that view. While the ruler will not appear along the vertical margin of your document in the Draft layout, it will display along the top. It works much the same way as it does in the Print layout.

First make sure your document is open and you’re looking at it in the Draft view. To do this, Select Draft on the View tab.

Select the Ruler check box on the Ribbon. It’s in the same column on the ribbon as Gridlines and Navigation Pane.

How to Use the Microsoft Word Ruler

With the Ruler is enabled in either the Print Layout or in the Draft Layout, you can use it to change the margins and tabs, or to see the size and placement of graphic or type elements.

Using the Ruler to Change the Margins

Hover the mouse over the double tab at the left margin. Your mouse will turn to a double arrow and “Left Margin” will display as hover text. The part of the document outside the margin — the the left — is shaded grey.

Select and drag the left margin icon to increase your left margin.

On the right end of the ruler is the right margin. Hover your mouse over it until your mouse turns into a two-way arrow with “Right Margin” appearing over it.

Select and drag the right margin icon to see how it changes your right margin.

How to Create a Tab Using the Ruler

Place your cursor on the line where you want to place the tab.

Select the ruler in the spot where you want the tab. This will create a small corner-shaped icon representing your tab.

Press the Tab key to place a tab in your document, then drag along to ruler to change the tab’s placement.

Sometimes you might want to increase the amount space in the Microsoft Outlook window for viewing messages, calendars, or tasks. At other times, you might need easy access to all your mail folders, or you might want to switch quickly between different views such as Calendar and Contacts. The Outlook Navigation Pane provides flexibility with several different views and options that help you to work as efficiently as possible.

Completely hide the Navigation Pane to increase the space in your Outlook window.

Minimize the Navigation Pane, so that with a single click you can open and close the pane to access your folders and different views.

Leave the Navigation Pane minimized and still access the Folder List and other panes within it.

What do you want to do?

Turn on or off the Navigation Pane

For Outlook 2010, On the View menu, in the Layout group, click Navigation Pane.

For Outlook 2007,On the View menu, point to Navigation Pane, and then click Normal or Minimized.

Click Normal, Minimized, or Off.

Minimize or expand the Navigation Pane

You can free more space in the Outlook window by minimizing the Navigation Pane. The slim profile of the minimized Navigation Pane makes a larger viewing area available in your Outlook window, while still providing quick access to the folders and files that you use most often. And you can still view your Folder List in a Folder List pane that opens from the minimized Navigation Pane.

There are several ways to minimize and expand the Navigation Pane. Choose the one that best fits your working style.

To minimize the expanded Navigation Pane, click the arrow in the upper corner. To expand the minimized Navigation Pane, click the arrow at the top.

This arrow is also available in the Navigation Pane header in other views, such as Contacts and Calendar.

On the View tab, in the Layout group, click Navigation Pane, and then click Normal or Minimized.

Point to the edge of the expanded Navigation Pane. When the pointer becomes a , double-click to minimize. Repeat the same action over the edge of the minimized Navigation Pane to expand it.

Point to the edge of the expanded Navigation Pane. When the pointer becomes a , drag it toward the edge until the Navigation Pane is collapsed into the minimized version. Drag the edge of the minimized Navigation Pane to expand again.

When the minimized Navigation Pane is expanded, it appears the same width as before it was minimized.

If you exit Outlook with the Navigation Pane minimized, it will be minimized when you restart Outlook.

Open the Folder List pane in the minimized Navigation Pane

With the Navigation Pane minimized, you have a larger viewing and working area available in your Outlook window, while maintaining easy access to your entire Mail Folder List with a single click. Opening only the Folder List allows you to keep the Navigation Pane minimized while you work, rather than expanding the Navigation Pane each time you need to access a folder. You can also perform an Instant Search from the Folder List.

On the minimized Navigation Pane, click the Navigation Pane folder button.

Note: Clicking a folder button in the minimized Navigation Pane opens that folder’s content in the Outlook message list.

The site page is the most basic and most often-used content type. Unlike landing pages, site pages have a navigation menu on the right side of the page called the right rail. On mobile devices right rail menu appears at the bottom of the page and always has core blue background color.

Create a Site Page

Go to Content > Add Content > Site Page.

Go to the Content Pane.

NOTE: The Content Pane is the left column on the page.

  1. Title(required): Write the page name here. Include important keywords in the title to improve the search results
  2. Main image: An image placed here will appear underneath the title and above the rest of the content on the page. How to add a main image.
  3. Summary: Add a brief description of the page content. It should be 150 characters or less. The description will appear in search engine results and help users determine the relevance of the page to their needs.

Add Paragraphs

Add content to site pages with paragraph types – pre-designed modules that allow you to create different types of content and place them in the order you want on your site page.

Go to Page Content.

  1. Click on the dropdown menu and then scroll to select the type of paragraph you want to add.
  2. To continue adding paragraphs, click Add Another Paragraph.

Add Content to Paragraphs

Use the default Text paragraph type to add content using the text editor similar to how you would in Microsoft Word, or use one of the following paragraph types: responsive image, tabs/accordion, CTA card, NC map, quick links, video card, view embed and webform embed.

Add as many paragraphs as you need to create your site page.

Add Files

If you want to link a document to your page, upload it in the Files field.

Go to Files > Add Media.

  • You may upload an unlimited number of files.
  • The maximum size for each file is 256 MB.
  • The allowed file types: pdf, doc, docx, xls, xlsx, csv, txt, rtf, zip, ppt, pptx, xml, kmz and mp3.
  • A best practice for file types is to use pdf format instead of Microsoft Office formats because not all users may not have access to Microsoft Office.
  • Get instructions on how to add a file.

Related Content

Go to Related Content.

  1. Put the address of the website you want to link to in the URL field.
  2. Include a title describing the website in the Link Text field.
  3. Click the Add Another Item button to create more links, if needed.

Menu Settings

Go to Admin Pane > Menu Settings

NOTE: The Admin Pane is the right column on the page.

Place the page in the menu to link it to the location on the site where you want it to reside, and to appear on the live site. Otherwise, your page is published but isn’t linked anywhere on the site for users to find it.

Step 1. Menu settings title: Go to the right rail. Click on the menu settings title to open the menu settings options.

Step 2. Provide a Menu Link: Click on the box next to provide a menu link.

Step 3. Menu link title: Enter a title if you want to use a different one than the page title. This is the title for the link in the navigation menus at the top of the page and the right rail.

Step 4. Description: Enter a brief description that will appear when users hover over the menu link.

Step 5. Parent item (required): Click on the dropdown menu. A list of the sections on the site will appear. Select the section where you want the page to appear. Indented sections are subsections of a link on the main menu.

Step 6. Weight: Pick a number to determine if the page appears higher or lower in the menu than the other pages in its section. Pages with lower numbers appear first. The default order is alphabetical.

Go to Current State.

  1. Select Preview to view the page before saving.
  2. From the dropdown menu, select the status in which you want to save the site page:
    • Draft: This is the default status of all pages. The page is saved but is not visible to the public. Only site managers and content creators can see it when logged in. You may create a new draft of a page while the existing published version remains live.
    • Needs review: This status is used to signify that content is ready for publication. Pushing content from draft to needs review signals that the content is ready for an authorized web manager to review and publish (or send back to draft state for further revisions)
    • Published: A page is live and visible to anyone browsing the Internet.

The Start menu in Windows 11, has been changed a lot. Users can see obvious changes in both the location and the appearance of the new Start menu in Windows 11. However, some users don’t like the changes and they want to get back the classic Start menu from Windows 10 to Windows 11. What should they do to restore the classic Start menu?

Almost all people know Windows 11, the latest version of Windows operating system. Microsoft added lots of new features and changes in the new system. Some users like them so much that they prefer to upgrade their system to Windows 11 at once. However, some users didn’t like or get used to the new changes in Windows 11.

There are many new features that will be added to Windows 11, the next generation of Windows operating system going to be released by Microsoft.

For instance, some users don’t want the new Start menu; they want to get back the Windows 11 classic Start menu. Is this possible? How to restore the classic Start menu? Please keep reading to find answers.

Attention:

You must back up your data first if you want to roll back Windows 11 to Windows 10 since you don’t like the changes in the new system. In fact, you still have another choice: you may try to revert to the classic style. MiniTool tells all about how to customize the Start menu in Windows 11 to get back the Windows classic Start menu. And the following software is very useful if some of your important files are lost suddenly during the process.

Windows 10 Classic Start Menu vs. Windows 11 New Start Menu

If you have ever used Windows 11 or take a glance at the Windows 11 screenshot, you can easily find that the Start menu in the new system looks very different from that in Windows 10.

The most two obvious changes are the location and layout.

  • In Windows 10, the Start menu is located in the lower left corner of PC screen. While in Windows 11, users get a centered Start menu at the bottom.
  • In Windows 10, there are a lot of things contained in the Start menu. But the Start menu in Windows 11 only consists of 3 sections: the Pinned section, the Recommended section, and the User account & Powerbutton section.

Can you restore classic Start menu in Windows 11 if you don’t like the changes? Yes. You should follow the steps mentioned below to show classic Start menu Windows 11.

#1. Move Taskbar Icons to the Left in Windows 11

You can get Windows 11 classic Start menu by changing settings to move the task icons to the left side.

  1. Open the Settings pane by pressing Windows + I or in other ways you like.
  2. Select Personalization from the left pane.
  3. Look for the Taskbar option in the right pane and click on it.
  4. Then, locate the Taskbar behaviors option and click to expand it.
  5. Click on the down arrow after the Taskbar alignment option.
  6. Select Left (instead of Center) from the drop-down menu.

#2. Restore Classic Start Menu in Windows 11 via Registry Editor

Another way to show classic Start menu Windows 11 is changing the Registry on your PC.

  1. Click on the search icon in the taskbar or press Windows + S to open the Windows search pane.
  2. Type regedit and press Enter to open Registry Editor.
  3. Go to this path: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Advanced.
  4. Right click on Advanced in the left pane or right click on the blank area in the right pane.
  5. Choose New ->DWORD (32-bit) Value. And then name it as Start_ShowClassicMode.
  6. Double click on this value you created to open it. Then, change the Value data to 1 and click OK.
  7. Restart your computer.

There’s another way to open Registry Editor: press Windows + R to open Run -> type regedit -> click OK.

In addition, you can choose one of the third-party tools used for changing Windows 11 Start menu to classic style.

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About The Author

Sarah has been working as an editor at MiniTool since she graduated from university. Sarah aims at helping users with their computer problems such as disk errors and data loss. She feels a sense of accomplishment to see that users get their issues fixed relying on her articles. Besides, she likes to make friends and listen to music after work.

APPLIES TO: Power BI service for business users Power BI service for designers & developers Power BI Desktop Requires Pro or Premium license

This article takes a look at the report Filters pane in the Power BI service. Use the filters to discover new insights in your data.

There are many different ways to filter data in Power BI. This article explains how to use the Filters pane. You can also filter by selecting data points on a report visual to filter the other visuals on the page — this is referred to as cross-filtering and cross-highlighting. For more information about cross-filtering and cross-highlighting, see How visuals cross-filter each other in a Power BI report.

Working with the report Filters pane

When a colleague shares a report with you, be sure to look for the Filters pane. Sometimes it’s collapsed along the right edge of the report. Select it to expand it.

The Filters pane contains filters that the report designer added to the report. Business users like you can interact with the existing filters and save your changes, but you can’t add new filters to the report. For example, in the screenshot above the designer added three page level filters: Segment is All, Year is 2014, and Region is Central. You can interact and change these filters, but you can’t add a fourth page level filter.

Some of the filters are shaded, and some are not. If a filter is shaded, that means a filter has been applied and some data is being excluded. For example, the Region filter card is shaded, and when you expend the card you see that only Central is selected from the dropdown. Since Region is under the Filters on this page heading, all visuals on this page are not displaying (excluding) data for the West and East regions.

In the Power BI service, reports keep any changes you make in the Filters pane. The service carries those changes through to the mobile version of the report.

To reset the Filters pane to the designer’s defaults, select the Reset icon from the upper menu bar.

If you don’t see the Reset to default option, it may have been disabled by the report designer. The designer can also lock specific filters so that you can’t change them.

View all the filters for a report page

The Filters pane displays all filters added by the designer to the report. The Filters pane is also the area where you can view information about the filters and interact with them. Save changes you make or use Reset to default to revert to the original filter settings.

If there are changes you’d like to save, you can also create a personal bookmark. For more information, see What are bookmarks?.

The Filters pane displays and manages several types of report filters: report, report page, and visual.

In this example, we’ve selected a visual that has three filters: Manufacturer, Month, and Total units. The report page also has filters, listed under the Filters on this page heading. And, the entire report has a filter for Date, listed under Filters on all pages.

Some of the filters have (All) next to them. (All) means all values are being included in the filter. In the screenshot above, Segment(All) tells us this report page includes data about all the product segments.

Anyone with permissions to view this report can interact with these filters.

View only those filters applied to a visual

To get a closer look at the filters affecting a specific visual, hover over the visual to reveal the filter icon . Select that filter icon to see a pop-up with all the filters, slicers, and so on, affecting that visual. The filters on the pop-up include the same filters displayed on the Filters pane, plus any additional filtering affecting the selected visual.

Here are the types of filters this view can display:

  • Basic filters
  • Slicers
  • Cross-highlighting
  • Cross-filtering
  • Advanced filters
  • Top N filters
  • Relative Date filters
  • Sync-slicers
  • Include/Exclude filters
  • Filters passed through a URL

In this example:

Included tells us that the visual has been cross-filtered. What this means is that the states of Alabama and Texas have been selected on one of the other visuals on this report page. In this case, it’s the map visual. The selection of those two states has eliminated data for all other states from displaying on the selected bar chart.

Date is a filter applied to all pages in this report.

Region is Central and Year is 2014 are filters applied to this report page.

Manufacturer is VanArsdel, Natura, Aliqui, or Pirum is a filter applied to this visual.

Search in a filter

Sometimes a filter can have a long list of values. Use the search box to find and select the value you want.

Display filter details

To understand a filter, expand it and take a look at the available values and counts. To expand the filter, select the arrow next to the filter name.

Change filter selections

One way to search for data insights is to interact with the filters. You can change filter selections using the drop-down arrow next to the field name. Depending on the filter and type of data that Power BI is filtering, your options will range from simple selections from a list, to identifying ranges of dates or numbers. In the advanced filter below, we’ve changed the Total Units YTD filter on the treemap to be between 2,000 and 3,000. Notice that this change removes Pirum and VanArsdel from the treemap.

To select more than one filter value at a time, hold down the CTRL key. Most filters support multi-select.

Reset filter to default

If you want to back out of all changes you’ve made to the filters, select the Reset icon from the top menu bar. This selection reverts the filters to their original state, as set by the report designer.

Clear a filter

To reset a filter to (All), clear it by selecting the eraser icon next to the filter name.

12 February 2022

The Navigation Pane was a great addition to Word (for Windows … our Mac friends have yet to get it) but there’s more in that pane than the obvious.

  • Doing a Find appears in four different ways, three on Navigation Pane.
  • Heading view has controls over which heading levels appear.
  • You can move the Navigation Pane away from its usual left-side location.
  • Quickly jump to non-text elements like tables and pictures.
  • Show Navigation Pane
  • Navigation Pane Components
  • Page View
  • Results
  • Jump to Tables, Graphics, Equations, Footnotes, Endnotes or Comments

Show Navigation Pane

Turn on Navigation Pane from View | Show | Navigation Pane.

There’s an unofficial shortcut to open the Navigation Pane – Ctrl + F. In earlier versions of Word Ctrl + F opened the “Find and Replace” dialog – now it opens the Navigation Pane to the Results panel.

In the Headings panel, right-click to see ways to move about content, promote/demote heading and create new headings.

For navigation there’s a few useful tricks in that right-menu.

Expand All – reveals all headings at all levels.

Collapse All – show just the top level headings. Very useful to see an overview of a long document,

Show Heading Levels – lets you select which headings to see and collapse all below that.

Navigation Pane Components

There are four main parts of the Navigation pane:

  • Search text box
    at the top then three small tabs below it …
  • Headings view
  • Page view aka Thumbnail page view
  • Search Results View.

You can Move, Resize and Close the navigation window. Using the mouse you can drag and resize the navigation window so it appears outside the normal Word window.

Page View

Pages view shows thumbnail versions of each page. Click on a thumbnail to move to that page.

Results

When you do a search, the results appear in FOUR different places, three are in the Navigation pane.

Word highlights the search matches in the document itself and on each of the Navigation Pane tabs.

Headings – are highlighted if the search term is within that part of the document

Pages – only pages with the search term are displayed.

Result – shows a snippet of the text around the search term.

Jump to Tables, Graphics, Equations, Footnotes, Endnotes or Comments

On the pull-down men in the Navigation pane are some quick ways to reach non-text parts of Word.

Apart from finding content you can even find graphics, tables, formulas, footnotes and comments given by reviewers in the document. As shown in the below screenshot if we select to find “Graphics” in the document then all the graphics in the document are highlighted and also the total number of graphics in the document is displayed.

By clicking the two arrow symbols (next to results) you can navigate up and down between the searched results.

Tweak the widget settings to suit your own interests

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Windows 11 has introduced a brand new Widgets panel, where you can access a variety of updated information using configurable topic boxes (what Microsoft calls information cards). It’s made up of two sections: a top section that offers widgets for weather, sports, your latest photos, and other personalized topics, and a news section that offers clickable headlines from a variety of sources.

Here’s how to make the most of the current Windows 11 widgets.

Access your widgets

To access the widgets, select the Widgets icon in the taskbar (it’s the one that looks like a square divided into white and blue sections). You can also hit the Window + W keys or, if you’ve got a touchscreen, swipe from the left.

You’ll probably see a variety of starter widgets on top that will give you info about sports scores, the weather, stock prices, and any images you may have in your OneDrive account. There is also a search field and a button that lets you add new widgets. Under that, you can scroll down to find a number of news sources.

Windows 11 review: a familiar home that’s still being renovated

Adjust your widgets

There are a variety of ways you can tweak your widget panel.

  • To move your widgets around, long-press on the top of a widget until you see an open hand. (This is as opposed to a “pointing” hand, which enables you to click on a link.) You can then change its position on the panel.
  • To change the size of a widget, remove it from your panel, or customize it, click on the three dots in the upper right corner. The selections that you see will depend on the widget; for example, the Weather widget can be small, medium, or large, and you can customize it to set a default location and work either in Fahrenheit or Celsius. The Photos app, meanwhile, only sizes to medium or large and has no other customizations.

The three “More” dots let you adjust the size of the widget, customize it, or remove it.

  • Click on the name of the widget in the upper left corner, and you will be taken to a separate page where you can access more information — more details on the weather, for example, or more of the latest sports scores.
  • If you want to see the current selection of widgets available, click on the “Add widgets” button that is between your widgets and the news feeds. It’s not a large list right now — I counted 11, all available are Microsoft-produced. Hopefully, however, there will be additional third-party entries coming.

Windows 11 doesn’t yet have a great many widgets, but that may change.

News feed

The news section is below the “Add widgets” button. It is headed by a “Top stories” section that highlights several headlines, followed by individual stories. Both come with Facebook-like icons that you can attach to each story (including thumbs-up, heart, “surprised,” “thinking,” sad, or angry).

You can “react” to each news item with an appropriate mood icon.

Select the three dots next to each headline, and you can see more or fewer stories like that, hide stories from that source, save it for later (in other words, bookmark it), or report it. Any bookmarked stories will have a gray square around those three dots.

Personalize your interests

The “Add widgets” button also offers a link (in the lower-left corner) that lets you tell the Widget app what you are and are not interested in. (You can get to the same place by clicking on the three dots next to a news story and select “Manage interests.”)

You can influence what shows up in your news feed.

Either way, you’ll end up on the Microsoft Start page — essentially, the settings page for the Edge browser. Using the “My Interests” tab, you can tell Windows what types of news stories you want or don’t want. On the left side of the page, you can choose from categories such as News, Sports, Travel, Health, etc.; as you click on each of those categories, you’ll get a list of specific topics in the main window. For example, if you select “Entertainment,” you can choose from topics such as “Celebrities,” “Music,” or “Books,” among others.

Other tabs you can choose from include “Profile” (which introduces you to what is called the “Microsoft News Community”), “My Saves” (any stories you saved), “History” (a list of stories you’ve read within the last 48 hours), and “Experience Settings.” You may want to visit this last: it lets you choose the language of your feed (the default is English) or toggle several features on and off, including those Facebook-like reaction icons. You can also toggle off some of the basic information cards, such as finance or weather.

If you’re not in the mood for community reactions, you can remove them.

Currently, the Windows 11 widgets seem to be more of a curiosity or a way to take a quick break than a real tool. However, if and when third-party widgets become available, the widget pane could become truly useful.

You can use the Windows PowerShell Integrated Scripting Environment (ISE) to create, run, and debug commands and scripts. The Windows PowerShell ISE consists of the menu bar, Windows PowerShell tabs, the toolbar, script tabs, a Script Pane, a Console Pane, a status bar, a text-size slider and context-sensitive Help.

Menu Bar

The menu bar contains the File, Edit, View, Tools, Debug, Add-ons, and Help menus. The buttons on the menus allow you to perform tasks related to writing and running scripts and running commands in the Windows PowerShell ISE. Additionally, an add-on tool may be placed on the menu bar by running scripts that use the The ISE Object Model Hierarchy.

Windows PowerShell Tabs

A Windows PowerShell tab is the environment in which a Windows PowerShell script runs. You can open new Windows PowerShell tabs in the Windows PowerShell ISE to create separate environments on your local computer or on remote computers. You may have a maximum of eight PowerShell tabs simultaneously open.

Toolbar

The following buttons are located on the toolbar.

Button Function
New Opens a new script.
Open Opens an existing script or file.
Save Saves a script or file.
Cut Cuts the selected text and copies it to the clipboard.
Copy Copies the selected text to the clipboard.
Paste Pastes the contents of the clipboard at the cursor location.
Clear Console Pane Clears all content in the Console Pane.
Undo Reverses the action that was just performed.
Redo Performs the action that was just undone.
Run Script Runs a script.
Run Selection Runs a selected portion of a script.
Stop Operation Stops a script that is running.
New Remote PowerShell Tab Creates a new PowerShell Tab that establishes a session on a remote computer. A dialog box appears and prompts you to enter details required to establish the remote connection.
Start PowerShell.exe Opens a PowerShell Console.
Show Script Pane Top Moves the Script Pane to the top in the display.
Show Script Pane Right Moves the Script Pane to the right in the display.
Show Script Pane Maximized Maximizes the Script Pane.
Show Command Window Shows the Commands Pane for installed Modules, as a separate Window.
Show Command Add-on Shows the Commands Pane for installed Modules, as a sidebar Add-on.

Script Tab

Displays the name of the script you are editing. You can click a script tab to select the script you want to edit.

When you point to the script tab, the fully qualified path to the script file appears in a tooltip.

Script Pane

Allows you to create and run scripts. You can open, edit and run existing scripts in the Script Pane. For more information, see How to Write and Run Scripts in the Windows PowerShell ISE.

Console Pane

Displays the results of the commands and scripts you have run. You can run commands in the Console pane. You can also copy and clear the contents in the Console Pane.

For more information, see the following articles:

Status Bar

Allows you to see whether the commands and scripts that you run are complete. The status bar is at the very bottom of the display. Selected portions of error messages are displayed on the status bar.

Text-Size Slider

Increases or decreases the size of the text on the screen.

I’m a big fan of many applications offering a Dark Mode and I’ve also switched my Office theme to Black.

This works well but the Reading Pane in Outlook remains white and creates a very bright contrast with the Black theme.

I read that there should be a Sun/Moon option somewhere to toggle the Reading Pane dark too but I can’t seem to find it anywhere.

How do I turn the Reading Pane dark as well with the Black Theme enabled in Outlook?

The ability to turn the Reading Pane dark in Outlook has a couple of requirements.

Only when you fulfill all requirements will you be able to turn the Reading Pane dark in Outlook when you have selected the Black theme.

By default, with the Black theme selected, the Reading Pane will show with a dark background and you’re able to toggle it between dark and white with the Switch Background command (Sun/Moon button) left from the Reply, Reply All and Forward commands.

The Sun/Moon button toggles between a white and dark Reading Pane in the Black Theme.

Requirement 1: Only in Microsoft 365 Version 2001 and up

The new Black Theme with support for a dark Reading Pane with the ability to toggle between light and dark (Sun/Moon button) got first introduced in Version 2001.

To check your version use;

  • File-> Office Account-> the version number is shown in the About Outlook section.

Make sure your Office installation is up-to-date.

Requirement 2: Only in the Black theme

Dark Reading Pane support really only applies to the Black Theme.

I personally think that it would also work and look nice in the Dark Gray Theme, but unfortunately that isn’t an option.

To check which Office Theme you have selected use;

  • File-> Office Account-> Office Theme

Verify that you have the Black Theme selected and not Dark Gray.

Requirement 3: Not in Office 2016 and Office 2019

Even though you might be running a version way beyond Version 2001, when you have an Office 2016 or Office 2019 license, the dark Reading Pane will not be available to you in the Black theme (in fact: Outlook 2016 only has the Dark Grey theme and not a Black theme).

The dark Reading Pane option requires you to use Outlook as part of a Microsoft 365 subscription.

To check your Office license information use;

  • File-> Office Account-> section: Product Information (top right)

Outlook as part of a Microsoft 365 subscription.

Requirement 4: Make sure Dark Reading Pane support isn’t disabled

When you comply with all the requirements above but still have a white Reading Pane, it’s very likely that the option for the dark Reading Pane has been turned off.

To turn it back on use;

  • File-> Options-> General-> section: Personalize your copy of Microsoft Office-> disable: Never change the message background color

Do not select the highlighted option or you’ll turn off Dark Reading Pane support.